PoliticalGraveyard.com
The Political Graveyard: A Database of American History
The Internet's Most Comprehensive Source of U.S. Political Biography
(or, The Web Site that Tells Where the Dead Politicians are Buried)
Created and maintained by Lawrence Kestenbaum

Namesake Politicians: Roads and Streets

in alphabetical order

  Aris Tee Allen (1910-1991) — also known as Aris T. Allen — of Annapolis, Anne Arundel County, Md. Born in San Antonio, Bexar County, Tex., December 27, 1910. Republican. Physician; member of Maryland state house of delegates, 1967-74, 1991; died in office 1991; delegate to Republican National Convention from Maryland, 1972 (delegation chair); Maryland Republican state chair, 1977-79; candidate for Lieutenant Governor of Maryland, 1978; member of Maryland state senate 30th District, 1979-81. African Methodist Episcopal. African ancestry. Member, Alpha Phi Alpha; American Medical Association; American Legion; NAACP. Following a diagnosis of cancer, he died from a self-inflicted gunshot, in his parked rental car, in Annapolis, Anne Arundel County, Md., February 5, 1991 (age 80 years, 40 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of James Allen and Maryetta (Whitby) Allen; married 1947 to Faye E. Watson.
  Aris T. Allen Boulevard (Maryland Route 665), in Annapolis, Maryland, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Glenn Malcolm Anderson (1913-1994) — also known as Glenn M. Anderson — of Hawthorne, Los Angeles County, Calif.; Harbor City, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, Calif.; San Pedro, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, Calif. Born in Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, Calif., February 21, 1913. Democrat. Merchant; mayor of Hawthorne, Calif., 1940-42; served in the U.S. Army during World War II; member of California state assembly, 1943-50; chair of Los Angeles County Democratic Party, 1948-50; California Democratic state chair, 1950-52; candidate for California state senate, 1950; delegate to Democratic National Convention from California, 1956, 1960, 1964, 1988; Lieutenant Governor of California, 1959-67; U.S. Representative from California, 1969-93 (17th District 1969-73, 35th District 1973-75, 32nd District 1975-93). Episcopalian. Member, American Legion; Disabled American Veterans; Amvets; Elks; Kiwanis; Redmen; Native Sons of the Golden West; Toastmasters. Died, from complications of Alzheimer's disease, at San Pedro Peninsula Hospital Pavilion, San Pedro, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, Calif., December 13, 1994 (age 81 years, 295 days). Interment at Green Hills Memorial Park, Rancho Palos Verdes, Calif.
  Relatives: Son of William J. Anderson and Serene W. (Fister) Anderson; married to Patricia Arlene Hawley and Lenore Marie 'Lee' Dutton (1924-2012).
  The Glenn Anderson Freeway Transitway (I-105), in Los Angeles County, California, is named for him.
  Epitaph: "Loved husband, father, grandfather, and public servant."
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
John J. Bagley John Judson Bagley (1832-1881) — also known as John J. Bagley — of Detroit, Wayne County, Mich. Born in Medina, Orleans County, N.Y., July 24, 1832. Republican. Cigar manufacturer; president, Michigan Mutual Life Insurance Company, 1867-72; bank director; Governor of Michigan, 1873-76. Unitarian. Died, from tuberculosis, in San Francisco, Calif., July 27, 1881 (age 49 years, 3 days). Interment at Woodmere Cemetery, Detroit, Mich.
  Relatives: Son of John Bagley and Mary M. (Smith) Bagley; married, January 16, 1855, to Frances E. Newberry (daughter of Samuel Newberry (born c.1809)); father of Margaret Bagley (who married George S. Hosmer (1855-1921)) and Frances Bagley (who married George S. Hosmer (1855-1921)).
  Political family: Bagley-Newberry family of Detroit, Michigan.
  Bagley Street, in downtown Detroit, Michigan, is named for him.
  See also National Governors Association biography — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: Portrait & Biographical Album of Washtenaw County (1891)
  Bernard Nadal Baker (1854-1918) — also known as Bernard N. Baker — of Catonsville, Baltimore County, Md. Born in Baltimore, Md., May 11, 1854. Democrat. Glass manufacturing business; established Atlantic Transport Line, operating steamships, shipping freight and passengers from Baltimore and Philadelphia to Europe; also had lighterage and cold storage enterprises; philanthropist; member, U.S. Shipping Board, 1917; resigned 1917. Died in Cottage Hospital, Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara County, Calif., December 20, 1918 (age 64 years, 223 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Charles J. Baker; married 1877 to Elizabeth Elton Livezey; married 1916 to Rosalie Barry.
  Baker Avenue, in Catonsville, Maryland, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article
  Edward Dickinson Baker (1811-1861) — also known as Edward D. Baker — of Springfield, Sangamon County, Ill.; Galena, Jo Daviess County, Ill.; San Francisco, Calif.; Oregon City, Clackamas County, Ore. Born in London, England, February 24, 1811. Lawyer; member of Illinois state house of representatives, 1837-40; member of Illinois state senate, 1841-45; U.S. Representative from Illinois, 1845-46, 1849-51 (7th District 1845-46, 6th District 1849-51); resigned 1846; colonel in the U.S. Army during the Mexican War; U.S. Senator from Oregon, 1860-61; died in office 1861; general in the Union Army during the Civil War. Killed in battle at Balls Bluff, Loudoun County, Va., October 21, 1861 (age 50 years, 239 days). Interment at San Francisco National Cemetery, San Francisco, Calif.
  Relatives: Married, April 27, 1831, to Mary A. Lee.
  Baker County, Ore. is named for him.
  The city of Baker City, Oregon, is named for him.  — Fort Baker (previously, Lime Point Military Reservation; renamed Fort Baker in 1897; now part of Golden Gate National Recreation Area), in Marin County, California, is named for him.  — Baker Street, in San Francisco, California, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Howard Henry Baker Jr. (1925-2014) — also known as Howard H. Baker — of Huntsville, Scott County, Tenn. Born in Huntsville, Scott County, Tenn., November 15, 1925. Republican. Served in the U.S. Navy during World War II; lawyer; U.S. Senator from Tennessee, 1967-85; defeated, 1964; delegate to Republican National Convention from Tennessee, 1972; candidate for Republican nomination for President, 1980; White House Chief of Staff, 1987-88; Presidential Elector for Tennessee, 2000; U.S. Ambassador to Japan, 2001-05. Presbyterian. Member, American Bar Association; Phi Delta Phi; Pi Kappa Phi. Received the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1984. Died in Huntsville, Scott County, Tenn., June 26, 2014 (age 88 years, 223 days). Interment at Mossop Cemetery, Huntsville, Tenn.
  Relatives: Step-son of Irene Bailey Baker; son of Dora (Ladd) Baker and Howard Henry Baker (1902-1964); married, December 22, 1951, to Joy Dirksen (died 1993; daughter of Everett McKinley Dirksen); married, December 7, 1996, to Nancy Landon Kassebaum (daughter of Alfred Mossman Landon).
  Political family: Baker-Dirksen family of Huntsville and Alcoa, Tennessee.
  Cross-reference: Victor Ashe
  Howard Baker Jr. Avenue, in Knoxville, Tennessee, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Boce William Barlow Jr. (1915-2005) — also known as Boce W. Barlow, Jr. — of Hartford, Hartford County, Conn.; Silver Spring, Montgomery County, Md. Born in Americus, Sumter County, Ga., August 8, 1915. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army during World War II; lawyer; municipal judge in Connecticut, 1957; member of Connecticut state senate; elected 1966; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Connecticut, 1968; member of Connecticut Democratic State Central Committee, 1977. Congregationalist. Member, NAACP; Elks; Kappa Alpha Psi. Died in Silver Spring, Montgomery County, Md., January 31, 2005 (age 89 years, 176 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Boce William Barlow (1894-1938) and Ethel (Green) Barlow (1898-1981); married to Catherine Swanson.
  Boce Barlow Way, a street in Hartford, Connecticut, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Phineas Taylor Barnum (1810-1891) — also known as P. T. Barnum; "Prince of Humbugs" — of Fairfield, Fairfield County, Conn.; Bridgeport, Fairfield County, Conn. Born in Bethel, Fairfield County, Conn., July 5, 1810. Republican. Grocer; auctioneer; newspaper publisher; Entrepreneur, impressario, museum owner, founder of the Barnum & Bailey circus, known as "The Greatest Show on Earth"; member of Connecticut state house of representatives, 1865-66, 1877-79; mayor of Bridgeport, Conn., 1875-76. Died, of heart failure, in Bridgeport, Fairfield County, Conn., April 7, 1891 (age 80 years, 276 days). Interment at Mountain Grove Cemetery, Bridgeport, Conn.; statue at Seaside Park, Bridgeport, Conn.; statue at Bethel Public Library Grounds, Bethel, Conn.
  Relatives: Son of Philo Barnum and Irena (Taylor) Barnum (1784-1868); half-brother of Philo Fairchild Barnum; married, November 8, 1829, to Charity Hallet (1808-1873); married, September 16, 1874, to Nancy Fish (1850-1927); second cousin of Andrew Gould Chatfield (1810-1875); second cousin once removed of Charles Robert Sherman; second cousin thrice removed of Benjamin Huntington and Almon Ferdinand Rockwell; third cousin of Charles Taylor Sherman, William Tecumseh Sherman, Lampson Parker Sherman and John Sherman; third cousin once removed of William Henry Barnum; third cousin twice removed of Samuel Huntington, Henry Huntington, Gurdon Huntington and Charles William Barnum; fourth cousin once removed of Ebenezer Huntington, Samuel H. Huntington, Abel Huntington, Benjamin Nicoll Huntington and Rhamanthus Menville Stocker.
  Political families: Otis family of Connecticut; Sherman family of Connecticut; Kellogg-Adams-Seymour-Chapin family of Connecticut and New York (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
   — Barnum Avenue, in Bridgeport, Connecticut, is named for him.  — The town of Barnum (incorporated 1887; annexed 1896 to Denver, Colorado), was named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS P. T. Barnum (built 1943 at Terminal Island, Los Angeles, California; scrapped 1961) was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Books by P. T. Barnum: The Life of P. T. Barnum: Written by Himself
  Edward Fitzgerald Beale (1822-1893) — Born in Washington, D.C., February 4, 1822. Surveyor; explorer; served in the U.S. Army during the Mexican War; led the experiment to use camels in the U.S. Army; during the Mexican War, made six trips between Washington, D.C. and the Pacific coast, relaying military information; thought to be the courier who brought news to Washington of the discovery of gold in California; Superintendent of Indian Affairs for California and Nevada, 1853-56; U.S. Minister to Austria-Hungary, 1876-77. Died in Washington, D.C., April 22, 1893 (age 71 years, 77 days). Interment at Chester Rural Cemetery, Chester, Pa.
  Relatives: Son of George Dixon Beale (1792-1835) and Emily (Truxton) Beale (1798-1885); married 1849 to Mary Edwards (1827-1902; daughter of Samuel Edwards); father of Truxtun Beale (1856-1936).
