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The Political Graveyard: A Database of American History
Namesake Politicians/Politician Namesakes

Politicians For Whom Things Were Named

  Jo Abbott (1840-1908) — also known as Joseph Abbott — of Hillsboro, Hill County, Tex. Born near Decatur, Morgan County, Ala., January 15, 1840. Democrat. Served in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; lawyer; member of Texas state house of representatives, 1869-71; district judge in Texas, 1879-84; U.S. Representative from Texas 6th District, 1887-97. Died in Hillsboro, Hill County, Tex., February 11, 1908 (age 68 years, 27 days). Interment at Old Cemetery, Hillsboro, Tex.
  Relatives: Son of William Abbott and Mary Abbott; married, December 15, 1868, to Rowena W. Sturgis (1843-1908).
  The city of Abbott, Texas, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  George Abernethy (1807-1877) — Born in New York, New York County, N.Y., October 7, 1807. Governor of Oregon Territory, 1845-49; newspaper publisher. Methodist. Scottish ancestry. Died in Portland, Multnomah County, Ore., March 2, 1877 (age 69 years, 146 days). Interment at River View Cemetery, Portland, Ore.
  Relatives: Married 1830 to Ann Pope.
  The Abernethy Bridge on I-205, crossing the Willamette River between Oregon City & West Linn, Oregon, is named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS George Abernethy (built 1942, scrapped 1960) was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article
  John Adair (1757-1840) — of Harrodsburg, Mercer County, Ky. Born in Chester District (now Chester County), S.C., January 9, 1757. Democrat. General in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; delegate to Kentucky state constitutional convention, 1792; member of Kentucky state house of representatives, 1793-95, 1798, 1800-03, 1817; Speaker of the Kentucky State House of Representatives, 1802-03; U.S. Senator from Kentucky, 1805-06; general in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812; Governor of Kentucky, 1820-24; U.S. Representative from Kentucky 7th District, 1831-33. Died in Harrodsburg, Mercer County, Ky., May 19, 1840 (age 83 years, 131 days). Original interment in unknown location; reinterment in 1872 at Frankfort Cemetery, Frankfort, Ky.
  Relatives: Son of Baron William Adair; father-in-law of Thomas Bell Monroe (1791-1865).
  Political family: Monroe family of Virginia and Washington (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Adair counties in Iowa, Ky. and Mo. are named for him.
  The city of Adairville, Kentucky, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
John Adams John Adams (1735-1826) — also known as "His Rotundity"; "The Duke of Braintree"; "American Cato"; "Old Sink and Swim"; "The Colossus of Independence"; "Father of the American Navy" — of Quincy, Norfolk County, Mass. Born in Braintree (part now in Quincy), Norfolk County, Mass., October 30, 1735. Lawyer; Delegate to Continental Congress from Massachusetts, 1774-78; signer, Declaration of Independence, 1776; U.S. Minister to Netherlands, 1781-88; Great Britain, 1785-88; Vice President of the United States, 1789-97; President of the United States, 1797-1801; defeated (Federalist), 1800; delegate to Massachusetts state constitutional convention, 1820. Unitarian. English ancestry. Member, American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Elected to the Hall of Fame for Great Americans in 1900. Died in Quincy, Norfolk County, Mass., July 4, 1826 (age 90 years, 247 days). Original interment at Hancock Cemetery, Quincy, Mass.; reinterment at United First Parish Church, Quincy, Mass.
  Relatives: Son of John Adams (1691-1761) and Susanna (Boylston) Adams (1699-1797); married, October 25, 1764, to Abigail Smith (1744-1818; aunt of William Cranch); father of Abigail Amelia Adams (1765-1813; who married William Stephens Smith) and John Quincy Adams (1767-1848); grandfather of George Washington Adams and Charles Francis Adams (1807-1886); great-grandfather of John Quincy Adams (1833-1894) and Brooks Adams; second great-grandfather of Charles Francis Adams (1866-1954); third great-grandfather of Thomas Boylston Adams; first cousin thrice removed of Edward M. Chapin; first cousin four times removed of Arthur Chapin; first cousin six times removed of Denwood Lynn Chapin; second cousin of Samuel Adams; second cousin once removed of Joseph Allen; second cousin twice removed of John Milton Thayer; second cousin thrice removed of William Vincent Wells; second cousin four times removed of Lyman Kidder Bass, Daniel T. Hayden, Arthur Laban Bates and Almur Stiles Whiting; second cousin five times removed of Charles Grenfill Washburn, Lyman Metcalfe Bass and Emerson Richard Boyles; third cousin once removed of Jeremiah Mason and George Bailey Loring; third cousin twice removed of Asahel Otis, Erastus Fairbanks, Charles Stetson, Henry Brewster Stanton, Charles Adams, Jr., Isaiah Stetson, Joshua Perkins, Eli Thayer and Bailey Frye Adams; third cousin thrice removed of Day Otis Kellogg, Dwight Kellogg, Caleb Stetson (1801-1885), Oakes Ames, Oliver Ames, Jr., Benjamin W. Waite, Alfred Elisha Ames, George Otis Fairbanks, Austin Wells Holden, Horace Fairbanks, Ebenezer Oliver Grosvenor, Joseph Washburn Yates, Augustus Brown Reed Sprague, Franklin Fairbanks, Erskine Mason Phelps, Arthur Newton Holden, John Alden Thayer, Irving Hall Chase, Isaiah Kidder Stetson and Giles Russell Taggart.
  Political families: Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York; Kidder family of Connecticut (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Adams counties in Idaho, Iowa, Miss., Neb., Ohio, Pa., Wash. and Wis. are named for him.
  Mount Adams (second highest peak in the Northeast), in the White Mountains, Coos County, New Hampshire, is named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: John Adams HarperJohn A. CameronJohn A. DixJohn Adams FisherJohn A. TaintorJohn A. GilmerJohn A. PerkinsJohn Adams HymanJohn A. DamonJohn A. LeeJohn A. SandersJohn Adams Hurson
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Books about John Adams: John Ferling, John Adams: A Life — Joseph J. Ellis, The Passionate Sage: The Character and Legacy of John Adams — David McCullough, John Adams — Gore Vidal, Inventing A Nation: Washington, Adams, Jefferson — John Ferling, Adams vs. Jefferson: The Tumultuous Election of 1800 — James Grant, John Adams : Party of One
  Image source: Portrait & Biographical Album of Washtenaw County (1891)
John Quincy Adams John Quincy Adams (1767-1848) — also known as "Old Man Eloquent"; "The Accidental President"; "The Massachusetts Madman" — of Boston, Suffolk County, Mass.; Quincy, Norfolk County, Mass. Born in Braintree (part now in Quincy), Norfolk County, Mass., July 11, 1767. Lawyer; U.S. Minister to Netherlands, 1794-97; Prussia, 1797-1801; Russia, 1809-14; Great Britain, 1815-17; member of Massachusetts state senate, 1802; U.S. Senator from Massachusetts, 1803-08; resigned 1808; U.S. Secretary of State, 1817-25; President of the United States, 1825-29; U.S. Representative from Massachusetts, 1831-48 (11th District 1831-33, 12th District 1833-43, 8th District 1843-48); died in office 1848; candidate for Governor of Massachusetts, 1834. Unitarian. English ancestry. Member, American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Elected to the Hall of Fame for Great Americans in 1905. Suffered a stroke while speaking on the floor of the U.S. House of Representatives, February 21, 1848, and died two days later in the Speaker's office, U.S. Capitol Building, Washington, D.C., February 23, 1848 (age 80 years, 227 days). Original interment at Hancock Cemetery, Quincy, Mass.; reinterment at United First Parish Church, Quincy, Mass.; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery, Washington, D.C.
  Relatives: Son of John Adams and Abigail (Smith) Adams (1744-1818); brother of Abigail Amelia Adams (1765-1813; who married William Stephens Smith); married, July 26, 1797, to Louisa Catherine Johnson (1775-1852; daughter of Joshua Johnson; sister-in-law of John Pope; niece of Thomas Johnson); father of George Washington Adams and Charles Francis Adams (1807-1886); grandfather of John Quincy Adams and Brooks Adams; great-grandfather of Charles Francis Adams (1866-1954); second great-grandfather of Thomas Boylston Adams; first cousin of William Cranch; second cousin once removed of Samuel Adams; second cousin twice removed of Edward M. Chapin; second cousin thrice removed of Arthur Chapin; second cousin five times removed of Denwood Lynn Chapin; third cousin of Joseph Allen; third cousin once removed of Samuel Sewall, Josiah Quincy and John Milton Thayer; third cousin twice removed of William Vincent Wells; third cousin thrice removed of Lyman Kidder Bass, Daniel T. Hayden, Arthur Laban Bates and Almur Stiles Whiting; fourth cousin of Jeremiah Mason, Josiah Quincy, Jr. and George Bailey Loring; fourth cousin once removed of Asahel Otis, Erastus Fairbanks, Charles Stetson, Henry Brewster Stanton, Charles Adams, Jr., Isaiah Stetson (1812-1880), Joshua Perkins, Eli Thayer, Bailey Frye Adams and Samuel Miller Quincy.
  Political families: Kidder family of Connecticut; Greene family of Providence, Rhode Island; DuPont family of Wilmington, Delaware; Thayer-Capron-Aldrich-Stetson family; Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York; Stetson family of New York and Massachusetts (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Cross-reference: John Smith — Thurlow Weed
  Adams counties in Ill. and Ind. are named for him.
  Mount Quincy Adams, in the White Mountains, Coos County, New Hampshire, is named for him.  — Mount Quincy Adams, on the border between British Columbia, Canada, and Hoonah-Angoon Census Area, Alaska, is named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: John Q. A. BrackettJohn Q. A. SheldenJ. Q. A. Reber
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Books about John Quincy Adams: Paul C. Nagel, John Quincy Adams : A Public Life, a Private Life — Lynn Hudson Parsons, John Quincy Adams — Robert V. Remini, John Quincy Adams — Joseph Wheelan, Mr. Adams's Last Crusade: John Quincy Adams's Extraordinary Post-Presidential Life in Congress
  Image source: Portrait & Biographical Album of Washtenaw County (1891)
  Samuel Adams (1722-1803) — also known as "The Tribune of the People"; "The Cromwell of New England"; "Determinatus"; "The Psalm Singer"; "Amendment Monger"; "American Cato"; "Samuel the Publican" — of Massachusetts. Born in Boston, Suffolk County, Mass., September 27, 1722. Delegate to Continental Congress from Massachusetts, 1774-81; signer, Declaration of Independence, 1776; delegate to Massachusetts state constitutional convention, 1779, 1788; member of Massachusetts state senate, 1781; candidate for U.S. Representative from Massachusetts, 1788; Lieutenant Governor of Massachusetts, 1789-94; Governor of Massachusetts, 1793-97; received 15 electoral votes, 1796. Congregationalist. Died in Boston, Suffolk County, Mass., October 2, 1803 (age 81 years, 5 days). Interment at Old Granary Burying Ground, Boston, Mass.
  Relatives: Son of Samuel Adams and Mary (Fifield) Adams; married 1749 to Elizabeth Checkley; married 1764 to Elizabeth Wells; uncle of Joseph Allen; granduncle of Charles Allen; great-grandfather of Elizabeth Wells Randall (who married Alfred Cumming) and William Vincent Wells; second cousin of John Adams; second cousin once removed of John Quincy Adams (1767-1848); second cousin twice removed of George Washington Adams, Charles Francis Adams (1807-1886) and John Milton Thayer; second cousin thrice removed of Edward M. Chapin, John Quincy Adams (1833-1894) and Brooks Adams; second cousin four times removed of Lyman Kidder Bass, Daniel T. Hayden, Arthur Chapin, Arthur Laban Bates, Charles Francis Adams (1866-1954) and Almur Stiles Whiting; second cousin five times removed of Charles Grenfill Washburn, Lyman Metcalfe Bass, Emerson Richard Boyles and Thomas Boylston Adams; third cousin of Samuel Huntington; third cousin once removed of Samuel H. Huntington and Caleb Cushing; third cousin twice removed of Willard J. Chapin, Erastus Fairbanks, Nathaniel Huntington, James Huntington, Elisha Mills Huntington, Charles Adams, Jr., James Brooks and Bailey Frye Adams; third cousin thrice removed of Alphonso Taft, Benjamin W. Waite, George Otis Fairbanks, Austin Wells Holden, Horace Fairbanks, Ebenezer Oliver Grosvenor (1820-1910), Franklin Fairbanks, Edgar Weeks and Arthur Newton Holden; third cousin four times removed of John Quincy Adams (1848-1911).
  Political family: Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Mount Sam Adams, in the White Mountains, Coos County, New Hampshire, is named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS Samuel Adams (built 1941, scrapped 1966) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Books about Samuel Adams: Donald Barr Chidsey, The World of Samuel Adams
  Michael J. Adanti (1940-2005) — also known as "Red" — of Ansonia, New Haven County, Conn.; Shelton, Fairfield County, Conn. Born June 23, 1940. Democrat. Played football for the Ansonia Black Knights of the Atlantic Coast League; school teacher; mayor of Ansonia, Conn., 1973-77; candidate for U.S. Representative from Connecticut 5th District, 1976; president, Southern Connecticut State University, 1984-2003. Killed in an automobile accident, in Sardinia, July 31, 2005 (age 65 years, 38 days). Interment at Mt. St. Peter Catholic Cemetery, Derby, Conn.
  Relatives: Married to Linda Shashinska.
  The Michael J. Adanti Student Center, at Southern Connecticut State University, New Haven, Connecticut, is named for him.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Jane Addams (1860-1935) — of Chicago, Cook County, Ill. Born in Cedarville, Stephenson County, Ill., September 6, 1860. Progressive. Social worker; sociologist; lecturer; suffragette; pacifist; delegate to Progressive National Convention from Illinois, 1912; candidate for Presidential Elector for Illinois, 1924; received the Nobel Peace Prize in 1931. Female. Presbyterian or Unitarian. English ancestry. Lesbian. Member, Phi Beta Kappa; American Civil Liberties Union; Women's International League for Peace and Freedom; NAACP. Died, from cancer, in Chicago, Cook County, Ill., May 21, 1935 (age 74 years, 257 days). Interment at Cedarville Cemetery, Cedarville, Ill.
  Relatives: Daughter of Sarah (Weber) Addams (1817-1863) and John Huy Addams; aunt of Anna Marcet Haldeman (1887-1941; who married Emanuel Julius (1889-1951)); grandniece of William Addams.
  The World War II Liberty ship SS Jane Addams (built 1942, sold 1947) was named for her.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  George Ade (1866-1944) — of Kentland, Newton County, Ind. Born in Kentland, Newton County, Ind., February 9, 1866. Republican. Author; humorist; newspaper columnist; delegate to Republican National Convention from Indiana, 1908. Member, Sigma Chi. Suffered a heart attack, fell into a coma, and died, in Brook, Newton County, Ind., May 16, 1944 (age 78 years, 97 days). Interment at Fairlawn Cemetery, Kentland, Ind.
  Relatives: Son of John Ade and Adaline (Bush) Ade; brother-in-law of Warren Terry McCray (1865-1938).
  The Ross-Ade Stadium (built 1924), at Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana, is partly named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS George Ade (built 1944, scrapped 1968) was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Leon Joseph Albert (1840-1912) — of Cape Girardeau, Cape Girardeau County, Mo. Born in 1840. Democrat. Steamboat builder; mayor of Cape Girardeau, Mo., 1877-79, 1886-91. Died in 1912 (age about 72 years). Burial location unknown.
  Albert Hall (built 1904, demolished 1960), one of the first two dormitory buildings at Southeast Missouri State University in Cape Girardeau, Missouri, was named for him.
Nelson W. Aldrich Nelson Wilmarth Aldrich (1841-1915) — also known as Nelson W. Aldrich; "General Manager of the United States" — of Providence, Providence County, R.I.; Warwick, Kent County, R.I. Born in Foster, Providence County, R.I., November 6, 1841. Republican. Served in the Union Army during the Civil War; grocer; director, Roger Williams Bank; president, First National Bank of Providence; trustee, Providence, Hartford and Fishkill Railroad; organizer and president, United Traction and Electric Company; member of Rhode Island state house of representatives, 1875-77; Speaker of the Rhode Island State House of Representatives, 1876-77; U.S. Representative from Rhode Island 1st District, 1879-81; U.S. Senator from Rhode Island, 1881-1911; author of Aldrich-Vreeland Currency Act and Payne-Aldrich Tariff Act. English ancestry. Member, Freemasons. Died, from an apoplectic stroke, in Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., April 16, 1915 (age 73 years, 161 days). Interment at Swan Point Cemetery, Providence, R.I.
  Relatives: Son of Anan Evans Aldrich (1807-1892) and Abby Ann (Burgess) Aldrich (1809-1888); married, October 9, 1866, to Abby Pearce Truman Chapman (1845-1917); father of Richard Steere Aldrich and Winthrop Williams Aldrich; grandfather of Nelson Aldrich Rockefeller and Winthrop Rockefeller; great-grandfather of John Davison Rockefeller IV and Winthrop Paul Rockefeller (1948-2006).
  Political family: Rockefeller family of New York City, New York (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Aldrich Hall (built 1953), at the Harvard University Business School, Boston, Massachusetts, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Image source: Library of Congress
Russell A. Alger Russell Alexander Alger (1836-1907) — also known as Russell A. Alger — of Detroit, Wayne County, Mich. Born in a log cabin, Lafayette Township, Medina County, Ohio, February 27, 1836. Republican. Lawyer; general in the Union Army during the Civil War; lumber business; delegate to Republican National Convention from Michigan, 1884, 1896; Governor of Michigan, 1885-86; candidate for Republican nomination for President, 1888; Presidential Elector for Michigan, 1888; U.S. Secretary of War, 1897-99; U.S. Senator from Michigan, 1902-07; appointed 1902; died in office 1907. Member, Freemasons; Grand Army of the Republic; Sons of the American Revolution; Loyal Legion. Died in Washington, D.C., January 24, 1907 (age 70 years, 331 days). Entombed at Elmwood Cemetery, Detroit, Mich.
  Relatives: Son of Russell Alger (died 1849) and Caroline (Moulton) Alger (1809-1848); brother of Charles Moulton Alger; married, April 2, 1861, to Annette H. Henry (1840-1919); father of Frederick Moulton Alger (1876-1933) (who married Mary Eldridge Swift); grandfather of Frederick Moulton Alger, Jr..
  Political family: Alger family of Detroit, Michigan.
  Alger County, Mich. is named for him.
  The village of Alger, Ohio, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: Portrait & Biographical Album of Washtenaw County (1891)
  Aris Tee Allen (1910-1991) — also known as Aris T. Allen — of Annapolis, Anne Arundel County, Md. Born in San Antonio, Bexar County, Tex., December 27, 1910. Republican. Physician; member of Maryland state house of delegates, 1967-74, 1991; died in office 1991; delegate to Republican National Convention from Maryland, 1972 (delegation chair); Maryland Republican state chair, 1977-79; candidate for Lieutenant Governor of Maryland, 1978; member of Maryland state senate 30th District, 1979-81. African Methodist Episcopal. African ancestry. Member, Alpha Phi Alpha; American Medical Association; American Legion; NAACP. Following a diagnosis of cancer, he died from a self-inflicted gunshot, in his parked rental car, in Annapolis, Anne Arundel County, Md., February 5, 1991 (age 80 years, 40 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of James Allen and Maryetta (Whitby) Allen; married 1947 to Faye E. Watson.
  Aris T. Allen Boulevard (Maryland Route 665), in Annapolis, Maryland, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Ebenezer Allen (1804-1863) — of Orono, Penobscot County, Maine; Galveston, Galveston County, Tex. Born in Newport, Sullivan County, N.H., April 8, 1804. Lawyer; Texas Republic Secretary of State, 1844-45, 1845-46; Attorney General of the Texas Republic, 1844-45; Texas state attorney general, 1850-52; railroad promoter; served in the Confederate Army during the Civil War. Died in the Civil War in Richmond, Va., 1863 (age about 59 years). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of David Allen and Hannah (Wilcox) Allen; married 1833 to Sylvina Morse.
  The city of Allen, Texas, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article
  Henry Watkins Allen (1820-1866) — of Texas; Louisiana. Born in Prince Edward County, Va., April 29, 1820. Member of Texas state house of representatives, 1853; general in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; Governor of Louisiana, 1864-65. Presbyterian. Died in Mexico City (Ciudad de México), Distrito Federal, April 22, 1866 (age 45 years, 358 days). Interment at Old State Capitol, Baton Rouge, La.
  Relatives: Son of Dr. Thomas Allen and Ann (Watkins) Allen; married to Salome Crane.
  Allen Parish, La. is named for him.
  The city of Port Allen, Louisiana, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article
  Oscar Kelly Allen (1882-1936) — also known as O. K. Allen — of Louisiana. Born in a log cabin in Winn Parish, La., August 8, 1882. Democrat. School teacher; member of Louisiana state senate, 1920; Governor of Louisiana, 1932-36; died in office 1936. Baptist. Member, Freemasons. Died, from a cerebral hemorrhage, in the Louisiana Governor's mansion, Baton Rouge, East Baton Rouge Parish, La., January 28, 1936 (age 53 years, 173 days). Interment at Winnfield Cemetery, Winnfield, La.
  Relatives: Son of Asa Levi Allen and Sophronia (Perkins) Allen; brother of Asa Leonard Allen (1891-1969); married, December 4, 1912, to Florence Scott Love (1894-1938).
  Cross-reference: Richard W. Leche
  The Huey P. Long - O.K. Allen Bridge (opened 1940), which carries U.S. Highway 190 and a rail line over the Mississippi River, between East Baton Rouge Parish and West Baton Rouge Parish, Louisiana, is partly named for him.
  Epitaph: "A friend to man, a follower of God, great builder, courageous leader, humble in life, exalted in death."
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  William Allen (1704-1780) — of Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa. Born in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., August 5, 1704. Merchant; lawyer; mayor of Philadelphia, Pa., 1735-36. Scotch-Irish ancestry. Member, Freemasons. Died in Mount Airy, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., September 6, 1780 (age 76 years, 32 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Married, February 16, 1734, to Margaret Hamilton.
  The city of Allentown, Pennsylvania, and William Allen High School, are named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
John P. Altgeld John Peter Altgeld (1847-1902) — also known as John P. Altgeld — of Andrew County, Mo.; Chicago, Cook County, Ill. Born in Hesse, Germany, December 30, 1847. Served in the Union Army during the Civil War; lawyer; Andrew County State's Attorney, 1875; candidate for U.S. Representative from Illinois, 1884; superior court judge in Illinois, 1886-91; Governor of Illinois, 1893-97; Independent candidate for mayor of Chicago, Ill., 1899. German ancestry. Pardoned the surviving protesters of the Haymarket incident in Chicago, and refused to send troops against the Pullman railway strikers. These actions were not popular at the time, and he never won another election. As he finished a speech at the Joliet Opera House, he suffered a stroke, was carried across the street to the Hotel Monroe, and died the next morning, in Joliet, Will County, Ill., March 12, 1902 (age 54 years, 72 days). Interment at Graceland Cemetery, Chicago, Ill.; statue at Lincoln Park, Chicago, Ill.
  Altgeld Gardens Homes (built 1944-45), a public housing complex in Chicago, Illinois, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Image source: American Monthly Review of Reviews, April 1902
  Otho Webb Altizer (1888-1957) — also known as O. W. Altizer — of Christiansburg, Montgomery County, Va. Born in Floyd County, Va., January 3, 1888. Republican. Farmer; miller; Montgomery County Sheriff; alternate delegate to Republican National Convention from Virginia, 1944. Presbyterian. Member, Lions. Died, from histoplasmosis of lungs, in Lewis Gale Hospital, Roanoke, Va., June 16, 1957 (age 69 years, 164 days). Interment at Sunset Cemetery, Christiansburg, Va.
  Relatives: Son of John L. Altizer and Kate (Peterman) Altizer; married, February 29, 1924, to Ruth B. Patterson (1899-1965).
  The Altizer Bridge (named 1957), taking Route 8 across the Little River, from Floyd County to Montgomery County, Virginia, is named for him.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Oakes Ames (1804-1873) — of North Easton, Easton, Bristol County, Mass. Born in Easton, Bristol County, Mass., January 10, 1804. Republican. U.S. Representative from Massachusetts 2nd District, 1863-73. He and his brother Oliver Ames, president of the Union Pacific Railroad, prime movers in construction of the first transcontinental railroad line, completed in 1869; he was as censured by the House of Representatives in 1873 for his role in the Credit Mobilier bribery scandal. Died in Easton, Bristol County, Mass., May 8, 1873 (age 69 years, 118 days). Interment at Village Cemetery, North Easton, Easton, Mass.; memorial monument at Oliver and Oakes Ames Monument, Sherman, Wyo.
  Relatives: Son of Oliver Ames (1779-1863) and Susannah (Angier) Ames (1783-1847); brother of Oliver Ames, Jr.; married to Eveline Gilmore (1809-1882); father of Oliver Ames (1831-1895); third cousin thrice removed of John Adams; fourth cousin of Alfred Elisha Ames; fourth cousin once removed of Albert Alonzo Ames (1842-1911).
  Political family: Ames family of North Easton, Massachusetts (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  The city of Ames, Iowa, is named for him.  — The community of Ames, Nebraska, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Forrest Howard Anderson (1913-1989) — also known as Forrest Anderson — of Helena, Lewis and Clark County, Mont. Born in Helena, Lewis and Clark County, Mont., January 30, 1913. Democrat. Lawyer; member of Montana state house of representatives, 1943-45; Lewis and Clark County Attorney, 1945-47; justice of Montana state supreme court, 1953-57; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Montana, 1956; Montana state attorney general, 1957-68; Governor of Montana, 1969-73. Methodist. Member, Freemasons; Shriners; Elks; Eagles; Moose; Phi Delta Theta. Died of a self-inflicted gunshot wound, in Helena, Lewis and Clark County, Mont., July 20, 1989 (age 76 years, 171 days). Cremated; ashes interred at Forestvale Cemetery, Helena, Mont.
  Relatives: Son of Oscar A. Anderson and Nora (O'Keefe) Anderson; married, January 24, 1941, to Margaret Evelyn Samson (1914-2001).
  The Forrest H. Anderson Memorial Bridge, which crosses the Missouri River at Craig, Montana, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Glenn Malcolm Anderson (1913-1994) — also known as Glenn M. Anderson — of Hawthorne, Los Angeles County, Calif.; Harbor City, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, Calif.; San Pedro, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, Calif. Born in Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, Calif., February 21, 1913. Democrat. Merchant; mayor of Hawthorne, Calif., 1940-42; served in the U.S. Army during World War II; member of California state assembly, 1943-50; chair of Los Angeles County Democratic Party, 1948-50; California Democratic state chair, 1950-52; candidate for California state senate, 1950; delegate to Democratic National Convention from California, 1956, 1960, 1964, 1988; Lieutenant Governor of California, 1959-67; U.S. Representative from California, 1969-93 (17th District 1969-73, 35th District 1973-75, 32nd District 1975-93). Episcopalian. Member, American Legion; Disabled American Veterans; Amvets; Elks; Kiwanis; Redmen; Native Sons of the Golden West; Toastmasters. Died, from complications of Alzheimer's disease, at San Pedro Peninsula Hospital Pavilion, San Pedro, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, Calif., December 13, 1994 (age 81 years, 295 days). Interment at Green Hills Memorial Park, Rancho Palos Verdes, Calif.
  Relatives: Son of William J. Anderson and Serene W. (Fister) Anderson; married to Patricia Arlene Hawley and Lenore Marie 'Lee' Dutton (1924-2012).
  The Glenn Anderson Freeway Transitway (I-105), in Los Angeles County, California, is named for him.
  Epitaph: "Loved husband, father, grandfather, and public servant."
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — votes in Congress from the Washington Post — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Howard Palmer Anderson (1915-2000) — also known as Howard P. Anderson — Born in Crystal Hill, Halifax County, Va., May 25, 1915. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Navy during World War II; FBI special agent; lawyer; member of Virginia state house of delegates, 1958-71; member of Virginia state senate 18th District, 1972-91. Member, Ruritan; Freemasons; American Legion; Veterans of Foreign Wars; Farm Bureau. Died in South Boston, Halifax County, Va., November 1, 2000 (age 85 years, 160 days). Interment at Crystal Hill Cemetery, Crystal Hill, Va.
  Relatives: Son of Howard Putnam Anderson (1894-1987) and Mary Elizabeth (Palmer) Anderson (1897-1989); married, February 28, 1941, to Mildred Graham Webb (1918-1992).
  The Howard P. Anderson Bridge (built 1989, named 1992), which takes US Route 501 over the Staunton River, between Brookneal and Halifax County, Virginia, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Hunter Booker Andrews (1921-2005) — also known as Hunter B. Andrews — of Hampton, Va. Born in Hampton, Va., May 28, 1921. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Navy during World War II; lawyer; member of Virginia state senate, 1964-95 (31st District 1964-65, 28th District 1966-71, 1st District 1972-95); delegate to Democratic National Convention from Virginia, 1980. Episcopalian. Member, Rotary; American Legion. Died, from a heart attack, in Hampton, Va., January 13, 2005 (age 83 years, 230 days). Interment at St. John's Church Cemetery, Hampton, Va.
  Relatives: Son of Henry Stuart Andrews (1892-1977) and Dorothy Whiting (Booker) Andrews (1894-1973); married to Cynthia Bentley Collings (1921-2011).
  Hunter B. Andrews Elementary School, in Hampton, Virginia, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
James B. Angell James Burrill Angell (1829-1916) — also known as James B. Angell — of Ann Arbor, Washtenaw County, Mich. Born in Scituate, Providence County, R.I., January 7, 1829. Editor of Sen. Henry B. Anthony's newspaper, Providence Journal, 1860-66; president, University of Vermont, 1866-71; president, University of Michigan, 1871-1909; U.S. Minister to China, 1880-81; Turkey, 1897-98. Congregationalist. Member, American Historical Association. Died in Ann Arbor, Washtenaw County, Mich., April 1, 1916 (age 87 years, 85 days). Interment at Forest Hill Cemetery, Ann Arbor, Mich.
  Relatives: Son of Andrew Aldrich Angell and Amey (Aldrich) Angell; married, November 26, 1855, to Sarah S. Caswell (died 1903; daughter of Alexis Caswell (president, Brown University)); father of Alexis Caswell Angell (1857-1932).
  Political family: Angell-Cooley family of Ann Arbor, Michigan.
  Angell Hall, at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Mich., is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: Past and Present of Washtenaw County (1906)
  George Tobey Anthony (1824-1896) — of Leavenworth, Leavenworth County, Kan. Born in Mayfield, Fulton County, N.Y., June 9, 1824. Republican. Major in the Union Army during the Civil War; Governor of Kansas, 1877-79; member of Kansas state house of representatives, 1885. Died, of pneumonia, Leavenworth, Leavenworth County, Kan., August 5, 1896 (age 72 years, 57 days). Interment at Topeka Cemetery, Topeka, Kan.
  Relatives: Son of Benjamin Anthony and Anna (Odell) Anthony; married 1852 to Rosa A. Lyon; cousin of Susan B. Anthony (women's rights advocate).
  The city of Anthony, Kansas, is named for him.
  James Tillinghast Archer (1819-1859) — also known as James T. Archer — of Florida. Born in Gillisonville, Jasper County, S.C., May 15, 1819. Lawyer; U.S. Attorney for the Western District of Florida, 1840; secretary of state of Florida, 1845-48. Died, of heart disease, in Tallahassee, Leon County, Fla., June 1, 1859 (age 40 years, 17 days). Interment at Old City Cemetery, Tallahassee, Fla.
  Relatives: Son of Hugh Archer and Susan Matilda (Tillinghast) Archer; married to Mary Brown.
  The city of Archer, Florida, is named for him.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Oliver Percy Archer (1869-1930) — also known as O. P. Archer — of McAllen, Hidalgo County, Tex. Born in Garland, Tipton County, Tenn., November 29, 1869. Mayor of McAllen, Tex., 1913-23. Member, Rotary. Died May 3, 1930 (age 60 years, 155 days). Interment at Roselawn Cemetery, McAllen, Tex.
  Relatives: Married to Clara Hill (1879-1958).
  Archer Park, McAllen, Texas, is named for him.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Benjamin William Arnett (1838-1906) — also known as Benjamin W. Arnett — of Wilberforce, Greene County, Ohio. Born in Brownsville, Fayette County, Pa., March 16, 1838. Republican. School teacher and principal; ordained minister; member of Ohio state house of representatives from Greene County, 1886-87; first Black state legislator elected to represent a majority white constituency; bishop; offered prayer, Republican National Convention, 1896. African Methodist Episcopal. African, Scottish, American Indian, and Irish ancestry. Lost a leg due to a tumor in 1858. Died, of uremia, in Wilberforce, Greene County, Ohio, October 7, 1906 (age 68 years, 205 days). Interment at Wilberforce Cemetery, Wilberforce, Ohio.
  Relatives: Son of Samuel G. Arnett and Mary Louisa Arnett; married, May 25, 1858, to Mary Louisa Gordon.
  Arnett Hall, at Wilberforce University, Wilberforce, Ohio, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Samuel Ashe (1725-1813) — of New Hanover County, N.C. Born in Bath, Beaufort County, N.C., March 24, 1725. Lawyer; delegate to North Carolina state constitutional convention, 1776; justice of North Carolina state supreme court, 1777; Governor of North Carolina, 1795-98. Died in Rocky Point, Pender County, N.C., February 3, 1813 (age 87 years, 316 days). Interment at Ashe Family Cemetery, Rocky Point, N.C.; memorial monument at Pack Square Park, Asheville, N.C.
  Relatives: Son of John Baptista Ashe ; married to Mary Porter and Elizabeth Merrick; father of John Baptista Ashe (1748-1802); uncle and cousin by marriage of William Henry Hill; grandfather of John Baptista Ashe (1810-1857), Thomas Samuel Ashe and William Shepperd Ashe; great-granduncle of George Davis (1820-1896) and Horatio Davis; cousin by marriage of Alfred Moore Waddell.
  Political families: Polk family; Ashe-Polk family of North Carolina (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Ashe County, N.C. is named for him.
  The city of Asheville, North Carolina, is named for him.  — The city of Asheboro, North Carolina, is named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS Samuel Ashe (built 1942, scrapped 1970) was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article
  William Henry Ashley (c.1778-1838) — also known as William H. Ashley — of St. Louis, Mo. Born in Powhatan County, Va., about 1778. Democrat. Fur trader; Lieutenant Governor of Missouri, 1820-24; U.S. Representative from Missouri at-large, 1831-37. Died near Boonville, Cooper County, Mo., March 26, 1838 (age about 60 years). Interment in private or family graveyard.
  Relatives: Married, November 17, 1806, to Mary Able; married, October 17, 1832, to Elizabeth Woodson Moss (1804-1873).
  The Ashley National Forest (established 1908), in Daggett, Duchesne, Summit, Uintah, and Utah counties, Utah, and Sweetwater County, Wyoming, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  David Rice Atchison (1807-1886) — also known as David R. Atchison — of Plattsburg, Clinton County, Mo.; Platte City, Platte County, Mo. Born in Frogtown, Fayette County, Ky., August 11, 1807. Lawyer; member of Missouri state house of representatives, 1834, 1838; circuit judge in Missouri, 1841; U.S. Senator from Missouri, 1843-48, 1849-55. Presbyterian. Member, Freemasons. An organizer of the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railroad. Thought by some to have been president for one day in 1849, because President Zachary Taylor refused to be inaugurated on a Sunday. Died near Gower, Clinton County, Mo., January 26, 1886 (age 78 years, 168 days). Interment at Greenlawn Cemetery, Plattsburg, Mo.; statue at Clinton County Courthouse Grounds, Plattsburg, Mo.
  Relatives: Son of William Atchison and Catherine (Allen) Atchison.
  Atchison counties in Kan. and Mo. are named for him.
  The city of Atchison, Kansas, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  William Wallace Atterbury (1866-1935) — also known as William W. Atterbury; "The Railroad General" — of Radnor, Delaware County, Pa. Born in New Albany, Floyd County, Ind., January 31, 1866. Republican. Railroad superintendent; president, American Railway Association; during World War I, he was called on to organize organized U.S. military railroad operations in France; he was designated Director-General of Transportation for the American Expeditionary Forces; delegate to Republican National Convention from Pennsylvania, 1920; President, Pennsylvania Railroad, 1925-35. Member, American Philosophical Society; American Academy of Political and Social Science. Died, of apoplexy, in Radnor, Delaware County, Pa., September 20, 1935 (age 69 years, 232 days). Interment at Old St. David's Church Cemetery, Radnor, Pa.