  Political families: Beale-Blaine-Edwards family of Chester, Pennsylvania; Dewey-Blaine-Coit-Huntington family of Connecticut (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Beale Air Force Base, near Marysville, California, is named for him.  — Beale Street, in San Francisco, California, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Truxtun Beale (1856-1936) — of San Francisco, Calif.; Annapolis, Anne Arundel County, Md. Born in San Francisco, Calif., March 6, 1856. Republican. Lawyer; U.S. Minister to Persia, 1891-92; Greece, 1892-93; delegate to Republican National Convention from California, 1912; alternate delegate to Republican National Convention from Maryland, 1920. Died near Annapolis, Anne Arundel County, Md., June 2, 1936 (age 80 years, 88 days). Interment at Bruton Parish Churchyard, Williamsburg, Va.
  Relatives: Son of Edward Fitzgerald Beale (1822-1893) and Mary (Edwards) Beale (1827-1902); married, April 30, 1894, to Harriet 'Hattie' Blaine (1871-1958; daughter of James Gillespie Blaine); married, April 23, 1903, to Marie Oge (1880-1956).
  Political family: Beale-Blaine-Edwards family of Chester, Pennsylvania (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Truxtun Avenue and Beale Avenue, in Bakersfield, California, are named for him.  — Beale Park, in Bakersfield, California, is named for him.
  See also U.S. State Dept career summary — Find-A-Grave memorial
E. M. Bigelow Edward Manning Bigelow (1850-1916) — also known as E. M. Bigelow; "Father of Pittsburgh's Parks" — of Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, Pa. Born in Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, Pa., November 6, 1850. Republican. Civil engineer; alternate delegate to Republican National Convention from Pennsylvania, 1888; Pittsburgh city engineer, 1880-88; chief of public works, city of Pittsburgh, 1888-1900; Commissioner, Pennsylvania State Highway Department, 1911-15. Presbyterian. Died, from colon cancer, in Allegheny Hospital, Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, Pa., December 6, 1916 (age 66 years, 30 days). Interment at Homewood Cemetery, Pittsburgh, Pa.; statue at Schenley Park, Pittsburgh, Pa.
  Relatives: Son of Edward Manning Bigelow (1819-1898) and Mary (Steel) Bigelow; married 1880 to Mary Peabody (1857-1934).
  Bigelow Boulevard, in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: Pittsburgh Press, January 30, 1888
  Wyatt Tate Brady (1870-1925) — also known as W. Tate Brady — of Tulsa, Tulsa County, Okla. Born in Forest City, Holt County, Mo., January 20, 1870. Democrat. Hotelier; member of Democratic National Committee from Oklahoma, 1907. Member, Ku Klux Klan; Sons of Confederate Veterans. Died from a self-inflicted gunshot wound, in Tulsa, Tulsa County, Okla., August 29, 1925 (age 55 years, 221 days). Interment at Oaklawn Cemetery, Tulsa, Okla.
  Relatives: Son of Henry Harrison Brady (1841-1917) and Minerva Anne (Snyder) Brady (1842-1911); married 1895 to Rachel Cassandra Davis (1875-1962).
  Brady Street (now Reconciliation Way), in Tulsa Oklahoma, was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  John Broome (1738-1810) — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in Staten Island, Richmond County, N.Y., July 19, 1738. Importer and exporter; delegate to New York state constitutional convention, 1777; colonel in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; member of New York state assembly from New York County, 1800-02; member of New York state senate Southern District, 1803-04; Lieutenant Governor of New York, 1804-10; died in office 1810. Died in New York, New York County, N.Y., August 8, 1810 (age 72 years, 20 days). Interment at First Presbyterian Churchyard, Manhattan, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Samuel Broome and Marie (LaTourette) Broome; married, October 19, 1769, to Rebecca Lloyd (1746-1800); married 1806 to Ruth Hunter (1755-1840).
  Broome County, N.Y. is named for him.
  The town of Broome, New York, is named for him.  — Broome Street, in Manhattan, New York, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Henry Bruckner (1871-1942) — of Bronx, Bronx County, N.Y. Born in Bronx, New York County (now Bronx County), N.Y., June 17, 1871. Democrat. President, Bruckner Beverages; director, Milton Realty Co.; director, American Metal Cap Co.; member of New York state assembly from New York County 35th District, 1901; New York City Commissioner of Public Works, 1902-06; delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1912 (alternate), 1924, 1932 (alternate); U.S. Representative from New York 22nd District, 1913-17; resigned 1917; borough president of Bronx, New York, 1918-33. Member, Freemasons; Rotary; Elks. In 1932, the Seabury investigating committee, looking into corruption in New York City, called him to testify about the wealth he had accumulated; at the conclusion of the investigation, the committee called for his removal as Borough President. Died, from chronic nephritis, in Bronx, Bronx County, N.Y., April 14, 1942 (age 70 years, 301 days). Interment at Woodlawn Cemetery, Bronx, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of John A. Bruckner and Katharine (Schmidt) Bruckner; married, November 17, 1904, to Helen Zobel (c.1879-1930).
  Bruckner Expressway, Bronx, New York, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  James Calhoun (1743-1816) — of Baltimore, Md. Born April 17, 1743. Orphan's court judge in Maryland, 1791; mayor of Baltimore, Md., 1794-1804. Died August 14, 1816 (age 73 years, 119 days). Interment at Westminster Burying Ground, Baltimore, Md.
  Calhoun Street, in Baltimore, Maryland, is named for him.
Lewis Cass Lewis Cass (1782-1866) — of Detroit, Wayne County, Mich. Born in Exeter, Rockingham County, N.H., October 9, 1782. Democrat. Member of Ohio state house of representatives, 1806; general in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812; Governor of Michigan Territory, 1813-31; U.S. Secretary of War, 1831-36; U.S. Minister to France, 1836-42; member of University of Michigan board of regents, 1843-44; appointed 1843; candidate for Democratic nomination for President, 1844, 1852; U.S. Senator from Michigan, 1845-48, 1849-57; resigned 1848; candidate for President of the United States, 1848; U.S. Secretary of State, 1857-60. Member, Freemasons. Died in Detroit, Wayne County, Mich., June 17, 1866 (age 83 years, 251 days). Interment at Elmwood Cemetery, Detroit, Mich.
  Relatives: Second great-grandfather of Thomas Cass Ballenger (1926-2015).
  Cass counties in Ill., Ind., Iowa, Mich., Minn., Mo., Neb. and Tex. are named for him.
  The town and village of Cassville, Wisconsin, is named for him.  — The village of Cass City, Michigan, is named for him.  — The village of Cassopolis, Michigan, is named for him.  — The city of Cassville, Missouri, is named for him.  — Cass Lake, and the adjoining city of Cass Lake, Minnesota, are named for him.  — Cass Lake, in Oakland County, Michigan, is named for him.  — The Cass River, in Tuscola and Saginaw counties, Michigan, is named for him.  — The Lewis Cass Building (opened 1921 as the State Office Building; damaged in a fire in 1951; rebuilt and named for Lewis Cass; changed to Elliott-Larsen Building in 2020), in Lansing, Michigan, was named for him.  — Cass Avenue, Cass Park, and Cass Technical High School, in Detroit, Michigan, are named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: Lewis Cass WilmarthLewis C. CarpenterLewis C. VandergriftLewis C. TidballLewis Cass WickLewis Cass Tidball IILewis C. Gabbert
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Books about Lewis Cass: Willard Carl Klunder, Lewis Cass and the Politics of Moderation — Frank Bury Woodford, Lewis Cass, the Last Jeffersonian
  Image source: Library of Congress
  Anton Josef Cermak (1873-1933) — also known as Anton J. Cermak; "Pushcart Tony" — of Chicago, Cook County, Ill. Born in Kladno, Bohemia (now Czechia), May 9, 1873. Democrat. Member of Illinois state house of representatives, 1910; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Illinois, 1924, 1928, 1932; candidate for U.S. Senator from Illinois, 1928; mayor of Chicago, Ill., 1931-33; died in office 1933. Bohemian ancestry. On February 15, 1933, while he was standing on the running board of an open car from which president-elect Franklin D. Roosevelt had just given a speech, was shot and badly wounded by Italian-American bricklayer Guiseppe Zangara, who had aimed for Roosevelt; over the next month, the wound became infected, and he died, in Jackson Memorial Hospital, Miami, Dade County (now Miami-Dade County), Fla., March 6, 1933 (age 59 years, 301 days). Entombed at Bohemian National Cemetery, Chicago, Ill.
  Relatives: Married 1894 to Marie Horejs (1875-1928); father of Ludmila 'Lillian' Cermak (1885-1971; who married Richey V. Graham) and Helena Irene Cermak (1906-1973; daughter-in-law of Otto Kerner; who married Otto Kerner Jr. (1908-1976)).
  Political family: Kerner-Cermak family of Chicago, Illinois.
  Cermak Road (formerly 22nd Street), from Chicago to Oak Brook, Illinois, is named for him.  — Antonin Cermak Elementary School, in Prague, Czechia, is named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS A. J. Cermak (built 1943 at Baltimore, Maryland; scrapped 1964) was named for him.
  Epitaph: "I Am Glad It Was Me, Instead of You."
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Bertram Thomas Combs (1911-1991) — also known as Bert T. Combs — of Prestonsburg, Floyd County, Ky. Born in Manchester, Clay County, Ky., August 13, 1911. Democrat. Lawyer; served in the U.S. Army during World War II; Judge, Kentucky Court of Appeals, 1951-55; state court judge in Kentucky, 1957-59; Governor of Kentucky, 1959-63; defeated, 1955, 1971; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Kentucky, 1960, 1964; member of Democratic National Committee from Kentucky, 1966; Judge of U.S. Court of Appeals for the 6th Circuit, 1967-70. Baptist. Member, American Bar Association; Freemasons; Shriners; Order of the Coif; Phi Delta Phi. Drowned when his automobile was washed from the roadway into the Red River, during a flood, near Rosslyn, Powell County, Ky., December 4, 1991 (age 80 years, 113 days). Interment at Beech Creek Cemetery, Manchester, Ky.
  Relatives: Son of Stephen Gibson Combs and Martha (Jones) Combs; married, June 15, 1937, to Mabel Hall.
  The Bert T. Combs Mountain Parkway, which runs through Clark, Powell, Wolfe, Morgan, and Magoffin counties in Kentucky, is named for him.  — Bert T. Combs Lake, in Clay County, Kentucky, is named for him.
  See also National Governors Association biography — NNDB dossier
  Douglas Conner — of Starkville, Oktibbeha County, Miss. Democrat. Physician; alternate delegate to Democratic National Convention from Mississippi, 1996. African ancestry. Burial location unknown.
  Dr. Douglas Conner Drive, in Starkville, Mississippi, is named for him.
  William Gordon Cooke (1808-1847) — of Texas. Born in Fredericksburg, Va., March 26, 1808. Served in the Texas Army during the Texas War of Independence; member of Texas Republic House of Representatives, 1844-45; Texas Republic Secretary of War and Marine, 1845-46; candidate for U.S. Representative from Texas, 1846; Adjutant General of Texas, 1846-47; died in office 1847. Member, Freemasons. Died of tuberculosis, at Seguin, Guadalupe County, Tex., December 24, 1847 (age 39 years, 273 days). Original interment somewhere in Geronimo, Tex.; reinterment in 1937 at Texas State Cemetery, Austin, Tex.
  Relatives: Nephew by marriage of José Antonio Navarro (1795-1871).
  Political family: Navarro family of San Antonio, Texas.
  Cooke County, Tex. is named for him.
  Cooke Avenue, in San Antonio, Texas, is named for him.
  George Henry Corliss (1817-1888) — also known as George H. Corliss — of North Providence, Providence County, R.I. Born in Easton, Washington County, N.Y., June 2, 1817. Republican. Mechanical engineer; inventor; developed the Corliss steam engine; member of Rhode Island state house of representatives, 1868-70; Presidential Elector for Rhode Island, 1876. Congregationalist. Died in Providence, Providence County, R.I., February 21, 1888 (age 70 years, 264 days). Interment at Swan Point Cemetery, Providence, R.I.
  Relatives: Son of Dr. Hiram Corliss (1793-1877) and Susan (Sheldon) Corliss (1794-1843); married 1839 to Phebe F. Frost (1814-1859); married 1866 to Emily Shaw (1835-1910).
  Corliss Street, in Providence, Rhode Island, is named for him.  — Corliss High School (opened 1974), in Chicago, Illinois, is named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS G. H. Corliss (built 1942 at Richmond, California; scrapped 1972) was named for him.
  Epitaph: "Serving God in his life and with his wealth. Serving men with a kindness that was both careful and generous. By the gift of God, he increased magnificently as an inventor the world's resources in the use of steam machinery."
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  William Ashmead Courtenay (1831-1908) — of Charleston, Charleston County, S.C.; Columbia, Richland County, S.C. Born in Charleston, Charleston County, S.C., February 4, 1831. Book publisher; served in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; mayor of Charleston, S.C., 1879-87. Died in Columbia, Richland County, S.C., March 17, 1908 (age 77 years, 42 days). Interment at Magnolia Cemetery, Charleston, S.C.
  Relatives: Son of Edward Smith Courtenay (1793-1857) and Elizabeth Storer (Wade) Courtenay (1805-1886); married 1854 to Julia Anna Francis.
  Courtenay School (built 1888, rebuilt 1955, now the Charleston Progressive School), and Courtenay Drive, in Charleston, South Carolina, are named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Wilbur Lucius Cross (1862-1948) — also known as Wilbur L. Cross — of New Haven, New Haven County, Conn. Born in Mansfield, Tolland County, Conn., April 10, 1862. Democrat. University professor; Governor of Connecticut, 1931-39; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Connecticut, 1932, 1936, 1940, 1944; candidate for U.S. Senator from Connecticut, 1946. Member, American Philosophical Society; Society of the Cincinnati; Sons of the American Revolution; Phi Beta Kappa; Society of Colonial Wars. Died in New Haven, New Haven County, Conn., October 5, 1948 (age 86 years, 178 days). Interment at Evergreen Cemetery, New Haven, Conn.
  Relatives: Son of Samuel Cross and Harriet M. (Gurley) Cross; married, July 17, 1889, to Helen B. Avery.
  Wilbur Cross Parkway (built 1939-47), in New Haven County, Connecticut, is named for him.  — Wilbur L. Cross Elementary School, in Bridgeport, Connecticut, is named for him.
  Personal motto: "Always do right. This will gratify some people and astonish the rest."
  See also National Governors Association biography — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
Thomas E. Dewey Thomas Edmund Dewey (1902-1971) — also known as Thomas E. Dewey — of Pawling, Dutchess County, N.Y.; Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born in Owosso, Shiawassee County, Mich., March 24, 1902. Republican. Lawyer; U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York, 1933; New York County District Attorney, 1937-41; candidate for Republican nomination for President, 1940; Governor of New York, 1943-55; defeated, 1938; candidate for President of the United States, 1944, 1948; delegate to Republican National Convention from New York, 1952 (speaker), 1956. Episcopalian. English and French ancestry. Member, Freemasons; American Bar Association; Council on Foreign Relations; Farm Bureau; Grange; Phi Mu Alpha; Phi Delta Phi. Died, from a heart attack, in his room at the Seaview Hotel, Bal Harbor, Dade County (now Miami-Dade County), Fla., March 16, 1971 (age 68 years, 357 days). Entombed in mausoleum at Pawling Cemetery, Pawling, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of George Martin Dewey and Anne Louise 'Annie' (Thomas) Dewey (1877-1954); married, June 16, 1928, to Frances Eileen Hutt (1903-1970; grandniece of Jefferson Finis Davis); nephew of Edmond Otis Dewey; first cousin four times removed of David Waterman; second cousin thrice removed of Thomas Glasby Waterman; second cousin five times removed of Luther Waterman and Joshua Coit (1758-1798); third cousin thrice removed of John Hall Brockway; fourth cousin once removed of James Gillespie Blaine III.
  Political families: Roosevelt family of New York; Saltonstall-Davis-Frelinghuysen-Appleton family of Massachusetts; Waterman-Huntington family of Connecticut; Eastman family; Conger-Hungerford family; Chandler-Hale family of Portland, Maine; Abbott family of Salinas, California; Kellogg-Adams-Seymour-Chapin family of Connecticut and New York; Dewey-Blaine-Coit-Huntington family of Connecticut (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Cross-reference: Herbert Brownell, Jr. — Charles C. Wing — Martin T. Manton — Herman Methfessel
  The Thomas E. Dewey Thruway, which runs through Westchester, Rockland, Orange, Ulster, Greene, Albany, Schenectady, Montgomery, Herkimer, Oneida, Madison, Onondaga, Cayuga, Seneca, Ontario, Monroe, Genesee, Erie, and Chautauqua counties in New York, is named for him.
  See also National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Books about Thomas E. Dewey: Mary M. Stolberg, Fighting Organized Crime : Politics, Justice, and the Legacy of Thomas E. Dewey — Barry K. Beyer, Thomas E. Dewey, 1937-1947 : A Study in Political Leadership — Richard Norton Smith, Thomas E. Dewey and His Times — Scott Farris, Almost President: The Men Who Lost the Race but Changed the Nation — David Pietrusza, 1948: Harry Truman's Improbable Victory and the Year that Transformed America
  Image source: Library of Congress
John D. Dingell John David Dingell Jr. (1926-2019) — also known as John D. Dingell; "Big John"; "The Truck" — of Detroit, Wayne County, Mich.; Trenton, Wayne County, Mich.; Dearborn, Wayne County, Mich. Born in Colorado Springs, El Paso County, Colo., July 8, 1926. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army during World War II; lawyer; U.S. Representative from Michigan, 1955-2003 (15th District 1955-65, 16th District 1965-2003, 15th District 2003); delegate to Democratic National Convention from Michigan, 1956, 1960, 1968, 1984, 1988, 1996, 2000, 2004, 2008. Catholic. Polish and Scotch-Irish ancestry. Member, Polish Legion of American Veterans; Veterans of Foreign Wars; American Legion; Knights of Columbus; National Rifle Association. Died, from prostate cancer, in Dearborn, Wayne County, Mich., February 7, 2019 (age 92 years, 214 days). Interment at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Va.
  Relatives: Son of Grace Blossom (Bigler) Dingell (1894-1962) and John David Dingell; married 1952 to Helen Henebry (1927-2016); married 1981 to Deborah Ann Insley; father of Christopher D. Dingell (born c.1954).
  Political family: Dingell family of Detroit, Michigan.
  Cross-reference: Doug Ross
  John Dingell Drive, in Detroit Metro Airport, Romulus, Michigan, is named for him.  — The John D. Dingell VA Medical Center, in Detroit, Michigan, is named for him.  — The John D. Dingell Jr. Memorial Bridges, which take Stadium Boulevard over State Street and the Ann Arbor Railroad tracks, in Ann Arbor, Michigan, are named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Ballotpedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: Michigan Manual 1957-58
  John Wesley Dobbs (1882-1961) — also known as J. W. Dobbs — of Atlanta, Fulton County, Ga. Born in Marietta, Cobb County, Ga., March 6, 1882. Republican. Co-founder of the Atlanta Negro Voters League, 1946; delegate to Republican National Convention from Georgia, 1948, 1952 (member, Resolutions Committee). African ancestry. Died in Atlanta, Fulton County, Ga., August 30, 1961 (age 79 years, 177 days). Interment at South View Cemetery, Atlanta, Ga.; statue at John Wesley Dobbs Plaza, Atlanta, Ga.
  Presumably named for: John Wesley
  Relatives: Married 1906 to Irene Ophelia Thompson (1885-1972); grandfather of Maynard Holbrook Jackson Jr. (1938-2003).
  John Wesley Dobbs Avenue (formerly Houston Street), and Dobbs Elementary School, Atlanta, Georgia, are named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Neal Dow (1804-1897) — also known as "Napoleon of Temperance"; "Father of Prohibition"; "Grand Old Man in the Temperance Cause" — of Portland, Cumberland County, Maine. Born in Portland, Cumberland County, Maine, March 20, 1804. Tanning business; mayor of Portland, Maine, 1851, 1855; member of Maine state house of representatives, 1858-59; general in the Union Army during the Civil War; alternate delegate to Republican National Convention from Maine, 1868; Prohibition candidate for President of the United States, 1880. Quaker. During the Civil War was captured by Confederate forces, imprisoned, and eventually exchanged for Confederate Gen. William Henry Fitzhugh Lee, who was a Union prisoner. Died in Portland, Cumberland County, Maine, October 2, 1897 (age 93 years, 196 days). Interment at Evergreen Cemetery, Portland, Maine.
  Relatives: Son of Josiah Dow (1766-1861) and Dorcas Dow (1773-1851); married, January 20, 1830, to Maria Cornelia Durant Maynard (1808-1883); father of Frederick Neal Dow (1840-1934).
  Neal Dow Avenue, in Westerleigh, Staten Island, New York, is named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: Neil D. CranmerNeal Dow BeckerNeal D. Bishop
  See also Wikipedia article
  William Grant Edens (1863-1957) — also known as William G. Edens — of Chicago, Cook County, Ill. Born in Richmond, Wayne County, Ind., November 27, 1863. Republican. Railway conductor; banker; president, Illinois Highway Improvement Association, 1912-20; leading advocate for construction of hard surface roads; campaign manager for U.S. Sen William B. McKinley, 1920 and 1926; candidate in primary for U.S. Representative from Illinois at-large, 1934. Methodist. Member, Brotherhood of Railroad Trainmen; American Bankers Association; Knights of Pythias; Moose. Died, in the Villa St. Cyril old age home, Highland Park, Lake County, Ill., November 14, 1957 (age 93 years, 352 days). Entombed in mausoleum at Memorial Park Cemetery, Skokie, Ill.
  Relatives: Son of Hervey G. Washington Edens and Elsie Jane (Fought) Edens; married, December 9, 1896, to Lillian Maude Bruner (1875-1968).
  The Edens Expressway (opened 1951, now mostly part of I-94), in Cook County, Illinois, is named for him.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  John Christoph Blucher Ehringhaus (1882-1949) — also known as J. C. B. Ehringhaus — of Elizabeth City, Pasquotank County, N.C.; Raleigh, Wake County, N.C. Born in Elizabeth City, Pasquotank County, N.C., February 5, 1882. Democrat. Lawyer; member of North Carolina state house of representatives, 1905-08; Solicitor, 1st District, 1910-22; Governor of North Carolina, 1933-37; delegate to Democratic National Convention from North Carolina, 1940, 1944 (speaker), 1948. Episcopalian. Member, American Bar Association; Phi Beta Kappa; Delta Kappa Epsilon; Theta Nu Epsilon; Freemasons; Shriners; Odd Fellows; Elks. Died, of a heart attack, in his suite at the Sir Walter Hotel, Raleigh, Wake County, N.C., July 31, 1949 (age 67 years, 176 days). Interment at Episcopal Cemetery, Elizabeth City, N.C.