  Relatives: Son of John G. Atterbury and Catharine (Larned) Atterbury.
  Camp Atterbury, a military training camp in Johnson County, Indiana, is named for him.  — Atterbury Army Air Base, Columbus, Indiana, later known as Bakalar Air Force Base, and since 1970 as Columbus Municipal Airport, was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Mark Evans Austad (1917-1988) — also known as Marcus Jacob Austad; "Mark Evans" — of Scottsdale, Maricopa County, Ariz. Born in Ogden, Weber County, Utah, April 1, 1917. Served in the U.S. Army during World War II; radio announcer, broadcast newsman, and host of his own television news show; U.S. Ambassador to Finland, 1975-77; Norway, 1981-84. Mormon. Norwegian ancestry. Died in Arizona, October 20, 1988 (age 71 years, 202 days). Interment at Washington Heights Memorial Park, South Ogden, Utah.
  The Mark Evans Austad Auditorium, at Weber State University, Ogden, Utah, is named for him.
  Epitaph: "Grandpa, I'll bet Heavenly Father will be happy to see you."
  See also Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Stephen Fuller Austin (1793-1836) — also known as Stephen F. Austin; "Father of Texas" — Born in Wythe County, Va., November 3, 1793. Member of Missouri territorial legislature, 1814-19; delegate to Texas Convention of 1832 from District of San Felipe de Austin, 1832; took petition to Mexico City for the establishment of Texas as a separate Mexican state, 1832; charged with attempting revolution, and imprisoned until 1835; delegate to Texas Convention of 1833 from District of Austin, 1833; delegate to Texas Consultation of 1835 from District of San Felipe de Austin, 1835; candidate for President of the Texas Republic, 1836; Texas Republic Secretary of State, 1836; died in office 1836. Member, Freemasons. Died of pneumonia, in Brazoria County, Tex., December 27, 1836 (age 43 years, 54 days). Original interment at Peach Point Cemetery, Gulf Prairie, Tex.; reinterment in 1910 at Texas State Cemetery, Austin, Tex.
  Relatives: Son of Moses Austin (1761-1821) and Maria (Brown) Austin (1768-1824).
  Austin County, Tex. is named for him.
  The city of Austin, Texas, is named for him.  — Stephen F. Austin State University, Nacogdoches, Texas, is named for him.  — Austin College, Sherman, Texas, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Handbook of Texas Online
  Books about Stephen F. Austin: Gregg Cantrell, Stephen F. Austin : Empresario of Texas
  Edward Dickinson Baker (1811-1861) — also known as Edward D. Baker — of Springfield, Sangamon County, Ill.; Galena, Jo Daviess County, Ill.; San Francisco, Calif.; Oregon City, Clackamas County, Ore. Born in London, England, February 24, 1811. Lawyer; member of Illinois state house of representatives, 1837-40; member of Illinois state senate, 1841-45; U.S. Representative from Illinois, 1845-46, 1849-51 (7th District 1845-46, 6th District 1849-51); resigned 1846; colonel in the U.S. Army during the Mexican War; U.S. Senator from Oregon, 1860-61; died in office 1861; general in the Union Army during the Civil War. Killed in battle at Balls Bluff, Loudoun County, Va., October 21, 1861 (age 50 years, 239 days). Interment at San Francisco National Cemetery, San Francisco, Calif.
  Relatives: Married, April 27, 1831, to Mary A. Lee.
  Baker County, Ore. is named for him.
  Fort Baker (previously, Lime Point Military Reservation; renamed Fort Baker in 1897; now part of Golden Gate National Recreation Area), in Marin County, California, is named for him.  — Baker Street, in San Francisco, California, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Abraham Baldwin (1754-1807) — of Augusta, Richmond County, Ga. Born in North Guilford, Guilford, New Haven County, Conn., November 2, 1754. Served in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; lawyer; member of Georgia state house of representatives, 1785; Delegate to Continental Congress from Georgia, 1785, 1787-89; member, U.S. Constitutional Convention, 1787; U.S. Representative from Georgia at-large, 1789-99; U.S. Senator from Georgia, 1799-1807; died in office 1807. Congregationalist. Member, Society of the Cincinnati. One of the founders, and first president, of Franklin College, which later became the University of Georgia. Died in Washington, D.C., March 4, 1807 (age 52 years, 122 days). Interment at Rock Creek Cemetery, Washington, D.C.; cenotaph at Greenfield Hill Cemetery, Fairfield, Conn.
  Relatives: Son of Michael Baldwin and Lucy (Dudley) Baldwin; half-brother of Henry Baldwin (1780-1844); brother of Ruth Baldwin (who married Joel Barlow).
  Political family: Baldwin family of Connecticut.
  Baldwin counties in Ala. and Ga. are named for him.
  The World War II Liberty ship SS Abraham Baldwin (built 1941, sunk as artifical reef 1976) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Matthias William Baldwin (1795-1866) — also known as Matthias W. Baldwin — Born in Elizabethtown, Essex County (now Elizabeth, Union County), N.J., December 10, 1795. Jeweler; inventor; locomotive manufacturer; abolitionist; delegate to Pennsylvania state constitutional convention, 1837. Died in Wissinoming, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., September 7, 1866 (age 70 years, 271 days). Interment at Laurel Hill Cemetery, Philadelphia, Pa.; statue at Philadelphia City Hall Grounds, Philadelphia, Pa.
  Relatives: Son of William Baldwin.
  Matthias Baldwin Park, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Bland Ballard (1761-1853) — of Shelby County, Ky. Born in Fredericksburg, Va., October 16, 1761. Member of Kentucky state legislature, 1800-05; served in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812. Died September 5, 1853 (age 91 years, 324 days). Original interment somewhere in Shelbyville, Ky.; reinterment in 1854 at Frankfort Cemetery, Frankfort, Ky.
  Relatives: Grandfather of Bland Ballard (1819-1879).
  Ballard County, Ky. is named for him.
  The city (now inactive) of Blandville, Kentucky, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article
William B. Bankhead William Brockman Bankhead (1874-1940) — also known as William B. Bankhead — of Jasper, Walker County, Ala. Born in Moscow (now Sulligent), Lamar County, Ala., April 12, 1874. Democrat. Lawyer; member of Alabama state house of representatives, 1900-02; speaker, Democratic National Convention, 1912 ; U.S. Representative from Alabama, 1917-40 (10th District 1917-33, 7th District 1933-40); died in office 1940; Speaker of the U.S. House, 1936-40; died in office 1940. Methodist. Member, Phi Delta Theta; Freemasons; Odd Fellows; Junior Order; Woodmen. Died in Washington, D.C., September 15, 1940 (age 66 years, 156 days). Interment at Oak Hill Cemetery, Jasper, Ala.
  Relatives: Son of John Hollis Bankhead and Tallulah James (Brockman) Bankhead; brother of John Hollis Bankhead II; married, January 31, 1900, to Adalaide Eugene Sledge; father of Tallulah Bankhead (actress); uncle of Walter Will Bankhead (1897-1988).
  Political family: Bankhead family of Jasper, Alabama.
  Cross-reference: Carter Manasco
  The William B. Bankhead National Forest (established as Alabama National Forest 1918; given current name 1942), in Franklin, Lawrence, and Winston counties, Alabama, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: Library of Congress
Alben W. Barkley Alben William Barkley (1877-1956) — also known as Alben W. Barkley; Willie Alben Barkley; "Dear Alben"; "Little Alby"; "Veep" — of Paducah, McCracken County, Ky. Born in a log cabin near Lowes, Graves County, Ky., November 24, 1877. Democrat. Lawyer; McCracken County Prosecuting Attorney, 1906-09; county judge in Kentucky, 1909-13; U.S. Representative from Kentucky 1st District, 1913-27; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Kentucky, 1920, 1924, 1928, 1932, 1936, 1940, 1944 (speaker), 1948 (Temporary Chair; chair, Committee to Notify Vice-Presidential Nominee), 1952; candidate in primary for Governor of Kentucky, 1923; U.S. Senator from Kentucky, 1927-49, 1955-56; died in office 1956; candidate for Democratic nomination for Vice President, 1944; Vice President of the United States, 1949-53. Methodist. Member, Delta Tau Delta; Phi Alpha Delta; Odd Fellows; Elks. Died of a heart attack while speaking at the Washington and Lee University Mock Democratic Convention, Lexington, Va., April 30, 1956 (age 78 years, 158 days). Interment at Mt. Kenton Cemetery, Near Paducah, McCracken County, Ky.
  Relatives: Son of John Wilson Barkley and Electra Eliza (Smith) Barkley; married, June 23, 1903, to Dorothy Brower (died 1947); married, November 18, 1949, to Jane Hadley; father of Laura Louise Barkley (who married Douglas MacArthur II (1909-1997)).
  Political families: MacArthur family of Pennsylvania; Dodge-Duke-Cromwell family of Detroit, Michigan (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  C. V. Whitney's thoroughbread racehorse "The Veep" (born 1948), was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about Alben W. Barkley: Polly Ann Davis, Alben W. Barkley, Senate Majority Leader and Vice President — James K. Libbey, Dear Alben : Mr. Barkley of Kentucky
  Image source: Truman Library
  Boce William Barlow, Jr. (1915-2005) — also known as Boce W. Barlow, Jr. — of Hartford, Hartford County, Conn.; Silver Spring, Montgomery County, Md. Born in Americus, Sumter County, Ga., August 8, 1915. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army during World War II; lawyer; municipal judge in Connecticut, 1957; member of Connecticut state senate; elected 1966; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Connecticut, 1968; member of Connecticut Democratic State Central Committee, 1977. Congregationalist. Member, NAACP; Elks; Kappa Alpha Psi. Died in Silver Spring, Montgomery County, Md., January 31, 2005 (age 89 years, 176 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Boce William Barlow (1894-1938) and Ethel (Green) Barlow (1898-1981); married to Catherine Swanson.
  Boce Barlow Way, a street in Hartford, Connecticut, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
Joel Barlow Joel Barlow (1754-1812) — of Hartford, Hartford County, Conn. Born in Redding, Fairfield County, Conn., March 24, 1754. Served in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; chaplain; writer; poet; lawyer; U.S. Consul in Cadiz, 1792-93; U.S. Consul General in Algiers, 1796-97; U.S. Minister to France, 1811-12, died in office 1812. Member, Society of the Cincinnati; Freemasons. He was sent to Algeria to negotiate for the release of those held prisoner by the Barbary pirates, and was protected by a detachment of U.S. Marines. The words "to the shores of Tripoli" in the U.S. Marine Hymn are a reference to this incident. Died, of pneumonia or exposure, in Zarnowiec, Poland, December 24, 1812 (age 58 years, 275 days). Interment at Churchyard, Zarnowiec, Poland; cenotaph at Great Pasture Road Cemetery, Redding, Conn.
  Relatives: Son of Samuel Barlow and Esther (Hull) Barlow; married, December 26, 1779, to Ruth Baldwin (sister of Abraham Baldwin (1754-1807)).
  Political family: Baldwin family of Connecticut.
  Joel Barlow High School, in Redding, Connecticut, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about Joel Barlow: Peter P. Hill, Joel Barlow, American Diplomat and Nation Builder
  Image source: National Portrait Gallery
  Phineas Taylor Barnum (1810-1891) — also known as P. T. Barnum; "Prince of Humbugs" — of Fairfield, Fairfield County, Conn.; Bridgeport, Fairfield County, Conn. Born in Bethel, Fairfield County, Conn., July 5, 1810. Republican. Grocer; auctioneer; newspaper publisher; Entrepreneur, impressario, museum owner, founder of the Barnum & Bailey circus, known as "The Greatest Show on Earth"; member of Connecticut state house of representatives, 1865-66, 1877-79; mayor of Bridgeport, Conn., 1875-76. Died, of heart failure, in Bridgeport, Fairfield County, Conn., April 7, 1891 (age 80 years, 276 days). Interment at Mountain Grove Cemetery, Bridgeport, Conn.; statue at Seaside Park, Bridgeport, Conn.; statue at Bethel Public Library Grounds, Bethel, Conn.
  Relatives: Son of Philo Barnum and Irena (Taylor) Barnum (1784-1868); half-brother of Philo Fairchild Barnum; married, November 8, 1829, to Charity Hallet (1808-1873); married, September 16, 1874, to Nancy Fish (1850-1927); second cousin of Andrew Gould Chatfield (1810-1875); second cousin once removed of Charles Robert Sherman; second cousin thrice removed of Benjamin Huntington and Almon Ferdinand Rockwell; third cousin of Charles Taylor Sherman, William Tecumseh Sherman, Lampson Parker Sherman and John Sherman; third cousin once removed of William Henry Barnum; third cousin twice removed of Samuel Huntington, Henry Huntington, Gurdon Huntington and Charles William Barnum; fourth cousin once removed of Ebenezer Huntington, Samuel H. Huntington, Abel Huntington, Benjamin Nicoll Huntington and Rhamanthus Melville Stocker.
  Political families: Otis family of Connecticut; Sherman family of Connecticut; Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  The town of Barnum (incorporated 1887; annexed 1896 to Denver, Colorado), was named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS P. T. Barnum (built 1943, scrapped 1961) was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Books by P. T. Barnum: The Life of P. T. Barnum: Written by Himself
  Francis Stebbins Bartow (1816-1861) — also known as Francis S. Bartow — of Georgia. Born in Savannah, Chatham County, Ga., September 6, 1816. Lawyer; candidate for U.S. Representative from Georgia 1st District, 1856; delegate to Georgia secession convention, 1861; Delegate from Georgia to the Confederate Provisional Congress, 1861; died in office 1861; colonel in the Confederate Army during the Civil War. Killed by rifle shot, while rallying his men on the Henry House Hill, during the first battle of Manassas, Va., July 21, 1861 (age 44 years, 318 days). Interment at Laurel Grove North Cemetery, Savannah, Ga.
  Relatives: Son of Theodosius Bartow (1775-1856) and Frances Louisa (Stebbins) Bartow (1792-1873); married, April 18, 1844, to Louisa Green Berrien (1827-1913; daughter of John Macpherson Berrien); first cousin twice removed of Theodosia Bartow (1746-1794; who married Aaron Burr (1756-1836)).
  Political families: Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York; Sherman family of Connecticut; Appleton family of Massachusetts; Keeler-Floyd-Sherman-Bangs family of New York; Floyd-Woodbridge-Edwards family of New York; Cornell-Schilplin-Washburn-Burr family of New York; Berrien-Burr-Bartow-Biddle family of Pennsylvania; Hamlin-Bemis-Stowell-Appleton family of Bangor, Maine (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Bartow County, Ga. is named for him.
  The city of Bartow, Florida, is named for him.  — The town of Bartow, Georgia, is named for him.  — The community of Bartow, West Virginia, is named for him.  — Bartow Elementary School (now Otis J. Brock Elementary School), in Savannah, Georgia, was formerly named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS Francis S. Bartow (built 1944, scrapped 1971) was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Marc Basnight (b. 1947) — of Manteo, Dare County, N.C. Born in Manteo, Dare County, N.C., May 13, 1947. Democrat. Restaurant business; member of North Carolina state senate 1st District, 1984-2010. Member, Freemasons. Still living as of 2011.
  The Marc Basnight Bridge (opened 2019), over the Oregon Inlet, from Bodie Island to Pea Island, in Dare County, North Carolina, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article
  George Joseph Bates (1891-1949) — also known as George J. Bates — of Salem, Essex County, Mass. Born in Salem, Essex County, Mass., February 25, 1891. Republican. Member of Massachusetts state house of representatives Eighteenth Essex District, 1918-24; mayor of Salem, Mass., 1924-37; U.S. Representative from Massachusetts 6th District, 1937-49; died in office 1949. Killed in an airplane collision between an Eastern Air Lines DC-4 passenger airliner and a war surplus P-38 fighter plane purchased by Bolivia, near Washington National Airport, Arlington, Arlington County, Va., November 1, 1949 (age 58 years, 249 days). Interment at St. Mary's Cemetery, Salem, Mass.
  Relatives: Son of Thomas F. Bates and Annie (Burns) Bates; married, October 31, 1911, to Nora Jennings; father of William Henry Bates (1917-1969).
  Bates Elementary School, in Salem, Massachusetts, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Vito Piranesi Battista (1909-1990) — also known as Vito P. Battista — of Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y. Born in Bari, Italy, September 7, 1909. Republican. Architect; candidate for mayor of New York City, N.Y., 1957 (United Taxpayers), 1961 (United Taxpayers), 1965 (United Taxpayers), 1977; candidate for New York state senate 10th District, 1962; member of New York state assembly 38th District, 1968-75; member of New York Republican State Committee, 1970-73; delegate to Republican National Convention from New York, 1972; candidate for U.S. Representative from New York 9th District, 1980. Catholic. Italian ancestry. Member, Alpha Phi Delta; American Institute of Architects; Kiwanis. Died in Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y., May 24, 1990 (age 80 years, 259 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Vincenzo Battista and Sabina (Caputo) Battista; married, June 30, 1941, to JOsephine Palermo.
  The Vito P. Battista Playground, Brooklyn, New York, is named for him.
Thomas F. Bayard, Sr. Thomas Francis Bayard, Sr. (1828-1898) — also known as Thomas F. Bayard, Sr. — of Wilmington, New Castle County, Del. Born in Wilmington, New Castle County, Del., October 29, 1828. Democrat. Lawyer; U.S. Attorney for Delaware, 1853-55; U.S. Senator from Delaware, 1869-85; candidate for Democratic nomination for President, 1880, 1884; U.S. Secretary of State, 1885-89; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Delaware, 1892; U.S. Ambassador to Great Britain, 1893-97. Died in Dedham, Norfolk County, Mass., September 28, 1898 (age 69 years, 334 days). Interment at Old Swedes Church Cemetery, Wilmington, Del.
  Relatives: Son of James Asheton Bayard, Jr. and Anne (Francis) Bayard; married 1856 to Louisa Lee; married, November 7, 1889, to Mary W. Clymer; father of Thomas Francis Bayard, Jr.; nephew of Richard Henry Bayard (1796-1868); grandson of James Asheton Bayard, Sr.; grandfather of Mabel Bayard Warren (who married Joseph Gardner Bradley), Thomas Francis Bayard III and Alexis Irenee du Pont Bayard (1918-1985); great-grandson of Richard Bassett; great-grandfather of Richard Henry Bayard (1949?-); great-grandnephew of John Bubenheim Bayard; fourth great-grandnephew of Nicholas Bayard (1644?-1707); fifth great-grandnephew of Pieter Stuyvesant; second cousin once removed of Littleton Kirkpatrick; second cousin four times removed of Stephanus Bayard; third cousin of Andrew Kirkpatrick; third cousin thrice removed of Nicholas Bayard (1736-1802); fourth cousin of John Sluyter Wirt.
  Political families: DuPont family of Wilmington, Delaware; Livingston-Schuyler family of New York; Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Mount Bayard, on the border between British Columbia, Canada, and the Prince of Wales-Hyder Census Area, Alaska, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier
  Image source: James G. Blaine, Twenty Years of Congress, vol. 2 (1886)
  Robert Emmett Bledsoe Baylor (1793-1874) — also known as Robert E. B. Baylor — Born in Lincoln County, Ky., May 10, 1793. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812; member of Kentucky state house of representatives, 1819-20; member of Alabama state house of representatives, 1824; U.S. Representative from Alabama 2nd District, 1829-31; judge of Texas Republic, 1841-45; delegate to Texas state constitutional convention, 1845; district judge in Texas, 1845-60. Baptist. Member, Freemasons. One of the founders, in 1845, of Baylor University, and of Baylor Female College (now the University of Mary Hardin-Baylor). Died in Gay Hill, Washington County, Tex., January 6, 1874 (age 80 years, 241 days). Original interment at Old Baylor University Campus, Independence, Tex.; reinterment in 1886 at University of Mary Hardin-Baylor Campus, Belton, Tex.
  Relatives: Nephew of Jesse Bledsoe (1776-1836).
  Baylor University, Waco, Texas, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Edward Fitzgerald Beale (1822-1893) — Born in Washington, D.C., February 4, 1822. Surveyor; explorer; served in the U.S. Army during the Mexican War; led the experiment to use camels in the U.S. Army; during the Mexican War, made six trips between Washington, D.C. and the Pacific coast, relaying military information; thought to be the courier who brought news to Washington of the discovery of gold in California; Superintendent of Indian Affairs for California and Nevada, 1853-56; U.S. Minister to Austria-Hungary, 1876-77. Died in Washington, D.C., April 22, 1893 (age 71 years, 77 days). Interment at Chester Rural Cemetery, Chester, Pa.
  Relatives: Son of George Dixon Beale (1792-1835) and Emily (Truxton) Beale (1798-1885); married 1849 to Mary Edwards (1827-1902; daughter of Samuel Edwards); father of Truxtun Beale (1856-1936).
  Political families: Beale-Blaine-Edwards family of Chester, Pennsylvania; Dewey-Blaine-Coit-Huntington family of Connecticut (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Beale Air Force Base, near Marysville, California, is named for him.  — Beale Street, in San Francisco, California, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Truxtun Beale (1856-1936) — of San Francisco, Calif.; Annapolis, Anne Arundel County, Md. Born in San Francisco, Calif., March 6, 1856. Republican. Lawyer; U.S. Minister to Persia, 1891-92; Greece, 1892-93; delegate to Republican National Convention from California, 1912; alternate delegate to Republican National Convention from Maryland, 1920. Died near Annapolis, Anne Arundel County, Md., June 2, 1936 (age 80 years, 88 days). Interment at Bruton Parish Churchyard, Williamsburg, Va.
  Relatives: Son of Edward Fitzgerald Beale (1822-1893) and Mary (Edwards) Beale (1827-1902); married, April 30, 1894, to Harriet 'Hattie' Blaine (1871-1958; daughter of James Gillespie Blaine); married, April 23, 1903, to Marie Oge (1880-1956).
  Political family: Beale-Blaine-Edwards family of Chester, Pennsylvania (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Truxtun Avenue and Beale Avenue, in Bakersfield, California, are named for him.  — Beale Park, in Bakersfield, California, is named for him.
  See also U.S. State Dept career summary — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Hiram Iddings Bearss (1875-1938) — also known as Hiram I. Bearss — of Peru, Miami County, Ind. Born in Peru, Miami County, Ind., April 13, 1875. Republican. Served in the U.S. Marine Corps during Spanish-American War; received the Medal of Honor for his actions in the Philippine Islands, 1901-02; served in the U.S. Marine Corps during World War I; delegate to Republican National Convention from Indiana, 1920, 1936. Died in an automobile accident, in Columbia City, Whitley County, Ind., August 28, 1938 (age 63 years, 137 days). Interment at Mt. Hope Cemetery, Peru, Ind.
  Relatives: Son of Franklin Wallace Bearss (1846-1942) and Desdemonia (Iddings) Bearss (1849-1923); married, May 1, 1904, to Louise A. Madden; nephew of George Russell Bearss and Albert Cole Bearss (1836-?); grandson of Daniel Robert Bearss.
  Political family: Bearss family of Peru, Indiana.
  The USS Bearss (built 1943, scapped 1976), a U.S. Navy destroyer, was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Charles E. Beatley, Jr. (1916-2003) — also known as Charles E. Beatley; Chuck Beatley — of Alexandria, Va. Born in Ohio, May 17, 1916. Democrat. Airline pilot; mayor of Alexandria, Va., 1967-76, 1979-85; candidate for U.S. Representative from Virginia 8th District, 1986. Died in Alexandria, Va., December 29, 2003 (age 87 years, 226 days). Cremated; ashes scattered in a private or family graveyard, Fauquier County, Va.
  Relatives: Married 1945 to Marjorie Perry.
  The Charles E. Beatley Central Library, Alexandria, Virginia, is named for him.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Armstrong Beattie — of St. Joseph, Buchanan County, Mo. Mayor of St. Joseph, Mo., 1857-59, 1860-61, 1866-67, 1878-80. Burial location unknown.
  The city of Beattie, Kansas, is named for him.
  Ralph Elihu Becker (1907-1994) — also known as Ralph E. Becker — of Port Chester, Westchester County, N.Y.; Washington, D.C. Born in New York, New York County, N.Y., January 29, 1907. Republican. Lawyer; delegate to Republican National Convention from New York, 1936; served in the U.S. Army during World War II; candidate for Presidential Elector for District of Columbia, 1972; U.S. Ambassador to Honduras, 1976-77. Jewish; later Episcopalian. Lithuanian and Belarusian ancestry. Member, American Bar Association; American Judicature Society; Federal Bar Association; National Trust for Historic Preservation; Freemasons; Shriners; Elks; Jewish War Veterans; American Legion; B'nai B'rith; American Jewish Committee. Donor of the Ralph E. Becker Collection of Political Americana to the Smithsonian Institution; a sponsor of the Antarctic-South Pole Operation Deep Freeze expedition, 1963. Died, from congestive heart failure, in George Washington University Hospital, Washington, D.C., August 24, 1994 (age 87 years, 207 days). Cremated; ashes interred at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Va.
  Relatives: Son of Max Joseph Becker and Rose (Becker) Becker; married to Ann Marie Watters; father of Ralph Elihu Becker, Jr. (1952-).
  Mount Becker, in the Merrick Mountains of Palmer Land, Antarctica, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Roswell Beebe (1795-1856) — of Little Rock, Pulaski County, Ark. Born in Dutchess County, N.Y., December 22, 1795. Lawyer; president, Cairo and Fulton Railroad Company; mayor of Little Rock, Ark., 1849-50. Died in New York, New York County, N.Y., September 21, 1856 (age 60 years, 274 days). Interment at Mt. Holly Cemetery, Little Rock, Ark.
  The city of Beebe, Arkansas, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Nicholas Joseph Begich (1932-1972) — also known as Nick Begich — of Anchorage, Alaska. Born in Eveleth, St. Louis County, Minn., April 6, 1932. Democrat. Member of Alaska state senate, 1963-71; U.S. Representative from Alaska at-large, 1971-72; died in office 1972; alternate delegate to Democratic National Convention from Alaska, 1972. Alaska Native and Croatian ancestry. Disappeared while on a campaign flight from Anchorage to Juneau, and presumed killed in a plane crash, somewhere in Alaska, October 16, 1972 (age 40 years, 193 days). The wreckage was never found. Cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery, Washington, D.C.
  Relatives: Brother of Joseph R. Begich (1930-); married 1956 to Margaret Jendro; father of Nicholas J. Begich, Thomas Begich and Mark Begich (who married Deborah Bonito).
  Political family: Begich family of Anchorage, Alaska.
  Begich Peak in the Chugach Mountains, Anchorage, Alaska, is named for him.  — Begich Middle School, in Anchorage, Alaska, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Frederick William Behmler (1895-1966) — also known as Fred W. Behmler — of Appleton, Swift County, Minn.; Morris, Stevens County, Minn. Born in Jordan, Scott County, Minn., February 2, 1895. Served in the U.S. Army during World War I; physician; surgeon; member of Minnesota state senate 48th District, 1955-58; defeated, 1958. Lutheran. German ancestry. Member, American Medical Association; American Legion; Kiwanis; Freemasons; Shriners. Died, from a myocardial infarction, in Abbott Northwestern Hospital, Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minn., November 6, 1966 (age 71 years, 277 days). Interment at Summit Cemetery, Morris, Minn.
  Relatives: Son of Otto August Behmler (1864-1946) and Martha (Drager) Behmler (1871-1949); married, August 20, 1920, to Mathilda Ovedia Eidem (1894-1993).
  Behmler Hall, at the University of Minnesota Morris, is named for him.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial — Minnesota Legislator record
Martin Behrman Martin Behrman (1864-1926) — of New Orleans, Orleans Parish, La. Born in New York, New York County, N.Y., October 14, 1864. Democrat. Delegate to Louisiana state constitutional convention, 1898, 1921; Louisiana state auditor, 1904-05; mayor of New Orleans, La., 1904-20, 1925-26; defeated, 1920; died in office 1926; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Louisiana, 1908, 1912, 1916 (member, Credentials Committee), 1924; Louisiana Democratic state chair, 1925. German and Jewish ancestry. Died, of heart disease, in New Orleans, Orleans Parish, La., January 12, 1926 (age 61 years, 90 days). Interment at Metairie Cemetery, New Orleans, La.
  Relatives: Son of Henry Behrman and Frederica Behrman; married 1887 to Julia Collins.
  The World War II Liberty ship SS Martin Behrman (built 1944, scrapped 1965) was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article
  Books by Martin Behrman: Martin Behrman of New Orleans : Memoirs of a City Boss
  Image source: Library of Congress
  William Worth Belknap (1829-1890) — also known as William W. Belknap — of Iowa. Born in Newburgh, Orange County, N.Y., September 22, 1829. Lawyer; member of Iowa state house of representatives, 1857-58; general in the Union Army during the Civil War; U.S. Secretary of War, 1869-76. Impeached in 1876 by the House of Representatives for taking bribes; resigned on March 2, 1876. Despite arguments that the Senate lacked jurisdiction after his resignation, an impeachment trial was held; on August 1, the Senate voted 35 to 25 for his conviction, short of the necessary two-thirds. Died, of an apparent heart attack, in Washington, D.C., October 13, 1890 (age 61 years, 21 days). Interment at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Va.
  Relatives: Son of William Goldsmith Belknap (Mexican War general) and Ann (Clark) Belknap; married to Cora LeRoy, Carrie Thompson and Mrs. John Bower; father of Hugh Reid Belknap (1860-1901).
  Mount Belknap, in the Tushar Mountains, Beaver and Piute counties, Utah, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Peter Hansborough Bell (1812-1898) — also known as Peter H. Bell — of Austin, Travis County, Tex. Born in Spotsylvania County, Va., May 12, 1812. Democrat. Served in the Texas Army during the Texas War of Independence; colonel in the U.S. Army during the Mexican War; Governor of Texas, 1849-53; U.S. Representative from Texas 2nd District, 1853-57; colonel in the Confederate Army during the Civil War. Died in Littleton, Halifax County, N.C., March 8, 1898 (age 85 years, 300 days). Original interment at City Cemetery, Littleton, N.C.; reinterment in 1930 at Texas State Cemetery, Austin, Tex.; memorial monument at Courthouse Grounds, Belton, Tex.
  Bell County, Tex. is named for him.
  The city of Belton, Texas, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  August Belmont (1816-1890) — also known as August Schönberg — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in Alzei, Germany, December 2, 1816. Democrat. U.S. Charge d'Affaires to Netherlands, 1853-54; U.S. Minister to Netherlands, 1854-57; Chairman of Democratic National Committee, 1860-68; delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1860, 1864, 1876; speaker, 1868. Jewish. Fought a duel with Edward Hayward, in Elkton, Md., 1840; both men were injured. Died in New York, New York County, N.Y., November 24, 1890 (age 73 years, 357 days). Interment at Island Cemetery, Newport, R.I.
  Relatives: Son of Simon Belmont; married 1849 to Caroline Slidell Perry (daughter of Matthew C. Perry (1794-1858; Commodore, U.S. Navy); aunt by marriage of Joseph Clark Grew; first cousin of Matthew Calbraith Butler); father of Perry Belmont, August Belmont (1853-1924) and Oliver Hazard Perry Belmont.
  Political family: Belmont-Perry family of New York City, New York (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  The town of Belmont, New Hampshire, is named for him.  — The former town of Belmont, Missouri (now largely abandoned due to flooding), was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary
  Thomas Bennett (1781-1865) — of South Carolina. Born in Charleston, Charleston County, S.C., August 14, 1781. Architect; banker; member of South Carolina state house of representatives, 1804-06, 1808-10, 1812-18; Speaker of the South Carolina State House of Representatives, 1814-18; intendant of Charleston, South Carolina, 1812-13; member of South Carolina state senate, 1819-20, 1837-40; Governor of South Carolina, 1820-22. Died in Charleston, Charleston County, S.C., January 30, 1865 (age 83 years, 169 days). Interment at Magnolia Cemetery, Charleston, S.C.
  Relatives: Adoptive father of Christopher Gustavus Memminger (1803-1888).
  Political family: Memminger family of Charleston, South Carolina.
  The city of Bennettsville, South Carolina, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
William Benton William Burnett Benton (1900-1973) — also known as William Benton — of Southport, Fairfield, Fairfield County, Conn. Born in Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minn., April 1, 1900. Democrat. Advertising business; introduced sound effects into television commercials; popularized the "Amos 'n' Andy" radio show; vice-president, University of Chicago, 1937-45; publisher of the Encyclopedia Brittanica; U.S. Assistant Secretary of State for Public Affairs, 1945-47; U.S. Senator from Connecticut, 1949-53; defeated, 1952; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Connecticut, 1952 (member, Platform and Resolutions Committee), 1956, 1960, 1968. Episcopalian. Member, American Legion; Council on Foreign Relations; Zeta Psi. Died, in the Waldorf Towers Hotel, Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., March 18, 1973 (age 72 years, 351 days). Cremated; ashes scattered.
  Relatives: Son of Charles William Benton and Elma (Hixson) Benton; married 1928 to Helen Hemingway.
  The William Benton Museum of Art, at the University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  Image source: Connecticut Register and Manual 1950
  William H. Berkey (1874-1952) — of Cassopolis, Cass County, Mich. Born in Cambria County, Pa., February 24, 1874. Republican. Newspaper editor and publisher; farmer; delegate to Republican National Convention from Michigan, 1920 (alternate), 1940; member of Michigan state board of agriculture, 1930-47; Dry candidate for delegate to Michigan convention to ratify 21st amendment from Cass County, 1933. Member, Freemasons. Died in 1952 (age about 78 years). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Joshua Berkey and Barbara (Mahan) Berkey; married, June 8, 1911, to Olive K. Gard.
  Berkey Hall, a classroom and office building at Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan, is named for him.
  John Bigler (1805-1871) — of Centre County, Pa.; Sacramento County, Calif. Born in Carlisle, Cumberland County, Pa., January 8, 1805. Democrat. Newspaper editor; member of California state assembly, 1850-52 (Sacramento District 1850-51, 12th District 1851-52); Governor of California, 1852-56; defeated, 1855; U.S. Minister to Chile, 1857-61; delegate to Democratic National Convention from California, 1868. Died November 29, 1871 (age 66 years, 325 days). Interment at Sacramento City Cemetery, Sacramento, Calif.
  Relatives: Son of Jacob Bigler and Susan (Dock) Bigler; brother of William Bigler (1814-1880).
  Lake Bigler (later changed to Lake Tahoe), in Placer and El Dorado counties, California, and Washoe and Douglas counties, and Carson City, Nevada, was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary
  Frederick H. Billings (1823-1890) — Born in Royalton, Windsor County, Vt., September 27, 1823. Republican. Vermont secretary of civil and military affairs, 1846-48; lawyer; went to California for the 1849 Gold Rush; president, Northern Pacific Railway, 1879-81; delegate to Republican National Convention from Vermont, 1880. Died in Woodstock, Windsor County, Vt., September 30, 1890 (age 67 years, 3 days). Interment at River Street Cemetery, Woodstock, Vt.
  Relatives: Son of Oel Billings (1788-1871) and Sophie (Wetherbe) Billings (1796-1870); married to Julia Parmly (1835-1914); uncle of Franklin Swift Billings (1862-1935); granduncle of Franklin Swift Billings, Jr..
  Political family: Billings family of Woodstock, Vermont.
  Billings County, N.Dak. is named for him.
  The city of Billings, Montana, is named for him.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  William Bingham (1752-1804) — of Pennsylvania. Born in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., March 8, 1752. Banker; Delegate to Continental Congress from Pennsylvania, 1786-88; member of Pennsylvania state house of representatives, 1790-91; Speaker of the Pennsylvania State House of Representatives, 1791; member of Pennsylvania state senate, 1794-95; U.S. Senator from Pennsylvania, 1795-1801. Died in Bath, England, February 7, 1804 (age 51 years, 336 days). Interment at Paris Church, Bath, England.
  Relatives: Son of William Bingham and Marry (Stamper) Bingham; married, October 26, 1780, to Anne Willing.
  The city of Binghamton, New York, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Lloyd Campbell Bird (1894-1978) — also known as Lloyd C. Bird — of Richmond, Va. Born in Highland County, Va., August 1, 1894. Democrat. Member of Virginia state senate 43rd District, 1943-50; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Virginia, 1944. Methodist. Member, Kiwanis; American Chemical Society. Died in Chesterfield County, Va., April 20, 1978 (age 83 years, 262 days). Interment at Hollywood Cemetery, Richmond, Va.
  Relatives: Son of George Anson Bird and Mary Susan (Campbell) Bird; married to Lucille Crutchfield (1894-1970).
  L. C. Bird High School, in Chesterfield, Virginia, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Redmond Black (1863-1937) — of Reynolds County, Mo.; Redmondville, Iron County, Mo.; Shepard, Iron County, Mo. Born in Ellington, Reynolds County, Mo., September 15, 1863. Democrat. Farmer; Reynolds County Assessor, 1898-1902; member of Missouri state house of representatives from Iron County, 1921-26, 1929-30. Died in Ironton, Iron County, Mo., December 18, 1937 (age 74 years, 94 days). Interment at Ottery Cemetery, Near Belleview, Iron County, Mo.
  Relatives: Son of William Monroe Black (1835-1921) and Cynthia (Chitwood) Black (1840-1917); married, September 8, 1886, to Nancy Wadlow; married, March 25, 1903, to Lucy Jane Neely (1864-1949).
  The community of Redmondville, Missouri, is named for him.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
Joseph C. S. Blackburn Joseph Clay Stiles Blackburn (1838-1918) — also known as Joseph C. S. Blackburn — of Versailles, Woodford County, Ky. Born near Spring Station, Woodford County, Ky., October 1, 1838. Democrat. Lawyer; served in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; member of Kentucky state house of representatives, 1871-75; U.S. Representative from Kentucky 7th District, 1875-85; U.S. Senator from Kentucky, 1885-97, 1901-07; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Kentucky, 1896, 1900, 1904. Died in Washington, D.C., September 12, 1918 (age 79 years, 346 days). Interment at Frankfort Cemetery, Frankfort, Ky.
  Relatives: Son of Edward Mitchell Blackburn (1787-1867) and Lavinia St. Clair (Bell) Blackburn (1794-1863); brother of Luke Pryor Blackburn; married, February 10, 1858, to Therese Graham (1839-1899); married, December 11, 1901, to Mary E. Blackburn; father of Corinne Blackburn (1869-1958; who married William Holt Gale); granduncle of Smith Alford Blackburn; great-granduncle of Charles Milton Blackburn; first cousin twice removed of Gabriel Slaughter; third cousin of Charles Rice Slaughter (1819-1862); third cousin once removed of Robert Pryor Henry, John Flournoy Henry and Gustavus Adolphus Henry.
  Political families: Blackburn-Slaughter-Buckner-Madison family of Kentucky; Pendleton-Lee family (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Mount Blackburn, the highest peak of the Wrangell Mountains, in the Valdez-Cordova Census Area, Alaska, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: The Parties and The Men (1896)
  Luke Pryor Blackburn (1816-1887) — also known as Luke P. Blackburn — of Kentucky. Born in Woodford County, Ky., June 16, 1816. Physician; member of Kentucky state house of representatives, 1843; Governor of Kentucky, 1879-83. Baptist. In 1865, he was tried and acquitted in a Toronto court for violating Canadian neutrality, in connection with a Confederate scheme to spread yellow fever in Northern cities. Died in Frankfort, Franklin County, Ky., September 14, 1887 (age 71 years, 90 days). Interment at Frankfort Cemetery, Frankfort, Ky.
  Relatives: Son of Edward Mitchell Blackburn (1787-1867) and Lavinia St. Clair (Bell) Blackburn (1794-1863); brother of Joseph Clay Stiles Blackburn; married, November 24, 1835, to Ella Boswell; married, November 17, 1857, to Julia Churchill; uncle of Corinne Blackburn (1869-1958; who married William Holt Gale); granduncle of Smith Alford Blackburn; great-granduncle of Charles Milton Blackburn; first cousin twice removed of Gabriel Slaughter; third cousin of Charles Rice Slaughter (1819-1862); third cousin once removed of Robert Pryor Henry, John Flournoy Henry and Gustavus Adolphus Henry.
  Political families: Blackburn-Slaughter-Buckner-Madison family of Kentucky; Pendleton-Lee family (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  The Blackburn Correctional Complex (opened 1972), in Lexington, Kentucky, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about Luke Pryor Blackburn: Nancy Disher Baird, Luke Pryor Blackburn : Physician, Governor, Reformer
  Robert R. Blacker (1845-1931) — of Manistee, Manistee County, Mich. Born in 1845. Democrat. Lumber business; secretary of state of Michigan, 1891-92; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Michigan, 1896. Died in 1931 (age about 86 years). Burial location unknown.
  Manistee County Blacker Airport, Manistee, Michigan, is named for him.
James G. Blaine James Gillespie Blaine (1830-1893) — also known as James G. Blaine; "The Plumed Knight"; "Belshazzar Blaine"; "Magnetic Man" — of Augusta, Kennebec County, Maine. Born in West Brownsville, Washington County, Pa., January 31, 1830. Republican. Delegate to Republican National Convention from Maine, 1856 (Honorary Secretary); member of Maine state house of representatives, 1859-62; Speaker of the Maine State House of Representatives, 1861-62; U.S. Representative from Maine 3rd District, 1863-76; Speaker of the U.S. House, 1869-75; candidate for Republican nomination for President, 1876, 1880; U.S. Senator from Maine, 1876-81; U.S. Secretary of State, 1881, 1889-92; candidate for President of the United States, 1884. Congregationalist. Scotch-Irish ancestry. Died in Washington, D.C., January 27, 1893 (age 62 years, 362 days). Original interment at Oak Hill Cemetery, Washington, D.C.; reinterment in 1920 at Blaine Memorial Park, Augusta, Maine.
  Relatives: Son of Ephraim Lyon Blaine (1796-1850) and Maria (Gillespie) Blaine (1801-1871); married, June 30, 1850, to Harriet Stanwood (1827-1903); father of Harriet Blaine (1871-1958; who married Truxtun Beale); nephew of Ellen Blaine (who married John Hoge Ewing (1796-1887)); grandfather of James Gillespie Blaine III.
  Political family: Dewey-Blaine-Coit-Huntington family of Connecticut (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Cross-reference: Robert G. Ingersoll
  Blaine counties in Idaho, Mont., Neb. and Okla. are named for him.
  Mount Blaine, in Park County, Colorado, is named for him.  — The city of Blaine, Washington, is named for him.
  Politician named for him: J. B. McLaughlin
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Books about James G. Blaine: Mark Wahlgren Summers, Rum, Romanism, & Rebellion : The Making of a President, 1884 — Edward P. Crapol, James G. Blaine : Architect of Empire — Richard B. Cheney & Lynne V. Cheney, Kings Of The Hill : How Nine Powerful Men Changed The Course of American History
  Image source: William C. Roberts, Leading Orators (1884)
John I. Blair John Insley Blair (1802-1899) — also known as John I. Blair — of Blairstown, Warren County, N.J. Born in Warren County, N.J., August 22, 1802. Republican. Merchant; postmaster; manufacturer; railroad builder; delegate to Republican National Convention from New Jersey, 1860, 1868; candidate for Governor of New Jersey, 1868. Presbyterian. Scottish ancestry. Died in Blairstown, Warren County, N.J., December 2, 1899 (age 97 years, 102 days). Interment at Gravel Hill Cemetery, Blairstown, N.J.
  Relatives: Son of John Blair and Rachel (Insley) Blair; married, September 20, 1826, to Nancy Ann Locke (1804-1888); father of Emma Elizabeth Blair (1827-1869; married the publisher Charles Scribner).
  The township of Blairstown, New Jersey, is named for him.  — The city of Blair, Nebraska, is named for him.  — The city of Blairstown, Iowa, is named for him.  — Blair Hall, at Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: King's Notable New Yorkers of 1896-1899
  Neal Shaw Blaisdell (1902-1975) — also known as Neal S. Blaisdell — of Honolulu, Island of Oahu, Honolulu County, Hawaii. Born in Honolulu, Island of Oahu, Honolulu County, Hawaii, November 6, 1902. Republican. School teacher; member of Hawaii territorial House of Representatives, 1944-46; member of Hawaii territorial senate, 1946-50; mayor of Honolulu, Hawaii, 1955-69. Died, from a probable brain hemorrhage, in Honolulu, Island of Oahu, Honolulu County, Hawaii, November 5, 1975 (age 72 years, 364 days). Interment at Oahu Cemetery, Honolulu, Island of Oahu, Hawaii.
  Relatives: Son of William Wallace Blaisdell and Malia K. (Merseberg) Blaisdell; married, October 23, 1926, to Lucy Thurston.
  The Neal S. Blaisdell Convention Center, Honolulu, Hawaii, is named for him.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Henry Goode Blasdel (1825-1900) — also known as Henry G. Blasdel — of Virginia City, Storey County, Nev.; Oakland, Alameda County, Calif. Born near Lawrenceburg, Dearborn County, Ind., January 29, 1825. Republican. Farmer; merchant; riverboat captain; miller; mining business; Governor of Nevada, 1864-71. Died in Oakland, Alameda County, Calif., July 22, 1900 (age 75 years, 174 days). Interment at Mountain View Cemetery, Oakland, Calif.
  Relatives: Son of Jacob Blasdel (1782-1841) and Elizabeth (Weaver) Blasdel (1791-1878); married 1845 to Sarah Jane Cox (1827-1904).
  The Blasdel state office building, in Carson City, Nevada, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Samuel M. Blatchford (1820-1893) — of Auburn, Cayuga County, N.Y.; New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in New York, New York County, N.Y., March 9, 1820. Lawyer; U.S. District Judge for the Southern District of New York, 1867-78; Judge of U.S. Court of Appeals for the 2nd Circuit, 1878-82; Associate Justice of U.S. Supreme Court, 1882-93; died in office 1893. Episcopalian. Member, Freemasons. Died in Newport, Newport County, R.I., July 7, 1893 (age 73 years, 120 days). Interment at Green-Wood Cemetery, Brooklyn, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Julia (Mumford) Blatchford and Richard Milford Blatchford (1798-1875); married, December 17, 1844, to Caroline Appleton (1817-1881).
  The World War II Liberty ship SS Samuel Blatchford (built 1942, scrapped 1969) was named for him.
  See also federal judicial profile — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  John Anton Blatnik (1911-1991) — also known as John A. Blatnik — of Chisholm, St. Louis County, Minn. Born in Chisholm, St. Louis County, Minn., August 17, 1911. Democrat. School teacher; member of Minnesota state senate 60th District, 1941-46; served in the U.S. Army Air Force in World War II; U.S. Representative from Minnesota 8th District, 1947-75; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Minnesota, 1952 (member, Committee on Permanent Organization), 1960, 1964 (delegation chair); member of Democratic National Committee from Minnesota, 1963. Died, from heart failure, in Forest Heights, Prince George's County, Md., December 17, 1991 (age 80 years, 122 days). Interment somewhere in Chisholm, Minn.
  Relatives: Married, April 9, 1955, to Gisela Hager; married to Evelyn Castiglioni.
  Cross-reference: James L. Oberstar
  The John A. Blatnik Bridge, between Duluth, Minnesota, and Superior, Wisconsin, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — NNDB dossier — Minnesota Legislator record
  Joseph Bloomfield (1753-1823) — of Burlington, Burlington County, N.J. Born in Woodbridge, Middlesex County, N.J., October 18, 1753. Democrat. Lawyer; served in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; New Jersey state attorney general, 1783-92; Presidential Elector for New Jersey, 1792; mayor of Burlington, N.J., 1795-1800; Governor of New Jersey, 1801-02, 1803-12; chancellor of New Jersey court of chancery, 1801-02, 1803-12; general in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812; U.S. Representative from New Jersey 3rd District, 1817-21. Died in Burlington, Burlington County, N.J., October 3, 1823 (age 69 years, 350 days). Interment at St. Mary's Churchyard, Burlington, N.J.
  Relatives: Son of Dr. Moses Bloomfield (1729-1791) and Sarah (Ogden) Bloomfield (1734-1773); married, December 17, 1778, to Mary McIlvaine (1752-1818); married to Isabella Macomb Ramsay (1779-1871).
  The township of Bloomfield, New Jersey, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Thomas Hale Boggs, Sr. (1914-1972) — also known as Hale Boggs — of New Orleans, Orleans Parish, La. Born in Long Beach, Harrison County, Miss., February 15, 1914. Democrat. Lawyer; U.S. Representative from Louisiana 2nd District, 1941-43, 1947-72; died in office 1972; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Louisiana, 1948, 1956, 1960, 1968; Parliamentarian, 1964; chair, Resolutions and Platform Committee, chair, 1968; candidate in primary for Governor of Louisiana, 1952; Vice-Chair of Democratic National Committee, 1957; member, President's Commission on the Assassination of President KNDY, 1963-64. Catholic. Member, American Legion; Amvets; Catholic War Veterans; Sons of the American Revolution; Knights of Columbus; American Bar Association; American Judicature Society; Phi Beta Kappa; Beta Theta Pi; Omicron Delta Kappa. Disappeared while on a campaign flight from Anchorage to Juneau, and presumed killed in a plane crash, somewhere in Alaska, October 16, 1972 (age 58 years, 244 days). The wreckage was never found. Cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery, Washington, D.C.
  Relatives: Son of William Robertson Boggs and Claire Josephine (Hale) Boggs; married, January 22, 1938, to Corinne Claiborne (1916-2013); father of Barbara Boggs Sigmund, Thomas Hale Boggs, Jr. and Cokie Roberts (National Public Radio reporter and commentator).
  Boggs Peak in the Chugach Mountains, Anchorage, Alaska, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Books about Thomas Hale Boggs: Gary Boulard, The Big Lie: Hale Boggs, Lucille May Grace, and Leander Perez
  John Frederick Bohler (1885-1960) — also known as J. Fred Bohler — of Pullman, Whitman County, Wash. Born in Reading, Berks County, Pa., April 14, 1885. Athletic coach; mayor of Pullman, Wash., 1949-51. Died in Pullman, Whitman County, Wash., July 12, 1960 (age 75 years, 89 days). Interment at Associated Order of United Workers Cemetery, Pullman, Wash.
  Bohler Gymnasium, at Washington State University, Pullman, Washington, is named for him.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Harvey Wesley Bolin (1909-1978) — also known as H. Wesley Bolin — of Phoenix, Maricopa County, Ariz. Born in Butler, Bates County, Mo., July 1, 1909. Democrat. Secretary of state of Arizona, 1949-77; Governor of Arizona, 1977-78; died in office 1978. Congregationalist. Member, Elks; Moose; Jaycees; Kiwanis. Died, from a heart attack, Phoenix, Maricopa County, Ariz., March 4, 1978 (age 68 years, 246 days). Interment at State Capitol Grounds, Phoenix, Ariz.
  Relatives: Son of Doc Strother Bolin and Margaret (Combs) Bolin; married, February 18, 1940, to Julia Elizabeth Hentz.
  The Wesley Bolin Memorial Plaza, Phoenix, Arizona, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Herbert Covington Bonner (1891-1965) — also known as Herbert C. Bonner — of Washington, Beaufort County, N.C. Born in Washington, Beaufort County, N.C., May 16, 1891. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army during World War I; U.S. Representative from North Carolina 1st District, 1940-65; died in office 1965; delegate to Democratic National Convention from North Carolina, 1944 (alternate), 1956, 1964. Episcopalian. Member, Elks; Freemasons; Shriners. Died in Walter Reed Army Hospital, Washington, D.C., November 7, 1965 (age 74 years, 175 days). Interment at Oakdale Cemetery, Washington, N.C.
  Relatives: Son of Herbert M. Bonner and Hannah (Hare) Bonner; married to Eva Hassell Hackney (1890-1975).
  The Herbert C. Bonner Bridge (built 1963, closed 2013), over the Oregon Inlet, from Bodie Island to Pea Island, in Dare County, North Carolina, was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
  David Augustus Boody (1837-1930) — also known as David A. Boody; "Grand Old Man of Brooklyn"; "Grand Old Man of Wall Street" — of Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y. Born, in a log cabin built by his father, in Jackson, Waldo County, Maine, August 13, 1837. Democrat. Lawyer; banker; stockbroker; delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1888; U.S. Representative from New York 2nd District, 1891; defeated (Independent Democratic), 1882; resigned 1891; mayor of Brooklyn, N.Y., 1892-93; defeated, 1893. Presbyterian. Died in Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y., January 20, 1930 (age 92 years, 160 days). Interment at Green-Wood Cemetery, Brooklyn, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of David Boody and Lucretia Boody; married to Alice H. Treat.
  David A. Boody Junior High School, in Brooklyn, New York, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Ratliff Boon (1781-1844) — of Boonville, Warrick County, Ind. Born in Franklin County, N.C., January 18, 1781. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812; member of Indiana territorial House of Representatives, 1814-15; member of Indiana state house of representatives, 1816-18; member of Indiana state senate, 1818-19; Lieutenant Governor of Indiana, 1819-22, 1822-24; Governor of Indiana, 1822; U.S. Representative from Indiana 1st District, 1825-27, 1829-39; Presidential Elector for Indiana, 1828. Presbyterian. Died in Louisiana, Pike County, Mo., November 20, 1844 (age 63 years, 307 days). Original interment at Lousiana Cemetery, Louisiana, Mo.; reinterment at Riverview Cemetery, Louisiana, Mo.
  Relatives: Cousin of Daniel Boone.
  The city of Boonville, Indiana, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Daniel Boone (1734-1820) — Born in Berks County, Pa., November 2, 1734. Explorer and frontiersman; member of Virginia state house of delegates, 1781, 1787. English and Welsh ancestry. Died in St. Charles County, Mo., September 26, 1820 (age 85 years, 329 days). Original interment at a private or family graveyard, St. Charles County, Mo.; reinterment at Frankfort Cemetery, Frankfort, Ky.
  Relatives: Married to Rebecca Ann Bryan (1739-1813); father of Jessie Bryan Boone and Nathan Boone; grandfather of Harriett Morgan Boone (1794-1861; who married Hiram Howell Baber); granduncle of Levi Day Boone (1808-1882); second great-grandfather of Elmer Charless Henderson.
  Political families: Thomas-Smith-Irwin family of Pennsylvania; Boone family of St. Charles County, Missouri (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Boone counties in Ark., Ill., Ind., Ky., Mo., Neb. and W.Va. are named for him.
  The Daniel Boone National Forest (established 1937 as Cumberland National Forest; renamed 1966), in Bath, Clay, Estill, Harlan, Jackson, Knox, Laurel, Lee, Leslie, McCreary, Menifee, Morgan, Owsley, Perry, Powell, Pulaski, Rockcastle, Rowan, Wayne, Whitley, and Wolfe counties, Kentucky, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Gail Borden, Jr. (1801-1874) — Born in Norwich, Chenango County, N.Y., November 9, 1801. School teacher; surveyor; delegate to Texas Convention of 1833 from District of Austin, 1833; newspaper publisher; Collector of Customs at Galveston for the Texas Republic, 1837-38 and 1841-43; in 1849, he invented a dehydrated beef product called a "meat biscuit", but it failed commercially; in 1853, he invented a process to make sweetened condensed milk, which could be transported without refrigeration, and developed sanitation practices to to prevent contamination. Died in Borden, Colorado County, Tex., January 11, 1874 (age 72 years, 63 days). Interment at Woodlawn Cemetery, Bronx, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Gail Borden (1777-1863) and Philadelphia (Wheeler) Borden (1780-1828).
  Borden County, Tex. is named for him.
  The community of Borden, Texas, is named for him.  — The community of Gail, Texas, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article
William C. Bouck William C. Bouck (1786-1859) — also known as "Old White Hoss of Schoharie" — of Schoharie County, N.Y. Born in Fultonham, Schoharie County, N.Y., January 7, 1786. Farmer; sheriff; member of New York state assembly from Schoharie County, 1813-16, 1817-18; member of New York state senate Middle District, 1820-22; Governor of New York, 1843-45; defeated, 1840; delegate to New York state constitutional convention, 1846. Died in Schoharie County, N.Y., April 19, 1859 (age 73 years, 102 days). Interment at Middleburgh Cemetery, Middleburgh, N.Y.
  Relatives: Father of Charles C. Bouck (1830?-?).
  Political family: Cornell family of New York (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  The community of Bouckville, New York, is named for him.
  See also NNDB dossier
  Image source: New York Red Book 1896
  Earl Murphy Bourdon (1917-1993) — also known as Earl M. Bourdon — of Claremont, Sullivan County, N.H. Born in Claremont, Sullivan County, N.H., December 16, 1917. Democrat. Delegate to Democratic National Convention from New Hampshire, 1980. Died June 19, 1993 (age 75 years, 185 days). Interment at River Cemetery, Plainfield, N.H.
  Relatives: Married to Honorine Hadley (1920-2003).
  The Earl M. Bourdon Centre (senior housing) in Claremont, New Hampshire, is named for him.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  James Bowdoin (1726-1790) — of Massachusetts. Born in Boston, Suffolk County, Mass., August 7, 1726. Delegate to Massachusetts state constitutional convention, 1779-80; Governor of Massachusetts, 1785-87; delegate to Massachusetts convention to ratify U.S. constitution, 1788. French ancestry. Member, American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Died, of consumption (tuberculosis), in Boston, Suffolk County, Mass., November 6, 1790 (age 64 years, 91 days). Interment at Old Granary Burying Ground, Boston, Mass.
  Relatives: Son of James Bowdoin (1676-1747) and Hannah (Portage) Bowdoin (1686-1726); married to Elizabeth Erving (1731-1809); father of James Bowdoin III; great-grandfather of Robert Charles Winthrop; fifth great-grandfather of William Amory Gardner Minot and John Forbes Kerry; second cousin thrice removed of George Griswold Sill (1829-1907).
  Political family: Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Bowdoin College, in Brunswick, Maine, is named for him.  — The towns of Bowdoin & Bowdoinham, Maine, are named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Walter Bowne (1770-1846) — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in Flushing, Queens, Queens County, N.Y., September 26, 1770. Member of New York state senate, 1816-24 (Southern District 1816-22, 1st District 1823-24); mayor of New York City, N.Y., 1829-33. Died August 31, 1846 (age 75 years, 339 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of James Bowne and Caroline (Rodman) Bowne; married 1803 to Elizabeth Southgate.
  Bowne Park, in Flushing, Queens, New York, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article
  Nancy Merritt Boykin (1919-2006) — also known as Nancy M. Boykin; Nancy Merritt; Nancy Smith — of Detroit, Wayne County, Mich. Born in Washington, D.C., March 20, 1919. Republican. Social worker; founder (1966) and head (1966-87) of Detroit Public Schools Continuing Education for Girls; delegate to Republican National Convention from Michigan, 1972 (alternate), 1976; Presidential Elector for Michigan, 1976; member of Michigan Republican State Central Committee, 1975-80, 1983-2006. Female. African ancestry. Member, Phi Delta Kappa; Alpha Kappa Alpha. Died January 28, 2006 (age 86 years, 314 days). Interment at Detroit Memorial Park West, Redford Township, Wayne County, Mich.
  Relatives: Daughter of Matthew Merritt and Mary Gertrude (White) Merritt; married, April 17, 1965, to Ulysses Wilhelm Boykin; step-mother of Ulysses Boykin III (1959?-).
  Political family: Boykin family of Redford Township and Detroit, Michigan.
  The Nancy Boykin Continuing Education Center (closed 2010), an alternative school for pregnant teens in Detroit, Michigan, was named for her.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
Carl Brablec Carl Brablec (1908-1986) — of Lenawee County, Mich.; Roseville, Macomb County, Mich. Born in Ogden Township, Lenawee County, Mich., September 24, 1908. Democrat. School teacher and principal; superintendent of schools; justice of the peace; candidate in primary for Michigan state house of representatives from Lenawee County, 1936; member of University of Michigan board of regents, 1958-66. Methodist. Moravian ancestry. Member, Rotary; Pi Kappa Delta; Kappa Delta Pi; Freemasons. Died in 1986 (age about 77 years). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Married 1937 to Dorothy Margaret Kanous.
  Carl Brablec High School, in Roseville, Michigan, is named for him.
  Image source: Michigan Manual 1957-58
  William Bradford (1755-1795) — of Pennsylvania. Born in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., September 14, 1755. Colonel in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; lawyer; Pennsylvania state attorney general, 1780-91; justice of Pennsylvania state supreme court, 1791-94; U.S. Attorney General, 1794-95; died in office 1795. Presbyterian. Died August 23, 1795 (age 39 years, 343 days). Interment at St. Mary's Churchyard, Burlington, N.J.
  Relatives: Son of William Bradford and Rachel (Budd) Bradford; married to Susan Vergereau Boudinot (1764-1854; daughter of Elias Boudinot; niece of Richard Stockton (1730-1781)).
  Political family: Stockton family of Princeton, New Jersey (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Bradford County, Pa. is named for him.
  The city of Bradford, Pennsylvania, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Lewis Rice Bradley (1805-1879) — also known as Lewis R. Bradley; "Broadhorns" — of Stockton, San Joaquin County, Calif.; Nevada. Born in Orange County, Va., February 18, 1805. Democrat. Delegate to Democratic National Convention from California, 1860; member of California state assembly 8th District, 1861-62; Governor of Nevada, 1871-79; defeated, 1878. Died in Elko, Elko County, Nev., March 21, 1879 (age 74 years, 31 days). Interment at Elko Cemetery, Elko, Nev.
  Relatives: Married 1835 to Virginia Hode Willis (1817-1852); grandfather of Charles Belknap Henderson (1873-1954).
  The Bradley state office building, in Las Vegas, Nevada, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Wyatt Tate Brady (1870-1925) — also known as W. Tate Brady — of Tulsa, Tulsa County, Okla. Born in Forest City, Holt County, Mo., January 20, 1870. Democrat. Hotelier; member of Democratic National Committee from Oklahoma, 1907. Member, Ku Klux Klan; Sons of Confederate Veterans. Died from a self-inflicted gunshot wound, in Tulsa, Tulsa County, Okla., August 29, 1925 (age 55 years, 221 days). Interment at Oaklawn Cemetery, Tulsa, Okla.
  Relatives: Son of Henry Harrison Brady (1841-1917) and Minerva Anne (Snyder) Brady (1842-1911); married 1895 to Rachel Cassandra Davis (1875-1962).
  Brady Street (now Reconciliation Way), in Tulsa Oklahoma, was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Louis Dembitz Brandeis (1856-1941) — also known as Louis D. Brandeis — of Dedham, Norfolk County, Mass. Born in Louisville, Jefferson County, Ky., November 13, 1856. Lawyer; law clerk to Justice Horace Gray, 1879-80; Associate Justice of U.S. Supreme Court, 1916-39; took senior status 1939. Jewish. Died in Washington, D.C., October 5, 1941 (age 84 years, 326 days). Cremated; ashes interred at University of Louisville Law School, Louisville, Ky.
  Relatives: Son of Adolph Brandeis (1822-1906) and Fredericka (Dembitz) Brandeis (1829-1901); brother of Fannie Brandeis (1850-1890; who married Charles Nagel (1849-1940)) and Alfred Brandeis (1854-1928; brother-in-law of Walter M. Taussig); married, March 23, 1891, to Alice Goldmark (1866-1945).
  Political family: Taussig family of St. Louis, Missouri.
  Cross-reference: Dean Acheson — James M. Landis — Calvert Magruder
  Brandeis University, in Waltham, Massachusetts, is named for him.  — The Louis D. Brandeis School of Law, in Louisville, Kentucky, is named for him.
  See also federal judicial profile — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about Louis D. Brandeis: Lewis J. Paper, Brandeis: An Intimate Biography of One of America's Truly Great Supreme Court Justices — Stephen W. Baskerville, Of Laws and Limitations : An Intellectual Portrait of Louis Dembitz Brandeis — Philippa Strum, Louis D. Brandeis: Justice for the People — Robert A. Burt, Two Jewish Justices: Outcasts in the Promised Land
  Gerard Chittocque Brandon (1788-1850) — also known as Gerard C. Brandon — of Mississippi. Born near Natchez, Adams County, Miss., September 15, 1788. Member of Mississippi territorial House of Representatives, 1815-17; Lieutenant Governor of Mississippi, 1817-20, 1822-25; Governor of Mississippi, 1825-26, 1826-32. Died near Fort Adams, Wilkinson County, Miss., March 28, 1850 (age 61 years, 194 days). Interment a private or family graveyard, Wilkinson County, Miss.
  The city of Brandon, Mississippi, is named for him.
  John Cabell Breckinridge (1821-1875) — also known as John C. Breckinridge — of Lexington, Fayette County, Ky. Born near Lexington, Fayette County, Ky., January 16, 1821. Democrat. Lawyer; major in the U.S. Army during the Mexican War; member of Kentucky state house of representatives, 1849-51; U.S. Representative from Kentucky 8th District, 1851-55; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Kentucky, 1856; Vice President of the United States, 1857-61; Southern Democratic candidate for President of the United States, 1860; U.S. Senator from Kentucky, 1861; general in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; Confederate Secretary of War, 1865. Presbyterian. Member, Freemasons. Expelled from the U.S. Senate on December 4, 1861 for his participation in the Confederate military. Fled to Cuba at the end of the war, and lived in England and Canada until 1869. Died, from lung disease and liver cirrhosis, in Lexington, Fayette County, Ky., May 17, 1875 (age 54 years, 121 days). Interment at Lexington Cemetery, Lexington, Ky.
  Relatives: Son of Mary Clay (Smith) Breckinridge (1787-1864) and Joseph Cabell Breckinridge; married 1840 to Elizabeth Lucas (1825-1889); married, December 12, 1843, to Mary Cyrene Burch (1826-1907); father of Clifton Rodes Breckinridge; nephew of Robert Jefferson Breckinridge; grandson of John Breckinridge; great-grandson of John Witherspoon; great-grandnephew of William Preston and William Cabell; first cousin of Peter Augustus Porter (1827-1864), Robert Jefferson Breckinridge, Jr. and William Campbell Preston Breckinridge; first cousin once removed of James Douglas Breckinridge, Benjamin William Sheridan Cabell (1793-1862), Peter Augustus Porter (1853-1925), Levin Irving Handy, Desha Breckinridge and Henry Skillman Breckinridge; first cousin twice removed of William Cabell, Jr., Francis Smith Preston, William Henry Cabell and James Patton Preston; second cousin of Carter Henry Harrison, William Lewis Cabell and George Craighead Cabell; second cousin once removed of William Campbell Preston, James McDowell, John Buchanan Floyd, John Smith Preston, George Rogers Clark Floyd, Edward Carrington Cabell, Benjamin Earl Cabell and Carter Henry Harrison II; second cousin twice removed of Earle Cabell; third cousin of John William Leftwich.
  Political families: Marshall-Harrison-Randolph-Cabell family of Virginia; Breckinridge-Preston-Cabell-Henry family of Virginia; Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York; Walker-Bolling family of Huntsville, Alabama (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  The city of Breckenridge, Missouri, is named for him.  — The city of Breckenridge, Colorado, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial — BillionGraves burial record
  Books about John C. Breckinridge: William C. Davis, An Honorable Defeat: The Last Days of the Confederate Government — Frank Hopkins Heck, Proud Kentuckian, John C. Breckinridge, 1821-1875 — William C. Davis, Breckinridge : Statesman, Soldier, Symbol
  Sidney Breese (1800-1878) — of Carlyle, Clinton County, Ill. Born in Whitesborough, Oneida County, N.Y., July 15, 1800. Democrat. U.S. Attorney for Illinois, 1827-29; circuit judge in Illinois 2nd Circuit, 1835-41, 1855-57; justice of Illinois state supreme court, 1841-43, 1857-78; died in office 1878; U.S. Senator from Illinois, 1843-49; member of Illinois state house of representatives, 1851-52; Speaker of the Illinois State House of Representatives, 1851. Died in Pinckneyville, Perry County, Ill., June 27, 1878 (age 77 years, 347 days). Interment at Carlyle Cemetery, Carlyle, Ill.
  The city of Breese, Illinois, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  Andrew Broaddus (1900-1972) — of Louisville, Jefferson County, Ky. Born in Louisville, Jefferson County, Ky., May 15, 1900. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Navy during World War I; laundry business; mayor of Louisville, Ky., 1953-57. Died, from a heart attack, in Louisville, Jefferson County, Ky., September 7, 1972 (age 72 years, 115 days). Interment at Cave Hill Cemetery, Louisville, Ky.
  Relatives: Son of Russell Broaddus (1873-1946) and Julia Ducan (Ely) Broaddus (1876-1961); married, September 24, 1924, to Elizabeth Robertson (1900-1993); third cousin twice removed of Elbridge Jackson Broaddus; fourth cousin once removed of Joseph Broaddus and Bower Slack Broaddus (1888-1949).
  Political family: Broaddus family of Madison County, Kentucky.
  The Mayor Andrew Broaddus, a floating life-saving station in Louisville, Kentucky, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  David Colbreth Broderick (1820-1859) — also known as David C. Broderick — of New York; San Francisco, Calif. Born in Washington, D.C., February 4, 1820. Democrat. Candidate for U.S. Representative from New York, 1846; went to California for the 1849 Gold Rush; member of California state senate, 1850-52; Lieutenant Governor of California, 1851-52; U.S. Senator from California, 1857-59; died in office 1859. Irish ancestry. Mortally wounded in a duel on September 13, 1859 with David S. Terry, chief justice of the California Supreme Court, and died in San Francisco, Calif., September 16, 1859 (age 39 years, 224 days). Original interment at Laurel Hill Cemetery (which no longer exists), San Francisco, Calif.; reinterment in 1942 at Cypress Lawn Memorial Park, Colma, Calif.
  Relatives: Son of Thomas Broderick and Honora (Colbert) Broderick; cousin *** of Andrew Kennedy and Case Broderick (1839-1920).
  Political family: Broderick-Kennedy family of Indianapolis and Muncie, Indiana.
  The former town of Broderick, now part of West Sacramento, California, was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
Clark L. Brody Clark Louis Brody (1879-1961) — also known as Clark L. Brody — of Lansing, Ingham County, Mich. Born in Fabius, St. Joseph County, Mich., February 1, 1879. Republican. Farmer; county agricultural agent, 1915-21; executive with Farm Bureau; member of Michigan state board of agriculture, 1921-59; appointed 1921; alternate delegate to Republican National Convention from Michigan, 1956. Methodist. Member, Farm Bureau; Alpha Zeta; Phi Kappa Phi; Kiwanis. Died in Lansing, Ingham County, Mich., October 12, 1961 (age 82 years, 253 days). Interment at Evergreen Cemetery, Lansing, Mich.
  Relatives: Son of James Polk Brody (1845-1915) and Emma L. (Seeley) Brody (1853-1904); married, November 14, 1906, to Margaret Ellen York (1879-1960).
  The Brody Complex of dormitories at Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan, is named for him.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: Michigan Manual 1957-58
  John Brooks (1752-1825) — of Massachusetts. Born in Medford, Middlesex County, Mass., May 4, 1752. Physician; served in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; member of Massachusetts state house of representatives, 1785-86; delegate to Massachusetts convention to ratify U.S. constitution, 1788; member of Massachusetts state senate, 1791; Adjutant General of Massachusetts, 1812-16; Governor of Massachusetts, 1816-23. Member, Society of the Cincinnati. Died in Medford, Middlesex County, Mass., March 1, 1825 (age 72 years, 301 days). Interment at Salem Street Burial Ground, Medford, Mass.
  Relatives: Son of Caleb Brooks and Ruth (Albree) Brooks; married 1774 to Lucy Smith.
  The town of Brooks, Maine, is named for him.
  Preston Smith Brooks (1819-1857) — also known as Preston S. Brooks — of Ninety Six, Edgefield District (now Greenwood County), S.C. Born in Edgefield, Edgefield District (now Edgefield County), S.C., August 5, 1819. Lawyer; member of South Carolina state house of representatives, 1844; U.S. Representative from South Carolina 4th District, 1853-56, 1856-57; died in office 1857. Suffered a hip wound in a duel with Louis T. Wigfall, 1839, and could walk only with a cane for the rest of his life. In May, 1856, furious over an anti-slavery speech, he went to the Senate and beat Senator Charles Sumner with a cane, causing severe injuries; an attempt to expel him from Congress failed for lack of the necessary two-thirds vote, but he resigned; re-elected to his own vacancy. Died in Washington, D.C., January 27, 1857 (age 37 years, 175 days). Interment at Willow Brook Cemetery, Edgefield, S.C.; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery, Washington, D.C.
  Relatives: Son of Whitefield Brooks and Mary P. (Carroll) Brooks; married 1841 to Caroline Means (1820-1843); married 1843 to Martha Means; cousin *** of Milledge Luke Bonham (1813-1890).