  Relatives: Son of Erskine Ehringhaus and Carrie Colville (Mathews) Ehringhaus; married, January 4, 1912, to Matilda Bradford Haughton (1890-1980).
  Ehringhaus Street, in Elizabeth City, North Carolina, is named for him.
  See also National Governors Association biography — Find-A-Grave memorial
Dwight D. Eisenhower Dwight David Eisenhower (1890-1969) — also known as Dwight D. Eisenhower; "Ike" — Born in Denison, Grayson County, Tex., October 14, 1890. Republican. General in the U.S. Army during World War II; president of Columbia University, 1948-53; President of the United States, 1953-61. Presbyterian. German and Swiss ancestry. Member, American Legion; Council on Foreign Relations; Loyal Legion. Died, after a series of heart attacks, at Walter Reed Army Hospital, Washington, D.C., March 28, 1969 (age 78 years, 165 days). Interment at Eisenhower Center, Abilene, Kan.
  Relatives: Son of Ida Elizabeth (Stover) Eisenhower (1862-1946) and David Jacob Eisenhower (1863-1942); brother of Milton Stover Eisenhower; married, July 1, 1916, to Mamie Eisenhower; father of John Sheldon Doud Eisenhower (1922-2013); grandfather of Dwight David Eisenhower II (son-in-law of Richard Milhous Nixon).
  Political family: Eisenhower-Nixon family (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Cross-reference: Sherman Adams — Carter L. Burgess — Woodrow Wilson Mann — Jacqueline C. Odlum — George E. Allen — Meyer Kestnbaum — Bernard M. Shanley
  The Eisenhower Expressway, from downtown Chicago west to Hillside, in Cook County, Illinois, is named for him.  — The Eisenhower Tunnel (opened 1973), which carries westbound I-70 under the Continental Divide, in the Rocky Mountains, from Clear Creek County to Summit County, Colorado, is named for him.  — The Eisenhower Range of mountains, in Victoria Land, Antarctica, is named for him.  — Mount Eisenhower (formerly Mount Pleasant), in the White Mountains, Coos County, New Hampshire, is named for him.
  Coins and currency: His portrait appeared on the U.S. $1 coin (1971-78).
  Campaign slogan: "I Like Ike."
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Books about Dwight D. Eisenhower: Stephen E. Ambrose, Eisenhower : Soldier and President — Fred I. Greenstein, The Hidden-Hand Presidency : Eisenhower as Leader — Carlo d'Este, Eisenhower : A Soldier's Life — Robert F. Burk, Dwight D. Eisenhower: Hero and Politician — Wiley T. Buchanan, Jr., Red Carpet at the White House : Four years as Chief of Protocol in the Eisenhower Administration — Jim Newton, Eisenhower: The White House Years — William Lee Miller, Two Americans: Truman, Eisenhower, and a Dangerous World
  Image source: U.S. postage stamp (1969)
  Wallace Rider Farrington (1871-1933) — of Hawaii. Born in Orono, Penobscot County, Maine, May 3, 1871. Governor of Hawaii Territory, 1921-29. Congregationalist. Died of heart disease in Honolulu, Island of Oahu, Honolulu County, Hawaii, October 6, 1933 (age 62 years, 156 days). Interment at Oahu Cemetery, Honolulu, Island of Oahu, Hawaii.
  Relatives: Son of Joseph Rider Farrington (1830-1897) and Ellen Elizabeth (Holyoke) Farrington (1835-1895); married, October 26, 1896, to Catharine McAlpine Crane (1870-1953); father of Joseph Rider Farrington (1897-1954); second cousin of Edward Silsby Farrington.
  Political family: Farrington family of Honolulu, Hawaii.
  Farrington High School, in Honolulu, Hawaii, is named for him.  — Farrington Street and Farrington Highway, in Honolulu, Hawaii, are named for him.  — Farrington Hall auditorium (built 1930, demolished in the 1970s), at the University of Hawaii, Honolulu, Hawaii, was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Clinton Bowen Fisk (1828-1890) — also known as Clinton B. Fisk — of Coldwater, Branch County, Mich.; New Jersey. Born in York, Livingston County, N.Y., December 8, 1828. Merchant; miller; banker; insurance business; general in the Union Army during the Civil War; Prohibition candidate for President of the United States, 1888. Died in New York, New York County, N.Y., July 9, 1890 (age 61 years, 213 days). Interment at Oak Grove Cemetery, Coldwater, Mich.
  Relatives: Son of Benjamin Bigford e Fisk and Lydia (Aldrich) Fisk; married 1850 to Jeannette Crippen.
  Fisk University, Nashville, Tennessee, is named for him.  — Clinton B. Fisk Avenue, in Westerleigh, Staten Island, New York, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  John Francis Fitzgerald (1863-1950) — also known as John F. Fitzgerald; "Honey Fitz" — of Boston, Suffolk County, Mass. Born in Boston, Suffolk County, Mass., February 11, 1863. Democrat. Newspaper editor and publisher; member of Massachusetts state senate, 1893-94; U.S. Representative from Massachusetts, 1895-1901, 1919 (9th District 1895-1901, 10th District 1919); mayor of Boston, Mass., 1906-08, 1910-14; defeated, 1907; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Massachusetts, 1912 (speaker), 1932; candidate for U.S. Senator from Massachusetts, 1916; candidate for Governor of Massachusetts, 1922; Presidential Elector for Massachusetts, 1932. Catholic. Died in Boston, Suffolk County, Mass., October 2, 1950 (age 87 years, 233 days). Interment at St. Joseph's Cemetery, West Roxbury, Boston, Mass.
  Relatives: Son of Thomas Fitzgerald (1823-1885) and Rosanna (Cox) Fitzgerald (1835-1879); married, September 18, 1889, to Josephine Mary Hannon (1865-1964); father of Rose Elizabeth Fitzgerald (1890-1995; who married Joseph Patrick Kennedy, Sr.); grandfather of Joseph Patrick Kennedy Jr., John Fitzgerald Kennedy (who married Jaqueline Lee Bouvier), Patricia Kennedy Lawford, Robert Francis Kennedy, Jean Kennedy Smith and Edward Moore Kennedy; great-grandfather of Kathleen Kennedy Townsend, Joseph Patrick Kennedy II, John Fitzgerald Kennedy Jr., Mark Kennedy Shriver (born1964) and Patrick Joseph Kennedy.
  Political family: Kennedy family.
  The John F. Fitzgerald Expressway (also known as the Central Artery, Interstate 93, U.S. Highway 1, and Route 3), in Boston, Massachusetts, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
Gerald R. Ford Gerald Rudolph Ford Jr. (1913-2006) — also known as Gerald R. Ford; Jerry Ford; Leslie Lynch King Jr.; "Passkey" — of Grand Rapids, Kent County, Mich.; Rancho Mirage, Riverside County, Calif. Born in Omaha, Douglas County, Neb., July 14, 1913. Republican. Lawyer; served in the U.S. Navy during World War II; delegate to Republican National Convention from Michigan, 1948, 1960, 1964; U.S. Representative from Michigan 5th District, 1949-73; resigned 1973; member, President's Commission on the Assassination of President KNDY, 1963-64; Vice President of the United States, 1973-74; President of the United States, 1974-77; defeated, 1976. Episcopalian. English and Scottish ancestry. Member, Freemasons; Scottish Rite Masons; Shriners; American Legion; Veterans of Foreign Wars; Amvets; Sons of the American Revolution; Forty and Eight; Jaycees; Delta Kappa Epsilon; Phi Delta Phi; Humane Society; Elks; American Bar Association. Shot at in two separate incidents in San Francisco in September 1975. On September 5, Lynette 'Squeaky' Fromme, follower of murderous cult leader Charles Manson, got close to the President with a loaded pistol, and squeezed the trigger at close range; the gun misfired. On September 22, Sara Jane Moore fired a shot at him, but a bystander deflected her aim. Both women were convicted and sentenced to life in prison. Received the Medal of Freedom in 1999. Died in Rancho Mirage, Riverside County, Calif., December 26, 2006 (age 93 years, 165 days). Interment at Gerald R. Ford Museum, Grand Rapids, Mich.
  Relatives: Step-son of Gerald Rudolph Ford, Sr. (1890-1962); son of Leslie Lynch King, Sr. (1884-1941) and Dorothy Ayer (Gardner) King Ford (1892-1967); half-brother of Thomas G. Ford Sr. (1918-1995); married, October 15, 1948, to Betty Warren.
  Political family: Ford family of Grand Rapids, Michigan.
  Cross-reference: Richard M. Nixon — L. William Seidman
  The Gerald R. Ford Freeway (I-196), in Kent, Ottawa, and Allegan counties, Michigan, is named for him.  — The Gerald R. Ford International Airport (opened 1963, given present name 1999), near Grand Rapids, Michigan, is named for him.  — The Gerald R. Ford Federal Building and U.S. Courthouse, in Grand Rapids, Michigan, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Books by Gerald R. Ford: A Time to Heal: The Autobiography of Gerald R. Ford (1983)
  Books about Gerald R. Ford: John Robert Greene, The Presidency of Gerald R. Ford — Edward L. Schapsmeier, Gerald R. Ford's Date With Destiny: A Political Biography — James Cannon, Time and Chance : Gerald Ford's Appointment With History — Douglas Brinkley, Gerald R. Ford
  Image source: Michigan Manual 1957-58
  Harry T. Gast Jr. (b. 1920) — also known as Harry Gast — of St. Joseph, Berrien County, Mich. Born in St. Joseph, Berrien County, Mich., September 19, 1920. Republican. Supervisor of Lincoln Township, Michigan, 1960; member of Michigan state house of representatives 43rd District, 1971-78; member of Michigan state senate, 1978-99 (22nd District 1978-94, 20th District 1995-99). Baptist. Member, Farm Bureau. Presumed deceased. Burial location unknown.
  Harry Gast Parkway, a portion of highway M-63, in Berrien County, Michigan, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article
  John Herschel Glenn Jr. (1921-2016) — also known as John Glenn — of New Concord, Muskingum County, Ohio; Columbus, Franklin County, Ohio. Born in Cambridge, Guernsey County, Ohio, July 18, 1921. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Marine Corps during World War II; Astronaut; in February 1962, first American to orbit the earth; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Ohio, 1964, 1996, 2004, 2008; U.S. Senator from Ohio, 1975-99; candidate for Democratic nomination for President, 1984; received the Medal of Freedom in 2012; also inducted to the International Air & Space Hall of Fame, the National Aviation Hall of Fame, the International Space Hall of Fame, and the U.S. Astronaut Hall of Fame. Presbyterian. Member, Freemasons; Scottish Rite Masons. Died in Columbus, Franklin County, Ohio, December 8, 2016 (age 95 years, 143 days). Interment at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Va.
  Relatives: Married 1943 to Anna Margaret Castor.