  Political family: Bonham family of Edgefield, South Carolina.
  Cross-reference: L. M. Keitt
  Brooks County, Ga. is named for him.
  The city of Brooksville, Florida, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  John Broome (1738-1810) — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in Staten Island, Richmond County, N.Y., July 19, 1738. Importer and exporter; delegate to New York state constitutional convention, 1777; colonel in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; member of New York state assembly from New York County, 1800-02; member of New York state senate Southern District, 1803-04; Lieutenant Governor of New York, 1804-10; died in office 1810. Died in New York, New York County, N.Y., August 8, 1810 (age 72 years, 20 days). Interment at First Presbyterian Churchyard, Manhattan, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Samuel Broome and Marie (LaTourette) Broome; married, October 19, 1769, to Rebecca Lloyd (1746-1800); married 1806 to Ruth Hunter (1755-1840).
  Broome County, N.Y. is named for him.
  The town of Broome, New York, is named for him.  — Broome Street, in Manhattan, New York, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Albert Gallatin Brown (1813-1880) — also known as Albert G. Brown — of Terry, Hinds County, Miss. Born in Chester District (now Chester County), S.C., May 31, 1813. Democrat. Lawyer; member of Mississippi state house of representatives, 1835-39; U.S. Representative from Mississippi, 1839-41, 1847-53 (at-large 1839-41, 4th District 1847-53); circuit judge in Mississippi, 1842-43; Governor of Mississippi, 1844-48; U.S. Senator from Mississippi, 1854-61; served in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; Senator from Mississippi in the Confederate Congress, 1862-65. Member, Freemasons. Died near Terry, Hinds County, Miss., June 12, 1880 (age 67 years, 12 days). Interment at Greenwood Cemetery, Jackson, Miss.
  Presumably named for: Albert Gallatin
  Relatives: Son of Joseph Brown and Elizabeth (Rice) Brown; married 1835 to Elizabeth Taliaferro (1817-1836); married, January 12, 1841, to Roberta Eugenia Young (1813-1886).
  Brown County, Kan. is named for him.
  The World War II Liberty ship SS Albert G. Brown (built 1943, scrapped 1960) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  Charles M. Brown (1903-1995) — also known as Charlie Brown — of Atlanta, Fulton County, Ga. Born in 1903. Fulton County Commissioner, 1941-48, 1966-79; member of Georgia state senate, 1957-64. Died in 1995 (age about 92 years). Burial location unknown.
  Charlie Brown Field (Fulton County general aviation airport), Atlanta, Georgia, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article
  J. Sinclair Brown — of Roanoke, Va. Democrat. Presidential Elector for Virginia, 1924; delegate to Virginia limited constitutional convention 21st District, 1945. Burial location unknown.
  The J. Sinclair Brown Bridge (opened 1949), which takes Route 11 over the Roanoke River, in Salem, Virginia, is named for him.
  James Thomas Broyhill (b. 1927) — also known as James T. Broyhill; Jim Broyhill — of Lenoir, Caldwell County, N.C. Born in Lenoir, Caldwell County, N.C., August 19, 1927. Republican. U.S. Representative from North Carolina, 1963-86 (9th District 1963-69, 10th District 1969-86); U.S. Senator from North Carolina, 1986; defeated, 1986. Baptist. Member, Freemasons; Shriners. Still living as of 2014.
  The James T. Broyhill Post Office Building, in Lenoir, North Carolina, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — NNDB dossier
Blanche K. Bruce Blanche Kelso Bruce (1841-1898) — also known as Blanche K. Bruce — of Floreyville (unknown county), Miss. Born in slavery near Farmville, Prince Edward County, Va., March 1, 1841. Republican. School teacher; planter; Bolivar County Sheriff and Tax Collector, 1872-75; U.S. Senator from Mississippi, 1875-81; delegate to Republican National Convention from Mississippi, 1880, 1884; Register of the U.S. Treasury, 1881, 1897-98; District of Columbia Recorder of Deeds, 1891-93. African ancestry. Died in Washington, D.C., March 17, 1898 (age 57 years, 16 days). Interment at Woodlawn Cemetery, Washington, D.C.
  The Blanche K. Bruce Foundation (supporitng arts and high-risk youth) is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — NNDB dossier
  Image source: James G. Blaine, Twenty Years of Congress, vol. 2 (1886)
  Henry Bruckner (1871-1942) — of Bronx, Bronx County, N.Y. Born in Bronx, New York County (now Bronx County), N.Y., June 17, 1871. Democrat. President, Bruckner Beverages; director, Milton Realty Co.; director, American Metal Cap Co.; member of New York state assembly from New York County 35th District, 1901; New York City Commissioner of Public Works, 1902-06; delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1912 (alternate), 1924, 1932 (alternate); U.S. Representative from New York 22nd District, 1913-17; resigned 1917; borough president of Bronx, New York, 1918-33. Member, Freemasons; Rotary; Elks. In 1932, the Seabury investigating committee, looking into corruption in New York City, called him to testify about the wealth he had accumulated; at the conclusion of the investigation, the committee called for his removal as Borough President. Died, from chronic nephritis, in Bronx, Bronx County, N.Y., April 14, 1942 (age 70 years, 301 days). Interment at Woodlawn Cemetery, Bronx, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of John A. Bruckner and Katharine (Schmidt) Bruckner; married, November 17, 1904, to Helen Zobel (c.1879-1930).
  Bruckner Expressway, Bronx, New York, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
Martin G. Brumbaugh Martin Grove Brumbaugh (1862-1930) — also known as Martin G. Brumbaugh; "Hercules of the Educational World" — of Huntingdon County, Pa.; Germantown, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa. Born in Penn Township, Huntingdon County, Pa., April 14, 1862. Republican. Huntingdon County Superintendent of Schools, 1884-90; university professor; president, Juniata College, 1895-1906; Puerto Rico Commissioner of Education, 1900-02; Philadelphia superintendent of schools, 1906-15; Governor of Pennsylvania, 1915-19; candidate for Republican nomination for President, 1916; delegate to Republican National Convention from Pennsylvania, 1916. Brethren. German ancestry. Member, Union League. Died in Pinehurst, Moore County, N.C., March 14, 1930 (age 67 years, 334 days). Interment at Valley View Cemetery, McConnellstown, Pa.
  Relatives: Son of George Boyer Brumbaugh and Martha (Peightal) Brumbaugh; married 1884 to Anna Konigmacher (died 1914); married, January 29, 1916, to Flora Belle Parks.
  Brumbaugh Hall, a residence hall at Pennsylvania State University, University Park, State College, Pennsylvania, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Books about Martin Grove Brumbaugh: Earl C. Kaylor, Jr., Martin Grove Brumbaugh : A Pennsylvanian's Odyssey from Sainted Schoolman to Bedeviled World War I Governor, 1862-1930
  Image source: Smull's Legislative Hand Book and Manual 1916
  Jared L. Brush (1835-1913) — of Greeley, Weld County, Colo. Born in Clermont County, Ohio, July 6, 1835. Republican. Member of Colorado state house of representatives, 1879-93; Lieutenant Governor of Colorado, 1895-99; alternate delegate to Republican National Convention from Colorado, 1912. Died in Greeley, Weld County, Colo., April 24, 1913 (age 77 years, 292 days). Interment at Linn Grove Cemetery, Greeley, Colo.
  The city of Brush, Colorado, is named for him.
  John Alexander Bryan (1794-1864) — also known as John A. Bryan — of Ellicottville, Cattaraugus County, N.Y.; Columbus, Franklin County, Ohio; Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, Wis.; Menasha, Winnebago County, Wis. Born in Berkshire County, Mass., April 13, 1794. Lawyer; member of New York state assembly from Cattaraugus County, 1827; Ohio auditor of state, 1833-39; U.S. Charge d'Affaires to Peru, 1845. Member, Freemasons. Died in Menasha, Winnebago County, Wis., May 24, 1864 (age 70 years, 41 days). Interment at Oak Hill Cemetery, Neenah, Wis.
  Relatives: Father-in-law of John B. Weller; father of Charles Henry Bryan (1822-1877).
  Political family: Bryan-Weller family.
  The city of Bryan, Ohio, is named for him.
  See also U.S. State Dept career summary
James Buchanan James Buchanan (1791-1868) — also known as "The Sage of Wheatland"; "Buck"; "Old Buck" — of Lancaster, Lancaster County, Pa. Born in a log cabin near Mercersburg, Franklin County, Pa., April 23, 1791. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812; lawyer; member of Pennsylvania state house of representatives, 1814; U.S. Representative from Pennsylvania, 1821-31 (3rd District 1821-23, 4th District 1823-31); U.S. Minister to Russia, 1832-33; Great Britain, 1853-56; U.S. Senator from Pennsylvania, 1834-45; resigned 1845; candidate for Democratic nomination for President, 1844, 1848, 1852; U.S. Secretary of State, 1845-49; President of the United States, 1857-61. Presbyterian. Member, Freemasons. Died near Lancaster, Lancaster County, Pa., June 1, 1868 (age 77 years, 39 days). Interment at Woodward Hill Cemetery, Lancaster, Pa.; memorial monument at Meridian Hill Park, Washington, D.C.
  Relatives: Son of James Buchanan (c.1761-1821) and Elizabeth (Speer) Buchanan (1767-1833).
  Cross-reference: David Fullerton Robison — John A. Quitman — John Gallagher Montgomery
  Buchanan counties in Iowa, Mo. and Va. are named for him.
  The city of Buchanan, Michigan, is named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: James B. DukeJames B. CullisonJames Buchanan SigginsJ. B. MarcumJames B. Searcy
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier
  Books about James Buchanan: Philip S. Klein, President James Buchanan: A Biography — Jean H. Baker, James Buchanan — R. G. Horton, The Life And Public Services Of James Buchanan: Late Minister To England And Formerly Minister To Russia, Senator And Representative In Congress, And Sec. Of State
  Critical books about James Buchanan: Nathan Miller, Star-Spangled Men : America's Ten Worst Presidents
  Image source: Portrait & Biographical Album of Washtenaw County (1891)
  James Paul Buchanan (1867-1937) — also known as James P. Buchanan — of Brenham, Washington County, Tex. Born in Midway, Barnwell District (now Bamberg County), S.C., April 30, 1867. Democrat. Member of Texas state house of representatives, 1906-13; U.S. Representative from Texas 10th District, 1913-37; died in office 1937. Died in Washington, D.C., February 22, 1937 (age 69 years, 298 days). Interment at Prairie Lea Cemetery, Brenham, Tex.
  Relatives: Cousin *** of Edward William Pou (1863-1934).
  Buchanan Dam on the Colorado River, and Lake Buchanan, in Burnet and Llano counties, Texas, are named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  George Washington Buckner (1855-1943) — also known as George W. Buckner — Born in slavery near Greensburg, Green County, Ky., December 1, 1855. U.S. Minister to Liberia, 1913-15; U.S. Consul General in Monrovia, as of 1914. African ancestry. Died in Evansville, Vanderburgh County, Ind., February 17, 1943 (age 87 years, 78 days). Interment at Oak Hill Cemetery, Evansville, Ind.
  Presumably named for: George Washington
  The Buckner Towers public housing development, in Evansville, Indiana, is named for him.
  See also U.S. State Dept career summary
  Aedanus Burke (1743-1802) — also known as "Cassius" — of Charleston, Charleston District (now Charleston County), S.C. Born in County Galway, Ireland, June 16, 1743. Circuit judge in South Carolina, 1778; member of South Carolina state house of representatives, 1778-79; served in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; delegate to South Carolina convention to ratify U.S. constitution, 1788; U.S. Representative from South Carolina at-large, 1789-91. Died in Charleston, Charleston County, S.C., March 30, 1802 (age 58 years, 287 days). Interment at Burnt Church Burial Ground, Jacksonboro, S.C.
  The World War II Liberty ship SS Aedanus Burke (built 1943, scrapped 1964) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  Albert Sidney Burleson (1863-1937) — also known as Albert S. Burleson — of Austin, Travis County, Tex. Born in San Marcos, Hays County, Tex., June 7, 1863. Democrat. Lawyer; U.S. Representative from Texas, 1899-1913 (9th District 1899-1903, 10th District 1903-13); alternate delegate to Democratic National Convention from Texas, 1912 (speaker); U.S. Postmaster General, 1913-21. Died, from a heart attack, in Austin, Travis County, Tex., November 24, 1937 (age 74 years, 170 days). Interment at Oakwood Cemetery, Austin, Tex.
  Relatives: Son of Edward Burleson, Jr. (1826-1877) and Emma Lucy (Kyle) Burleson (1832-1877); married 1889 to Adele Lubbock Steiner (1863-1948; author, playwright, poet); grandson of Edward Burleson.
  Political family: Burleson family of Austin, Texas.
  The World War II Liberty ship SS Albert S. Burleson (built 1943, scrapped 1971) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Otway Burns (c.1775-1850) — of Swansboro, Onslow County, N.C.; Beaufort, Carteret County, N.C. Born near Swansboro, Onslow County, N.C., about 1775. Ship captain; privateer during the War of 1812; shipbuilder; planter; member of North Carolina house of commons, 1821-22, 1824-27, 1832; member of North Carolina state senate, 1828-30, 1834; lighthouse keeper at the Brant Island Shoal Light, 1835-50. Died in Portsmouth, Carteret County, N.C., August 25, 1850 (age about 75 years). Interment at Old Burying Ground, Beaufort, N.C.; statue at Town Square, Burnsville, N.C.
  Relatives: Married, July 6, 1809, to Joanna Grant; grandfather of Walter Francis Burns (1872?-?).
  The town of Burnsville, North Carolina, is named for him.  — The community of Otway, North Carolina, is named for him.  — Two U.S. Navy destroyers were named for him, in 1918 and in 1942.
  See also Wikipedia article
  Fiction about Otway Burns: Ruth P. Barbour, The Cruise of the Snap Dragon
  James Burrill, Jr. (1772-1820) — of Providence, Providence County, R.I. Born in Providence, Providence County, R.I., April 25, 1772. Rhode Island state attorney general, 1797-1812; member of Rhode Island state house of representatives, 1810; Speaker of the Rhode Island State House of Representatives, 1814-16; U.S. Senator from Rhode Island, 1817-20; died in office 1820. Died in Washington, D.C., December 25, 1820 (age 48 years, 244 days). Interment at Congressional Cemetery, Washington, D.C.
  Relatives: Grandfather of George William Curtis; great-grandfather of Theodore Francis Green (1867-1966).
  Political family: Arnold family of Providence, Rhode Island (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  The town of Burrillville, Rhode Island, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  Wellington R. Burt (1831-1919) — also known as "The Lone Pine of Michigan" — of Saginaw, Saginaw County, Mich. Born in Pike, Wyoming County, N.Y., August 26, 1831. Lumber and timber business; railroad builder; mayor of East Saginaw, Mich., 1867-68; alternate delegate to Republican National Convention from Michigan, 1872, 1880; Fusion candidate for Governor of Michigan, 1888; member of Michigan state senate 22nd District, 1893-94; defeated (Democratic), 1904, 1908; Democratic candidate for U.S. Representative from Michigan 8th District, 1900; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Michigan, 1900, 1912 (member, Committee to Notify Presidential Nominee); Democratic candidate for University of Michigan board of regents, 1903; delegate to Michigan state constitutional convention 22nd District, 1907-08. Died, from stomach trouble, in Saginaw, Saginaw County, Mich., March 2, 1919 (age 87 years, 188 days). Interment at Forest Lawn Cemetery, Saginaw, Mich.
  Relatives: Son of Luther Burt.
  The community of Burt, Michigan, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  George Herbert Walker Bush (1924-2018) — also known as George Bush; "Poppy"; "Sheepskin"; "Timberwolf" — of Midland, Midland County, Tex.; Houston, Harris County, Tex. Born in Milton, Norfolk County, Mass., June 12, 1924. Republican. Served in the U.S. Navy during World War II; delegate to Republican National Convention from Texas, 1964; candidate for U.S. Senator from Texas, 1964, 1970; U.S. Representative from Texas 7th District, 1967-71; U.S. Representative to United Nations, 1971-73; Chairman of Republican National Committee, 1973-74; U.S. Liaison to China, 1974-75; director, U.S. Central Intelligence Agency, 1976-77; candidate for Republican nomination for President, 1980; Vice President of the United States, 1981-89; President of the United States, 1989-93; defeated, 1992. Episcopalian. Member, American Legion; Skull and Bones; Council on Foreign Relations; Delta Kappa Epsilon; Society of the Cincinnati; Phi Beta Kappa. Died in Houston, Harris County, Tex., November 30, 2018 (age 94 years, 171 days). Interment at George H. W. Bush Presidential Library and Museum, College Station, Tex.
  Relatives: Son of Prescott Sheldon Bush and Dorothy (Walker) Bush (1901-1992); married, January 6, 1945, to Barbara Pierce (1925-2018); father of George Walker Bush and John Ellis Bush (1953-); first cousin thrice removed of David Davis.
  Political family: Bush family of Massachusetts.
  Cross-reference: Caspar W. Weinberger — John H. Sununu — Don Evans — James C. Oberwetter
  The George Bush School of Government and Public Service, at Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas, is named for him.  — George Bush High School, in Richmond, Texas, is named for him.  — George Herbert Walker Bush Elementary School, in Addison, Texas, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Books by George H. W. Bush: All The Best, George Bush: My Life and Other Writings (1999) — Looking Forward (1987) — A World Transformed (1998)
  Books about George H. W. Bush: John Robert Greene, The Presidency of George Bush — Tim O'Shei & Joe Marren, George H. W. Bush (for young readers)
  Critical books about George H. W. Bush: Kevin Phillips, American Dynasty: Aristocracy, Fortune, and the Politics of Deceit in the House of Bush — Kitty Kelly, The Family : The Real Story of the Bush Dynasty
  Pierce Butler (1744-1822) — of South Carolina. Born in County Carlow, Ireland, July 11, 1744. Democrat. Member of South Carolina state house of representatives, 1778-89; Adjutant General of South Carolina, 1779; Delegate to Continental Congress from South Carolina, 1787; member, U.S. Constitutional Convention, 1787; U.S. Senator from South Carolina, 1789-96, 1802-04. Episcopalian. Died in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., February 15, 1822 (age 77 years, 219 days). Interment at Christ Church Burial Ground, Philadelphia, Pa.; cenotaph at St. Michael's Church Cemetery, Charleston, S.C.
  Relatives: Son of Sir Richard Butler (1699-1771) and Henrietta (Percy) Butler (1701-1794); married, January 10, 1771, to Mary Middleton (1748-1790; niece of Henry Middleton (1717-1784); first cousin of Arthur Middleton).
  Political families: Middleton-Huger-Rutledge-Drayton family of Charleston, South Carolina; Pinckney-Middleton-Laurens family of Charleston, South Carolina; Shippen-Middleton family of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  The World War II Liberty ship SS Pierce Butler (built 1942, torpedoed and lost 1941), was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Edward Norman Cahn (b. 1933) — also known as Edward N. Cahn — Born in Allentown, Lehigh County, Pa., 1933. Lawyer; U.S. District Judge for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania, 1974-98; retired 1998. Still living as of 2010.
  The Edward N. Cahn Federal Building and U.S. Courthouse, Allentown, Pennsylvania, is named for him.
  See also federal judicial profile — Wikipedia article — Ballotpedia article
  Thomas E. Caldecott (1878-1951) — of Berkeley, Alameda County, Calif. Born in Chester, England, July 27, 1878. Pharmacist; mayor of Berkeley, Calif., 1930-32. Welsh ancestry. Died, of a heart attack, in Berkeley, Alameda County, Calif., July 23, 1951 (age 72 years, 361 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Married 1910 to Eveline Grooms; father of Thomas William Caldecott (1914-1994).
  The Caldecott Tunnel, from Oakland to Orinda, California, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article
  Alexander Caldwell (1830-1917) — of Leavenworth, Leavenworth County, Kan. Born in Drakes Ferry, Huntingdon County, Pa., March 1, 1830. Republican. Banker; U.S. Senator from Kansas, 1871-73; resigned 1873. Died, from a cerebral hemorrhage, in St. Joseph's Hospital, Kansas City, Jackson County, Mo., May 19, 1917 (age 87 years, 79 days). Interment at Mt. Muncie Cemetery, Lansing, Kan.
  Relatives: Son of James Caldwell.
  The city of Caldwell, Kansas, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  Millard Fillmore Caldwell, Jr. (1897-1984) — also known as Millard F. Caldwell, Jr. — of Milton, Santa Rosa County, Fla.; Tallahassee, Leon County, Fla. Born in Knoxville, Knox County, Tenn., February 6, 1897. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army during World War I; lawyer; member of Florida state house of representatives, 1929-32; U.S. Representative from Florida 3rd District, 1933-41; Governor of Florida, 1945-49; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Florida, 1948, 1956; justice of Florida state supreme court, 1962-69. Protestant. Member, Sons of the American Revolution; Kappa Sigma; Phi Alpha Delta; Freemasons; Shriners; Knights of Pythias; Elks; Newcomen Society; American Legion; American Judicature Society; Alpha Kappa Psi; Blue Key. Died in Tallahassee, Leon County, Fla., October 23, 1984 (age 87 years, 260 days). Interment at Harwood Plantation Cemetery, Leon County, Fla.
  Presumably named for: Millard Fillmore
  Relatives: Son of Millard Fillmore Caldwell and Martha Jane (Clapp) Caldwell; married, February 14, 1925, to Mary Rebecca Harwood.
  The Millard Caldwell state office building (opened 1949), in Tallahassee, Florida, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — NNDB dossier
  James Calhoun (1743-1816) — of Baltimore, Md. Born April 17, 1743. Orphan's court judge in Maryland, 1791; mayor of Baltimore, Md., 1794-1804. Died August 14, 1816 (age 73 years, 119 days). Interment at Westminster Burying Ground, Baltimore, Md.
  Calhoun Street, in Baltimore, Maryland, is named for him.
John C. Calhoun John Caldwell Calhoun (1782-1850) — also known as John C. Calhoun — of Pickens District (now Pickens County), S.C. Born in Abbeville District (part now in McCormick County), S.C., March 18, 1782. Member of South Carolina state house of representatives, 1808; U.S. Representative from South Carolina 6th District, 1811-17; U.S. Secretary of War, 1817-25; Vice President of the United States, 1825-32; U.S. Senator from South Carolina, 1832-43, 1845-50; died in office 1850; U.S. Secretary of State, 1844-45. Scotch-Irish ancestry. Died in Washington, D.C., March 31, 1850 (age 68 years, 13 days). Interment at St. Philip's Churchyard, Charleston, S.C.; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery, Washington, D.C.; memorial monument at Marion Park, Charleston, S.C.
  Relatives: Son of James Patrick Calhoun (1727-1795) and Martha (Caldwell) Calhoun (1750-1802); married, December 27, 1809, to Floride Bonneau (1792-1866); father of Anna Maria Calhoun (1817-1875; who married Thomas Green Clemson (1807-1888)); uncle of John Alfred Calhoun and Martha Catherine Calhoun (1809-1869; who married Armistead Burt); great-granduncle of John Temple Graves; first cousin of John Ewing Colhoun and Joseph Calhoun; first cousin once removed of Andrew Pickens; first cousin twice removed of Francis Wilkinson Pickens; second cousin once removed of Sarah Ann Calhoun (1811-1892; who married Alexander Henry Brown); second cousin twice removed of William Francis Calhoun.
  Political family: Calhoun-Pickens family of South Carolina (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Calhoun counties in Ala., Ark., Fla., Ga., Ill., Iowa, Mich., Miss., S.C., Tex. and W.Va. are named for him.
  The John C. Calhoun State Office Building (opened 1926), in Columbia, South Carolina, is named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: John C. JohnsonJohn Calhoun NichollsJohn Calhoun CookJohn C. SheppardJohn C. BellJohn C. C. MayoJohn C. Phillips
  Coins and currency: His portrait appeared on Confederate States $1,000 notes (1861) and $100 notes (1862).
  Campaign slogan: "Liberty dearer than union."
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about John C. Calhoun: Margaret L. Coit, John C. Calhoun : American Portrait — Clyde N. Wilson, John C. Calhoun — Merrill D. Peterson, The Great Triumvirate: Webster, Clay, and Calhoun — Warren Brown, John C. Calhoun (for young readers)
  Image source: James Smith Noel Collection, Louisiana State University in Shreveport
Joseph G. Cannon Joseph Gurney Cannon (1836-1926) — also known as Joseph G. Cannon; "Uncle Joe" — of Danville, Vermilion County, Ill. Born in Guilford, Guilford County, N.C., May 7, 1836. Republican. Lawyer; Vermilion County State's Attorney, 1861-68; U.S. Representative from Illinois, 1873-91, 1893-1913, 1915-23 (14th District 1873-83, 15th District 1883-91, 1893-95, 12th District 1895-1903, 18th District 1903-13, 1915-23); Speaker of the U.S. House, 1903-11; delegate to Republican National Convention from Illinois, 1892, 1904 (Permanent Chair); candidate for Republican nomination for President, 1908. Died in Danville, Vermilion County, Ill., November 12, 1926 (age 90 years, 189 days). Interment at Spring Hill Cemetery, Danville, Ill.
  Relatives: Son of Dr. Horace H. Cannon and Gulielma (Hollingsworth) Cannon; married 1862 to Mary P. Reed.
  The Cannon House Office Building, in Washington, D.C., is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about Joe Cannon: Richard B. Cheney & Lynne V. Cheney, Kings Of The Hill : How Nine Powerful Men Changed The Course of American History
  Image source: American Monthly Review of Reviews, October 1902
  Doyle Elam Carlton (1885-1972) — also known as Doyle E. Carlton — of Tampa, Hillsborough County, Fla. Born in Wauchula, Hardee County, Fla., July 6, 1885. Democrat. Lawyer; member of Florida state senate, 1917-19; Governor of Florida, 1929-33; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Florida, 1948, 1952, 1956. Baptist. Member, Freemasons; Shriners; Knights of Pythias; Moose; Elks; Kiwanis. Died in a nursing home at Tampa, Hillsborough County, Fla., October 25, 1972 (age 87 years, 111 days). Interment at Myrtle Hill Memorial Park, Tampa, Fla.
  Relatives: Son of Albert Carlton and Martha (McEwan) Carlton; married, July 30, 1912, to Nell Ray; distant relative *** of Vassar B. Carlton (1929?-).
  The Doyle E. Carlton Building (built 1955 for state government offices), in Tallahassee, Florida, is named for him.
  See also NNDB dossier
  Julian Shakespeare Carr (1845-1924) — also known as Julian S. Carr; Jule Carr — of Durham, Durham County, N.C. Born in Durham, Durham County, N.C., October 12, 1845. Democrat. Served in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; co-owner and president of the company which made "Bull Durham" tobacco; founder of the Durham Cotton Manufacturing Company and Durham Hosiery Mills; involved in railroads, utilities, and banking; mayor of Durham, N.C., 1873; delegate to Democratic National Convention from North Carolina, 1888, 1904, 1912 (Honorary Vice-President), 1916; candidate for Democratic nomination for Vice President, 1900. Methodist. Member, United Confederate Veterans. Died, of pneumonia, in Chicago, Cook County, Ill., April 29, 1924 (age 78 years, 200 days). Entombed in mausoleum at Maplewood Cemetery, Durham, N.C.
  Relatives: Son of John Wesley Carr (1814-1889) and Elizabeth Pannill (Bullock) Carr (1815-1906); married, February 18, 1873, to Nancy Graham 'Nannie' Parrish (1853-1915; daughter of Doctor Claiborne Parrish); nephew of Robert Bullock (1828-1905); first cousin of William Simeon Bullock.
  Political family: Bullock-Parrish family of Durham, North Carolina.
  The town of Carrboro, North Carolina, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Coleman Francis Carroll (1905-1977) — also known as Coleman F. Carroll — of Miami, Dade County (now Miami-Dade County), Fla. Born in Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, Pa., February 9, 1905. Republican. Catholic priest; bishop of Miami, 1958-68; archbishop, 1968-77; offered prayer, Republican National Convention, 1968. Catholic. Irish ancestry. Died in Miami Beach, Dade County (now Miami-Dade County), Fla., July 26, 1977 (age 72 years, 167 days). Interment at Our Lady of Mercy Cemetery, Miami, Fla.
  Relatives: Son of William B. Carroll and Margaret (Hogan) Carroll.
  Archbishop Coleman F. Carroll High School, in Miami, Florida, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Hugh Alton Carter, Sr. (1920-1999) — also known as Hugh Carter — of Georgia. Born in Plains, Sumter County, Ga., August 13, 1920. Served in the U.S. Army during World War II; member of Georgia state senate 14th District, 1967-81. Baptist. Died at Sumter Regional Hospital, Americus, Sumter County, Ga., June 24, 1999 (age 78 years, 315 days). Interment at Lebanon Cemetery, Near Plains, Sumter County, Ga.
  Relatives: Son of William Alton Carter (1888-1978) and Annie Laurie (Gay) Carter (1895-1940); married to Ruth Godwin (1921-2004); first cousin of James Earl Carter, Jr. (1924-).
  Political family: Carter family of Plains, Georgia.
  The Hugh Alton Carter Bridge, on Highway 280 over Choctahatchee Creek, in Webster County, Georgia, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Jerome Increase Case (1819-1891) — also known as Jerome I. Case — of Racine, Racine County, Wis. Born in Williamstown, Oswego County, N.Y., December 11, 1819. Inventor; threshing machine manufacturer; mayor of Racine, Wis., 1856, 1858, 1860; member of Wisconsin state senate, 1865-66; banker. Died in Racine, Racine County, Wis., December 22, 1891 (age 72 years, 11 days). Entombed at Mound Cemetery, Racine, Wis.; memorial monument at Monument Square, Racine, Wis.
  Relatives: Son of Calebv Case (1787-1874) and Deborah (Jackson) Case (1792-1833); married 1849 to Lydia Ann Bull (1826-1909); father of Jackson Irving Case (1865-1903).
  Jerome I. Case High School, in MOUNT Pleasant, Wisconsin, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Howard Cattle (1904-1992) — also known as Richard William Cattle — of Chino, San Bernardino County, Calif. Born in Thunder Bay, Ontario, December 23, 1904. Dry cleaning business; clothing merchant; mayor of Chino, Calif., 1956-59. English ancestry. Died in San Bernardino County, Calif., February 17, 1992 (age 87 years, 56 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Richard Henry Cattle (1877-1947) and Janet Mary Florence (Proudfoot) Cattle (1878-1952); married to Vera Pearl Cook.
  Howard Cattle Elementary School, in Chino, California, is named for him.
  Anton Joseph Cermak (1873-1933) — also known as Anton J. Cermak; "Pushcart Tony" — of Chicago, Cook County, Ill. Born in Kladno, Bohemia (now Czechia), May 9, 1873. Democrat. Delegate to Democratic National Convention from Illinois, 1924, 1928, 1932; candidate for U.S. Senator from Illinois, 1928; mayor of Chicago, Ill., 1931-33; died in office 1933. Bohemian ancestry. On February 15, 1933, while he was standing on the running board of an open car from which president-elect Franklin D. Roosevelt had just given a speech, was shot and badly wounded by Italian-American bricklayer Guiseppe Zangara, who had aimed for Roosevelt; over the next month, the wound became infected, and he died, in Jackson Memorial Hospital, Miami, Dade County (now Miami-Dade County), Fla., March 6, 1933 (age 59 years, 301 days). Entombed at Bohemian National Cemetery, Chicago, Ill.
  Relatives: Father of Helena I. Cermak (who married Otto Kerner, Jr. (1908-1976)) and Lillian Cermak (who married Richey V. Graham).
  Political family: Kerner-Cermak family of Chicago, Illinois.
  Cermak Road (formerly 22nd Street), from Chicago to Oak Brook, Illinois, is named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS A. J. Cermak (built 1943, scrapped 1964) was named for him.
  Epitaph: "I Am Glad It Was Me, Instead of You."
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Burton W. Chace (1901-1972) — of Long Beach, Los Angeles County, Calif. Born in Stanton, Stanton County, Neb., July 6, 1901. Republican. Lumber dealer; mayor of Long Beach, Calif., 1947-53; alternate delegate to Republican National Convention from California, 1952; member, Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors, 1953-72. Died in a car accident, August 22, 1972 (age 71 years, 47 days). Burial location unknown.
  Burton Chace Park, in Marina del Rey, California, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article
  Henry Champion (1751-1836) — of Colchester, New London County, Conn. Born in Westchester, Colchester, New London County, Conn., March 16, 1751. Major in Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; banker; member of Connecticut council of assistants, 1806-17; member of Connecticut state house of representatives from Colchester, 1820. Member, Society of the Cincinnati. Died July 13, 1836 (age 85 years, 119 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Henry Champion and Deborah (Brainard) Champion; brother of Epaphroditus Champion (1756-1834); married, October 10, 1781, to Abigail Tinker; father of Harriet Champion (1789-1823; who married Joseph Trumbull); first cousin four times removed of Charlotte H. McMorran; second cousin once removed of Amaziah Brainard; second cousin twice removed of Leveret Brainard; second cousin five times removed of Charles Gates Dawes, Rufus Cutler Dawes and Beman Gates Dawes; third cousin of Daniel Upson; third cousin twice removed of Chester Ackley, Charles Upson, Gad Ely Upson, Christopher Columbus Upson, Andrew Seth Upson and Evelyn M. Upson; third cousin thrice removed of Almar F. Dickson.
  Political families: Upson-Dawes family of Connecticut; Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York; Holden-Davis-Lawrence-Garcelon family of Massachusetts; Porter-Kelsey family of Connecticut (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  The town of Champion, New York, is named for him.  — The township of Champion, Ohio, named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article
  Charles Clarke Chapman (1853-1944) — also known as Charles C. Chapman; "The Orange King of California" — of Chicago, Cook County, Ill.; Fullerton, Orange County, Calif. Born in Illinois, June 2, 1853. Republican. Publishing business; mayor of Fullerton, Calif., 1904-06; delegate to Republican National Convention from California, 1916, 1924. Disciples of Christ. Died in Orange County, Calif., March 5, 1944 (age 90 years, 277 days). Interment at Forest Lawn Memorial Park, Glendale, Calif.; statue at Chapman University Entrance, Orange, Calif.
  Chapman University, in Orange, California, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
Salmon P. Chase Salmon Portland Chase (1808-1873) — also known as Salmon P. Chase; "Old Mr. Greenbacks" — of Cincinnati, Hamilton County, Ohio. Born in Cornish, Sullivan County, N.H., January 13, 1808. Republican. Liberty candidate for U.S. Representative from Ohio 1st District, 1846; U.S. Senator from Ohio, 1849-55, 1861; Governor of Ohio, 1856-60; candidate for Republican nomination for President, 1856, 1860; U.S. Secretary of the Treasury, 1861-64; Chief Justice of U.S. Supreme Court, 1864-73; died in office 1873. Episcopalian. Died in New York, New York County, N.Y., May 7, 1873 (age 65 years, 114 days). Original interment at Oak Hill Cemetery, Washington, D.C.; reinterment at Spring Grove Cemetery, Cincinnati, Ohio.
  Relatives: Son of Ithamar Chase (1762-1817) and Janette Chase (1777-1832); married to Eliza Ann Smith (1821-1845); father of Katherine Jane 'Kate' Chase (1840-1899; who married William Sprague (1830-1915)); nephew of Dudley Chase; cousin *** of Dudley Chase Denison.
  Political families: Sprague family of Providence, Rhode Island; Chase family of Vermont (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Chase County, Kan. is named for him.
  Chase Hall (dormitory, built 1926), at Harvard University Business School, Boston, Massachusetts, is named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS Salmon P. Chase (built 1942, scrapped 1960) was named for him.
  Politician named for him: Chase S. Osborn
  Coins and currency: His portrait appeared on various U.S. currency, including $1 and $10 notes in the 1860s, and the $10,000 bill from 1918 to 1946.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Books about Salmon P. Chase: Frederick J. Blue, Salmon P. Chase : A Life in Politics — John Niven, Salmon P. Chase : A Biography — Albert B. Hart, Salmon P. Chase — Doris Kearns Goodwin, Team of Rivals : The Political Genius of Abraham Lincoln
  Image source: Life and Work of James G. Blaine (1893)
  Andrew Gould Chatfield (1810-1875) — also known as Andrew G. Chatfield — of Addison, Steuben County, N.Y.; Racine, Racine County, Wis.; Belle Plaine, Scott County, Minn. Born in Butternuts, Otsego County, N.Y., January 27, 1810. Lawyer; member of New York state assembly from Steuben County, 1839-41, 1846; justice of Minnesota territorial supreme court, 1853-57. Episcopalian. Member, Freemasons. Died in Belle Plaine, Scott County, Minn., October 3, 1875 (age 65 years, 249 days). Interment at Episcopal Church of the Transfiguration Cemetery, Belle Plaine, Minn.