  The John Glenn Columbus International Airport (Port Columbus International Airport until 2016), in Columbus, Ohio, is named for him.  — John Glenn High School, in New Concord, Ohio, is named for him.  — John Glenn High School, in Westland, Michigan, is named for him.  — John Glenn High School, in Bay City, Michigan, is named for him.  — John Glenn High School, in Walkerton, Indiana, is named for him.  — John Glenn High School, in Norwalk, California, is named for him.  — John Glenn Middle School, in San Angelo, Texas, is named for him.  — Colonel Glenn Road, in Little Rock, Arkansas, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile
  Books by John Glenn: John Glenn: A Memoir (1999)
  Books about John Glenn: Robert Green, John Glenn : Astronaut and U.S. Senator (for young readers)
  Alexander Joseph Groesbeck (1873-1953) — also known as Alex J. Groesbeck — of Detroit, Wayne County, Mich. Born in Warren Township (now Warren), Macomb County, Mich., November 7, 1873. Republican. Lawyer; Michigan Republican state chair, 1913; Michigan state attorney general, 1917-20; Governor of Michigan, 1921-26; defeated in primary, 1914, 1926, 1930, 1934; delegate to Republican National Convention from Michigan, 1924, 1944. Dutch and French ancestry. Died March 10, 1953 (age 79 years, 123 days). Interment at Woodlawn Cemetery, Detroit, Mich.
  Relatives: Son of Louis Groesbeck (born c.1839) and Julia (Coquillard) Groesbeck; nephew of Charles G. Groesbeck.
  Political family: Groesbeck family of Macomb County, Michigan.
  Cross-reference: Adolph F. Marschner — Elton R. Eaton
  Groesbeck Highway (M-97), from Detroit, Michigan, northeast into suburban Macomb County, Michigan, is named for him.
  See also National Governors Association biography — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Lee Herbert Hamilton (b. 1931) — also known as Lee H. Hamilton — of Columbus, Bartholomew County, Ind. Born in Daytona Beach, Volusia County, Fla., April 20, 1931. Democrat. Lawyer; U.S. Representative from Indiana 9th District, 1965-99; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Indiana, 1968, 1996; received the Medal of Freedom in 2015. Methodist. Member, American Bar Association; Trilateral Commission; Rotary; Jaycees; Alpha Tau Omega. Inducted into the Indiana Basketball Hall of Fame. Still living as of 2018.
  Relatives: Son of Frank A. Hamilton (1895-1956) and Myra (Jones) Hamilton (1899-1979); married, August 21, 1954, to Nancy Ann Nelson (1930-2012; artist, died in an auto accident).
  The Lee H. Hamilton Highway (I-265 and Indiana 265), in Floyd and Clark counties, Indiana, is named for him.  — The Hamilton-Lugar School of Global and International Studies, at Indiana University, is partly named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — NNDB dossier
  Thomas Hardeman Jr. (1825-1891) — of Macon, Bibb County, Ga. Born in Eatonton, Putnam County, Ga., January 12, 1825. Democrat. Member of Georgia state house of representatives, 1853-57, 1863-64, 1874; U.S. Representative from Georgia, 1859-61, 1883-85 (3rd District 1859-61, at-large 1883-85); colonel in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; postmaster at Macon, Ga., 1885-90. Slaveowner. Died in Macon, Bibb County, Ga., March 6, 1891 (age 66 years, 53 days). Interment at Rose Hill Cemetery, Macon, Ga.
  Hardeman Avenue, in Macon, Georgia, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  William Hasson (1833-1923) — of Oil City, Venango County, Pa. Born in Shippenville, Clarion County, Pa., March 17, 1833. Democrat. Served in the Union Army during the Civil War; oil business; banker; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Pennsylvania, 1872, 1904, 1912; member of Pennsylvania state house of representatives from Venango County, 1875-76, 1883-84, 1899-1900. Died in Oil City, Venango County, Pa., May 15, 1923 (age 90 years, 59 days). Interment at St. Joseph's Cemetery, Oil City, Pa.
  Relatives: Son of James Hasson (1797-1883) and Sarah (Fetzer) Hasson (1805-1884); married 1871 to Mary Collins (1850-1925).
  Hasson Park, in Oil City, Pennsylvania, is named for him.  — Hasson Avenue, in Oil City, Pennsylvania, is named for him.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Joshua Taylor Heald (1821-1887) — also known as Joshua T. Heald — of Wilmington, New Castle County, Del. Born in New Castle, New Castle County, Del., May 26, 1821. Republican. Bookbinder; real estate developer; bank director; delegate to Republican National Convention from Delaware, 1860, 1868; President of the Wilmington City Railway Company, which built the city's first trolley line; later, he was president of the Wilmington and Western Railroad; candidate for U.S. Representative from Delaware, 1870. Died, from typhoid fever, in Wilmington, New Castle County, Del., July 23, 1887 (age 66 years, 58 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Joseph Heald and Hannah (Mendenhall) Heald; married 1844 to Hannah Pusey; third cousin of Harmon Gregg Heald (1824-1858).
  Heald Street, in Wilmington, Delaware, is named for him.
Sidney Hillman Sidney Hillman (1887-1946) — of New York. Born in Zagare, Lithuania, March 23, 1887. President, Amalgamated Clothing Workers of America (ACWA), and one of the founders of the Congress of Industrial Organizations (CIO); New York American Labor Party state chair, 1945. Jewish. Died in Point Lookout, Nassau County, Long Island, N.Y., July 10, 1946 (age 59 years, 109 days). Entombed at Westchester Hills Cemetery, Hastings-on-Hudson, N.Y.
  Relatives: Married to Bas Sheva 'Bessie' Abramowitz (1889-1970).
  Hillman Avenue, in Bronx, New York, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: Time Magazine, December 2, 1940
  Edward Dwight Holton (1815-1892) — also known as Edward D. Holton — of Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, Wis. Born in Lancaster, Coos County, N.H., April 28, 1815. Abolitionist; wheat trader; Liberty candidate for Delegate to U.S. Congress from Wisconsin Territory, 1845; founder, Milwaukee and Prairie du Chien Railroad; banker; Free Soil candidate for Governor of Wisconsin, 1853; Presidential Elector for Wisconsin, 1856; delegate to Republican National Convention from Wisconsin, 1856; member of Wisconsin state assembly from Milwaukee County 4th District, 1860. Died, from malaria and erysipelas, in Savannah, Chatham County, Ga., April 21, 1892 (age 76 years, 359 days). Interment at Forest Home Cemetery, Milwaukee, Wis.
  Relatives: Married, October 14, 1845, to Lucinda Millard (1824-1910).
  The city of Holton, Kansas, is named for him.  — Holton Hall, at the University of Wisconsin Milwaukee, is named for him.  — Holton Street, in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
John F. Hylan John Francis Hylan (1868-1936) — also known as John F. Hylan; "Red Mike" — of Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y. Born in Hunter, Greene County, N.Y., April 20, 1868. Democrat. Mayor of New York City, N.Y., 1918-25; defeated in primary, 1925. Catholic. Irish ancestry. Died of a heart attack in Forest Hills, Queens, Queens County, N.Y., January 12, 1936 (age 67 years, 267 days). Interment at St. John's Cemetery, Middle Village, Queens, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Thomas H. Hylan; married to Marian O'Hara.
  Hylan Avenue (named as such 1923), in Staten Island, New York, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article
  Image source: Empire State Notables (1914)
  Leslie Jensen (1892-1964) — of Hot Springs, Fall River County, S.Dak. Born in Hot Springs, Fall River County, S.Dak., September 15, 1892. Republican. Served in the U.S. Army on the Mexican border; served in the U.S. Army during World War I; lawyer; U.S. Collector of Internal Revenue for South Dakota, 1921-34; president, People's Telephone and Telegraph Co.; Governor of South Dakota, 1937-39; candidate in primary for U.S. Senator from South Dakota, 1938; colonel in the U.S. Army during World War II. Member, Freemasons; Elks; American Legion. Suffered a head injury in an automobile accident, and died three days later, in St. Johns-McNamara Hospital, Rapid City, Pennington County, S.Dak., December 14, 1964 (age 72 years, 90 days). Interment at Evergreen Cemetery, Hot Springs, S.Dak.
  Relatives: Son of C. L. Jensen and Lillie May (Haxby) Jensen; married, December 19, 1925, to Elizabeth Ward.
  The Leslie Jensen Scenic Drive, in Fall River County, South Dakota, is named for him.
  See also National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  John Hume Kedzie (1815-1903) — also known as John H. Kedzie — of Evanston, Cook County, Ill. Born in Stamford, Delaware County, N.Y., September 8, 1815. Republican. Lawyer; real estate developer; member of Illinois state house of representatives 7th District, 1877-78. Congregationalist. Scottish ancestry. Died in Evanston, Cook County, Ill., April 9, 1903 (age 87 years, 213 days). Interment at Rosehill Cemetery, Chicago, Ill.
  Kedzie Avenue, in Chicago, Illinois, is named for him.  — Kedzie Street, in Evanston, Illinois, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Thomas F. Larkin (c.1872-1928) — of Yonkers, Westchester County, N.Y. Born about 1872. Democrat. Contractor; business partner of James J. Lynch; mayor of Yonkers, N.Y., 1928; died in office 1928; delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1928. Died, of apoplexy, while playing golf, at the 13th tee of the Briarcliff Lodge golf course, in Briarcliff Manor, Westchester County, N.Y., July 25, 1928 (age about 56 years). Interment at St. Mary's Cemetery, Yonkers, N.Y.
  Larkin Plaza (also known as Dock Street), in Yonkers, New York, is named for him.
  John Christian Lodge (1862-1950) — also known as John C. Lodge — of Detroit, Wayne County, Mich. Born in Detroit, Wayne County, Mich., August 12, 1862. Republican. Newspaper reporter; lumber business; member of Michigan state house of representatives from Wayne County 1st District, 1909-10; mayor of Detroit, Mich., 1922-23, 1924, 1928-30; defeated, 1929. Presbyterian. Member, Freemasons. Died February 6, 1950 (age 87 years, 178 days). Interment at Elmwood Cemetery, Detroit, Mich.
  Relatives: Son of Dr. Edwin Albert Lodge and Christiana (Hanson) Lodge; uncle by marriage of Charles Augustus Lindbergh (1859-1924).
  The John C. Lodge Freeway (M-10), in Detroit, Michigan, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
Huey P. Long Huey Pierce Long (1893-1935) — also known as Huey P. Long; Hugh Pierce Long; "The Kingfish" — of Shreveport, Caddo Parish, La.; New Orleans, Orleans Parish, La. Born near Winnfield, Winn Parish, La., August 30, 1893. Democrat. Lawyer; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Louisiana, 1928; Governor of Louisiana, 1928-32; member of Democratic National Committee from Louisiana, 1928; impeached by the Louisiana House in 1929 over multiple charges including his attempt to impose an oil tax and his unauthorized demolition of the governor's mansion, but not convicted by the Senate; U.S. Senator from Louisiana, 1932-35; died in office 1935. Baptist. Member, Elks. Shot and mortally wounded by Dr. Carl Weiss (who was immediately killed at the scene), in the Louisiana State Capitol Building, September 8, 1935, and died two days later at Our Lady of the Lake Hospital, Baton Rouge, East Baton Rouge Parish, La., September 10, 1935 (age 42 years, 11 days). Interment at State Capitol Grounds, Baton Rouge, La.
  Relatives: Son of Hugh Pierce Long (1852-1937) and Caledonia Palestine (Tison) Long (1860-1913); brother of George Shannon Long and Earl Kemp Long (1895-1960) (who married Blanche B. Revere); married, April 12, 1913, to Rose McConnell; father of Russell Billiu Long; second cousin once removed of Gillis William Long and Speedy Oteria Long.
  Political family: Long family of Louisiana.
  Cross-reference: Cecil Morgan — John H. Overton — Harvey G. Fields — Gerald L. K. Smith
  The Huey P. Long - O.K. Allen Bridge (opened 1940), which carries U.S. Highway 190 and a rail line over the Mississippi River, between East Baton Rouge Parish and West Baton Rouge Parish, Louisiana, is partly named for him.  — Senador Huey Pierce Long, a street in Asunsion, Paraguay, is named for him.
  Campaign slogan: "Every Man a King."
  Campaign slogan: "Share Our Wealth."
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile
  Books by Huey P. Long: Every Man a King : The Autobiography of Huey P. Long
  Books about Huey P. Long: T. Harry Williams, Huey Long — Harnett T. Kane, Huey Long's Louisiana Hayride: The American Rehearsal for Dictatorship 1928-1940 — Richard D. White, Kingfish: The Reign of Huey P. Long — David R. Collins, Huey P. Long : Talker and Doer (for young readers)
  Image source: KnowLA Encyclopedia of Louisiana
  Joseph Echols Lowery (b. 1921) — also known as Joseph E. Lowery — of Atlanta, Fulton County, Ga. Born in Huntsville, Madison County, Ala., October 6, 1921. Democrat. Pastor; leader in the civil rights movement; co-founder of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference; escaped death in 1963 when his hotel room in Birmingham, Ala., was bombed, and in 1979 when Klansmen in Decatur, Ala., opened fire on Lowery and other protesters; arrested while demonstrating in support of a garbage workers' strike in Atlanta, 1968; arrested during protests in Cullman, Ala., 1978; arrested while protesting apartheid at the South African Embassy in Washington, D.C., 1984; offered prayer, Democratic National Convention, 1988 ; delivered eulogies at the funerals of Rosa Parks and Coretta Scott King; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Georgia, 2008. Methodist. African ancestry. Still living as of 2014.
  Relatives: Married 1950 to Evelyn Gibson.
  Joseph E. Lowery Boulevard, in Atlanta, Georgia, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  William T. Martin (d. 1866) — of Columbus, Franklin County, Ohio. Born in Bedford County, Pa. Mayor of Columbus, Ohio, 1824-26. Died in Columbus, Franklin County, Ohio, February 19, 1866. Burial location unknown.
  Martin Avenue, in Columbus, Ohio, is named for him.
Martin A. Matich Martin Anthony Matich (1927-2008) — also known as Martin A. Matich — of Colton, San Bernardino County, Calif.; San Bernardino, San Bernardino County, Calif. Born in Loma Linda, San Bernardino County, Calif., September 6, 1927. Engineer; grading contractor; his company built over 1,000 miles of roads, including major expressways and interchanges, as well as airport runways, flood control channels, landfills, and major buildings; mayor of Colton, Calif., 1958-60; director, San Bernardino Community Hospital. Catholic. Member, American Society of Civil Engineers; Navy League; American Arbitration Association; Knights of Columbus; Elks; Native Sons of the Golden West. Died in San Bernardino, San Bernardino County, Calif., April 19, 2008 (age 80 years, 226 days). Interment at Our Lady Queen of Peace Catholic Cemetery, Colton, Calif.
  Relatives: Son of John Matich and Williamina (Davidson) Matich; married, September 3, 1964, to Evelyn Winter.
  The Martin A. Matich Highway (Route 210), from San Bernardino to Redlands, California, is named for him.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: The Press-Enterprise, April 21, 2008
  William Sumner Maynard (1802-1866) — also known as William S. Maynard — of Ann Arbor, Washtenaw County, Mich. Born in Berkshire County, Mass., April 25, 1802. Merchant; village president of Ann Arbor, Michigan, 1836-38, 1839-40; mayor of Ann Arbor, Mich., 1856-58, 1865-66. Congregationalist. Suffering from severe depression, he killed himself by an overdose of morphine or laudanum, in Ann Arbor, Washtenaw County, Mich., June 18, 1866 (age 64 years, 54 days). Interment at Forest Hill Cemetery, Ann Arbor, Mich.
  Relatives: Married to Julia Guiteau (aunt of Charles Julius Guiteau (assassin in 1881 of President James A. Garfield)).
  Maynard Street, in Ann Arbor, Michigan, is named for him.
  Joseph Meharry Medill (1823-1899) — also known as Joseph Medill — of Chicago, Cook County, Ill. Born near St. John, New Brunswick, April 6, 1823. Editor-in-chief of the Chicago Tribune newspaper; delegate to Illinois state constitutional convention 59th District, 1869-70; mayor of Chicago, Ill., 1871-73. Scotch-Irish ancestry. Died in San Antonio, Bexar County, Tex., March 16, 1899 (age 75 years, 344 days). Interment at Graceland Cemetery, Chicago, Ill.; cenotaph at West Lawn Cemetery, Canton, Ohio.
  Relatives: Son of William Medill (1792-1865) and Margaret (Corbett) Medill (1803-1889); married, September 2, 1852, to Katherine Patrick (died 1894); father of Katherine Van Etta Medill (daughter-in-law of Cyrus Hall McCormick; who married Robert Sanderson McCormick (1849-1919)); grandfather of Joseph Medill McCormick (who married Ruth Hanna), Joseph Medill Patterson and Robert Rutherford McCormick; great-grandfather of Alicia Patterson (1907-1963; who married Harry Frank Guggenheim); second great-grandfather of Joseph Medill Patterson Albright (who married Madeleine Korbel).
  Political family: McCormick-Guggenheim-Morton-Medill family of Illinois and New York.
  Medill Avenue, in Chicago, Illiois, is named for him.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Schuyler Merritt (1853-1953) — of Stamford, Fairfield County, Conn. Born in New York, New York County, N.Y., December 16, 1853. Republican. Manufacturer; banker; delegate to Connecticut state constitutional convention, 1902; delegate to Republican National Convention from Connecticut, 1908 (alternate), 1916; U.S. Representative from Connecticut 4th District, 1917-31, 1933-37; defeated, 1930, 1936. Episcopalian. Died in Stamford, Fairfield County, Conn., April 1, 1953 (age 99 years, 106 days). Interment at Woodland Cemetery, Stamford, Conn.
  Relatives: Son of Matthew Franklin Merritt (1815-1896) and Mariah (Shaw) Merritt (1820-1901); married, October 21, 1879, to Frances Hannah Hoyt (1850-1943).
  Merritt Parkway, in Fairfield County, Connecticut, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Thomas Taylor Minor (1844-1889) — also known as Thomas T. Minor — of Port Townsend, Jefferson County, Wash.; Seattle, King County, Wash. Born, of American parents, in Manepy, Ceylon (now Sri Lanka), February 20, 1844. Republican. Served in the Union Army during the Civil War; physician; one of the founders of the Seattle, Lake Shore and Eastern Railroad; delegate to Republican National Convention from Washington Territory, 1880; mayor of Port Townsend, Wash., 1880-83; mayor of Seattle, Wash., 1887-88. Member, Freemasons. Last seen traveling by canoe to Whidbey Island, with others, on a duck huting trip, and was never heard from again; presumed drowned in a watercraft accident, in Puget Sound, December 2, 1889 (age 45 years, 285 days). His canoe was recovered, but his remains were not found.
  Relatives: Son of Eastman Strong Minor and Judith (Manchester) Minor (1814-1900); married, August 20, 1872, to Sarah Montgomery (1840-1931); grandfather of Thomas Minor Pelly (1902-1973).
  Political family: Moriarty-Minor family of Seattle, Washington.
  The T.T. Minor School (built 1890, demolished 1940, rebuilt 1941, closed 2010, renovated and reopened 2016), in Seattle, Washington, is named for him.  — Minor Avenue, in Seattle, Washington, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Henry Andrew Mucci (1911-1997) — also known as Henry A. Mucci; "Hero of Cabanatuan" — of Bridgeport, Fairfield County, Conn. Born in Bridgeport, Fairfield County, Conn., March 4, 1911. Democrat. Colonel in the U.S. Army during World War II; led famed raid in 1945 on a Japanese prison camp in the Philippines which rescued the survivors of the Bataan Death March; automobile dealer; candidate for U.S. Representative from Connecticut 4th District, 1946. Catholic. Italian ancestry. Member, Knights of Columbus. Died, of a stroke, in Melbourne, Brevard County, Fla., April 20, 1997 (age 86 years, 47 days). Interment at United States Military Academy Cemetery, West Point, N.Y.
  Relatives: Married 1947 to Marion Fountain (1920-1994).
  The Henry Mucci Highway (Route 25), in Trumbull, Connecticut, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Edwards Bobo Murray (1854-1894) — of Anderson, Anderson County, S.C. Born in Newberry District (now Newberry County), S.C., February 5, 1854. Democrat. Lawyer; newspaper editor; chair of Anderson County Democratic Party, 1878-90; member of South Carolina state house of representatives from Anderson County, 1878-84; involved in a dispute over alcohol prohibition in Anderson County, which he supported; on September 15, 1885, in the public square of Anderson, S.C., he was shot at by John Brown Moore, and fired back, injuring Moore; charges against him were dismissed; member of South Carolina state senate from Anderson County, 1886-90. Baptist. Member, Sons of Temperance. Drowned while rescuing his daughter in a swimming pond, Anderson, Anderson County, S.C., July 7, 1894 (age 40 years, 152 days). Interment at Silver Brook Cemetery, Anderson, S.C.
  Relatives: Son of John Scott Murray (1822-1892) and Claudia Rebecca (Edwards) Murray (1828-1909); married, May 9, 1876, to Mary Eva Sloan (1854-1929).
  Murray Avenue, in Anderson, South Carolina, is named for him.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  William Huston Natcher (1909-1994) — also known as William H. Natcher — of Bowling Green, Warren County, Ky. Born in Bowling Green, Warren County, Ky., September 11, 1909. Democrat. Lawyer; Warren County Attorney, 1938-50; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Kentucky, 1940; served in the U.S. Navy during World War II; commonwealth attorney, 8th District, 1951-53; U.S. Representative from Kentucky 2nd District, 1953-94; died in office 1994. Baptist. Member, American Legion; Forty and Eight; Kiwanis; Odd Fellows. Died, in the Bethesda Naval Hospital, Bethesda, Montgomery County, Md., March 29, 1994 (age 84 years, 199 days). Interment at Fairview Cemetery, Bowling Green, Ky.
  Relatives: Son of J. M. Natcher and Blanche (Hays) Natcher; married, June 17, 1937, to Virginia Reardon.
  The William H. Natcher Federal Building and U.S. Courthouse, in Bowling Green, Kentucky, is named for him.  — The William H. Natcher Parkway (opened 1972 as the Green River Parkway; renamed 1994; redesignated 2018 as Interstate 165, without the Natcher name), which ran through Warren, Butler, Ohio, and Daviess counties, Kentucky, was named for him.  — The William H. Natcher Bridge (opened 2002), which takes U.S. Highway 231 over the Ohio River, between Daviess County, Kentucky and Spencer County, Indiana, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
Tasker L. Oddie Tasker Lowndes Oddie (1870-1950) — also known as Tasker L. Oddie — of Nye County, Nev.; Reno, Washoe County, Nev. Born in Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y., October 20, 1870. Republican. Lawyer; real estate business; mining business; Nye County District Attorney, 1900-02; member of Nevada state senate, 1904-08; Governor of Nevada, 1911-15; defeated, 1914, 1918; U.S. Senator from Nevada, 1921-33; defeated, 1932, 1938; delegate to Republican National Convention from Nevada, 1924, 1928 (member, Resolutions Committee), 1932, 1940 (alternate). Episcopalian. Member, Freemasons; Knights Templar; Shriners; Elks. Died in San Francisco, Calif., February 17, 1950 (age 79 years, 120 days). Interment at Lone Mountain Cemetery, Carson City, Nev.