  Relatives: Son of Enos Chatfield (1782-1858) and Hannah (Starr) Chatfield (1782-1857); married, June 27, 1836, to Eunice Electa Clark Beeman (1817-1901); sixth great-grandson of Thomas Welles; first cousin thrice removed of Almon Ferdinand Rockwell; second cousin of Philo Fairchild Barnum and Phineas Taylor Barnum; third cousin once removed of Charles Robert Sherman and Truman Hotchkiss; fourth cousin of Charles Taylor Sherman, William Tecumseh Sherman, Lampson Parker Sherman, John Sherman and Glover Wheeler Cable; fourth cousin once removed of Asahel Otis and Nathan Summers Beardslee (1848-1915).
  Political family: Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  The city of Chatfield, in Fillmore and Olmsted counties, Minnesota, is named for him.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Lawton Mainor Chiles, Jr. (1930-1998) — also known as Lawton Chiles; "Walkin' Lawton" — of Lakeland, Polk County, Fla. Born in Lakeland, Polk County, Fla., April 3, 1930. Democrat. Member of Florida state house of representatives, 1959-67; member of Florida state senate, 1967-71; U.S. Senator from Florida, 1971-89; Governor of Florida, 1991-98; died in office 1998; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Florida, 1996 (delegation chair). Presbyterian. Member, Alpha Tau Omega. Died, of a heart condition, in the Governor's Mansion, Tallahassee, Leon County, Fla., December 12, 1998 (age 68 years, 253 days). Original interment and cenotaph at Roselawn Cemetery, Tallahassee, Fla.; reinterment at a private or family graveyard, Leon County, Fla.
  Relatives: Uncle of Kay Hagan (1953-).
  Lawton Chiles Middle School, in Miami, Florida, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  William Dudley Chipley (1840-1897) — also known as W. D. Chipley — of Pensacola, Escambia County, Fla. Born in Columbus, Muscogee County, Ga., June 6, 1840. Democrat. Colonel in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; fought against Reconstruction along with other members of the Ku Klux Klan; he was among those implicated in the murder of George W. Ashburn in in 1868; tried in a military court, but Georgia's re-admission to the Union ended military jurisdiction, so he and his co-defendants were released; general manager of the Pensacola Railroad; successfully promoted the construction of the Pensacola and Atlanta Railroad in 1881-83; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Florida, 1884, 1892; mayor of Pensacola, Fla., 1887-88; member of Florida state senate, 1895-97. Died in a hospital at Washington, D.C., December 1, 1897 (age 57 years, 178 days). Interment at Linwood Cemetery, Columbus, Ga.
  Relatives: Son of Dr. William Stout Chipley (1810-1880) and Elizabeth (Fannin) Chipley (1819-1873); brother of Stephen Fannin Chipley (1838-1898); married to Ann Elizabeth Billups (1848-1910).
  The city of Chipley, Florida, is named for him.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Clyde L. Choate (1920-2001) — of Anna, Union County, Ill. Born in West Frankfort, Franklin County, Ill., June 28, 1920. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army during World War II; member of Illinois state house of representatives, 1947-79 (50th District 1947-57, 58th District 1957-67, 59th District 1967-79); delegate to Democratic National Convention from Illinois, 1956 (alternate), 1964, 1972. Member, American Legion; Veterans of Foreign Wars; Disabled American Veterans; Elks; Moose; Purple Heart. Received the Medal of Honor for action near Bruyeres, France, October 25, 1944. Died October 5, 2001 (age 81 years, 99 days). Interment at Anna City Cemetery, Anna, Ill.
  Choate Mental Health Center (state mental hospital), in Anna, Illinois, is named for him.
  Abraham Clark (1726-1794) — of Elizabethtown, Essex County (now Elizabeth, Union County), N.J. Born near Elizabethtown, Essex County (now Elizabeth Union County), N.J., February 15, 1726. Delegate to Continental Congress from New Jersey, 1776-78, 1779-83, 1787-89; signer, Declaration of Independence, 1776; member of New Jersey state house of assembly from Essex County, 1776, 1783-85; U.S. Representative from New Jersey at-large, 1791-94; died in office 1794. Presbyterian. Died in Rahway, Union County, N.J., September 15, 1794 (age 68 years, 212 days). Interment at Rahway Cemetery, Rahway, N.J.
  The World War II Liberty ship SS Abraham Clark (built 1941, wrecked and scrapped 1959) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  Alexander Stephens Clay (1853-1910) — also known as Alexander S. Clay — of Marietta, Cobb County, Ga. Born near Powder Springs, Cobb County, Ga., September 25, 1853. Democrat. Lawyer; member of Georgia state house of representatives, 1884-87, 1889-90; member of Georgia state senate, 1892-94; U.S. Senator from Georgia, 1897-1910; died in office 1910. Methodist. Member, Freemasons; Odd Fellows. Died in Atlanta, Fulton County, Ga., November 13, 1910 (age 57 years, 49 days). Interment at Marietta City Cemetery, Marietta, Ga.
  Presumably named for: Alexander H. Stephens
  Relatives: Son of William J. Clay (1829-1911) and Edna Ann Elizabeth (Peak) Clay (1829-1914); married, November 25, 1880, to Sara Frances White (1861-1940).
  The World War II Liberty ship SS Alexander S. Clay (built 1944, scrapped 1970) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Clement Comer Clay (1789-1866) — also known as Clement C. Clay — of Huntsville, Madison County, Ala. Born in Halifax County, Va., December 17, 1789. Democrat. Lawyer; served in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812; member Alabama territorial council, 1817-18; state court judge in Alabama, 1819-23; member of Alabama state house of representatives, 1827-28; U.S. Representative from Alabama 1st District, 1829-35; Governor of Alabama, 1835-37; U.S. Senator from Alabama, 1837-41; associate justice of Alabama state supreme court, 1843. Fought a duel in 1823 with Dr. Waddy Tate. Died in Huntsville, Madison County, Ala., September 7, 1866 (age 76 years, 264 days). Interment at Maple Hill Cemetery, Huntsville, Ala.
  Relatives: Father of Clement Claiborne Clay, Jr. (1816-1882); second cousin once removed of Matthew Clay (1754-1815) and Green Clay; third cousin of Henry Clay (1777-1852), Porter Clay, Matthew Clay (1795?-1827), Brutus Junius Clay (1808-1878) and Cassius Marcellus Clay; third cousin once removed of Thomas Hart Clay, James Brown Clay and Brutus Junius Clay (1847-1932); third cousin twice removed of Henry Clay (1849-1884).
  Political families: Clay family of Kentucky; Ligon-Clay-Clopton family of Montgomery and Tuskegee, Alabama (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  The Clement C. Clay Bridge (built 1931; second span built 1965; first span replaced 2006), which carries U.S. 231 over the Tennessee River, between Madison and Morgan counties, Alabama, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
Henry Clay Henry Clay (1777-1852) — also known as "The Sage of Ashland"; "The Great Compromiser" — of Lexington, Fayette County, Ky. Born in Hanover County, Va., April 12, 1777. Member of Kentucky state house of representatives, 1803; U.S. Senator from Kentucky, 1806-07, 1810-11, 1831-42, 1849-52; died in office 1852; U.S. Representative from Kentucky, 1811-14, 1815-21, 1823-25 (5th District 1811-13, at-large 1813-14, 2nd District 1815-21, 3rd District 1823-25); Speaker of the U.S. House, 1811-14, 1815-20, 1823-25; candidate for President of the United States, 1824, 1832 (National Republican), 1844 (Whig); U.S. Secretary of State, 1825-29; candidate for Whig nomination for President, 1839. Member, Freemasons. In 1809, he fought a duel with Humphrey Marshall, in which both men were wounded. Elected to the Hall of Fame for Great Americans in 1900. Died in Washington, D.C., June 29, 1852 (age 75 years, 78 days). Interment at Lexington Cemetery, Lexington, Ky.; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery, Washington, D.C.
  Relatives: Son of John Clay and Elizabeth (Hudson) Clay (1750-1829); brother of Porter Clay; married, April 11, 1799, to Lucretia (Hart) Erwin (1781-1864); father of Thomas Hart Clay, Henry Clay, Jr. and James Brown Clay; grandfather of Henry Clay; granduncle of Ellen Hart Ross (who married James Reily (1811-1863)); first cousin once removed of Matthew Clay (1754-1815) and Green Clay; second cousin of Matthew Clay (1795?-1827), Brutus Junius Clay (1808-1878) and Cassius Marcellus Clay; second cousin once removed of Brutus Junius Clay (1847-1932); second cousin thrice removed of Oliver Carroll Clay; second cousin four times removed of Archer Woodford; third cousin of Clement Comer Clay; third cousin once removed of Clement Claiborne Clay, Jr..
  Political family: Clay family of Kentucky (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Clay counties in Ala., Fla., Ga., Ill., Ind., Kan., Minn., Miss., Mo., Neb., N.C., S.Dak., Tenn., Tex. and W.Va. are named for him.
  Mount Clay (also called Mount Reagan), in the White Mountains, Coos County, New Hampshire, is named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: Henry Clay LongneckerHenry Clay DeanH. Clay DickinsonHenry C. BrockmeyerH. Clay CockerillHenry Clay EwingHenry Clay CaldwellHenry Clay HallHenry Clay GoodingHenry Clay NaillHenry C. MyersHenry C. ColeH. Clay HarrisHenry C. MinerHenry C. WarmothHenry Clay ClevelandH. Clay EvansHenry C. PayneHenry C. BatesH. Clay FosterHenry C. McCormickHenry C. IdeHenry Clay WilliamsHenry C. SimmsHenry Clay FergusonHenry C. GloverH. Clay ParkHenry C. HansbroughHenry C. SnodgrassH. Clay MaydwellHenry C. GleasonHenry C. LoudenslagerH. Clay Van VoorhisHenry C. ClippingerH. Clay CrawfordH. Clay BascomH. Clay MichieH. Clay ChisolmH. Clay HowardHenry C. HallHenry Clay McDowellH. Clay JonesH. Clay DayHenry Clay HinesH. Clay HeatherHenry Clay MeachamHenry Clay CallowayH. Clay SuterH. Clay WarthHenry Clay ElwoodH. Clay KennedyH. Clay DavisH. Clay NeedhamHenry Clay EthertonH. Clay MaceH. Clay ArmstrongH. Clay BaldwinH. Clay HaynesH. Clay BurkholderMrs. H. Clay KauffmanH. Clay BentleyHenry C. GreenbergH. Clay Gardenhire, Jr.Henry Clay CoxH. Clay Myers, Jr.H. Clay Johnson
  Coins and currency: His portrait appeared on some U.S. currency issued in the 19th and early 20th centuries.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Books about Henry Clay: Robert Vincent Remini, Henry Clay: Statesman for the Union — Maurice G. Baxter, Henry Clay the Lawyer — Richard B. Cheney & Lynne V. Cheney, Kings Of The Hill : How Nine Powerful Men Changed The Course of American History — Merrill D. Peterson, The Great Triumvirate: Webster, Clay, and Calhoun — Scott Farris, Almost President: The Men Who Lost the Race but Changed the Nation — David S. Heidler & Jeanne T. Heidler, Henry Clay: The Essential American — Fergus M. Bordewich, America's Great Debate: Henry Clay, Stephen A. Douglas, and the Compromise That Preserved the Union
  Image source: James Smith Noel Collection, Louisiana State University in Shreveport
  Thomas Green Clemson (1807-1888) — Born in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., July 1, 1807. Mining engineer; U.S. Charge d'Affaires to Belgium, 1844-51; served in the Confederate Army during the Civil War. Among the founders of the Maryland Agricultural College, now the University of Maryland. Bequeathed his home and land holdings to the state of South Carolina for the purpose of establishing an agricultural college, which went on to become Clemson University. Died in Pickens County, S.C., April 6, 1888 (age 80 years, 280 days). Interment at St. Paul's Episcopal Churchyard, Pendleton, S.C.
  Relatives: Son of Thomas Green Clemson and Elizabeth (Baker) Clemson; married, November 13, 1838, to Anna Maria Calhoun (1817-1875; daughter of John Caldwell Calhoun (1782-1850)).
  Political family: Calhoun-Pickens family of South Carolina (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Clemson University, in Clemson, South Carolina, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary
Grover Cleveland Grover Cleveland (1837-1908) — also known as Stephen Grover Cleveland; "Uncle Jumbo"; "The Veto Mayor"; "Grover The Good"; "The Sage of Princeton"; "Dumb Prophet"; "Buffalo Hangman"; "The Veto President"; "Beast of Buffalo"; "Big Steve" — of Buffalo, Erie County, N.Y.; Princeton, Mercer County, N.J.; Tamworth, Carroll County, N.H. Born in Caldwell, Essex County, N.J., March 18, 1837. Democrat. Lawyer; Erie County Sheriff, 1870-73; mayor of Buffalo, N.Y., 1882; Governor of New York, 1883-85; President of the United States, 1885-89, 1893-97; defeated, 1888. Presbyterian. Member, Sigma Chi. Elected to the Hall of Fame for Great Americans in 1935. Died in Princeton, Mercer County, N.J., June 24, 1908 (age 71 years, 98 days). Interment at Princeton Cemetery, Princeton, N.J.; statue at City Hall Grounds, Buffalo, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Rev. Richard Falley Cleveland (1804-1853) and Anne (Neal) Cleveland (1806-1882); married, June 2, 1886, to Frances Folsom (1864-1947); father of Richard Folsom Cleveland (1897-1974) (son-in-law of Thomas Frank Gailor; brother-in-law of Frank Hoyt Gailor); first cousin once removed of Francis Landon Cleveland; second cousin of James Harlan Cleveland; second cousin once removed of James Harlan Cleveland, Jr.; second cousin twice removed of Jonathan Usher and Joseph Wheeler Bloodgood; third cousin once removed of John Palmer Usher and Robert Cleveland Usher; third cousin thrice removed of Ephraim Safford and Isaiah Kidder; fourth cousin once removed of Samuel Lord and Rollin Usher Tyler.
  Political families: Kidder family of Connecticut; Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Cross-reference: Henry T. Ellett — Wilson S. Bissell — David King Udall — Edward S. Bragg — Thomas F. Grady — Lyman K. Bass — George B. Cortelyou
  Cleveland counties in Ark. and Okla. are named for him.
  Mount Cleveland, a volcano on Chuginadak Island, Alaska, is named for him.  — The town of Grover, North Carolina, is named for him.  — The Cleveland National Forest (established 1908), in San Diego, Riverside, Orange counties, California, is named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: Grover C. CookGrover C. MeyrsGrover C. TalbotGrover C. HelmGrover C. RobertsonG. C. CooleyGrover A. WhalenGrover C. TaylorGrover C. WinnGrover C. LukeGrover C. AlbrightGrover Cleveland WelshGrover C. BelknapGrover C. WorrellGrover B. HillGrover C. DillmanGrover C. BrennemanGrover C. GeorgeGrover C. MitchellGrover C. LadnerGrover C. HallGrover C. TyeGrover C. CiselGrover C. HedrickGrover C. HunterGrover C. MontgomeryGrover C. FarwellGrover C. GillinghamGrover C. StudivanGrover C. LayneGrover C. HudsonGrover C. CombsGrover C. SnyderGrover C. GuernseyGrover C. HendersonGrover C. SmithGrover C. JacksonGrover C. HunterGrover C. BowerGrover C. LandGrover C. MoritzGrover C. GreggGrover C. Richman, Jr.Grover C. AndersonGrover C. ChrissGrover C. CriswellGrover C. BrownGrover C. Robinson III
  Coins and currency: His portrait appeared on the U.S. $20 bill (1914-28), and on the $1,000 bill (1928-46).
  Campaign slogan (1884): "We love him for the enemies he has made."
  Opposition slogan (1884): "Ma, Ma, Where's My Pa?"
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about Grover Cleveland: Alyn Brodsky, Grover Cleveland : A Study in Character — H. Paul Jeffers, An Honest President: The Life and Presidencies of Grover Cleveland — Mark Wahlgren Summers, Rum, Romanism, & Rebellion : The Making of a President, 1884 — Henry F. Graff, Grover Cleveland — Jeff C. Young, Grover Cleveland (for young readers)
  Critical books about Grover Cleveland: Matthew Algeo, The President Is a Sick Man: the Supposedly Virtuous Grover Cleveland Survives a Secret Surgery at Sea and Vilifies the Courageous Newspaperman Who Dared Expose the Truth — Charles Lachman, A Secret Life : The Lies and Scandals of President Grover Cleveland
  Image source: New York Red Book 1896
  Thomas Lanier Clingman (1812-1897) — also known as Thomas L. Clingman; "The Prince of Politicians" — of Asheville, Buncombe County, N.C. Born in Huntsville, Yadkin County, N.C., July 27, 1812. Democrat. Member of North Carolina state legislature, 1840; U.S. Representative from North Carolina, 1843-45, 1847-58 (1st District 1843-45, 1847-53, 8th District 1853-58); U.S. Senator from North Carolina, 1858-61; delegate to Democratic National Convention from North Carolina, 1868, 1876 (member, Resolutions Committee). When the Civil War began, he left Washington but did not resign his seat in the Senate; one of ten Southern senators expelled in absentia on July 11, 1861. Died in Morganton, Burke County, N.C., November 3, 1897 (age 85 years, 99 days). Interment at Riverside Cemetery, Asheville, N.C.
  Clingman's Dome, a mountain on the border between Sevier County, Tennessee, and Swain County, North Carolina, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
De_Witt Clinton De Witt Clinton (1769-1828) — also known as "Father of the Erie Canal" — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in Napanoch, Ulster County, N.Y., March 2, 1769. Democrat. Lawyer; member of New York state assembly from New York County, 1797-98; member of New York state senate Southern District, 1798-1802, 1805-11; delegate to New York state constitutional convention, 1801; member of New York council of appointment, 1801; U.S. Senator from New York, 1802-03; mayor of New York City, N.Y., 1803-07, 1808-10, 1811-15; Lieutenant Governor of New York, 1811-13; candidate for President of the United States, 1812; Governor of New York, 1817-23, 1825-28; died in office 1828. Member, Freemasons. Chief advocate for the Erie Canal, completed 1825. Died, from heart failure, in Albany, Albany County, N.Y., February 11, 1828 (age 58 years, 346 days). Original interment at Clinton Cemetery, Little Britain, N.Y.; reinterment at Green-Wood Cemetery, Brooklyn, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of James Clinton and Mary (De Witt) Clinton (1737-1795); half-brother of James Graham Clinton; brother of Charles Clinton, George Clinton, Jr., Mary Clinton (1773-1808; who married Ambrose Spencer (1765-1848)) and Katherine Clinton (1778-1837; who married Ambrose Spencer (1765-1848)); married, February 13, 1796, to Maria Franklin (died 1818); married, May 8, 1819, to Catherine Jones; nephew of George Clinton; first cousin of Jacob Hasbrouck DeWitt; first cousin once removed of Charles De Witt; first cousin five times removed of Abraham Owen Smoot III and Isaac Albert Smoot; second cousin once removed of Charles D. Bruyn and Charles Gerrit De Witt; second cousin twice removed of David Miller De Witt.
  Political family: Clinton-DeWitt-Smoot family of New York (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Cross-reference: Peter Gansevoort
  Clinton counties in Ill., Ind., Iowa, Ky., Mich., Mo. and Pa., and DeWitt County, Ill., are named for him.
  The township and city of DeWitt, Michigan, are named for him.  — The city of De Witt, Iowa, is named for him.  — The village of DeWitt, Illinois, is named for him.  — The city of De Witt, Missouri, is named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: De Witt C. StevensDeWitt C. WalkerDe Witt C. StanfordDe Witt C. LittlejohnDe Witt C. GageDeWitt C. ClarkDe Witt C. LeachDewitt C. WestJohn DeWitt Clinton AtkinsDeWitt C. WilsonDe Witt C. MorrisD. C. GiddingsDeWitt C. HoughDeWitt C. JonesDe Witt C. TowerD. C. CoolmanDeWitt Clinton CregierDeWitt C. HoytDeWitt Clinton SenterDe Witt C. RuggDeWitt C. AllenDeWitt C. PeckDeWitt C. RichmanDewitt C. AldenDeWitt C. CramDe Witt C. BoltonDeWitt C. HuntingtonDeWitt C. JonesDeWitt C. PondDe Witt C. CarrDeWitt C. PierceDe Witt C. BadgerDeWitt C. DominickDeWitt C. BeckerDe Witt C. TitusDe Witt C. WinchellDewitt C. TurnerDewitt C. RuscoeDeWitt C. BrownDeWitt C. FrenchDe Witt C. FlanaganDeWitt C. ColeDeWitt C. TalmageDewitt Clinton ChaseDe Witt C. Poole, Jr.DeWitt C. CunninghamDewitt C. Chastain
  Coins and currency: His portrait appeared on the U.S. $1,000 note in 1898-1905.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about De Witt Clinton: Evan Cornog, The Birth of Empire : DeWitt Clinton and the American Experience, 1769-1828
  Image source: New York Public Library
  William Jefferson Clinton (b. 1946) — also known as Bill Clinton; William Jefferson Blythe IV; "Slick Willie"; "Bubba"; "Elvis"; "Eagle"; "The Big Dog" — of Arkansas; Chappaqua, Westchester County, N.Y. Born in Hope, Hempstead County, Ark., August 19, 1946. Democrat. Rhodes scholar; candidate for U.S. Representative from Arkansas 3rd District, 1974; Arkansas state attorney general, 1977-79; Governor of Arkansas, 1979-81, 1983-92; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Arkansas, 1996, 2000; speaker, 1984, 1988; President of the United States, 1993-2001; delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 2004, 2008. Baptist. Member, Trilateral Commission; Council on Foreign Relations; Phi Beta Kappa; Pi Sigma Alpha; Phi Alpha Delta; American Bar Association. On October 29, 1994, Francisco Duran fired 27 shots from the sidewalk at the White House in an apparent assassination attempt against President Clinton. Impeached by the House of Representatives in December 1998 over allegations of perjury and obstruction of justice in connection with his sexual contact with a White House intern, Monica Lewinsky, but acquitted by the Senate. Still living as of 2020.
  Relatives: Step-son of Roger Clinton; son of William Jefferson Blythe II and Virginia (Cassidy) Clinton (1923-1994); married, October 11, 1975, to Hillary Diane Rodham (sister of Hugh Edwin Rodham); father of Chelsea Clinton (daughter-in-law of Edward Maurice Mezvinsky and Marjorie Margolies-Mezvinsky); third cousin twice removed of James Alexander Lockhart (1850-1905).
  Political families: Clinton family of Wadesboro, North Carolina; Ashe-Polk family of North Carolina (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Cross-reference: Abraham J. Hirschfeld — Kenneth W. Starr — Rahm Emanuel — Henry G. Cisneros — Maria Echaveste — Thurgood Marshall, Jr. — Walter S. Orlinsky — Charles F. C. Ruff — Sean Patrick Maloney — Lanny J. Davis
  The William Jefferson Clinton Federal Building (built 1934; renamed for Clinton 2012) in Washington, D.C., is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Books by Bill Clinton: Between Hope and History : Meeting America's Challenges for the 21st Century (1996) — My Life (2004)
  Books about Bill Clinton: David Maraniss, First in His Class : The Biography of Bill Clinton — Joe Conason, The Hunting of the President : The Ten-Year Campaign to Destroy Bill and Hillary Clinton — Gene Lyons, Fools for Scandal : How the Media Invented Whitewater — Sidney Blumenthal, The Clinton Wars — Dewayne Wickham, Bill Clinton and Black America — Joe Klein, The Natural : The Misunderstood Presidency of Bill Clinton — Nigel Hamilton, Bill Clinton: An American Journey — Bob Woodward, The Agenda: Inside the Clinton White House — George Stephanopolous, All Too Human — John F. Harris, The Survivor : Bill Clinton in the White House — Mark Katz, Clinton & Me: A Real Life Political Comedy — Michael Takiff, A Complicated Man: The Life of Bill Clinton as Told by Those Who Know Him — Tim O'Shei, Bill Clinton (for young readers)
  Critical books about Bill Clinton: Barbara Olson, The Final Days : The Last, Desperate Abuses of Power by the Clinton White House — Meredith L. Oakley, On the Make : The Rise of Bill Clinton — Robert Patterson, Dereliction of Duty: The Eyewitness Account of How Bill Clinton Endangered America's Long-Term National Security — Ambrose Evans-Pritchard, The Secret Life of Bill Clinton: The Unreported Stories — Ann Coulter, High Crimes and Misdemeanors: The Case Against Bill Clinton — Dick Morris & Eileen McGann, Because He Could — Jack Cashill, Ron Brown's Body : How One Man's Death Saved the Clinton Presidency and Hillary's Future — Christopher Hitchens, No One Left To Lie To: The Values of the Worst Family — Rich Lowry, Legacy: Paying the Price for the Clinton Years — Richard Miniter, Losing Bin Laden : How Bill Clinton's Failures Unleashed Global Terror
  Lila Cockrell (1922-2019) — also known as Lila May Banks — of San Antonio, Bexar County, Tex. Born in Fort Worth, Tarrant County, Tex., January 19, 1922. Mayor of San Antonio, Tex., 1975-81, 1989-91. Female. Member, Delta Delta Delta; League of Women Voters. Died in San Antonio, Bexar County, Tex., August 29, 2019 (age 97 years, 222 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Daughter of Robert Bruce Banks and Velma (Jones) Banks; married to Sidney Earl Cockrell, Jr. (1916-1986; second cousin once removed of Robert Spratt Cockrell (1866-1957)).
  Political family: Walker-Alston family of North Carolina.
  The Lila Cockrell Theatre, a 2,319-seat convention center auditorium, in San Antonio, Texas, is named for her.
  See also Wikipedia article
  Charles Emmett Coffin (1849-1934) — also known as Charles E. Coffin — of Indianapolis, Marion County, Ind. Born in Salem, Washington County, Ind., July 14, 1849. Real estate business; banker; Vice-Consul for Paraguay in Indianapolis, Ind., 1900-03. Methodist. Member, Optimist Club; Freemasons; Knights Templar; Shriners. Died in Indianapolis, Marion County, Ind., October 15, 1934 (age 85 years, 93 days). Interment at Crown Hill Cemetery, Indianapolis, Ind.
  Relatives: Son of Zachariah T. Coffin (1820-1882) and Caroline (Armfield) Coffin (1830-1917); married 1875 to Elizabeth H. Holloway (1853-1893); married, September 20, 1897, to Mary (Birch) Fletcher (1861-1933).
  The Charles E. Coffin Municipal Golf Course, in Indianapolis, Indiana, is named for him.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Walter Louis Cohen (1860-1930) — also known as Walter L. Cohen — of New Orleans, Orleans Parish, La. Born in New Orleans, Orleans Parish, La., January 22, 1860. Republican. Delegate to Republican National Convention from Louisiana, 1896, 1900, 1904, 1908, 1912, 1916, 1920 (member, Credentials Committee), 1924, 1928; life insurance business. Catholic. African and Jewish ancestry. Died in New Orleans, Orleans Parish, La., December 29, 1930 (age 70 years, 341 days). Interment at St. Louis Cemetery No. 3, New Orleans, La.
  Relatives: Son of Bernard Cohen and Amelia (Bingaman) Cohen; married, February 28, 1882, to Williamina Seldon.
  Cohen College Prep High School, in New Orleans, Louisiana, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Francis X. Collins — of Salem, Essex County, Mass. Democrat. Mayor of Salem, Mass., 1953-55; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Massachusetts, 1956, 1960, 1964 (alternate). Presumed deceased. Burial location unknown.
  Presumably named for: Francis Xavier
  Collins Middle School, in Salem, Massachusetts, is named for him.
  Martha Layne Collins (b. 1936) — of Versailles, Woodford County, Ky. Born in Bagdad, Shelby County, Ky., December 7, 1936. Democrat. School teacher; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Kentucky, 1972, 1980; Permanent Chair, 1984; clerk of the Kentucky court of appeals; elected 1975; Lieutenant Governor of Kentucky, 1979-83; Governor of Kentucky, 1983-87. Female. Baptist. Still living as of 2014.
  Martha Layne Collins High School, in Shelbyville, Kentucky, is named for her.
  See also NNDB dossier
  Books about Martha Layne Collins: Frances Smith, The Little Girl Who Grew Up to Be Governor : Stories from the Life of Martha Layne Collins
  Thomas LeRoy Collins (1909-1991) — also known as LeRoy Collins — of Florida. Born in Tallahassee, Leon County, Fla., March 10, 1909. Democrat. Lawyer; member of Florida state house of representatives, 1934-40; member of Florida state senate 8th District, 1940-54; served in the U.S. Navy during World War II; Governor of Florida, 1955-61; alternate delegate to Democratic National Convention from Florida, 1956; candidate for U.S. Senator from Florida, 1968. Episcopalian. Member, American Bar Association. Died of cancer, in Tallahassee, Leon County, Fla., March 12, 1991 (age 82 years, 2 days). Interment a private or family graveyard, Leon County, Fla.
  Relatives: Son of Marvin H. Collins and Mattie (Brandon) Collins; married, June 29, 1932, to Mary Call Darby (great-granddaughter of Richard Keith Call (1792-1862)).
  Political family: Walker-Alston family of North Carolina.
  The LeRoy Collins state office building (built 1962), in Tallahassee, Florida, is named for him.
  See also NNDB dossier
  Books about Leroy Collins: Tom Wagy, Governor Leroy Collins of Florida : Spokesman of the New South — Martin A. Dyckman, Floridian of His Century: The Courage of Governor LeRoy Collins
  Bertram Thomas Combs (1911-1991) — also known as Bert T. Combs — of Prestonsburg, Floyd County, Ky. Born in Manchester, Clay County, Ky., August 13, 1911. Democrat. Lawyer; served in the U.S. Army during World War II; Judge, Kentucky Court of Appeals, 1951-55; state court judge in Kentucky, 1957-59; Governor of Kentucky, 1959-63; defeated, 1955, 1971; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Kentucky, 1960, 1964; member of Democratic National Committee from Kentucky, 1966; Judge of U.S. Court of Appeals for the 6th Circuit, 1967-70. Baptist. Member, American Bar Association; Freemasons; Shriners; Order of the Coif; Phi Delta Phi. Drowned when his automobile was washed from the roadway into the Red River, during a flood, near Rosslyn, Powell County, Ky., December 4, 1991 (age 80 years, 113 days). Interment at Beech Creek Cemetery, Manchester, Ky.
  Relatives: Son of Stephen Gibson Combs and Martha (Jones) Combs; married, June 15, 1937, to Mabel Hall.
  The Bert T. Combs Mountain Parkway, which runs through Clark, Powell, Wolfe, Morgan, and Magoffin counties in Kentucky, is named for him.  — Bert T. Combs Lake, in Clay County, Kentucky, is named for him.
  See also NNDB dossier
  Abraham Bogart Conger (1814-1887) — also known as Abraham B. Conger — of Waldberg (now Congers), Rockland County, N.Y. Born in New York, New York County, N.Y., July 5, 1814. Democrat. Lawyer; member of New York state senate 7th District, 1852-53; delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1864. Died in New York, New York County, N.Y., May 24, 1887 (age 72 years, 323 days). Interment at Green-Wood Cemetery, Brooklyn, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of John Smith Conger (1785-1860) and Sarah (Bogart) Conger (1789-1858); married, November 12, 1836, to Mary Rutgers McCrea Hedges (1819-1884); third cousin twice removed of Hugh Conger; fourth cousin once removed of James Lockwood Conger, Anson Griffith Conger, Harmon Sweatland Conger, Omar Dwight Conger (1818-1898), Moore Conger, Frederick Ward Conger, Chauncey Stewart Conger and Charles Franklin Conger.
  Political families: Conger family of New York; Conger-Hungerford family (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  The community of Congers, New York, is named for him.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Douglas Conner — of Starkville, Oktibbeha County, Miss. Democrat. Physician; alternate delegate to Democratic National Convention from Mississippi, 1996. African ancestry. Burial location unknown.
  Dr. Douglas Conner Drive, in Starkville, Mississippi, is named for him.
  William Gordon Cooke (1808-1847) — of Texas. Born in Fredericksburg, Va., March 26, 1808. Served in the Texas Army during the Texas War of Independence; member of Texas Republic House of Representatives, 1844-45; Texas Republic Secretary of War and Marine, 1845-46; candidate for U.S. Representative from Texas, 1846; Adjutant General of Texas, 1846-47; died in office 1847. Member, Freemasons. Died of tuberculosis, at Seguin, Guadalupe County, Tex., December 24, 1847 (age 39 years, 273 days). Original interment somewhere in Geronimo, Tex.; reinterment in 1937 at Texas State Cemetery, Austin, Tex.
  Relatives: Nephew by marriage of José Antonio Navarro (1795-1871).
  Political family: Navarro family of San Antonio, Texas.
  Cooke County, Tex. is named for him.
  Cooke Avenue, in San Antonio, Texas, is named for him.
  Belle Cooledge (1884-1955) — also known as "Auntie Belle" — of Sacramento, Sacramento County, Calif. Born in Sutter Creek, Amador County, Calif., July 29, 1884. School teacher; instructor, dean of women, and vice president of Sacramento Junior College; mayor of Sacramento, Calif., 1948-49. Female. Member, Daughters of the American Revolution. Died in Sacramento, Sacramento County, Calif., November 9, 1955 (age 71 years, 103 days). Burial location unknown.
  The Belle Cooledge Branch Library, in Sacramento, California, is named for her.
  See also Wikipedia article
Thomas M. Cooley Thomas McIntyre Cooley (1824-1898) — also known as Thomas M. Cooley — of Adrian, Lenawee County, Mich.; Toledo, Lucas County, Ohio; Ann Arbor, Washtenaw County, Mich. Born in Attica, Wyoming County, N.Y., January 6, 1824. Lawyer; newspaper editor; law partner of Charles M. Croswell, 1855; reporter, Michigan Supreme Court, 1857-64; law professor; justice of Michigan state supreme court, 1865-85; chief justice of Michigan state supreme court, 1868-69, 1876-77, 1884-85; member, Interstate Commerce Commission, 1887-92. Member, American Bar Association. Died in Ann Arbor, Washtenaw County, Mich., September 12, 1898 (age 74 years, 249 days). Interment at Forest Hill Cemetery, Ann Arbor, Mich.
  Relatives: Son of Thomas Cooley (1778-1847) and Rachel (Hubbard) Cooley (1790-1869); married, December 30, 1846, to Elizabeth Horton (1830-1890); father of Fanny Cooley (1857-1934; who married Alexis Caswell Angell (1857-1932)).
  Political family: Angell-Cooley family of Ann Arbor, Michigan.
  Cross-reference: Samuel W. Beakes — Consider A. Stacy
  Thomas M. Cooley Law School, in Lansing, Michigan, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial — Michigan Supreme Court Historical Society
  Image source: Portrait & Biographical Album of Washtenaw County (1891)
  Jesse Sherwood Cooper, Jr. (1899-1971) — also known as Jesse S. Cooper, Jr. — of Mt. Vernon, Westchester County, N.Y.; Dover, Kent County, Del. Born in Dover, Kent County, Del., March 13, 1899. Democrat. Alternate delegate to Democratic National Convention from Delaware, 1928; Delaware state treasurer, 1945-46; defeated, 1946. Member, Freemasons; Knights Templar; Sons of the American Revolution. In 1950, he quietly helped Sen. John J. Williams to expose corruption in the U.S. Internal Revenue Service, but his role was not disclosed until after his death. Died in Dover, Kent County, Del., 1971 (age about 72 years). Interment at Woodlawn Cemetery, Bronx, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Jesse Sherwood Cooper (1873-1904) and Juliette Gardner (Minard) Cooper (1873-1966); married, April 19, 1937, to Elizabeth Roberts (1905-1985).