  Relatives: Son of Henry Meigs Oddie and Ellen Gibson (Prout) Oddie; married, November 30, 1916, to Daisy Rendall.
  Oddie Boulevard, in Reno and Sparks, Washoe County, Nevada, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article
  Image source: Library of Congress
  William Butler Ogden (1805-1877) — also known as William B. Ogden — of Delaware County, N.Y.; Chicago, Cook County, Ill.; New York, New York County (part now in Bronx, Bronx County), N.Y. Born in Walton, Delaware County, N.Y., June 15, 1805. Member of New York state assembly from Delaware County, 1835; mayor of Chicago, Ill., 1837-38; member of Illinois state senate 1st District, 1861-62; president, Union Pacific Railroad, 1862-63. Died in New York, New York County (part now in Bronx, Bronx County), N.Y., August 3, 1877 (age 72 years, 49 days). Interment at Woodlawn Cemetery, Bronx, N.Y.
  Ogden Avenue, in Chicago, Illinois, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Henry Kemble Oliver — also known as Henry K. Oliver — of Salem, Essex County, Mass. Massachusetts state treasurer, 1861-66; candidate for Governor of Massachusetts, 1873; mayor of Salem, Mass., 1877-80. Burial location unknown.
  Oliver Street, in Salem, Massachusetts, is named for him.
John J. Pershing John Joseph Pershing (1860-1948) — also known as John J. Pershing; "Black Jack" — of Washington, D.C. Born in Laclede, Linn County, Mo., September 13, 1860. Republican. Served in the U.S. Army during the Spanish-American War; general in the U.S. Army during World War I; candidate for Republican nomination for President, 1920; his autobiography won the Pulitzer Prize for history in 1932. Member, Freemasons. Died in Washington, D.C., July 15, 1948 (age 87 years, 306 days). Interment at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Va.
  Relatives: Son of John F. Pershing and Anne E. (Thompson) Pershing; married, June 26, 1905, to Helen Frances Warren (daughter of Francis Emroy Warren (1844-1929)).
  Pershing County, Nev. is named for him.
  Pershing Road, in Chicago, Illinois, is named for him.
  Politician named for him: John Pershing Caulfield
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: Munsey's Magazine, May 1919
  Marion L. Pillsbury (1902-1983) — also known as Pill Pillsbury — of Coldwater, Branch County, Mich. Born in Metz, Steuben County, Ind., January 7, 1902. Played professional basketball for the Fort Wayne Zollner Pistons (now the Detroit Pistons); automobile dealer; mayor of Coldwater, Mich., 1966-70. Member, Freemasons; Exchange Club; Farm Bureau. Died in the Community Health Center of Branch County, Coldwater, Branch County, Mich., January 2, 1983 (age 80 years, 360 days). Interment at Oak Grove Cemetery, Coldwater, Mich.
  Relatives: Son of Zachary A. Pillsbury and Meda (Burch) Pillsbury; married, December 1, 1925, to June Lois Merriman (1906-1985; second cousin of Robert Lendon Bibler (1905-1978)).
  Political family: Howard-Bibler-Merriman family of Indiana.
  Pillsbury Avenue in Coldwater, Michigan, is named for him.
Adam Clayton Powell, Jr. Adam Clayton Powell Jr. (1908-1972) — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born in New Haven, New Haven County, Conn., November 29, 1908. Democrat. Baptist minister; U.S. Representative from New York, 1945-71 (22nd District 1945-53, 16th District 1953-63, 18th District 1963-71); delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1952, 1960, 1964; cited for contempt of court in 1966 for refusing to pay damages in a lawsuit against him; on February 28, 1967, he was expelled from the House of Representatives on charges of unbecoming conduct and misusing public funds; the Supreme Court overturned the expulsion in 1969. Baptist. African ancestry. Member, Alpha Phi Alpha; Elks. Died, of prostate cancer, in Jackson Memorial Hospital, Miami, Dade County (now Miami-Dade County), Fla., April 4, 1972 (age 63 years, 127 days). Cremated; ashes scattered in a private or family graveyard, Bahamas.
  Relatives: Son of Adam Clayton Powell, Sr. (1865-1953; minister) and Mattie (Fletcher) Powell; married, March 8, 1933, to Isabel Washington (divorced 1945); married, August 1, 1945, to Hazel Scott (divorced 1960); married, December 15, 1960, to Yvette Marjorie Diago (Flores) Powell; father of Adam Clayton Powell IV (born1962).
  Adam Clayton Powell Jr. Boulevard (formerly part of Seventh Avenue), in Manhattan, New York, is named for him.  — The Adam Clayton Powell State Office Building (opened 1974 as the Harlem State Office Building; renamed 1983), in Manhattan, New York, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Books by Powell,Adam Clayton,Jr.: Adam by Adam: The Autobiography of Adam Clayton Powell, Jr.
  Books about Powell,Adam Clayton,Jr.: Tisha Hamilton, Adam Clayton Powell, Jr.: The Political Biography of an American Dilemma — Wil Haygood, King of the Cats: The Life and Times of Adam Clayton Powell, Jr.
  Image source: Library of Congress
Epaphroditus Ransom Epaphroditus Ransom (1798-1859) — of Vermont; Kalamazoo, Kalamazoo County, Mich. Born in Shelburne Falls, Shelburne, Franklin County, Mass., March 24, 1798. Lawyer; member of Vermont state house of representatives, 1830; justice of Michigan state supreme court, 1836-48; chief justice of Michigan state supreme court, 1843-48; Governor of Michigan, 1848-50; member of University of Michigan board of regents, 1850-51; member of Michigan state house of representatives from Kalamazoo County 2nd District, 1853-54. Died in Fort Scott, Bourbon County, Kan., November 9, 1859 (age 61 years, 230 days). Interment at Mountain Home Cemetery, Kalamazoo, Mich.
  Relatives: Uncle of Elizabeth Noyes Ransom (who married Charles Eugene Otis); granduncle of Edward Cahill (1843-1922).
  Political family: Otis family of Connecticut (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Ransom Avenue, in Grand Rapids, Michigan, is named for him.
  See also National Governors Association biography — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: Portrait & Biographical Album of Washtenaw County (1891)
  Benjamin Rush (1746-1813) — also known as "Father of American Psychiatry" — of Pennsylvania. Born in Byberry Township (now part of Philadelphia), Philadelphia County, Pa., January 4, 1746. Physician; Delegate to Continental Congress from Pennsylvania, 1776-77; signer, Declaration of Independence, 1776; served in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War. Member, American Philosophical Society. Died in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., April 19, 1813 (age 67 years, 105 days). Interment at Christ Church Burial Ground, Philadelphia, Pa.; memorial monument at Constitution Gardens, Washington, D.C.
  Relatives: Married, January 2, 1776, to Julia Stockton (1759-1848; daughter of Richard Stockton); father of Richard Rush (1780-1859).
  Political family: Stockton family of Princeton, New Jersey (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Rush County, Ind. is named for him.
  Rush Street, in Chicago, Illinois, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about Benjamin Rush: Alyn Brodsky, Benjamin Rush : Patriot and Physician — David Barton, Benjamin Rush — David Barton, Benjamin Rush: Signer of the Declaration of Independence
  Henry Rutgers (1745-1830) — of New York, New York County, N.Y.; New Brunswick, Middlesex County, N.J. Born in New York, New York County, N.Y., October 7, 1745. Served in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; member of New York state assembly from New York County, 1777-78, 1783-84, 1800-02, 1803-05, 1806-08; resigned 1778. Dutch Reformed. Died February 17, 1830 (age 84 years, 133 days). Original interment at Dutch Church Burial Ground, Manhattan, N.Y.; reinterment in 1865 at Green-Wood Cemetery, Brooklyn, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Hendrick Rutgers and Catharine (De Peyster) Rutgers; nephew of Johannes DePeyster; grandson of Johannes de Peyster; grandnephew of Abraham de Peyster; first cousin of Matthew Clarkson; first cousin once removed of Philip DePeyster; second cousin of Pierre Van Cortlandt; second cousin once removed of Philip Peter Livingston, Philip Van Cortlandt, John Stevens III and Pierre Van Cortlandt Jr.; second cousin twice removed of William Alexander Duer, John Duer (1782-1858) and Charles Ludlow Livingston; second cousin thrice removed of William Duer and Denning Duer; second cousin four times removed of Nicholas Fish, Hamilton Fish Jr. (1849-1936), John Kean and Hamilton Fish Kean; second cousin five times removed of Robert Reginald Livingston, Hamilton Fish Jr. (1888-1991) and Robert Winthrop Kean.
  Political families: Livingston-Schuyler family of New York; Roosevelt family of New York (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Rutgers University (founded 1766 as Queens College; renamed 1825 as Rutgers College) in New Brunswick, New Jersey, is named for him.  — Henry Street and Rutgers Street, in Manhattan, New York, are both named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  James W. Shocknessy (1906-1976) — of Columbus, Franklin County, Ohio. Born November 26, 1906. Democrat. Lawyer; chairman, Ohio Turnpike Commission, 1949-76; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Ohio, 1956, 1960, 1964. Died July 15, 1976 (age 69 years, 232 days). Burial location unknown.
  The James W. Shocknessy Ohio Turnpike (built 1949-55; given its current name 1976), in Mahoning, Trumbull, Portage, Summit, Cuyahoga, Lorain, Erie, Sandusky, Ottawa, Wood, Lucas, Fulton, and Williams counties, Ohio, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article
  Preston Earnest Smith (1912-2003) — also known as Preston Smith — of Austin, Travis County, Tex. Born March 8, 1912. Democrat. Lieutenant Governor of Texas, 1963-69; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Texas, 1964, 1972; Governor of Texas, 1969-73. Died October 18, 2003 (age 91 years, 224 days). Burial location unknown.
  Preston Smith Road (named 1997), which circles the campus of the University of Texas of the Permian Basin, Odessa, Texas, is named for him.
  See also National Governors Association biography — NNDB dossier
  Marion Eugene Snyder (1928-2007) — also known as Gene Snyder — of Brownsboro Farms, Jefferson County, Ky. Born in Louisville, Jefferson County, Ky., January 26, 1928. Republican. Lawyer; U.S. Representative from Kentucky, 1963-65, 1967-87 (3rd District 1963-65, 4th District 1967-87); defeated, 1964. Lutheran. Member, Optimist Club. Died in Naples, Collier County, Fla., February 16, 2007 (age 79 years, 21 days). Interment at Duncan Memorial, Oldham County, Ky.
  Relatives: Son of Marion Hustavus Snyder and Lois E. Snyder; married 1961 to Mary Louise Hodges (divorced 1974).
  The Gene Snyder U.S. Courthouse and Custom House (opened 1932, renamed 1986), in Louisville, Kentucky, is named for him.  — The Gene Snyder Freeway (I-265 and Ky-841), in Louisville, Kentucky, is named for him.  — The Gene Snyder Airport (general aviation), in Pendleton County, Kentucky, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Claus Spreckels (1828-1908) — also known as "The Sugar King of Hawaii"; "His Royal Saccharinity" — Born in Lamstedt, Germany, July 9, 1828. Republican. Sugar magnate; Presidential Elector for California, 1872, 1896. German ancestry. Died in San Francisco, Calif., December 26, 1908 (age 80 years, 170 days). Interment at Cypress Lawn Memorial Park, Colma, Calif.