  The Jesse S. Cooper Building (Delaware Health and Social Services division), in Dover, Delaware, is named for him.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  John Sherman Cooper (1901-1991) — of Somerset, Pulaski County, Ky. Born in Somerset, Pulaski County, Ky., August 23, 1901. Republican. Member of Kentucky state house of representatives, 1928-30; county judge in Kentucky, 1930-38; candidate for Governor of Kentucky, 1939; served in the U.S. Army during World War II; U.S. Senator from Kentucky, 1946-49, 1952-55, 1956-73; defeated, 1948, 1954; delegate to Republican National Convention from Kentucky, 1948, 1956 (speaker), 1960 (member, Resolutions Committee), 1972 (delegation chair); U.S. Ambassador to India, 1955-56; Nepal, 1955-56; East Germany, 1974-76; member, President's Commission on the Assassination of President KNDY, 1963-64. Baptist or Episcopalian. Member, American Legion; Veterans of Foreign Wars; Rotary; American Bar Association; Beta Theta Pi. Died of heart failure, in Washington, D.C., February 21, 1991 (age 89 years, 182 days). Interment at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Va.; statue at Fountain Square, Somerset, Ky.
  Relatives: Son of John Sherman Cooper, Sr. (1866-1924); married to Lorraine Rowan (1905-1985).
  Cross-reference: William Butts Macomber, Jr.
  The John Sherman Cooper Power Station, near Burnside, Kentucky, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — Find-A-Grave memorial
  William Cooper (1754-1809) — of New York. Born in a log house, in Smithfield (now part of Philadelphia), Philadelphia County, Pa., December 2, 1754. Merchant; common pleas court judge in New York, 1791; U.S. Representative from New York 10th District, 1795-97, 1799-1801. English ancestry. Died in Albany, Albany County, N.Y., December 22, 1809 (age 55 years, 20 days). Interment at Christ Churchyard, Cooperstown, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of James Cooper (1729-1795) and Hannah (Hibbs) Cooper; married to Elizabeth Fenimore (1752-1817); father of James Fenimore Cooper (1789-1851).
  The village of Cooperstown, New York, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  George Henry Corliss (1817-1888) — also known as George H. Corliss — of North Providence, Providence County, R.I. Born in Easton, Washington County, N.Y., June 2, 1817. Republican. Mechanical engineer; inventor; developed the Corliss steam engine; member of Rhode Island state house of representatives, 1868-70; Presidential Elector for Rhode Island, 1876. Congregationalist. Died in Providence, Providence County, R.I., February 21, 1888 (age 70 years, 264 days). Interment at Swan Point Cemetery, Providence, R.I.
  Relatives: Son of Dr. Hiram Corliss (1793-1877) and Susan (Sheldon) Corliss (1794-1843); married 1839 to Phebe F. Frost (1814-1859); married 1866 to Emily Shaw (1835-1910).
  Corliss Street, in Providence, Rhode Island, is named for him.  — Corliss High School (opened 1974), in Chicago, Illinois, is named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS G. H. Corliss (built 1942, scrapped 1972) was named for him.
  Epitaph: "Serving God in his life and with his wealth. Serving men with a kindness that was both careful and generous. By the gift of God, he increased magnificently as an inventor the world's resources in the use of steam machinery."
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  James Charles Corman (1920-2000) — also known as James C. Corman; Jim Corman — of Van Nuys, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, Calif.; Reseda, Los Angeles County, Calif. Born in Galena, Cherokee County, Kan., October 20, 1920. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Marine Corps during World War II; served in the U.S. Marine Corps during the Korean conflict; delegate to Democratic National Convention from California, 1960, 1964; U.S. Representative from California, 1961-81 (22nd District 1961-75, 21st District 1975-81). Methodist. Member, Lions; American Legion; Elks; Veterans of Foreign Wars; American Bar Association. Floor manager in U.S. House for Civil Rights Act and Voting Rights Act in 1960s; member of the Kerner Commission on Civil Disorders. Died, following a cerebral hemorrhage, in a hospital at Arlington, Arlington County, Va., December 30, 2000 (age 80 years, 71 days). Cremated; ashes interred at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Va.
  The James C. Corman Federal Building, in Van Nuys, Los Angeles, California, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  Erastus Corning (1794-1872) — of Albany, Albany County, N.Y. Born in Norwich, New London County, Conn., December 14, 1794. Democrat. Mayor of Albany, N.Y., 1834-37; member of New York state senate 3rd District, 1842-45; founder (1853) and first president of the New York Central Railroad; U.S. Representative from New York 14th District, 1857-59, 1861-63; delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1860; delegate to New York state constitutional convention, 1867. Died in Albany, Albany County, N.Y., April 9, 1872 (age 77 years, 117 days). Interment at Albany Rural Cemetery, Menands, N.Y.
  Relatives: Grandfather of Parker Corning and Edwin Corning (1883-1934); great-grandfather of Erastus Corning II.
  Political family: Corning family of Albany, New York.
  The city of Corning, New York, is named for him.  — The city of Corning, Iowa, is named for him.  — The city of Corning, Kansas, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
George B. Cortelyou George Bruce Cortelyou (1862-1940) — also known as George B. Cortelyou — of Huntington Bay, Suffolk County, Long Island, N.Y. Born in New York, New York County, N.Y., July 26, 1862. Republican. School principal; confidential stenographer to President Grover Cleveland, 1895-96; Executive Clerk of the White House, 1896-98; secretary to President William McKinley, 1900-01; secretary to President Theodore Roosevelt, 1901-03; financier; U.S. Secretary of Commerce and Labor, 1903-04; Chairman of Republican National Committee, 1904-07; U.S. Postmaster General, 1905-07; U.S. Secretary of the Treasury, 1907-09; president, Consolidated Gas Company, New York, 1909-35; director, New York Life Insurance Company; first president, Edison Electric Institute, 1933. Member, Union League. Died, following two heart attacks, in Huntington Bay, Suffolk County, Long Island, N.Y., October 23, 1940 (age 78 years, 89 days). Interment at Memorial Cemetery of St. John's Church, Laurel Hollow, Long Island, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Peter Crolius Cortelyou, Jr. (1839-1873) and Rose (Seary) Cortelyou (1840-1925); married, September 15, 1888, to Lily Morris Hinds (1867-1947); second cousin thrice removed of Lawrence Hillier Cortelyou (1802-1882); second cousin four times removed of Aaron Cortelyou.
  Political family: Cortelyou family of Staten Island, New York.
  The World War II Liberty ship SS George B. Cortelyou (built 1942, scrapped 1972) was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: American Monthly Review of Reviews, October 1901
  William Ashmead Courtenay (1831-1908) — of Charleston, Charleston County, S.C.; Columbia, Richland County, S.C. Born in Charleston, Charleston County, S.C., February 4, 1831. Book publisher; served in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; mayor of Charleston, S.C., 1879-87. Died in Columbia, Richland County, S.C., March 17, 1908 (age 77 years, 42 days). Interment at Magnolia Cemetery, Charleston, S.C.
  Relatives: Son of Edward Smith Courtenay (1793-1857) and Elizabeth Storer (Wade) Courtenay (1805-1886); married 1854 to Julia Anna Francis.
  Courtenay School (built 1888, rebuilt 1955, now the Charleston Progressive School), and Courtenay Drive, in Charleston, South Carolina, are named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Leonard Covington (1768-1813) — of Maryland. Born in Aquasco, Prince George's County, Md., October 30, 1768. Democrat. U.S. Representative from Maryland at-large, 1805-07; member of Maryland state senate, 1807-09; general in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812. Mortally wounded in the Battle of Chrysler's Field, and died in Frenchs Mills (now Fort Covington), Franklin County, N.Y., November 14, 1813 (age 45 years, 15 days). Original interment somewhere in Fort Covington, N.Y.; reinterment in 1820 at Mt. Covington, Sackets Harbor, N.Y.; cenotaph at Military Post Cemetery, Sackets Harbor, N.Y.
  Covington counties in Ala. and Miss. are named for him.
  The city of Covington, Kentucky, is named for him.  — The city of Covington, Georgia, is named for him.  — The town of Covington, New York, is named for him.  — Fort Covington (early 19th century blockhouse) and the town of Fort Covington, New York, were named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  John H. Coyne — of Yonkers, Westchester County, N.Y. Mayor of Yonkers, N.Y., 1906-07; defeated, 1907 (Democratic), 1913 (Progressive). Burial location unknown.
  Coyne Park and Playground, in Yonkers, New York, is named for him.
  James Craig (1818-1888) — of St. Joseph, Buchanan County, Mo. Born in Washington County, Pa., February 28, 1818. Democrat. Lawyer; served in the U.S. Army during the Mexican War; member of Missouri state house of representatives, 1856-57; U.S. Representative from Missouri 4th District, 1857-61; defeated, 1880; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Missouri, 1860, 1880; general in the Union Army during the Civil War; president, Hannibal & St. Joseph Railroad. Died in St. Joseph, Buchanan County, Mo., October 22, 1888 (age 70 years, 237 days). Interment at Mt. Mora Cemetery, St. Joseph, Mo.
  The city of Craig, Missouri, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  William A. Craven (1921-1999) — also known as Bill Craven — of Oceanside, San Diego County, Calif. Born in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., June 30, 1921. Republican. Served in the U.S. Marine Corps during World War II; served in the U.S. Marine Corps during the Korean conflict; member of California state assembly, 1973-79; member of California state senate, 1979-99. Advocated and won the creation of a California State University campus at San Marcos. Died, of congestive heart failure and complications of diabetes, at the Villas de Carlsbad Health Center, Carlsbad, San Diego County, Calif., July 11, 1999 (age 78 years, 11 days). Interment at Eternal Hills Memorial Park, Oceanside, Calif.
  Craven Hall, at California State University San Marcos, is named for him.
  John Lovick Crawford (1816-1902) — also known as John L. Crawford — of Florida. Born in Covington, Newton County, Ga., April 17, 1816. Physician; member of Florida state house of representatives, 1847; member of Florida state senate, 1860; secretary of state of Florida, 1881-1902; died in office 1902. Died in Tallahassee, Leon County, Fla., January 24, 1902 (age 85 years, 282 days). Interment at Old City Cemetery, Tallahassee, Fla.
  Relatives: Son of David Crawford and Frances (Harris) Crawford; married to Elizabeth Walker (1829-1901); father of Henry Clay Crawford (1856-1929).
  The community of Crawfordville, Florida, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  David Crockett (1786-1836) — also known as Davy Crockett; "King of the Wild Frontier" — of Tennessee. Born in Greene County, Tenn., August 17, 1786. Democrat. Member of Tennessee state house of representatives, 1821; U.S. Representative from Tennessee, 1827-31, 1833-35 (9th District 1827-31, 12th District 1833-35); served in the Texas Army during the Texas War of Independence. Member, Freemasons. Killed while defending the Alamo, in San Antonio, Bexar County, Tex., March 6, 1836 (age 49 years, 202 days). Cremated; ashes interred at San Fernando Cathedral, San Antonio, Tex.
  Relatives: Son of John Crockett and Rebecca (Hawkins) Crockett; married, August 16, 1806, to Mary 'Polly' Finley; married 1815 to Elizabeth Patton; father of John Wesley Crockett; first cousin twice removed of Charles Carroll Walcutt (1838-1898).
  Political family: Crockett-Walcutt family of Tennessee.
  Crockett counties in Tenn. and Tex. are named for him.
  The Davy Crockett National Forest (established 1936), in Houston and Trinity counties, Texas, is named for him.
  Personal motto: "Be sure you're right, then go ahead."
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books by David Crockett: A Narrative of the Life of David Crockett of the State of Tennessee
  Books about David Crockett: William C. Davis, Three Roads to the Alamo: The Lives and Fortunes of David Crockett, James Bowie, and William Barret Travis — Constance Rourke, Davy Crockett — Elaine Alphin, Davy Crockett (for young readers)
  Wilbur Lucius Cross (1862-1948) — also known as Wilbur L. Cross — of New Haven, New Haven County, Conn. Born in Mansfield, Tolland County, Conn., April 10, 1862. Democrat. University professor; Governor of Connecticut, 1931-39; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Connecticut, 1932, 1936, 1940, 1944; candidate for U.S. Senator from Connecticut, 1946. Member, American Philosophical Society; Society of the Cincinnati; Sons of the American Revolution; Phi Beta Kappa; Society of Colonial Wars. Died in New Haven, New Haven County, Conn., October 5, 1948 (age 86 years, 178 days). Interment at Evergreen Cemetery, New Haven, Conn.
  Relatives: Son of Samuel Cross and Harriet M. (Gurley) Cross; married, July 17, 1889, to Helen B. Avery.
  Wilbur Cross Parkway (built 1939-47), in New Haven County, Connecticut, is named for him.  — Wilbur L. Cross Elementary School, in Bridgeport, Connecticut, is named for him.
  Personal motto: "Always do right. This will gratify some people and astonish the rest."
  See also NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Daniel L. Crossman (1836-1901) — also known as D. L. Crossman — of Dansville, Ingham County, Mich.; Williamston, Ingham County, Mich. Born in Cayuga County, N.Y., November 4, 1836. Republican. Postmaster; miller; banker; member of Michigan state house of representatives, 1869; delegate to Republican National Convention from Michigan, 1872; clerk of the Michigan House of Representatives, 1873-91; Presidential Elector for Michigan, 1876. Member, Freemasons; Knights Templar; Royal Arch Masons. Died in Williamston, Ingham County, Mich., March 7, 1901 (age 64 years, 123 days). Entombed in mausoleum at Fairview Cemetery, Dansville, Mich.
  Relatives: Married to Nancy M. Woodhouse (1836-1910).
  The village of Dansville, Michigan, is named for him.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
Charles M. Croswell Charles Miller Croswell (1825-1886) — also known as Charles M. Croswell — of Adrian, Lenawee County, Mich. Born in Newburgh, Orange County, N.Y., October 31, 1825. Republican. Carpenter; contractor; lawyer; Lenawee County Register of Deeds, 1851-54; law partner of Thomas M. Cooley, 1855; mayor of Adrian, Mich., 1862-63; member of Michigan state senate, 1863-66, 1867-68 (10th District 1863-66, 8th District 1867-68); delegate to Michigan state constitutional convention, 1867; Presidential Elector for Michigan, 1868; member of Michigan state house of representatives from Lenawee County 4th District, 1873-74; Speaker of the Michigan State House of Representatives, 1873-74; Governor of Michigan, 1877-80. Presbyterian. Scotch-Irish and Dutch ancestry. Died in Adrian, Lenawee County, Mich., December 13, 1886 (age 61 years, 43 days). Interment at Oakwood Cemetery, Adrian, Mich.
  Relatives: Son of John Croswell and Sally (Hicks) Croswell; married 1852 to Lucy M. Eddy (died 1868); married to Elizabeth Musgrove.
  The city of Croswell, Michigan, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: Portrait & Biographical Album of Washtenaw County (1891)
Shelby M. Cullom Shelby Moore Cullom (1829-1914) — also known as Shelby M. Cullom — of Springfield, Sangamon County, Ill. Born in Monticello, Wayne County, Ky., November 22, 1829. Republican. Lawyer; member of Illinois state house of representatives, 1856, 1860-61, 1872-74; Speaker of the Illinois State House of Representatives, 1861, 1873; candidate for Presidential Elector for Illinois, 1856; U.S. Representative from Illinois 8th District, 1865-71; Governor of Illinois, 1877-83; resigned 1883; U.S. Senator from Illinois, 1883-1913; delegate to Republican National Convention from Illinois, 1884, 1892, 1904 (speaker), 1908. Died in Washington, D.C., January 28, 1914 (age 84 years, 67 days). Interment at Oak Ridge Cemetery, Springfield, Ill.
  Relatives: Son of Richard Northcraft Cullom (1795-1872) and Elizabeth (Coffey) Cullom (1797-1868); married, December 12, 1855, to Hannah M. Fisher (1831-1861); married, May 5, 1863, to Julia Fisher (1835-1909); father of Eleanor M. 'Ella' Cullom (1856-1902; who married William Barret Ridgely); nephew of Alvin Cullom (1797-1877) and William Cullom.
  Political family: Cullom family (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  The village of Cullom, Illinois, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Image source: American Monthly Review of Reviews, December 1901
  George N. Culmback (1888-1960) — of Everett, Snohomish County, Wash. Born in Jedsted, Denmark, December 30, 1888. Republican. Member of Washington state house of representatives 38th District, 1926-32; mayor of Everett, Wash., 1956-60; died in office 1960. Died in Everett, Snohomish County, Wash., July 6, 1960 (age 71 years, 189 days). Burial location unknown.
  Culmback Dam, on the Sultan River, in Snohomish County, Washington, is named for him.
Albert B. Cummins Albert Baird Cummins (1850-1926) — also known as Albert B. Cummins — of Des Moines, Polk County, Iowa. Born, in a log house, near Carmichaels, Greene County, Pa., February 15, 1850. Republican. Lawyer; member of Iowa state house of representatives, 1888; member of Republican National Committee from Iowa, 1896-1900; delegate to Republican National Convention from Iowa, 1896, 1904, 1924; Governor of Iowa, 1902-08; U.S. Senator from Iowa, 1908-26; died in office 1926; candidate for Republican nomination for President, 1912, 1916. Congregationalist. Died of a heart attack, in Des Moines, Polk County, Iowa, July 30, 1926 (age 76 years, 165 days). Interment at Woodland Cemetery, Des Moines, Iowa.
  Relatives: Son of Thomas Layton Cummins and Sarah (Baird) Cummins; married, June 24, 1874, to Ida Lucette Gallery.
  The World War II Liberty ship SS Albert B. Cummins (built 1943, scrapped 1961) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: American Monthly Review of Reviews, September 1901
  Mario Matthew Cuomo (1932-2015) — also known as Mario M. Cuomo — of Holliswood, Queens, Queens County, N.Y. Born in Queens, Queens County, N.Y., June 15, 1932. Democrat. Lawyer; law professor; secretary of state of New York, 1975-78; Liberal candidate for mayor of New York City, N.Y., 1977; Lieutenant Governor of New York, 1979-82; defeated, 1974; delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1980, 1984 (speaker), 1988; Governor of New York, 1983-94; defeated, 1994; Presidential Elector for New York, 1992. Catholic. Italian ancestry. Member, Delta Theta Phi; American Bar Association. Died January 1, 2015 (age 82 years, 200 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Married 1954 to Matilda Raffa; father of Andrew Mark Cuomo (1957-).
  Political family: Kennedy family.
  The Governor Mario M. Cuomo Bridge (built 2013-17; unofficially, the New Tappan Zee Bridge), on the New York Thruway, crossing the Hudson River between Tarrytown and Grand View-on-Hudson, New York, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile
  Books by Mario Cuomo: Why Lincoln Matters : Today More Than Ever
  Michael Curb (b. 1944) — also known as Mike Curb — of California; Nashville, Davidson County, Tenn. Born in Savannah, Chatham County, Ga., December 24, 1944. Republican. Musician; record company executive; race car owner; member of Republican National Committee from California, 1977; Lieutenant Governor of California, 1979-83; defeated, 1986; candidate in primary for Governor of California, 1982. In 2003, he was inducted into the Georgia Music Hall of Fame. Still living as of 2014.
  Relatives: Married to Linda Dunphy.
  The Curb Event Center arena, at Belmont University, Nashville, Tennessee, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile
  Thomas Cushing (1725-1788) — of Massachusetts. Born in Boston, Suffolk County, Mass., March 24, 1725. Delegate to Continental Congress from Massachusetts, 1774-76; Lieutenant Governor of Massachusetts, 1780-88; died in office 1788; Governor of Massachusetts, 1785. Died in Boston, Suffolk County, Mass., February 28, 1788 (age 62 years, 341 days). Interment at Old Granary Burying Ground, Boston, Mass.
  The town of Cushing, Maine, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  John Alfred Cuthbert (1788-1881) — also known as John A. Cuthbert — of Eatonton, Putnam County, Ga. Born in Savannah, Chatham County, Ga., June 3, 1788. Democrat. Lawyer; member of Georgia state house of representatives, 1811-13, 1817; member of Georgia state senate, 1814-15; U.S. Representative from Georgia at-large, 1819-21; newspaper editor and publisher. Died in Mon Louis Island, Mobile County, Ala., September 22, 1881 (age 93 years, 111 days). Interment a private or family graveyard, Mobile County, Ala.
  Relatives: Brother of Alfred Cuthbert (1785-1856).
  The city of Cuthbert, Georgia, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  Manasseh Cutler (1742-1823) — of Massachusetts. Born in Killingly, Windham County, Conn., May 13, 1742. Ordained minister; physician; member of Massachusetts state legislature, 1780; U.S. Representative from Massachusetts at-large, 1801-05. Congregationalist. Died in Hamilton, Essex County, Mass., July 28, 1823 (age 81 years, 76 days). Interment at Hamilton Cemetery, Hamilton, Mass.
  Relatives: Son of Hezekiah Cutler and Susanna (Clark) Cutler; father of Ephraim Cutler; great-grandfather of Rufus R. Dawes; second great-grandfather of Charles Gates Dawes (1865-1951), Rufus Cutler Dawes and Beman Gates Dawes.
  Political families: Upson-Dawes family of Connecticut; Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  The World War II Liberty ship SS Manasseh Cutler (built 1943, torpedoed and lost 1943) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Sam Dale (1772-1841) — of Alabama; Mississippi. Born in Rockbridge County, Va., 1772. Served in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812; member of Alabama state legislature, 1819; member of Mississippi state legislature, 1836. Scotch-Irish ancestry. Died near Daleville, Lauderdale County, Miss., May 24, 1841 (age about 68 years). Interment a private or family graveyard, Lauderdale County, Miss.
  Dale County, Ala. is named for him.
  Sam Dale State Park, on Highway 39, near Daleville, Mississippi, is named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS Sam Dale (built 1944, scrapped 1973) was named for him.
  Alexander James Dallas (1759-1817) — also known as Alexander J. Dallas — of Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa. Born in Kingston, Jamaica, June 21, 1759. Lawyer; newspaper editor; secretary of the commonwealth of Pennsylvania, 1791-1801; resigned 1801; U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania, 1801-14; U.S. Secretary of the Treasury, 1814-16. Scottish ancestry. Died in Trenton, Mercer County, N.J., January 16, 1817 (age 57 years, 209 days). Interment at St. Peter's Churchyard, Philadelphia, Pa.
  Relatives: Son of Dr. Robert Charles Dallas and Sarah Elizabeth (Cormack) Dallas; married to Arabella Maria Smith (1761-1837); father of Sophia Burrell Dallas (1784-1860; who married Richard Bache, Jr.) and George Mifflin Dallas (1792-1864); grandfather of Mary Blechenden Bache (1808-1873; who married Robert John Walker), Sophia Arabella Bache (1815-1904; who married William Wallace Irwin) and George Mifflin Dallas (1839-1917); great-grandfather of Robert Walker Irwin; third great-grandfather of Claiborne de Borda Pell; fourth great-grandfather of Daniel Baugh Brewster.
  Political families: Bache-Dallas family of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Claiborne-Dallas family of Virginia and Louisiana (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Cross-reference: James G. Birney
  Dallas County, Ala. is named for him.
  The World War II Liberty ship SS Alexander J. Dallas (built 1942, scrapped 1966) was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  George Mifflin Dallas (1792-1864) — also known as George M. Dallas — of Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa. Born in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., July 10, 1792. Democrat. Lawyer; mayor of Philadelphia, Pa., 1828-29; U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania, 1829-31; U.S. Senator from Pennsylvania, 1831-33; Pennsylvania state attorney general, 1833-35; U.S. Minister to Russia, 1837-39; Great Britain, 1856-61; Vice President of the United States, 1845-49. Scottish ancestry. Member, Freemasons. Died in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., December 31, 1864 (age 72 years, 174 days). Interment at St. Peter's Churchyard, Philadelphia, Pa.
  Relatives: Son of Alexander James Dallas and Arabella Maria (Smith) Dallas; brother of Sophia Burrell Dallas (1784-1860; who married Richard Bache, Jr.); married, May 23, 1816, to Sophia Chew Nicklin (1798-1860); uncle of Alexander Dallas Bache (1806-1867; physicist), Mary Blechenden Bache (1808-1873; who married Robert John Walker), Sophia Arabella Bache (1815-1904; who married William Wallace Irwin) and George Mifflin Dallas (1839-1917); granduncle of Robert Walker Irwin; second great-granduncle of Claiborne de Borda Pell; third great-granduncle of Daniel Baugh Brewster.
  Political families: Bache-Dallas family of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Claiborne-Dallas family of Virginia and Louisiana (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Dallas counties in Ark., Iowa, Mo. and Tex. are named for him.
  The city of Dallas, Texas, is named for him.
  Politician named for him: George M. Condon
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about George Mifflin Dallas: John M. Belohlavek, George Mifflin Dallas : Jacksonian Patrician
  Charles Wylie Dalrymple (1833-1907) — also known as Charles W. Dalrymple — of Albion, Calhoun County, Mich. Born in Wayne County, N.Y., May 13, 1833. Republican. Dry goods merchant; postmaster at Albion, Mich., 1861-66; mayor of Albion, Mich., 1900-01; defeated, 1901. Died in Albion, Calhoun County, Mich., May 20, 1907 (age 74 years, 7 days). Interment at Riverside Cemetery, Albion, Mich.
  Relatives: Son of David Dalrymple and Hannah (Douglas) Dalrymple (1804-1881); married, November 27, 1866, to Jane Ellen Knickerbocker (1842-1891); married 1896 to Ann (White) Marsters (1833-1912).
  Dalrymple Elementary School (built 1916, closed 1982, demolished 2017), in Albion, Michigan, was named for him.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Colgate Whitehead Darden, Jr. (1897-1981) — also known as Colgate W. Darden, Jr. — of Norfolk, Va. Born in Southampton County, Va., February 11, 1897. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Marine Corps during World War I; lawyer; member of Virginia state house of delegates, 1930-33; U.S. Representative from Virginia, 1933-37, 1939-41 (at-large 1933-35, 2nd District 1935-37, 1939-41); Governor of Virginia, 1942-46; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Virginia, 1944 (member, Platform and Resolutions Committee; speaker); president, University of Virginia, 1947. Episcopalian. Died in Norfolk, Va., June 9, 1981 (age 84 years, 118 days). Interment a private or family graveyard, Southampton County, Va.
  Relatives: Son of Colgate Whitehead Darden (1867-1945) and Katherine Lawrence (Pretlow) Darden (1870-1936); brother of Joshua Pretlow Darden (1903-1986); married, December 3, 1927, to Constance Simons Du Pont (1904-2002).
  The Colgate Whitehead Darden Jr. Bridge (built 1929, named 1982, replaced since 2013) for Meherrin Road (Highways 58 and 35) over the Nottoway River, in Southampton County, Virginia, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  William Darke (1736-1801) — of Berkeley County, Va. (now W.Va.). Born in Bucks County, Pa., May 6, 1736. Colonel in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; delegate to Virginia convention to ratify U.S. constitution from Berkeley County, 1788. Died in Jefferson County, Va (now W.Va.), November 26, 1801 (age 65 years, 204 days). Interment at Darke-Engle-Ronemous Cemetery, Shenandoah Junction, W.Va.
  Darke County, Ohio is named for him.
  The community of Darkesville, West Virginia, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Jay Norwood Darling (1876-1962) — also known as Jay N. Darling; "Ding" — of Des Moines, Polk County, Iowa. Born in Norwood, Charlevoix County, Mich., October 21, 1876. Republican. Cartoonist; received the Pulitzer Prize for his political cartoons in 1924 and 1943; delegate to Republican National Convention from Iowa, 1932; founder and first president, National Wildlife Federation; head of the U.S. Biological Survey (which later became the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service), 1934-35; obtained millions of acres for wildlife refuges. Member, Beta Theta Pi. Died January 12, 1962 (age 85 years, 83 days). Interment at Logan Park Cemetery, Sioux City, Iowa.
  Relatives: Son of Rev. Marcellus Warner Darling (1844-1913) and Clara (Woolson) Darling (1848-1916); married, September 19, 1911, to Genevieve Pendleton (1877-1968).
  The J.N. 'Ding' Darling National Wildlife Refuge, Sanibel Island, Florida, is named for him.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Richard Joseph Daronco (1931-1988) — also known as Richard J. Daronco — Born in New York, New York County, N.Y., August 1, 1931. Lawyer; Justice of New York Supreme Court, 1979-87; U.S. District Judge for the Southern District of New York, 1987-88; died in office 1988. Catholic. Italian ancestry. Shot and killed, by Charles L. Koster, in Pelham Heights, Pelham, Westchester County, N.Y., May 21, 1988 (age 56 years, 294 days). Koster, a retired police officer, was angry over ruling the judge had issued two days earlier; he killed himself at the scene. Burial location unknown.
  The Richard J. Daronco Westchester County Courthouse, in White Plains, New York, is named for him.
  See also federal judicial profile — Wikipedia article
  Henry Gassaway Davis (1823-1916) — also known as Henry G. Davis — of Piedmont, Mineral County, W.Va. Born near Woodstock, Howard County, Md., November 16, 1823. Democrat. Railroad promoter; member of West Virginia state house of delegates from Hampshire County, 1866; member of West Virginia state senate 10th District, 1869-71; U.S. Senator from West Virginia, 1871-83; delegate to Democratic National Convention from West Virginia, 1872, 1880, 1904, 1912; candidate for Vice President of the United States, 1904. Died in Washington, D.C., March 11, 1916 (age 92 years, 116 days). Interment at Maplewood Cemetery, Elkins, W.Va.; statue at Davis Park, Charleston, W.Va.
  Relatives: Son of Caleb Davis (1792-1850) and Louisa Warfield (Brown) Davis (1799-1868); brother of Thomas Beall Davis; married 1853 to Katherine Ann Salome 'Kate' Bantz (1892-1902); father of Hallie D. Davis (1853-1933; who married Stephen Benton Elkins (1841-1911)); grandfather of Davis Elkins.
  Political family: Elkins-Davis family of Elkins, West Virginia.
  The town of Davis, West Virginia, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  William Crosby Dawson (1798-1856) — also known as William C. Dawson — of Greensboro, Greene County, Ga. Born in Greensboro, Greene County, Ga., January 4, 1798. Lawyer; member of Georgia state house of representatives, 1830; U.S. Representative from Georgia at-large, 1836-41; candidate for Governor of Georgia, 1841; circuit judge in Georgia, 1845; U.S. Senator from Georgia, 1849-55. Member, Freemasons. Died in Greensboro, Greene County, Ga., May 5, 1856 (age 58 years, 122 days). Interment at Greensboro Cemetery, Greensboro, Ga.
  Dawson County, Ga. is named for him.
  The city of Dawson, Georgia, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  Jonathan Dayton (1760-1824) — of Elizabethtown, Essex County (now Elizabeth, Union County), N.J. Born in Elizabethtown, Essex County (now Elizabeth, Union County), N.J., October 16, 1760. Served in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; member of New Jersey state house of assembly from Essex County, 1786-87, 1790, 1814-15; Delegate to Continental Congress from New Jersey, 1787-89; member, U.S. Constitutional Convention, 1787; U.S. Representative from New Jersey at-large, 1791-99; Speaker of the U.S. House, 1795-99; U.S. Senator from New Jersey, 1799-1805. Episcopalian. Member, Society of the Cincinnati; Freemasons. Arrested in 1807 on charges of conspiring with Aaron Burr in treasonable projects; gave bail and was released, but never brought to trial. Died in Elizabethtown, Essex County (now Elizabeth, Union County), N.J., October 9, 1824 (age 63 years, 359 days). Entombed at St. John's Churchyard, Elizabeth, N.J.
  Relatives: Son of Elias Dayton (1737-1807); distant relative *** of William Lewis Dayton.
  Political family: Dayton family of Elizabeth, New Jersey.
  The city of Dayton, Ohio, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Henry Dearborn (1751-1829) — of Massachusetts. Born in North Hampton, Rockingham County, N.H., February 23, 1751. Democrat. U.S. Representative from Massachusetts, 1793-97 (4th District 1793-95, 1st District 1795-97); U.S. Secretary of War, 1801-09; U.S. Minister to Portugal, 1822-24. Member, Freemasons. Died in Roxbury, Norfolk County (now part of Boston, Suffolk County), Mass., June 6, 1829 (age 78 years, 103 days). Original interment in unknown location; subsequent interment in 1834 at Mt. Auburn Cemetery, Cambridge, Mass.; reinterment in 1848 at Forest Hills Cemetery, Jamaica Plain, Boston, Mass.
  Relatives: Father of Henry Alexander Scammell Dearborn (1783-1851).
  Dearborn County, Ind. is named for him.
  The city of Dearborn, Michigan, is named for him.  — The Dearborn River, in Lewis & Clark and Cascade counties, Montana, is named for him.  — Mount Dearborn, a former military arsenal on an island in the Catawba River, Chester County, South Carolina, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary
  Columbus Delano (1809-1896) — of Mt. Vernon, Knox County, Ohio. Born in Shoreham, Addison County, Vt., June 4, 1809. Republican. U.S. Representative from Ohio, 1845-47, 1865-67, 1868-69 (10th District 1845-47, 13th District 1865-67, 1868-69); delegate to Republican National Convention from Ohio, 1860; member of Ohio state house of representatives, 1863; U.S. Secretary of the Interior, 1870-75. Died in Mt. Vernon, Knox County, Ohio, October 23, 1896 (age 87 years, 141 days). Interment at Mound View Cemetery, Mt. Vernon, Ohio.
  The city of Delano, California, is named for him.  — Delano Peak, in Beaver and Piute counties, Utah, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
Mark L. De_Motte Mark Lindsey De Motte (1832-1908) — also known as Mark L. De Motte — of Valparaiso, Porter County, Ind.; Lexington, Lafayette County, Mo. Born in Rockville, Parke County, Ind., December 28, 1832. Republican. Lawyer; served in the Union Army during the Civil War; newspaper editor and publisher; candidate for U.S. Representative from Missouri 11th District, 1872, 1876; delegate to Republican National Convention from Missouri, 1876; U.S. Representative from Indiana 10th District, 1881-83; member of Indiana state senate, 1887-89; alternate delegate to Republican National Convention from Indiana, 1888; postmaster at Valparaiso, Ind., 1890-94. Methodist. French and Dutch ancestry. Member, Freemasons. Died in Valparaiso, Porter County, Ind., September 23, 1908 (age 75 years, 270 days). Interment at Maplewood Cemetery, Valparaiso, Ind.
  Relatives: Son of Rev. Daniel De Motte (died 1875).
  The town of DeMotte, Indiana, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Image source: New York Public Library
  William Dennison, Jr. (1815-1882) — of Ohio. Born November 23, 1815. Republican. Delegate to Republican National Convention from Ohio, 1856; Governor of Ohio, 1860-62; U.S. Postmaster General, 1864-66. Died June 15, 1882 (age 66 years, 204 days). Interment at Green Lawn Cemetery, Columbus, Ohio.
  Relatives: Grandfather of Edwin Haldeman Dennison (1872-?).
  The village of Dennison, Ohio, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Harmar Denny (1794-1852) — of Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, Pa. Born in Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, Pa., May 13, 1794. Member of Pennsylvania state legislature, 1820; U.S. Representative from Pennsylvania, 1829-37 (16th District 1829-33, 22nd District 1833-37). Died in Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, Pa., January 29, 1852 (age 57 years, 261 days). Interment at Allegheny Cemetery, Pittsburgh, Pa.
  Relatives: Son of Ebeneezer Denny (1761-1822); great-grandfather of Harmar Denny Denny, Jr..
  Political family: Denny family of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
  The township of Harmar, Pennsylvania, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  James William Denver (1817-1892) — also known as James W. Denver — Born near Winchester, Frederick County, Va., October 23, 1817. Served in the U.S. Army during the Mexican War; member of California state senate, 1852-53; secretary of state of California, 1853-55; U.S. Representative from California at-large, 1855-57; secretary of Kansas Territory, 1857-58; Governor of Kansas Territory, 1857-58, 1858, 1858; general in the Union Army during the Civil War; candidate for U.S. Representative from Ohio, 1866. Killed newspaper editor Edward Gilbert in a duel on August 2, 1852. Died in Washington, D.C., August 9, 1892 (age 74 years, 291 days). Interment at Sugar Grove Cemetery, Wilmington, Ohio.
  Relatives: Father of Matthew Rombach Denver (1870-1954).
  Denver County, Colo. is named for him.
  The city and county of Denver, Colorado, are named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS James W. Denver (built 1943, torpedoed and lost 1943) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Joseph A. DePaolo, Jr. (1908-1965) — of Plantsville, Southington, Hartford County, Conn. Born in Southington, Hartford County, Conn., 1908. Democrat. Insurance and real estate business; member of Connecticut state house of representatives from Southington, 1937-38, 1941-42; defeated, 1942; first selectman of Southington, Connecticut, 1947-50; postmaster at Plantsville, Conn., 1952; Southington town clerk, 1961-65. Catholic. Italian ancestry. Member, Sons of Italy; American Legion. Died in Southington, Hartford County, Conn., May 21, 1965 (age about 56 years). Interment at St. Thomas Cemetery, Southington, Conn.