  Relatives: Married to Anna Christina Mangels (1830-1910); father of John Diedrich Spreckels and Adolph Bernard Spreckels (1857-1924).
  Political family: Spreckels family of San Francisco, California.
  The community (former company town) of Spreckels, California, is named for him.  — The community (former company town) of Spreckelsville, Hawaii, is named for him.  — Claus-Spreckels-Strasse, a street in Lamstedt, Germany, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Llewellyn E. Thompson Jr. (1904-1972) — of Colorado; Washington, D.C. Born in Las Animas, Bent County, Colo., August 24, 1904. Accountant; Foreign Service officer; U.S. Vice Consul in Colombo, 1929-32; Geneva, 1933-36; U.S. Consul in Geneva, 1937-38; Moscow, 1941-43; U.S. Ambassador to Austria, 1952-57; Soviet Union, 1957-62, 1966-69; , 1962-66. Died of cancer, in Bethesda, Montgomery County, Md., February 6, 1972 (age 67 years, 166 days). Interment at Las Animas Cemetery, Las Animas, Colo.
  Relatives: Son of Llewellyn E. Thompson (1863-1953) and Lula Lorene (Butcher) Thompson (1870-1962); married, October 2, 1948, to Jane (Monroe) Goelet.
  Ambassador Thompson Boulevard (U.S. Highway 50), in Las Animas, Colorado, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about Llewellyn E. Thompson, Jr.: Jenny Thompson & Sherry Thompson, The Kremlinologist: Llewellyn E. Thompson, America's Man in Cold War Moscow
  Mangle Minthorne Tompkins (1807-1881) — also known as Minthorne Tompkins — of New York, New York County, N.Y.; Staten Island, Richmond County, N.Y. Born in Westchester County, N.Y., December 26, 1807. Member of New York state assembly from New York County, 1833-34; member of New York state senate 1st District, 1840-41; resigned 1841; Free Soil Democratic candidate for Governor of New York, 1852; Presidential Elector for New York, 1856; colonel in the Union Army during the Civil War. Died in New York, New York County, N.Y., June 5, 1881 (age 73 years, 161 days). Interment at Woodlawn Cemetery, Bronx, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Daniel D. Tompkins and Hannah Tompkins; married to Susan Montgomery Lawson (1810-1904); nephew of Caleb Tompkins (1759-1846); grandson of Jonathan Griffin Tompkins; granduncle of Guy Vernor Henry.
  Political family: Livingston-Schuyler family of New York (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Minthorne Street, in Tompkinsville, Staten Island, New York, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
Roy J. Turner Roy Joseph Turner (1894-1973) — also known as Roy J. Turner — of Oklahoma City, Oklahoma County, Okla. Born in Kendrick, Lincoln County, Okla., November 6, 1894. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army during World War I; real estate business; oil producer; rancher; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Oklahoma, 1944, 1948, 1952, 1956; Governor of Oklahoma, 1947-51. Methodist. Member, American Legion; Freemasons. Died in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma County, Okla., June 11, 1973 (age 78 years, 217 days). Interment at Rose Hill Burial Park, Oklahoma City, Okla.
  Relatives: Son of Reason Turner and Etta Louise (Rogers) Turner; married 1937 to Jessica E. Grimm.
  The Turner Turnpike (opened 1953), in Tulsa, Creek, Lincoln, and Oklahoma counties, Oklahoma, is named for him.
  See also National Governors Association biography — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: Who's Who in United States Politics (1950)
Robert A. Van_Wyck Robert Anderson Van Wyck (1849-1918) — also known as Robert A. Van Wyck — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born in New York, New York County, N.Y., July 20, 1849. Democrat. Lawyer; mayor of New York City, N.Y., 1898-1901; delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1904. Member, Tammany Hall. Died in Paris, France, November 30, 1918 (age 69 years, 133 days). Interment at Woodlawn Cemetery, Bronx, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of William Van Wyck; brother of Augustus Van Wyck (1850-1922); married to Kate E. Hertle.
  The Van Wyck Expressway (opened 1963), in Queens, New York, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article
  Image source: American Monthly Review of Reviews, November 1897
  William A. Walsh — of Yonkers, Westchester County, N.Y. Democrat. Mayor of Yonkers, N.Y., 1926-27. Burial location unknown.
  Walsh Road, in Yonkers, New York, is named for him.  — The William A. Walsh Homes (opened 1967), a public housing complex in Yonkers, New York, is named for him.
  John Wentworth (1815-1888) — also known as "Long John" — of Chicago, Cook County, Ill. Born in Sandwich, Carroll County, N.H., March 5, 1815. Lawyer; newspaper editor; U.S. Representative from Illinois, 1843-51, 1853-55, 1865-67 (4th District 1843-51, 2nd District 1853-55, 1st District 1865-67); mayor of Chicago, Ill., 1857-58, 1860-61; delegate to Illinois state constitutional convention from Cook County, 1862. Died in Chicago, Cook County, Ill., October 16, 1888 (age 73 years, 225 days). Interment at Rosehill Cemetery, Chicago, Ill.
  Relatives: Married to Roxana Marie Loomis (1817-1870); uncle of Moses Jones Wentworth (1848-1922); grandson of John Wentworth Jr..
  Political family: Wentworth family of New Hampshire (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Wentworth Avenue, in Chicago, Illinois, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
  John R. Williams (1782-1854) — of Detroit, Wayne County, Mich. Born in Detroit, Wayne County, Mich., May 4, 1782. Merchant; banker; mayor of Detroit, Mich., 1824-25, 1829-30, 1844-46; delegate to Michigan state constitutional convention 1st District, 1835. Died in Detroit, Wayne County, Mich., October 20, 1854 (age 72 years, 169 days). Interment at Elmwood Cemetery, Detroit, Mich.
  Relatives: Son of Thomas Williams and Cecile (Campeau) Williams; married 1804 to Mary Mott.
  John R. Street, in Detroit, Michigan, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article
William Woodbridge William Woodbridge (1780-1861) — of Detroit, Wayne County, Mich. Born in Norwich, New London County, Conn., August 20, 1780. Lawyer; member of Ohio state house of representatives, 1807; member of Ohio state senate, 1813-15; secretary of Michigan Territory, 1815-28; Delegate to U.S. Congress from Michigan Territory, 1819-20; resigned 1820; justice of Michigan territorial supreme court, 1828-32; delegate to Michigan state constitutional convention 1st District, 1835; candidate for U.S. Representative from Michigan at-large, 1835; member of Michigan state senate 1st District, 1838-40; Governor of Michigan, 1840-41; U.S. Senator from Michigan, 1841-47. Died in Detroit, Wayne County, Mich., October 20, 1861 (age 81 years, 61 days). Interment at Elmwood Cemetery, Detroit, Mich.
  Relatives: Son of Dudley Woodbridge (1747-1823) and Lucy (Backus) Woodbridge (1757-1817); married, June 29, 1806, to Julianna Trumbull (1786-1860); father of Julianna Trumbull Woodbridge (1815-1882; who married Henry Titus Backus (1809-1877)); third great-grandson of William Leete; first cousin of Henry Titus Backus (1809-1877); first cousin twice removed of George Douglas Perkins; first cousin thrice removed of Benjamin Huntington; first cousin five times removed of George Philip Kazen; second cousin of Isaac Backus; second cousin once removed of Enoch Woodbridge and Zina Hyde Jr.; second cousin twice removed of Samuel Huntington, Henry Huntington and Gurdon Huntington; third cousin of Thomas Worcester Hyde; third cousin once removed of Ebenezer Huntington, Joseph Silliman (1756-1829), Samuel H. Huntington, Timothy Pitkin, Abel Huntington, Phineas Lyman Tracy, Albert Haller Tracy, Benjamin Nicoll Huntington, Frederick Enoch Woodbridge, Matthew Griswold, Charles Edward Hyde, John Sedgwick Hyde and Edward Warden Hyde; third cousin twice removed of John Davenport, Joshua Coit and James Davenport; third cousin thrice removed of John Foster Dulles, Allen Welsh Dulles and Selden Chapin; fourth cousin of Benjamin Tallmadge, Oliver Wolcott Jr., Frederick Wolcott, Dudley Woodbridge (1782-1844), Henry Meigs, Joseph Silliman (c.1786-1850), Bela Edgerton, Jabez Williams Huntington, Heman Ticknor, Nathaniel Huntington, James Huntington, Martin Olds, Charles Phelps Huntington, Elisha Mills Huntington and Alonzo Mark Leffingwell; fourth cousin once removed of Augustus Seymour Porter, Samuel Lathrop, Peter Buell Porter, Theodore Davenport, Frederick Augustus Tallmadge, Henry Meigs Jr., John Forsyth Jr., Alfred Peck Edgerton, Joseph Ketchum Edgerton, Edward Green Bradford (1819-1884), Joseph Fitch Silliman, William Clark Huntington, Hiram Bingham and John Leffingwell Randolph.
  Political families: DuPont family of Wilmington, Delaware; Livingston-Schuyler family of New York; Kellogg-Adams-Seymour-Chapin family of Connecticut and New York; Sherman family of Connecticut (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  The township of Woodbridge, Michigan, is named for him.  — Woodbridge Street, in downtown Detroit, Michigan, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — National Governors Association biography
  Image source: Portrait & Biographical Album of Washtenaw County (1891)
  George Wythe (1726-1806) — of York County, Va. Born in Elizabeth City County, Va. (now part of Hampton, Va.), December 3, 1726. Member of Virginia state legislature, 1758-68; Delegate to Continental Congress from Virginia, 1775-77; signer, Declaration of Independence, 1776; state court judge in Virginia, 1777; member, U.S. Constitutional Convention, 1787; delegate to Virginia convention to ratify U.S. constitution from York County, 1788. Episcopalian. Apparently murderedpoisoned by his grandnephew — and died two weeks later, in Richmond, Va., June 8, 1806 (age 79 years, 187 days). Interment at St. John's Churchyard, Richmond, Va.; memorial monument at Constitution Gardens, Washington, D.C.
  Wythe County, Va. is named for him.
  The town of Wytheville, Virginia, is named for him.  — Wythe Avenue, in Richmond, Virginia, is named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS George Wythe (built 1941-42 at Baltimore, Maryland; scrapped 1970) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  Henry L. Yesler (1810-1892) — of Massillon, Stark County, Ohio; Seattle, King County, Wash. Born in Washington County, Md., November 30, 1810. Republican. Carpenter; millwright; mayor of Seattle, Wash., 1874-75, 1885-86. Died in Seattle, King County, Wash., December 16, 1892 (age 82 years, 16 days). Interment at Lake View Cemetery, Seattle, Wash.
  Yesler Way, a street in downtown Seattle, Washington, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
"Enjoy the hospitable entertainment of a political graveyard."
Henry L. Clinton, Apollo Hall, New York City, February 3, 1872
The Political Graveyard

The Political Graveyard is a web site about U.S. political history and cemeteries. Founded in 1996, it is the Internet's most comprehensive free source for American political biography, listing 315,917 politicians, living and dead.
 
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