  Relatives: Married 1942 to Juanine S. DePaolo (1914-1997).
  DePaolo Middle School, in Southington, Connecticut, is named for him.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
Chauncey M. Depew Chauncey Mitchell Depew (1834-1928) — also known as Chauncey M. Depew — of Peekskill, Westchester County, N.Y.; Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born in Peekskill, Westchester County, N.Y., April 23, 1834. Republican. Lawyer; member of New York state assembly from Westchester County 3rd District, 1862-63; secretary of state of New York, 1864-65; Westchester County Clerk, 1867; delegate to Republican National Convention from New York, 1868, 1892, 1896, 1900, 1904, 1908, 1912, 1916, 1920 (speaker), 1924; Liberal Republican candidate for Lieutenant Governor of New York, 1872; president, later chairman, New York Central Railroad; candidate for Republican nomination for President, 1888; U.S. Senator from New York, 1899-1911. French Huguenot, Dutch, and English ancestry. Member, Union League; Society of the Cincinnati; Skull and Bones. Died, of bronchial pneumonia, in Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., April 5, 1928 (age 93 years, 348 days). Entombed at Hillside Cemetery, Cortlandt town, Westchester County, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Isaac Depew (1800-1869) and Martha Minot (Mitchell) Depew (1810-1885); married, November 9, 1871, to Elise Hegeman (1848-1893); married, December 28, 1901, to May Palmer; second great-grandnephew of Roger Sherman; second cousin twice removed of Roger Sherman Baldwin, Sherman Day, Ebenezer Rockwood Hoar, William Maxwell Evarts and George Frisbie Hoar; second cousin four times removed of Aaron Burr; third cousin once removed of Simeon Eben Baldwin, Rockwood Hoar, Sherman Hoar, Maxwell Evarts and Arthur Outram Sherman (1864-?); third cousin twice removed of Charles Robert Sherman; third cousin thrice removed of Reuben Bostwick Heacock; fourth cousin of John Frederick Addis and Roger Sherman Hoar; fourth cousin once removed of John Adams Dix, Charles Taylor Sherman, William Tecumseh Sherman, Lampson Parker Sherman, John Sherman, John Stanley Addis and Archibald Cox.
  Political families: Sherman family of Connecticut; Sewall-Adams-Cony family of Maine; Hoar-Sherman family of Massachusetts; Baldwin-Greene-Upson-Hoar family of Connecticut (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  The village of Depew, New York, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: The Parties and The Men (1896)
  Gerald Desmond (1915-1964) — also known as Jerry Desmond — of Long Beach, Los Angeles County, Calif. Born in Long Beach, Los Angeles County, Calif., April 12, 1915. Democrat. Lawyer; delegate to Democratic National Convention from California, 1956, 1960. Died in 1964 (age about 49 years). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Walter Desmond (1876-1951); married 1937 to Virginia Slater.
  The Gerald Desmond Bridge (built 1965-68; replacement under construction 2019), which takes Ocean Boulevard over the Back Channel, in Long Beach, California, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article
  Thomas Edmund Dewey (1902-1971) — also known as Thomas E. Dewey — of Pawling, Dutchess County, N.Y.; Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born in Owosso, Shiawassee County, Mich., March 24, 1902. Republican. Lawyer; U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York, 1933; New York County District Attorney, 1937-41; candidate for Republican nomination for President, 1940; Governor of New York, 1943-55; defeated, 1938; candidate for President of the United States, 1944, 1948; delegate to Republican National Convention from New York, 1952 (speaker), 1956. Episcopalian. English and French ancestry. Member, Freemasons; American Bar Association; Council on Foreign Relations; Farm Bureau; Grange; Phi Mu Alpha; Phi Delta Phi. Died, from a heart attack, in his room at the Seaview Hotel, Bal Harbor, Dade County (now Miami-Dade County), Fla., March 16, 1971 (age 68 years, 357 days). Entombed in mausoleum at Pawling Cemetery, Pawling, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of George Martin Dewey and Anne Louise 'Annie' (Thomas) Dewey (1877-1954); married, June 16, 1928, to Frances Eileen Hutt (1903-1970; grandniece of Jefferson Finis Davis); nephew of Edmond Otis Dewey; first cousin four times removed of David Waterman; second cousin thrice removed of Thomas Glasby Waterman; second cousin five times removed of Luther Waterman and Joshua Coit (1758-1798); third cousin thrice removed of John Hall Brockway; fourth cousin once removed of James Gillespie Blaine III.
  Political families: Roosevelt family of New York City, New York; Saltonstall-Davis-Frelinghuysen-Appleton family of Massachusetts; Waterman-Huntington family of Connecticut and New York; Eastman family; Conger-Hungerford family; Chandler-Hale family of Portland, Maine; Abbott family of Salinas, California; Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York; Dewey-Blaine-Coit-Huntington family of Connecticut; Porter-Kelsey family of Connecticut (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Cross-reference: Herbert Brownell, Jr. — Charles C. Wing — Martin T. Manton — Herman Methfessel
  The Thomas E. Dewey Thruway, which runs through Westchester, Rockland, Orange, Ulster, Greene, Albany, Schenectady, Montgomery, Herkimer, Oneida, Madison, Onondaga, Cayuga, Seneca, Ontario, Monroe, Genesee, Erie, and Chautauqua counties in New York, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Books about Thomas E. Dewey: Mary M. Stolberg, Fighting Organized Crime : Politics, Justice, and the Legacy of Thomas E. Dewey — Barry K. Beyer, Thomas E. Dewey, 1937-1947 : A Study in Political Leadership — Richard Norton Smith, Thomas E. Dewey and His Times — Scott Farris, Almost President: The Men Who Lost the Race but Changed the Nation — David Pietrusza, 1948: Harry Truman's Improbable Victory and the Year that Transformed America
  Samuel Dexter (1761-1816) — of Lunenburg, Worcester County, Mass. Born in Boston, Suffolk County, Mass., May 14, 1761. Lawyer; member of Massachusetts state house of representatives, 1788-90; U.S. Representative from Massachusetts 1st District, 1793-95; U.S. Senator from Massachusetts, 1799-1800; U.S. Secretary of War, 1800; U.S. Secretary of the Treasury, 1801; candidate for Governor of Massachusetts, 1814, 1815, 1816. Died in Athens, Greene County, N.Y., May 4, 1816 (age 54 years, 356 days). Original interment in unknown location; reinterment at Mt. Auburn Cemetery, Cambridge, Mass.
  Relatives: Son of Hannah (Sigourney) Dexter (1719-1784) and Samuel Dexter (1725-1810); married to Katharine Gordon (1761-1841); father of Samuel William Dexter (1792-1863).
  The town of Dexter, Maine, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Samuel William Dexter (1792-1863) — also known as Samuel W. Dexter — of Dexter, Washtenaw County, Mich. Born in Boston, Suffolk County, Mass., February 18, 1792. Newspaper publisher; Washtenaw County Judge, 1826-27; candidate for Delegate to U.S. Congress from Michigan Territory, 1831. Died in Dexter, Washtenaw County, Mich., February 6, 1863 (age 70 years, 353 days). Interment at Forest Lawn Cemetery, Dexter, Mich.
  Relatives: Son of Katharine (Gordon) Dexter (1761-1841) and Samuel Dexter (1761-1816); married to Millicent Bond (1811-1899).
  The city of Dexter, Michigan, is named for him.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Michael Henry de Young (1849-1925) — also known as M. H. de Young — of San Francisco, Calif. Born in St. Louis, Mo., September 30, 1849. Republican. Newspaper publisher; in 1879, his brother Charles de Young (1846-1880), then editor of the San Francisco Chronicle, shot and wounded San Francisco mayor Isaac S. Kalloch; a few months later, Charles was shot to death in his office by the mayor's son; on November 19, 1884, he was shot and seriously wounded by Adolph B. Spreckels, who had been angered by an article in the Chronicle; Spreckels, who pleaded temporary insanity, was tried and found not guilty; delegate to Republican National Convention from California, 1888, 1892, 1908, 1920. Catholic. Jewish ancestry. Died in San Francisco, Calif., February 15, 1925 (age 75 years, 138 days). Interment at Holy Cross Catholic Cemetery, Colma, Calif.
  The World War II Liberty ship SS M. H. De Young (built 1943, scrapped 1950) was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article
  Clarence Douglas Dillon (1909-2003) — also known as C. Douglas Dillon; Clarence Douglass Dillon — of Far Hills, Somerset County, N.J. Born in Geneva, Switzerland, of American parents, August 21, 1909. Republican. Served in the U.S. Navy during World War II; financier; delegate to Republican National Convention from New Jersey, 1952 (alternate), 1968; U.S. Ambassador to France, 1953-57; U.S. Secretary of the Treasury, 1961-65. Scottish, French, Swedish, and Jewish ancestry. Member, Council on Foreign Relations; Society of Colonial Wars. Recipient of the Presidential Medal of Freedom on July 6, 1989. Died in New York, New York County, N.Y., January 10, 2003 (age 93 years, 142 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Anne McEldin (Douglass) Dillon (1881-1961) and Clarence Dillon (1882-1979; financier); married, March 10, 1931, to Phyllis Chess Ellsworth; married 1983 to Susan Sage.
  Dillon House (offices, built 1965), at Harvard University Business School, Boston, Massachusetts, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile
John D. Dingell John David Dingell, Jr. (1926-2019) — also known as John D. Dingell; "Big John"; "The Truck" — of Detroit, Wayne County, Mich.; Trenton, Wayne County, Mich.; Dearborn, Wayne County, Mich. Born in Colorado Springs, El Paso County, Colo., July 8, 1926. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army during World War II; lawyer; U.S. Representative from Michigan, 1955-2003 (15th District 1955-65, 16th District 1965-2003, 15th District 2003); delegate to Democratic National Convention from Michigan, 1956, 1960, 1968, 1984, 1988, 1996, 2000, 2004, 2008. Catholic. Polish and Scotch-Irish ancestry. Member, Polish Legion of American Veterans; Veterans of Foreign Wars; American Legion; Knights of Columbus; National Rifle Association. Died, from prostate cancer, in Dearborn, Wayne County, Mich., February 7, 2019 (age 92 years, 214 days). Interment at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Va.
  Relatives: Son of Grace Blossom (Bigler) Dingell (1894-1962) and John David Dingell; married 1952 to Helen Henebry (1927-2016); married 1981 to Deborah Ann Insley; father of Christopher D. Dingell (1954?-).
  Political family: Dingell family of Detroit, Michigan.
  Cross-reference: Doug Ross
  John Dingell Drive, in Detroit Metro Airport, Romulus, Michigan, is named for him.  — The John D. Dingell Jr. Memorial Bridges, which take Stadium Boulevard over State Street and the Ann Arbor Railroad tracks, in Ann Arbor, Michigan, are named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — votes in Congress from the Washington Post — Wikipedia article — Ballotpedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: Michigan Manual 1957-58
Everett M. Dirksen Everett McKinley Dirksen (1896-1969) — also known as Everett M. Dirksen; "The Wizard of Ooze" — of Pekin, Tazewell County, Ill. Born in Pekin, Tazewell County, Ill., January 4, 1896. Republican. Served in the U.S. Army during World War I; merchant; U.S. Representative from Illinois 16th District, 1933-49; delegate to Republican National Convention from Illinois, 1940 (alternate), 1948, 1952 (speaker), 1956 (speaker), 1960 (member, Credentials Committee), 1964 (delegation chair), 1968 (delegation chair); U.S. Senator from Illinois, 1951-69; died in office 1969. Christian Reformed. Member, American Legion; Veterans of Foreign Wars; Freemasons; Order of the Eastern Star; Shriners; Eagles; Elks; Moose; American Bar Association; Odd Fellows; Izaak Walton League. Died, of lung cancer, at the Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Washington, D.C., September 7, 1969 (age 73 years, 246 days). Interment at Glendale Memorial Gardens, Pekin, Ill.
  Relatives: Father of Joy Dirksen (who married Howard Henry Baker, Jr. (1925-2014)).
  Political family: Baker-Dirksen family of Huntsville and Alcoa, Tennessee.
  Cross-reference: Harold E. Rainville
  The Dirksen Senate Office Building (opened 1958), in Washington, D.C., is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile
  Books about Everett Dirksen: Byron C. Hulsey, Everett Dirksen and His Presidents: How a Senate Giant Shaped American Politics
  Image source: U.S. postage stamp (1981)
  John Adams Dix (1798-1879) — also known as John A. Dix — of Cooperstown, Otsego County, N.Y.; Albany, Albany County, N.Y.; New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in Boscawen, Merrimack County, N.H., July 24, 1798. Democrat. Secretary of state of New York, 1833-39; member of New York state assembly from Albany County, 1842; U.S. Senator from New York, 1845-49; postmaster at New York City, N.Y., 1860-61; U.S. Secretary of the Treasury, 1861; general in the Union Army during the Civil War; U.S. Minister to France, 1866-69; Governor of New York, 1873-75; defeated, 1848, 1874; candidate for mayor of New York City, N.Y., 1876. Died in New York, New York County, N.Y., April 21, 1879 (age 80 years, 271 days). Interment at Trinity Cemetery, Manhattan, N.Y.
  Presumably named for: John Adams
  Relatives: Son-in-law of John Jordan Morgan; son of Col. Timothy Dix, Jr. (1770-1813) and Abigail (Wilkins) Dix; married to Catharine Waine Morgan (1802-1884); first cousin thrice removed of Roger Sherman; second cousin once removed of Nathan Read; third cousin once removed of Roger Sherman Baldwin, Sherman Day, Ebenezer Rockwood Hoar, William Maxwell Evarts, George Frisbie Hoar, John Hill Walbridge and Henry E. Walbridge; third cousin twice removed of Aaron Kellogg and Charles Kirk Tilden; fourth cousin of Simeon Eben Baldwin, Rockwood Hoar, Sherman Hoar, Maxwell Evarts and Arthur Outram Sherman; fourth cousin once removed of Abel Merrill, Samuel Laning, Orsamus Cook Merrill, John Lanning, Timothy Merrill (1781-1836), Daniel Putnam Tyler, Chauncey Mitchell Depew, John Frederick Addis and Roger Sherman Hoar.
  Political families: Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York; Woodruff-Hornblower-Seymour-Wadsworth family of Connecticut; Hoar-Sherman family of Massachusetts; Murphy-Merrill family of Harbor Beach, Michigan (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Fort Dix (established 1917 as Camp Dix; later Fort Dix; now Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst), a U.S. Army post in Burlington County, New Jersey, is named for him.  — Dix Mountain, in the Ardirondack Mountains, Essex County, New York, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Archibald Dixon (1802-1876) — of Henderson, Henderson County, Ky. Born near Redhouse, Caswell County, N.C., April 2, 1802. Lawyer; Lieutenant Governor of Kentucky, 1844-48; U.S. Senator from Kentucky, 1851-55. Died in Henderson, Henderson County, Ky., April 23, 1876 (age 74 years, 21 days). Interment at Fernwood Cemetery, Henderson, Ky.
  The city of Dixon, Kentucky, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  John Wesley Dobbs (1882-1961) — also known as J. W. Dobbs — of Atlanta, Fulton County, Ga. Born in Marietta, Cobb County, Ga., March 6, 1882. Republican. Co-founder of the Atlanta Negro Voters League, 1946; delegate to Republican National Convention from Georgia, 1948, 1952 (member, Resolutions Committee). African ancestry. Died in Atlanta, Fulton County, Ga., August 30, 1961 (age 79 years, 177 days). Interment at South View Cemetery, Atlanta, Ga.; statue at John Wesley Dobbs Plaza, Atlanta, Ga.
  Presumably named for: John Wesley
  Relatives: Married 1906 to Irene Ophelia Thompson (1885-1972); grandfather of Maynard Holbrook Jackson, Jr. (1938-2003).
  John Wesley Dobbs Avenue (formerly Houston Street), and Dobbs Elementary School, Atlanta, Georgia, are named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  William Polk Dobson (1793-1846) — also known as William P. Dobson — of Surry County, N.C. Born in Stokes County, N.C., 1793. Member of North Carolina state senate, 1818-19, 1827, 1830-34, 1836, 1842 (Surry County 1818-19, 1827, 1830-34, 43rd District 1836, 1842). Died in Rockford, Surry County, N.C., 1846 (age about 53 years). Interment at Dobson Family Cemetery, Near Rockford, Surry County, N.C.
  The town of Dobson, North Carolina, is named for him.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Philip Doddridge (1773-1832) — of Virginia. Born in Bedford County, Va., May 17, 1773. Member of Virginia state legislature, 1810; U.S. Representative from Virginia 18th District, 1829-32; died in office 1832. Died in Washington, D.C., November 19, 1832 (age 59 years, 186 days). Interment at Congressional Cemetery, Washington, D.C.
  Doddridge County, W.Va. is named for him.
  The World War II Liberty ship SS Philip Doddridge (built 1943, scrapped 1969) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  Henry Dodge (1782-1867) — of Ste. Genevieve County, Mo.; Michigan; Dodgeville, Iowa County, Wis. Born near Vincennes, Knox County, Ind., October 12, 1782. Democrat. General in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812; delegate to Missouri state constitutional convention from Ste. Genevieve County, 1820; member Michigan territorial council 7th District, 1832-33; Governor of Wisconsin Territory, 1836-41, 1845-48; Delegate to U.S. Congress from Wisconsin Territory, 1841-45; U.S. Senator from Wisconsin, 1848-57. Died in Burlington, Des Moines County, Iowa, June 19, 1867 (age 84 years, 250 days). Interment at Aspen Grove Cemetery, Burlington, Iowa.
  Relatives: Son of Nancy Ann (Hunter) Dodge and Israel Dodge (1760-1806); half-brother of Lewis Fields Linn; married 1800 to Christiana McDonald; father-in-law of James Clarke (1812-1850); father of Augustus Caesar Dodge; third cousin once removed of Augustus Sabin Chase (1828-1896); third cousin twice removed of Irving Hall Chase; third cousin thrice removed of Augustus Sabin Chase (1897-1970); fourth cousin once removed of David Lane Dodge.
  Political family: Polk family (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Dodge counties in Minn. and Wis., and Henry County, Iowa, are named for him.
  Fort Dodge (military installation, 1850-53), and the city of Fort Dodge, Iowa, were named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  John A. Doelle (1878-1962) — of Michigan; Grosse Pointe Park, Wayne County, Mich. Born February 10, 1878. Republican. Superintendent of schools; member of Michigan state board of agriculture, 1922; resigned 1922. Died in Grosse Pointe Farms, Wayne County, Mich., March 7, 1962 (age 84 years, 25 days). Interment at Mountain Home Cemetery, Kalamazoo, Mich.
  The John A. Doelle School (now closed), in Tapiola, Michigan, was named for him.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Joseph Norton Dolph (1835-1897) — also known as Joseph N. Dolph — of Portland, Multnomah County, Ore. Born in Schuyler County, N.Y., October 19, 1835. Republican. Lawyer; U.S. Attorney for Oregon, 1865-68; member of Oregon state senate, 1866-74; U.S. Senator from Oregon, 1883-95. Died in Portland, Multnomah County, Ore., March 10, 1897 (age 61 years, 142 days). Interment at River View Cemetery, Portland, Ore.
  Relatives: Uncle of Frederick William Mulkey (1874-1924).
  The former community (now abandoned) of Dolph, Oregon, was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Alexander William Doniphan (1808-1887) — of Liberty, Clay County, Mo.; Richmond, Ray County, Mo. Born in Maysville, Mason County, Ky., July 9, 1808. Lawyer; member of Missouri state house of representatives, 1836, 1840, 1854; in 1838, he refused to obey an order to execute Joseph Smith and other Mormon leaders, calling it "cold-blooded murder"; colonel in the U.S. Army during the Mexican War; led Doniphan's Expedition into Mexico, 1846-47; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Missouri, 1876. Died in Richmond, Ray County, Mo., August 8, 1887 (age 79 years, 30 days). Interment at Fairview Cemetery, Liberty, Mo.; statue at County Courthouse Grounds, Richmond, Mo.
  Relatives: Son-in-law of John Thorton (1786-1847); married, December 21, 1837, to Elizabeth Jane Thornton (1820-1873).
  Political family: Trigg family of Virginia.
  Doniphan County, Kan. is named for him.
  The city of Doniphan, Missouri, is named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS Alexander W. Doniphan (built 1944, scrapped 1964) was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article
  Books about Alexander William Doniphan: Roger D. Launius, Alexander William Doniphan: Portrait of a Missouri Moderate
  James H. Donovan (1923-1990) — of Chadwicks, Oneida County, N.Y. Born in Marcy, Oneida County, N.Y., November 12, 1923. Republican. Served in the U.S. Marine Corps during World War II; member of New York state senate, 1966-90 (51st District 1966, 46th District 1967-82, 47th District 1983-90); died in office 1990; delegate to Republican National Convention from New York, 1980. Catholic. Member, American Legion; Veterans of Foreign Wars; Knights of Columbus. Represented Oneida County in the New York State Senate longer than any other senator in the history of the county. Died, of colon cancer, in Chadwicks, Oneida County, N.Y., August 31, 1990 (age 66 years, 292 days). Interment at St. Mary's Cemetery, Clayville, N.Y.
  Donovan Middle School, and Donovan Hall, at the State University of New York Polytechnic Institute, Utica, New York, are named for him.
  Richard Joseph Donovan (1926-1971) — also known as Richard Donovan; Dick Donovan — of Chula Vista, San Diego County, Calif. Born in New Rochelle Hospital, New Rochelle, Westchester County, N.Y., February 24, 1926. Republican. Served in the U.S. Navy during World War II; police officer; lawyer; member of California state assembly, 1965-69; municipal judge in California, 1969-71; died in office 1971. Catholic; later Congregationalist. Member, Elks; Kiwanis; Sons of the American Revolution. Suffered a self-inflicted gunshot wound, and died soon after, in a hospital at Chula Vista, San Diego County, Calif., November 21, 1971 (age 45 years, 270 days). Cremated; ashes interred at Glen Abbey Memorial Park, Bonita, Calif.
  The Richard J. Donovan Correctional Facility, in San Diego County, California, is named for him.
  James Duane Doty (1799-1865) — also known as James D. Doty — of Neenah, Winnebago County, Wis.; Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Utah. Born in Salem, Washington County, N.Y., November 5, 1799. Democrat. Lawyer; federal judge, 1828-32; member Michigan territorial council 7th District, 1834-35; Delegate to U.S. Congress from Wisconsin Territory, 1839-41; Governor of Wisconsin Territory, 1841-44; delegate to Wisconsin state constitutional convention, 1846; U.S. Representative from Wisconsin 3rd District, 1849-53; Governor of Utah Territory, 1863-65; died in office 1865. Presbyterian. Died in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Utah, June 13, 1865 (age 65 years, 220 days). Interment at Fort Douglas Cemetery, Salt Lake City, Utah.
  Relatives: Son of Chillus Doty and Sarah (Martin) Doty; married to Sarah Collins; father of Charles Doty (1824-1918); first cousin of Morgan Lewis Martin; third cousin twice removed of Samuel Allyne Otis; fourth cousin once removed of Harrison Gray Otis.
  Political family: Otis family of Connecticut (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  The World War II Liberty ship SS James D. Doty (built 1943, scrapped 1961) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Dennis Joseph Dougherty (1865-1951) — also known as Dennis Dougherty; "The Great Builder" — of Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa. Born in Ashland, Schuylkill County, Pa., August 16, 1865. Catholic priest; bishop of Buffalo, N.Y., 1916-18; archbishop of Philadelphia, Pa., 1918-51; cardinal, 1921-51; offered prayer, Republican National Convention, 1940, 1948; offered prayer, Democratic National Convention, 1948. Catholic. Irish ancestry. Died, from a stroke, in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., May 31, 1951 (age 85 years, 288 days). Entombed at Cathedral Basilica of Sts. Peter and Paul, Philadelphia, Pa.
  Relatives: Son of Patrick Dougherty and Bridget (Henry) Dougherty; uncle of Joseph Carroll McCormick (1907-1996).
  Cardinal Dougherty High School (opened 1956, closed 2010), in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Ben Elbert Douglas, Sr. (1894-1982) — also known as Ben E. Douglas — of Charlotte, Mecklenburg County, N.C. Born in Scotts Crossroad, Iredell County, N.C., September 3, 1894. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army during World War I; fur merchant; mayor of Charlotte, N.C., 1935-41; delegate to Democratic National Convention from North Carolina, 1940, 1956. Died in 1982 (age about 87 years). Interment at Elmwood Cemetery, Charlotte, N.C.
  Douglas Municipal Airport (now Charlotte Douglas International Airport), in Charlotte, North Carolina, is named for him.
  Kelsey Harris Douglass (d. 1840) — of Texas. Member of Texas Republic House of Representatives, 1837-38. Member, Freemasons. Died in 1840. Interment at Oak Grove Cemetery, Nacogdoches, Tex.
  The community of Douglass, Texas, is named for him.
  John Goodchild Dow (1905-2003) — also known as John G. Dow — of Rockland County, N.Y. Born in Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., May 6, 1905. Democratic candidate for New York state senate 33rd District, 1954; Democratic candidate for New York state assembly from Rockland County, 1956; U.S. Representative from New York 27th District, 1965-69, 1971-73; defeated, 1968 (Democratic), 1972 (Democratic), 1974 (Democratic), 1982 (Democratic primary), 1982 (Liberal), 1990 (Democratic); delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1968. Died in Suffern, Rockland County, N.Y., March 11, 2003 (age 97 years, 309 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Joy Wheeler Dow (born 1859) and Elizabeth (Goodchild) Dow.
  The John G. Dow Post Office Building, in Tappan, New York, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Neal Dow (1804-1897) — also known as "Napoleon of Temperance"; "Father of Prohibition"; "Grand Old Man in the Temperance Cause" — of Portland, Cumberland County, Maine. Born in Portland, Cumberland County, Maine, March 20, 1804. Tanning business; mayor of Portland, Maine, 1851, 1855; member of Maine state house of representatives, 1858-59; general in the Union Army during the Civil War; alternate delegate to Republican National Convention from Maine, 1868; Prohibition candidate for President of the United States, 1880. Quaker. During the Civil War was captured by Confederate forces, imprisoned, and eventually exchanged for Confederate Gen. William Henry Fitzhugh Lee, who was a Union prisoner. Died in Portland, Cumberland County, Maine, October 2, 1897 (age 93 years, 196 days). Interment at Evergreen Cemetery, Portland, Maine.
  Relatives: Son of Josiah Dow (1766-1861) and Dorcas Dow (1773-1851); married, January 20, 1830, to Maria Cornelia Durant Maynard (1808-1883); father of Frederick Neal Dow (1840-1934).
  Neal Dow Avenue, in Westerleigh, Staten Island, New York, is named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: Neil D. CranmerNeal Dow BeckerNeal D. Bishop
  See also Wikipedia article
  John Gately Downey (1827-1894) — also known as John G. Downey — of Los Angeles County, Calif. Born in Ireland, June 24, 1827. Democrat. Member of California state assembly 1st District, 1856-57; Lieutenant Governor of California, 1860; Governor of California, 1860-62; defeated, 1863. Died March 1, 1894 (age 66 years, 250 days). Original interment at Old Calvary Cemetery (which no longer exists), Los Angeles, Calif.; reinterment at Holy Cross Catholic Cemetery, Colma, Calif.
  The city of Downey, California, is named for him.
  Thomas Joseph Downing (1867-1927) — also known as Thomas J. Downing; Tom Downing — of McNeals Corner, Lancaster County, Va. Born May 25, 1867. Lawyer; member of Virginia state senate, 1920-27 (34th District 1920-23, 31st District 1924-27); died in office 1927. Died in McNeals Corner, Lancaster County, Va., December 24, 1927 (age 60 years, 213 days). Interment at Downing Family Cemetery, McNeals Corner, Va.
  Relatives: Son of Samuel Downing and Catharine Ellen (Payne) Downing; married to Estelle R. Chilton (1870-1946).
  The Downing Bridge (built 1927, rebuilt 1963), over the Rappahannock River, between Tappahannock and Warsaw, Virginia, is named for him.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Francis Marion Drake (1830-1903) — of Centerville, Appanoose County, Iowa. Born in Rushville, Schuyler County, Ill., December 30, 1830. Republican. General in the Union Army during the Civil War; lawyer; railroad builder; philanthropist; delegate to Republican National Convention from Iowa, 1888; Governor of Iowa, 1896-98. Disciples of Christ. Member, Grand Army of the Republic; Loyal Legion; Freemasons; Odd Fellows. Died, of diabetes, in Centerville, Appanoose County, Iowa, November 20, 1903 (age 72 years, 325 days). Interment at Oakland Cemetery, Centerville, Iowa.
  Presumably named for: Francis Marion
  Relatives: Son of John Adams Drake and Harriet Jane (O'Neal) Drake; married, December 24, 1855, to Mary Jane Lord (died 1883).
  Drake University, in Des Moines, Iowa, is named for him.
  Alfred Eastlack Driscoll (1902-1975) — also known as Alfred E. Driscoll — of Haddonfield, Camden County, N.J. Born in Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, Pa., October 25, 1902. Republican. Lawyer; member of New Jersey state senate from Camden County, 1939-41; Governor of New Jersey, 1947-54; delegate to Republican National Convention from New Jersey, 1948, 1952 (speaker); member, Commission on Intergovernmental Relations, 1953-55. Presbyterian. Member, Psi Upsilon. Died March 9, 1975 (age 72 years, 135 days). Interment at Haddonfield Baptist Churchyard, Haddonfield, N.J.
  Relatives: Son of Alfred Roble Driscoll and Mattie (Eastlack) Driscoll; married 1932 to Antoinette Ware Tatem.
  The Driscoll Bridge on the Garden State Parkway, over the Raritan River, between Sayreville & Woodbridge, New Jersey, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article
  Jesse K. Dubois — of Lawrence County, Ill. Republican. Member of Illinois state house of representatives, 1835-41, 1843-45; Illinois state auditor of public accounts, 1857-64; delegate to Republican National Convention from Illinois, 1868. Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Father of Fred Thomas Dubois (1851-1930).
  The township and village of Du Bois, Illinois, is named for him.
  Richard Moberley Dudley (1860-1925) — also known as Richard M. Dudley — of El Paso, El Paso County, Tex. Born in Waco, Madison County, Ky., 1860. Engineer; banker; member of Texas state house of representatives, 1910; mayor of El Paso, Tex., 1923-25; died in office 1925. Died, following ulcer surgery, in Hotel Dieu Hospital, El Paso, El Paso County, Tex., May 1, 1925 (age about 64 years). Interment at Evergreen Alameda Cemetery, El Paso, Tex.
  Relatives: Son of Thomas Parker Dudley (1834-1903) and Mary Susan (Gentry) Dudley (1837-1920); married to Frances Dow Moore (1875-1973).
  R. M. Dudley School (opened 1925; now gone), in El Paso, Texas, was named for him.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
John Foster Dulles John Foster Dulles (1888-1959) — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born in Washington, D.C., February 25, 1888. Republican. Lawyer; major in the U.S. Army during World War I; delegate to Republican National Convention from New York, 1944; U.S. Senator from New York, 1949; defeated, 1949; U.S. Secretary of State, 1953-59. Presbyterian. Member, Phi Beta Kappa; Phi Delta Phi; Council on Foreign Relations. Received the Medal of Freedom in 1959. Died of cancer and pneumonia, in Washington, D.C., May 24, 1959 (age 71 years, 88 days). Interment at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Va.
  Relatives: Son of Allen Macy Dulles (1854-1930) and Edith F. (Foster) Dulles (1863-1941); brother of Allen Welsh Dulles; married to Janet Pomeroy Avery (1891-1969); grandson of John Watson Foster; third great-grandnephew of Joshua Coit; first cousin twice removed of Langdon Cheves, Jr.; first cousin six times removed of Benjamin Huntington; second cousin thrice removed of Robert Coit, Jr.; second cousin four times removed of John Davenport, James Davenport, Henry Huntington, Gurdon Huntington and Abel Huntington; second cousin five times removed of Samuel Huntington; third cousin of Lewis Wardlaw Haskell; third cousin twice removed of Alonzo Mark Leffingwell and William Brainard Coit; third cousin thrice removed of Ebenezer Huntington, William Woodbridge, Zina Hyde, Jr., Isaac Backus, Theodore Davenport, Henry Titus Backus (1809-1877) and Benjamin Nicoll Huntington; fourth cousin once removed of John Leffingwell Randolph.
  Political families: Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York; Saltonstall-Davis-Frelinghuysen-Appleton family of Massachusetts; Waterman-Huntington family of Connecticut and New York; Wolcott-Wadsworth family of Connecticut and Maryland (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Cross-reference: Edward Corsi
  Washington Dulles International Airport (opened 1962), in Loudoun and Fairfax counties, Virginia, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: Time Magazine, August 13, 1951
  James Henry Duncan (1793-1869) — also known as James H. Duncan — of Haverhill, Essex County, Mass. Born in Haverhill, Essex County, Mass., December 5, 1793. Whig. Lawyer; member of Massachusetts state house of representatives, 1827, 1837-38, 1857; member of Massachusetts state senate, 1828-31; delegate to Whig National Convention from Massachusetts, 1839; U.S. Representative from Massachusetts 3rd District, 1849-53. Died in Haverhill, Essex County, Mass., February 8, 1869 (age 75 years, 65 days). Interment at Linwood Cemetery, Haverhill, Mass.
  The community of Duncan, Illinois, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  Moses Fell Dunn (1842-1915) — of Indiana. Born in Bedford, Lawrence County, Ind., April 26, 1842. Republican. Lawyer; member of Indiana state house of representatives, 1867-69; candidate for U.S. Representative from Indiana 6th District, 1870. Died October 21, 1915 (age 73 years, 178 days). Interment at Green Hill Cemetery, Bedford, Ind.
  Relatives: Son of George Grundy Dunn (1812-1857).
  Dunn Memorial Hospital (now St. Vincent Dunn Hospital), in Bedford, Indiana, is named for him.
  Germain P. Dupont (c.1915-1963) — of Manchester, Hillsborough County, N.H. Born in Manchester, Hillsborough County, N.H., about 1915. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army during World War II; employed at J. F. McElwain Shoe Company; secretary-treasurer, New Hampshire Shoe Workers Union; Hillsborough County Commissioner, 1959-63; candidate in primary for mayor of Manchester, N.H., 1963. Catholic. Member, Catholic War Veterans; American Legion; Disabled American Veterans; Foresters. Suffered a heart attack at his home, and was dead on arrival at Notre Dame Hospital, Manchester, Hillsborough County, N.H., December 12, 1963 (age about 48 years). Interment at Mt. Calvary Cemetery, Manchester, N.H.
  Relatives: Married to Laurette E. Prince.
  Dupont Pool (now Dupont Splash Pad), a public park facility in Manchester, New Hampshire, is named for him.
  George Harman Durand (1838-1903) — also known as George H. Durand — of Flint, Genesee County, Mich. Born in Cobleskill, Schoharie County, N.Y., February 21, 1838. Democrat. Lawyer; law partner of John J. Carton; mayor of Flint, Mich., 1873-75; U.S. Representative from Michigan 6th District, 1875-77; defeated, 1876; justice of Michigan state supreme court, 1892; appointed 1892; defeated, 1893; Presidential Elector for Michigan, 1892. Died in Flint, Genesee County, Mich., June 8, 1903 (age 65 years, 107 days). Interment at Glenwood Cemetery, Flint, Mich.
  Relatives: Brother of Lorenzo Thurston Durand (1849-1917).
  Political family: Durand family of Michigan.
  The city of Durand, Michigan, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Perry B. Duryea, Jr. (1921-2004) — of Montauk, Suffolk County, Long Island, N.Y. Born in Montauk, Suffolk County, Long Island, N.Y., October 18, 1921. Republican. Served in the U.S. Navy during World War II; member of New York state assembly, 1961-77 (Suffolk County 1st District 1961-65, 1st District 1966-77); Speaker of the New York State Assembly, 1969-73; delegate to New York state constitutional convention 1st District, 1967; member of New York Republican State Central Committee, 1968; delegate to Republican National Convention from New York, 1972; candidate for Governor of New York, 1978. Member, American Legion; Veterans of Foreign Wars; Lions; Freemasons. Died, from injuries suffered in a car accident, January 11, 2004 (age 82 years, 85 days). Interment at Fort Hill Cemetery, Montauk, Long Island, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Perry B. Duryea (1897?-?); married to Elizabeth Ann Weed.
  The Perry B. Duryea, Jr. State Office Building, in Islip, New York, is named for him.
  Gabriel Duvall (1752-1844) — of Maryland. Born in Prince George's County, Md., December 6, 1752. Democrat. Member of Maryland state legislature, 1787; U.S. Representative from Maryland 2nd District, 1794-96; state court judge in Maryland, 1796-1802; Presidential Elector for Maryland, 1796, 1800; Associate Justice of U.S. Supreme Court, 1811-35. Episcopalian. Died in Prince George's County, Md., March 6, 1844 (age 91 years, 91 days). Interment at Duvall Memorial Garden, Marietta House, Glenn Dale, Md.
  The World War II Liberty ship SS Gabriel Duvall (built 1942, scrapped 1962) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Ballotpedia article — NNDB dossier
  Theophilus Eaton (1590-1658) — Born in Buckinghamshire, England, 1590. Co-founder and first Governor of New Haven Colony, 1639-58. Puritan. Died in New Haven, New Haven County, Conn., January 17, 1658 (age about 67 years). Original interment and cenotaph at New Haven Green, New Haven, Conn.; reinterment at Grove Street Cemetery, New Haven, Conn.; cenotaph at Montowese Cemetery, North Haven, Conn.
  Relatives: Son of Richard Eaton and Elizabeth (Sheapheard) Eaton; married 1629 to Ann (Lloyd) Yale (1591-1658); fifth great-grandfather of David Parmalee Kelsey; sixth great-grandfather of Walter Samuel Hine (1863-1950), Arthur Eugene Parmelee, Lovel Davis Parmelee, Frank Clark Woodruff and Watson Stiles Woodruff; seventh great-grandfather of Layton Archer Kelsey and Cleon Lorenzo Parmelee.
  Political families: Woodruff-Hornblower-Seymour-Wadsworth family of Connecticut; Keeler-Floyd-Sherman-Bangs family of New York; Porter-Kelsey family of Connecticut; Fessenden family (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  The town of Eaton, New Hampshire, is named for him.
  Epitaph: "Eaton so fam'd so wise, so just, The Phoenix of our world, here lies his dust / This name forget, N. England never must."
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  William Eaton (1764-1811) — of Windsor, Windsor County, Vt.; Brimfield, Hampden County, Mass. Born in Woodstock, Windham County, Conn., February 23, 1764. Served in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; Clerk, Vermont House of Representatives, 1791-92; U.S. Consul General in Tunis, 1797-1803; led multinational military force in North Africa, 1804-05, in an effort to overthrow the Barbary pirates; member of Massachusetts state house of representatives, 1807-08. Died in Brimfield, Hampden County, Mass., June 1, 1811 (age 47 years, 98 days). Interment at Brimfield Cemetery, Brimfield, Mass.
  The town of Eaton, New York, is named for him.  — The USS Eaton, a World War II destroyer, was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
Charles H. Ebbets Charles Hercules Ebbets (1859-1925) — also known as Charles H. Ebbets; Charlie Ebbets — of Kings County, N.Y. Born in New York, New York County, N.Y., October 29, 1859. Architect; member of New York state assembly from Kings County 12th District, 1896; owner, Brooklyn Dodgers professional baseball team, 1902-25. Died, from heart failure, in his suite at the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel, Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., April 18, 1925 (age 65 years, 171 days). Interment at Green-Wood Cemetery, Brooklyn, N.Y.
  Relatives: Married, April 10, 1878, to Minnie Frances Amelia Broadbent (1858-1947); married, May 8, 1922, to Grace Eleanor Slade (1877-1959).
  Ebbets Field (built 1912, demolished 1960), ballpark for the Brooklyn Dodgers, in Brooklyn, New York, was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: Library of Congress
  Morris Michael Edelstein (1888-1941) — also known as M. Michael Edelstein — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born in Meseritz (Międzyrzec), Poland, February 5, 1888. Democrat. Lawyer; U.S. Representative from New York 14th District, 1940-41; died in office 1941. Jewish. Completed delivery of a speech on the floor of the U.S. House of Representatives, and then died nearby in the House cloakroom, in the U.S. Capitol Building, Washington, D.C., June 4, 1941 (age 53 years, 119 days). Interment at Mt. Zion Cemetery, Maspeth, Queens, N.Y.
  The World War II Liberty ship SS M. Michael Edelstein (built 1944, scrapped 1969) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  Arthur W. Edwards (c.1876-1932) — of Wyandotte, Wayne County, Mich. Born in Flat Rock, Wayne County, Mich., about 1876. Lawyer; metal products business; mayor of Wyandotte, Mich., 1932; died in office 1932. Died, following an attack of apoplexy, in a hospital at Chatham, Ontario, August 12, 1932 (age about 56 years). Interment at Woodmere Cemetery, Detroit, Mich.
  The Edwards Bridge, crossing the Ecorse River, between Wyandotte & Ecorse, Michigan, is named for him.
  Ninian Edwards (1775-1833) — of Kaskaskia, Randolph County, Ill.; Edwardsville, Madison County, Ill. Born in Montgomery County, Md., March 17, 1775. Democrat. Member of Kentucky state house of representatives, 1796-97; state court judge in Kentucky, 1803; justice of Kentucky state supreme court, 1808; Governor of Illinois Territory, 1809-18; U.S. Senator from Illinois, 1818-24; Governor of Illinois, 1826-30; candidate for U.S. Representative from Illinois, 1832. Baptist. Died of cholera, in Belleville, St. Clair County, Ill., July 20, 1833 (age 58 years, 125 days). Original interment somewhere in Belleville, Ill.; reinterment in 1855 at Oak Ridge Cemetery, Springfield, Ill.; statue at Ninian Edwards Plaza, Edwardsville, Ill.
  Relatives: Son of Margaret (Beall) Edwards (1750-1826) and Benjamin Edwards; brother of Cyrus Edwards (1793-1877); married, February 20, 1803, to Elvira Lane (1780-1839); father of Julia Catherine Edwards (1801-1830; who married Daniel Pope Cook) and Ninian Wirt Edwards; grandfather of John Pope Cook; granduncle of Richard Lee Metcalfe; great-granduncle of Theodore W. Metcalfe.
  Political family: Edwards-Cook family of Illinois and Nebraska (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Edwards County, Ill. is named for him.
  The city of Edwardsville, Illinois, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  John Christoph Blucher Ehringhaus (1882-1949) — also known as J. C. B. Ehringhaus — of Elizabeth City, Pasquotank County, N.C.; Raleigh, Wake County, N.C. Born in Elizabeth City, Pasquotank County, N.C., February 5, 1882. Democrat. Lawyer; member of North Carolina state house of representatives, 1905-08; Solicitor, 1st District, 1910-22; Governor of North Carolina, 1933-37; delegate to Democratic National Convention from North Carolina, 1940, 1944 (speaker), 1948. Episcopalian. Member, American Bar Association; Phi Beta Kappa; Delta Kappa Epsilon; Theta Nu Epsilon; Freemasons; Shriners; Odd Fellows; Elks. Died, of a heart attack, in his suite at the Sir Walter Hotel, Raleigh, Wake County, N.C., July 31, 1949 (age 67 years, 176 days). Interment at Episcopal Cemetery, Elizabeth City, N.C.
  Relatives: Son of Erskine Ehringhaus and Carrie Colville (Mathews) Ehringhaus; married, January 4, 1912, to Matilda Bradford Haughton (1890-1980).
  Ehringhaus Street, in Elizabeth City, North Carolina, is named for him.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
Dwight D. Eisenhower Dwight David Eisenhower (1890-1969) — also known as Dwight D. Eisenhower; "Ike" — Born in Denison, Grayson County, Tex., October 14, 1890. Republican. General in the U.S. Army during World War II; president of Columbia University, 1948-53; President of the United States, 1953-61. Presbyterian. German ancestry. Member, American Legion; Council on Foreign Relations; Loyal Legion. Died, after a series of heart attacks, at Walter Reed Army Hospital, Washington, D.C., March 28, 1969 (age 78 years, 165 days). Interment at Eisenhower Center, Abilene, Kan.
  Relatives: Son of Ida Elizabeth (Stover) Eisenhower (1862-1946) and David Jacob Eisenhower (1863-1942); brother of Milton Stover Eisenhower; married, July 1, 1916, to Mary Geneva "Mamie" Doud (1896-1979); father of John Sheldon Doud Eisenhower (1922-?); grandfather of Dwight David Eisenhower II (son-in-law of Richard Milhous Nixon).
  Political family: Eisenhower-Nixon family (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Cross-reference: Sherman Adams — Carter L. Burgess — Woodrow Wilson Mann — Jacqueline C. Odlum — George E. Allen — Meyer Kestnbaum
  The Eisenhower Expressway, from downtown Chicago west to Hillside, in Cook County, Illinois, is named for him.  — The Eisenhower Tunnel (opened 1973), which carries westbound I-70 under the Continental Divide, in the Rocky Mountains, from Clear Creek County to Summit County, Colorado, is named for him.  — The Eisenhower Range of mountains, in Victoria Land, Antarctica, is named for him.  — Mount Eisenhower (formerly Mount Pleasant), in the White Mountains, Coos County, New Hampshire, is named for him.
  Coins and currency: His portrait appeared on the U.S. $1 coin (1971-78).
  Campaign slogan: "I Like Ike."
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile
  Books about Dwight D. Eisenhower: Stephen E. Ambrose, Eisenhower : Soldier and President — Fred I. Greenstein, The Hidden-Hand Presidency : Eisenhower as Leader — Carlo d'Este, Eisenhower : A Soldier's Life — Robert F. Burk, Dwight D. Eisenhower: Hero and Politician — Wiley T. Buchanan, Jr., Red Carpet at the White House : Four years as Chief of Protocol in the Eisenhower Administration — Jim Newton, Eisenhower: The White House Years — William Lee Miller, Two Americans: Truman, Eisenhower, and a Dangerous World
  Image source: U.S. postage stamp (1969)
  Samuel Elbert (1740-1788) — of Georgia. Born in South Carolina, 1740. General in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; Delegate to Continental Congress from Georgia, 1784; Governor of Georgia, 1785-86. Died in Savannah, Chatham County, Ga., November 1, 1788 (age about 48 years). Interment at Colonial Park Cemetery, Savannah, Ga.
  Relatives: Married to Elizabeth Rae.
  Elbert County, Ga. is named for him.
  The city of Elberton, Georgia, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Samuel Hitt Elbert (1833-1899) — of Plattsmouth, Cass County, Neb.; Denver, Colo. Born in Logan County, Ohio, April 3, 1833. Republican. Member of Nebraska territorial legislature, 1860; delegate to Republican National Convention from Nebraska Territory, 1860; secretary of Colorado Territory, 1862-66; member of Colorado territorial legislature, 1869; Governor of Colorado Territory, 1873-74; justice of Colorado state supreme court, 1877-88; delegate to Republican National Convention from Colorado, 1884. Methodist. Died in Galveston, Galveston County, Tex., November 27, 1899 (age 66 years, 238 days). Interment at Riverside Cemetery, Denver, Colo.
  Relatives: Son of John Downes Elbert (1806-1865) and Achsa (Hitt) Elbert (1808-1901); married to Josephine Evans (1844-1868; daughter of John Evans (1814-1897)).
  Elbert County, Colo. is named for him.
  Mount Elbert, in Lake County, Colorado, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
Stephen B. Elkins Stephen Benton Elkins (1841-1911) — also known as Stephen B. Elkins — of Messilla, Dona Ana County, N.M.; Santa Fe, Santa Fe County, N.M.; Elkins, Randolph County, W.Va. Born near New Lexington, Perry County, Ohio, September 26, 1841. Republican. Served in the Union Army during the Civil War; lawyer; member of New Mexico territorial House of Representatives, 1864-65; New Mexico territory attorney general, 1867; U.S. Attorney for New Mexico, 1867-70; Delegate to U.S. Congress from New Mexico Territory, 1873-77; U.S. Secretary of War, 1891-93; U.S. Senator from West Virginia, 1895-1911; died in office 1911. Died in Washington, D.C., January 4, 1911 (age 69 years, 100 days). Interment at Maplewood Cemetery, Elkins, W.Va.
  Relatives: Son of Philip Duncan Elkins (1809-1897) and Sarah Pickett (Withers) Elkins (1814-1865); married, June 10, 1866, to Sarah Simms "Sallie" Jacobs (1841-1872); married, April 14, 1875, to Hallie Davis (1853-1933; daughter of Henry Gassaway Davis; niece of Thomas Beall Davis); father of Davis Elkins (1876-1959).
  Political family: Elkins-Davis family of Elkins, West Virginia.
  The city of Elkins, West Virginia, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  Image source: The Parties and The Men (1896)
  William Ellery (1727-1820) — of Rhode Island. Born in Newport, Newport County, R.I., December 22, 1727. Delegate to Continental Congress from Rhode Island, 1776; signer, Declaration of Independence, 1776; justice of Rhode Island state supreme court, 1785. Congregationalist. Died in Newport, Newport County, R.I., February 15, 1820 (age 92 years, 55 days). Interment at Common Burying Ground, Newport, R.I.
  Relatives: Uncle of Christopher Ellery (1768-1840).
  The town of Ellery, New York, was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  Powhatan Ellis (1790-1863) — of Winchester, Wayne County, Miss. Born in Amherst County, Va., January 17, 1790. Democrat. Justice of Mississippi state supreme court, 1823; U.S. Senator from Mississippi, 1825-26, 1827-32; federal judge, 1832; U.S. Charge d'Affaires to Mexico, 1836; U.S. Minister to Mexico, 1839-42. Died in Richmond, Va., March 18, 1863 (age 73 years, 60 days). Interment at Shockoe Hill Cemetery, Richmond, Va.
  The town of Ellisville, Mississippi, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — U.S. State Dept career summary — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Oliver Ellsworth (1745-1807) — of Connecticut. Born in Windsor, Hartford County, Conn., April 29, 1745. Lawyer; Delegate to Continental Congress from Connecticut, 1777-84; member of Connecticut council of assistants, 1780-85, 1802-07; died in office 1807; superior court judge in Connecticut, 1785-89; member, U.S. Constitutional Convention, 1787; U.S. Senator from Connecticut, 1789-96; received 11 electoral votes, 1796; Chief Justice of U.S. Supreme Court, 1796-1800; resigned 1800. Congregationalist. Member, Freemasons. Died in Windsor, Hartford County, Conn., November 26, 1807 (age 62 years, 211 days). Interment at Palisado Cemetery, Windsor, Conn.
  Relatives: Son of David Ellsworth (1709-1782) and Jemima (Leavitt) Ellsworth (1721-1790); married 1772 to Abigail Wolcott (1756-1818; grandniece of Roger Wolcott); father of Delia Ellsworth (who married Thomas Scott Williams), Henry Leavitt Ellsworth and William Wolcott Ellsworth; second cousin once removed of Abijah Blodget; second cousin twice removed of Harrison Blodget, Elisha Hunt Allen and Gouverneur Morris; second cousin thrice removed of William Fessenden Allen, Walter Harrison Blodget and Frederick Hobbes Allen; second cousin four times removed of Luther Thomas Ellsworth; second cousin five times removed of Hallet Thomas Ellsworth and Wayne Lyman Morse; third cousin once removed of Gaylord Griswold and Elisha Phelps; third cousin twice removed of Hezekiah Case, Oliver Owen Forward, Walter Forward, Abiel Case, Chauncey Forward, Edmund Holcomb, Jairus Case, Norman A. Phelps, Anson Levi Holcomb, George Smith Catlin, John Smith Phelps, William Gleason, Jr. and Allen Jacob Holcomb; third cousin thrice removed of Parmenio Adams, Oliver Dwight Filley (1806-1881), Albert Asahel Bliss, Philemon Bliss, William Dean Kellogg, Charles Jenkins Hayden, Almon Case, Noah Webster Holcomb, Edwin Carpenter Pinney, William Walter Phelps and Lafayette Blanchard Gleason.
  Political family: Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  The city of Ellsworth, Maine, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — federal judicial profile — Wikipedia article — Ballotpedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Lucius Quintius Cincinnatus Elmer (1793-1883) — also known as Lucius Q. C. Elmer — of Bridgeton, Cumberland County, N.J. Born in Bridgeton, Cumberland County, N.J., February 3, 1793. Democrat. Major in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812; lawyer; member of New Jersey state house of assembly from Cumberland County, 1820-23; Speaker of the New Jersey State House of Assembly, 1823; U.S. Attorney for New Jersey, 1824-28; U.S. Representative from New Jersey 1st District, 1843-45; New Jersey state attorney general, 1850-52; associate justice of New Jersey state supreme court, 1852-59, 1861-69. Died in Bridgeton, Cumberland County, N.J., March 11, 1883 (age 90 years, 36 days). Interment at Old Broad Street Presbyterian Church Cemetery, Bridgeton, N.J.
  Relatives: Son of Ebenezer Elmer and Hannah P. (Seeley) Elmer (1757-1832); married to Catharine Hay (1795-1884); nephew of Jonathan Elmer (1745-1817); first cousin once removed of Eli Elmer and Joseph H. Elmer; second cousin of Reuben Fithian; second cousin once removed of Amos Fithian Garrison, Sr.; second cousin twice removed of Alexander Robeson Fithian; second cousin thrice removed of Charles Grant Garrison, Lindley Miller Garrison and James Hampton Fithian; third cousin of Apollos Morrell Elmer; third cousin once removed of John Allen and George Frederick Stone; third cousin twice removed of Daniel Chapin (1761-1821) and George Buckingham Beecher; fourth cousin of Amaziah Brainard, Luther Walter Badger, Daniel Kellogg (1791-1875) and John William Allen; fourth cousin once removed of Elijah Boardman, William Bostwick, Daniel Warner Bostwick, Daniel Chapin (1791-1878), Chester William Chapin, Graham Hurd Chapin, Anson Levi Holcomb, Albert Asahel Bliss, Philemon Bliss, George Bradley Kellogg, Leveret Brainard, Henry Purdy Day, Edmund Day, Daniel Kellogg (1835-1918) and Allen Jacob Holcomb.
  Political family: Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  The borough of Elmer, New Jersey, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Asher Bates Emery (1867-1924) — also known as Asher B. Emery — of East Aurora, Erie County, N.Y. Born in East Aurora, Erie County, N.Y., February 18, 1867. Republican. Physician; lawyer; bank director; alternate delegate to Republican National Convention from New York, 1908; Justice of New York Supreme Court 8th District, 1922-24; appointed 1922; died in office 1924. Member, Freemasons; Odd Fellows; Knights of Pythias. Died, from kidney disease, in Sisters Hospital, Buffalo, Erie County, N.Y., August 8, 1924 (age 57 years, 172 days). Interment at Oakwood Cemetery, East Aurora, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Josiah Emery (1819-1896) and Elizabeth C. (Kellogg) Emery (1828-1884); brother of Edward Kellogg Emery (1851-1919).
  Asher B. Emery County Park, in South Wales, New York, is named for him.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  John Morton Eshleman (1876-1916) — also known as John M. Eshleman; Jack Eshleman — of California. Born in Villa Ridge, Pulaski County, Ill., June 14, 1876. Republican. Member of California state assembly 52nd District; elected 1906; delegate to Republican National Convention from California, 1912; Lieutenant Governor of California, 1915-16; died in office 1916. Member, Freemasons. Died, of tuberculosis, in a train station at at Indio, Riverside County, Calif., February 28, 1916 (age 39 years, 259 days). Original interment in unknown location; reinterment at Sunset View Cemetery, El Cerrito, Calif.
  Relatives: Married to Elizabeth Ledgett Eshleman (1884?-1961).
  Eshleman Hall, at the University of California Berkeley, is named for him.
  March Fong Eu (1922-2017) — also known as March Kong; March K. Fong — of Oakland, Alameda County, Calif.; Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, Calif. Born in Oakdale, Stanislaus County, Calif., March 29, 1922. Democrat. Dental hygenist; supervisor of dental health education, Alameda County; member of California state assembly 15th District, 1967-74; delegate to Democratic National Convention from California, 1968, 1988; secretary of state of California, 1975-94; resigned 1994; defeated, 2002; U.S. Ambassador to Micronesia, 1994-96. Female. Chinese ancestry. Member, Delta Kappa Gamma. Died, following a fall, in Irvine, Orange County, Calif., December 21, 2017 (age 95 years, 267 days). The California Secretary of State building in Sacramento is named for her. Cremated; ashes interred at Mountain View Cemetery, Oakland, Calif.
  Relatives: Daughter of Yuen Kong and Shin (Shee) Kong; married to Chester Fong and Henry Eu; adoptive mother of Matthew Kipling Fong (1953-2011).
  The March Fong Eu Secretary of State Building, Sacramento, California, is named for her.
  See also Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — Find-A-Grave memorial
John Evans John Evans (1814-1897) — of Chicago, Cook County, Ill. Born in Waynesville, Warren County, Ohio, March 9, 1814. Republican. Physician; Governor of Colorado Territory, 1862-65; delegate to Republican National Convention from Colorado Territory, 1868 (member, Credentials Committee; member, Committee on Permanent Organization; speaker). Methodist. One of the founders of Northwestern University, and of the University of Denver. Died in Denver, Colo., July 3, 1897 (age 83 years, 116 days). Interment at Riverside Cemetery, Denver, Colo.
  Relatives: Son of David Evans and Rachel (Burnett) Evans; married 1838 to Hannah P. Canby (1813-1850); married 1853 to Margaret Patten Gray (1830-1906); father of Josephine Evans (1844-1868; who married Samuel Hitt Elbert (1833-1899)).
  The city of Evanston, Illinois, is named for him.  — The city of Evans, Colorado, is named for him.  — Mount Evans, in Clear Creek County, Colorado, is named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS John Evans (built 1943, scrapped 1961) was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article
  Image source: American Monthly Review of Reviews, August 1897
  Edward Everett (1794-1865) — of Cambridge, Middlesex County, Mass.; Charlestown, Middlesex County (now part of Boston, Suffolk County), Mass. Born in Dorchester, Norfolk County (now part of Boston, Suffolk County), Mass., April 11, 1794. Unitarian minister; college professor; U.S. Representative from Massachusetts 4th District, 1825-35; Governor of Massachusetts, 1836-40; U.S. Minister to Great Britain, 1841-45; president, Harvard College, 1846-49; U.S. Secretary of State, 1852-53; U.S. Senator from Massachusetts, 1853-54; Constitutional Union candidate for Vice President of the United States, 1860; Presidential Elector for Massachusetts, 1864. Unitarian. Delivered a lengthy speech immediately preceding Abraham Lincoln's brief Gettysburg Address, November 19, 1863. Died in Boston, Suffolk County, Mass., January 15, 1865 (age 70 years, 279 days). Interment at Mt. Auburn Cemetery, Cambridge, Mass.
  Relatives: Son of Rev. Oliver Everett and Lucy (Hill) Everett; brother of Alexander Hill Everett; married, May 8, 1822, to Charlotte Gray Brooks (1800-1859; sister-in-law of Charles Francis Adams (1807-1886); niece of Benjamin Gorham; granddaughter of Nathaniel Gorham); father of William Everett; uncle of Charles Hale.
  Political families: Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York; Sewall-Adams-Cony family of Maine; Adams-Baldwin-Otis family of Boston, Massachusetts (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  The city of Everett, Massachusetts, is named for him.  — The borough of Everett, Pennsylvania, is named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: Edward E. BostwickEdward Everett AbramsEdward E. BruenEdward E. RobbinsEdward E. HollandEdward E. ChaseEdward E. McCallE. E. DixonEdward E. LibbyEdward E. EslickEdward E. DenisonE. Everett SwanEdward Everett Brodie
  Coins and currency: His portrait appeared on the U.S. $50 silver certificates in the 1880s.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  William Nash Everett (1864-1928) — of Rockingham, Richmond County, N.C. Born in Rockingham, Richmond County, N.C., December 29, 1864. Democrat. Member of North Carolina state senate, 1917-18; member of North Carolina state house of representatives from Richmond County, 1919-22; secretary of state of North Carolina, 1923-28; died in office 1928. Died of a heart attack in his room at the Sir Walter Raleigh Hotel, Raleigh, Wake County, N.C., February 7, 1928 (age 63 years, 40 days). Interment at Everett Cemetery, Rockingham, N.C.
  The Everett Residence Hall at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, is named for him.
  James Edgar Evins — also known as J. Edgar Evins — of Smithville, DeKalb County, Tenn. Democrat. Delegate to Democratic National Convention from Tennessee, 1940, 1944. Entombed in mausoleum at Smithville Town Cemetery, Smithville, Tenn.
  Relatives: Father of Joseph Landon Evins (1910-1984).
  Edgar Evins State Park, in DeKalb County, Tennessee, is named for him.
  Charles Ewing (1780-1832) — of Trenton, Mercer County, N.J. Born in Bridgeton, Cumberland County, N.J., June 8, 1780. Lawyer; Federalist candidate for New Jersey state house of assembly, 1815; chief justice of New Jersey state supreme court, 1824-32. Died, from cholera, in Trenton, Mercer County, N.J., August 5, 1832 (age 52 years, 58 days). Interment at First Presbyterian Churchyard, Trenton, N.J.; cenotaph at Riverview Cemetery, Trenton, N.J.
  Relatives: Son of James Ewing (1744-1823) and Martha (Boyd) Ewing (1745-1782); married to Eleanor Graeme Armstrong (1783-1816).
  The township of Ewing, New Jersey, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  John Fairfield (1797-1847) — of Saco, York County, Maine. Born in Saco, York County, Maine, January 30, 1797. Democrat. Lawyer; U.S. Representative from Maine, 1835-38 (3rd District 1835-37, 4th District 1837-38); resigned 1838; Governor of Maine, 1839-41, 1842-43; defeated, 1840; U.S. Senator from Maine, 1843-47; died in office 1847. Died in Washington, D.C., December 24, 1847 (age 50 years, 328 days). Interment at Laurel Hill Cemetery, Saco, Maine; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery, Washington, D.C.
  Fort Fairfield (old military installation), and the town of Fort Fairfield, Maine, were named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Clyde Edward Fant (1905-1973) — also known as Clyde E. Fant — of Shreveport, Caddo Parish, La. Born in Linden, Cass County, Tex., 1905. Democrat. Mayor of Shreveport, La., 1946-54, 1958-70. Baptist. Died in Shreveport, Caddo Parish, La., 1973 (age about 68 years). Interment at Forest Park East Cemetery, Shreveport, La.
  Clyde Fant Park, along the Red River, in Shreveport, Louisiana, is named for him.
  Herman Daniel Farrell, Jr. (1932-2018) — also known as Denny Farrell — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born in Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., February 4, 1932. Democrat. Automobile mechanic; member of New York state assembly, 1975-2017 (74th District 1975-82, 71st District 1983-2017); delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1980, 1984, 1996, 2000, 2004, 2008; candidate in primary for mayor of New York City, N.Y., 1985; member of Democratic National Committee from New York, 1988, 2004-08; Presidential Elector for New York, 1996, 2000; New York Democratic state chair, 2001-06. African ancestry. Died in New York City (unknown county), N.Y., May 26, 2018 (age 86 years, 111 days). Burial location unknown.
  Denny Farrell Riverbank State Park (opened 1993 as Riverbank State Park; renamed 2017), in Manhattan, New York, is named for him.  — The Herman 'Denny' Farrell Pedestrian Bridge (opened 2017), over the Henry Hudson Parkway and railroad tracks, to Riverside Park, in Manhattan, New York, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article
  Wallace Rider Farrington (1871-1933) — of Hawaii. Born in Orono, Penobscot County, Maine, May 3, 1871. Governor of Hawaii Territory, 1921-29. Congregationalist. Died of heart disease in Honolulu, Island of Oahu, Honolulu County, Hawaii, October 6, 1933 (age 62 years, 156 days). Interment at Oahu Cemetery, Honolulu, Island of Oahu, Hawaii.
  Relatives: Son of Joseph Rider Farrington (1830-1897) and Ellen Elizabeth (Holyoke) Farrington (1835-1895); married, October 26, 1896, to Catharine McAlpine Crane (1870-1953); father of Joseph Rider Farrington (1897-1954); second cousin of Edward Silsby Farrington.
  Political family: Farrington family of Honolulu, Hawaii.
  Farrington High School, in Honolulu, Hawaii, is named for him.  — Farrington Street and Farrington Highway, in Honolulu, Hawaii, are named for him.  — Farrington Hall auditorium (built 1930, demolished in the 1970s), at the University of Hawaii, Honolulu, Hawaii, was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Jacob Sloat Fassett (1853-1924) — also known as J. Sloat Fassett — of Elmira, Chemung County, N.Y. Born in Elmira, Chemung County, N.Y., November 13, 1853. Republican. Lawyer; newspaper editor; Chemung County District Attorney, 1879-80; delegate to Republican National Convention from New York, 1880, 1892, 1904, 1908, 1916; member of New York state senate 27th District, 1884-91; Secretary of Republican National Committee, 1888-92; U.S. Collector of Customs, 1891; candidate for Governor of New York, 1891; U.S. Representative from New York 33rd District, 1905-11; defeated, 1910; banker; lumber business. Died in Vancouver, British Columbia, April 21, 1924 (age 70 years, 160 days). Interment at Woodlawn Cemetery, Elmira, N.Y.
  Relatives: Married, February 13, 1879, to Jennie L. Crocker (1860-1939; daughter of Edwin Bryant Crocker (1818-1875); who married Charles Crocker).
  Political family: Crocker-Whitehouse family (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  The World War II Liberty ship SS Jacob Sloat Fassett (built 1944, scrapped 1965) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  James Herman Faulkner, Sr. (1916-2008) — also known as Jimmy Faulkner — of Bay Minette, Baldwin County, Ala. Born in Lamar County, Ala., March 1, 1916. Democrat. Newspaper publisher; insurance agent; mayor of Bay Minette, Ala., 1941-43; member of Alabama Democratic State Executive Committee, 1942; served in the U.S. Army Air Force in World War II; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Alabama, 1948, 1952 (alternate); member of Alabama state senate, 1950-54; owned a chain of seven radio stations; bank director. Church of Christ. Died, in Oakwood Nursing Home, Bay Minette, Baldwin County, Ala., August 22, 2008 (age 92 years, 174 days). Interment at Bay Minette Cemetery, Bay Minette, Ala.
  Relatives: Son of Henry L. Faulkner and Ebbie (Johnson) Faulkner; married to Evelyn Louise Irwin (1910-1995).
  Faulkner University (founded 1942 as Montgomery Bible College; renamed 1953 as Alabama Christian College; renamed 1985 as Faulkner University), in Montgomery, Alabama, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  James Fenner (1771-1846) — of Providence, Providence County, R.I. Born in Providence, Providence County, R.I., January 22, 1771. Democrat. U.S. Senator from Rhode Island, 1805-07; Governor of Rhode Island, 1807-11, 1824-31, 1843-45; Presidential Elector for Rhode Island, 1816, 1820; Presidential Elector for Rhode Island, 1836; delegate to Rhode Island state constitutional convention, 1842. Died April 17, 1846 (age 75 years, 85 days). Interment at North Burial Ground, Providence, R.I.
  Relatives: Son of Arthur Fenner (1745-1805).
  The town of Fenner, New York, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
Reuben E. Fenton Reuben Eaton Fenton (1819-1885) — also known as Reuben E. Fenton — of Frewsburg, Chautauqua County, N.Y. Born in Carroll, Chautauqua County, N.Y., July 4, 1819. Lawyer; U.S. Representative from New York, 1853-55, 1857-65 (33rd District 1853-55, 1857-63, 29th District 1863-65); delegate to Republican National Convention from New York, 1856; Governor of New York, 1865-69; candidate for Republican nomination for Vice President, 1868; U.S. Senator from New York, 1869-75. Died in Jamestown, Chautauqua County, N.Y., August 25, 1885 (age 66 years, 52 days). Entombed at Lake View Cemetery, Jamestown, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of George Washington Fenton (1783-1860) and Elsie (Owen) Fenton (1790-1875); married, February 5, 1840, to Jane Frew (1820-1841); married, June 12, 1844, to Elizabeth Scudder (1824-1901); second cousin once removed of Nathaniel Freeman, Jr.; third cousin of Benjamin Fessenden and Charles Backus Hyde Fessenden; third cousin twice removed of Desda Chapin (1893-1945); third cousin thrice removed of Peronneau Finley Henderson; fourth cousin once removed of George Champlin, John Baldwin, Levi Yale, Herschel Harrison Hatch and Frank P. Fenton.
  Political families: Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York; Otis family of Connecticut (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  The town of Fenton, New York, is named for him.  — The community of Fentonville, New York, is named for him.  — Fenton Hall, at the State University of New York at Fredonia, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: New York Red Book 1896
  Fred Christian Fischer (1879-1963) — also known as Fred C. Fischer — of Belleville, Wayne County, Mich. Born in Flat Rock, Wayne County, Mich., November 12, 1879. Republican. School teacher and principal; alternate delegate to Republican National Convention from Michigan, 1920; candidate in primary for U.S. Representative from Michigan 16th District, 1934; Wayne County Superintendent of Schools, 1935-54. Methodist. German ancestry. Member, Freemasons; Knights Templar; Shriners; Odd Fellows. Died, from a myocardial infarction, in Ridgewood Osteopathic Hospital, Superior Township, Washtenaw County, Mich., April 20, 1963 (age 83 years, 159 days). Interment at Hillside Cemetery, Belleville, Mich.
  Relatives: Son of Fred Fischer and Eleanor (Alexander) Fischer; married, June 24, 1908, to Reva Ruthruff (1889-1968).
  Fred C. Fischer Elementary School (built 1957, closed 2011), in Taylor, Michigan, was named for him.  — The former Fred C. Fischer Library, in Belleville, Michigan, was named for him.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Bert Fish (1875-1943) — of DeLand, Volusia County, Fla. Born in Bedford, Lawrence County, Ind., October 8, 1875. Superintendent of schools; lawyer; county judge in Florida, 1910-17, 1931-33; U.S. Minister to Egypt, 1933-38; Saudi Arabia, 1939-41; Portugal, 1941-43, died in office 1943. German and English ancestry. Member, Sigma Nu. Died in Lisbon, Portugal, July 21, 1943 (age 67 years, 286 days). Interment at Oakdale Cemetery, DeLand, Fla.
  Relatives: Son of George W. Fish (1852-1895) and Sarah M. (Lee) Fish (1854-1907).
  Fish Memorial Hospital (later, Florida Hospital Fish Memorial; now, AdventHealth Fish Memorial), Orange City, Florida, is named for him.
  Epitaph: "An educator and philanthropist, a judge and outstanding statesman, who died while on duty, in the service of his country."
  See also Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Clinton Bowen Fisk (1828-1890) — also known as Clinton B. Fisk — of Coldwater, Branch County, Mich.; New Jersey. Born in York, Livingston County, N.Y., December 8, 1828. Merchant; miller; banker; insurance business; general in the Union Army during the Civil War; Prohibition candidate for President of the United States, 1888. Died in New York, New York County, N.Y., July 9, 1890 (age 61 years, 213 days). Interment at Oak Grove Cemetery, Coldwater, Mich.
  Relatives: Son of Benjamin Bigford e Fisk and Lydia (Aldrich) Fisk; married 1850 to Jeannette Crippen.
  Fisk University, Nashville, Tennessee, is named for him.  — Clinton B. Fisk Avenue, in Westerleigh, Staten Island, New York, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Edwin Henry Fitler (1825-1896) — also known as Edwin H. Fitler — of Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa. Born in Kensington (now part of Philadelphia), Philadelphia County, Pa., December 2, 1825. Republican. Rope and cordage manufacturer; Presidential Elector for Pennsylvania, 1876; Presidential Elector for Pennsylvania, 1876; mayor of Philadelphia, Pa., 1887-91; candidate for Republican nomination for President, 1888. German ancestry. Died in Torresdale, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., May 31, 1896 (age 70 years, 181 days). Interment at Laurel Hill Cemetery, Philadelphia, Pa.
  Relatives: Son of William Fitler (1785-1836) and Elizabeth (Wonderly) Fitler (1788-1880); married 1850 to Josephine R. Baker (1831-1904); great-grandfather of Margaretta 'Happy' Fitler (1926-2015; who married Nelson Aldrich Rockefeller (1908-1979)).
  Political families: Rockefeller family of New York City, New York; Wise-Sergeant family (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  The Edwin H. Fitler School (built 1897-98), in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, is named for him<