PoliticalGraveyard.com
The Political Graveyard: A Database of American History
The Internet's Most Comprehensive Source of U.S. Political Biography
(or, The Web Site that Tells Where the Dead Politicians are Buried)
Created and maintained by Lawrence Kestenbaum

Namesake Politicians: Lakes, Rivers, Islands, Dams

in alphabetical order

Chester A. Arthur Chester Alan Arthur (1829-1886) — also known as Chester A. Arthur; Chester Abell Arthur; "The Gentleman Boss"; "His Accidency"; "Elegant Arthur"; "Our Chet"; "Dude President" — of New York. Born in Fairfield, Franklin County, Vt., October 5, 1829. Republican. Lawyer; U.S. Collector of Customs, 1870-78; New York Republican state chair, 1879-81; delegate to Republican National Convention from New York, 1880; Vice President of the United States, 1881; President of the United States, 1881-85; candidate for Republican nomination for President, 1884. Episcopalian. Member, Loyal Legion; Psi Upsilon; Union League. Died, of Bright's disease and a cerebral hemorrhage, in New York, New York County, N.Y., November 18, 1886 (age 57 years, 44 days). Interment at Albany Rural Cemetery, Menands, N.Y.; statue at Madison Square Park, Manhattan, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Rev. William Arthur (1796-1875) and Malvina (Stone) Arthur (1802-1869); married, October 25, 1859, to Ellen Lewis "Nell" Herndon (1837-1880); fourth cousin once removed of Benjamin Franklin Flanders (1816-1896) and Cassius Montgomery Clay Twitchell.
  Political families: Eastman family; Flanders family of Vermont; Sargent-Davis-Pike-Flanders family of New Hampshire; Fairbanks-Adams family of Massachusetts (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Arthur County, Neb. is named for him.
  The village of Arthur, Nebraska, is named for him.  — The village of Chester, Nebraska, is named for him.  — Lake Arthur, in Polk County, Minnesota, is named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: Chester A. HeitmanChester Arthur PikeChester A. Johnson
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Books about Chester A. Arthur: Thomas C. Reeves, Gentleman Boss : The Life of Chester Alan Arthur — Justus D. Doenecke, The Presidencies of James A. Garfield and Chester A. Arthur — George Frederick Howe, Chester A. Arthur, A Quarter-Century of Machine Politics — Zachary Karabell, Chester Alan Arthur — Paul Joseph, Chester Arthur (for young readers)
  Image source: Portrait & Biographical Album of Washtenaw County (1891)
  John Bigler (1805-1871) — of Centre County, Pa.; Sacramento County, Calif. Born in Carlisle, Cumberland County, Pa., January 8, 1805. Democrat. Newspaper editor; member of California state assembly, 1850-52 (Sacramento District 1850-51, 12th District 1851-52); Governor of California, 1852-56; defeated, 1855; U.S. Minister to Chile, 1857-61; delegate to Democratic National Convention from California, 1868. Died November 29, 1871 (age 66 years, 325 days). Interment at Sacramento City Cemetery, Sacramento, Calif.
  Relatives: Son of Jacob Bigler and Susan (Dock) Bigler; brother of William Bigler (1814-1880).
  Lake Bigler (later changed to Lake Tahoe), in Placer and El Dorado counties, California, and Washoe and Douglas counties, and Carson City, Nevada, was named for him.
  See also National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary
  Daniel Boone (1734-1820) — Born in Berks County, Pa., November 2, 1734. Explorer and frontiersman; member of Virginia state house of delegates, 1781, 1787. English and Welsh ancestry. Died in St. Charles County, Mo., September 26, 1820 (age 85 years, 329 days). Original interment at a private or family graveyard, St. Charles County, Mo.; reinterment at Frankfort Cemetery, Frankfort, Ky.
  Relatives: Married to Rebecca Ann Bryan (1739-1813); father of Jessie Bryan Boone and Nathan Boone; grandfather of Harriett Morgan Boone (1794-1861; who married Hiram Howell Baber); granduncle of Levi Day Boone (1808-1882); second great-grandfather of Elmer Charless Henderson.
  Political families: Thomas-Smith-Irwin family of Pennsylvania; Boone family of St. Charles County, Missouri (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Boone counties in Ark., Ill., Ind., Ky., Mo., Neb. and W.Va. are named for him.
  The Daniel Boone National Forest (established 1937 as Cumberland National Forest; renamed 1966), in Bath, Clay, Estill, Harlan, Jackson, Knox, Laurel, Lee, Leslie, McCreary, Menifee, Morgan, Owsley, Perry, Powell, Pulaski, Rockcastle, Rowan, Wayne, Whitley, and Wolfe counties, Kentucky, is named for him.  — Boone Dam (built 1950-52), on the South Fork Holston River, in Sullivan and Washington counties, Tennessee, and the Boone Lake reservoir behind the dam, are named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Edmund Gerald Brown Sr. (1905-1996) — also known as Edmund G. Brown, Sr.; Pat Brown — of San Francisco, Calif.; Beverly Hills, Los Angeles County, Calif. Born in San Francisco, Calif., April 21, 1905. Democrat. Lawyer; Republican candidate for California state assembly, 1928; delegate to Democratic National Convention from California, 1944, 1948, 1956, 1960, 1964, 1988; California state attorney general, 1951-59; Governor of California, 1959-67; defeated, 1966; candidate for Democratic nomination for President, 1960. Catholic. Member, American Bar Association; Elks; Moose; Eagles; Native Sons of the Golden West. Died of a heart attack, in Beverly Hills, Los Angeles County, Calif., February 16, 1996 (age 90 years, 301 days). Interment at Holy Cross Catholic Cemetery, Colma, Calif.
  Relatives: Son of Edmund Brown and Ida (Schuckman) Brown; brother of Harold C. Brown; married, October 30, 1930, to Bernice Layne; father of Edmund Gerald Brown Jr. and Kathleen Brown (born c.1946).
  Political family: Brown family of California.
  Cross-reference: Warren Christopher — William K. Coblentz
  The Edmund G. Brown California Aqueduct, a system of canals and pipelines that brings water to Southern California, in Contra Costa, Alameda, San Joaquin, Stanislaus, Merced, Fresno, Kings, Kern, San Luis Obispo, Santa Barbara, and Los Angeles counties, is named for him.
  See also National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile
  Books about Edmund G. Brown: Ethan Rarick, California Rising: The Life and Times of Pat Brown
  James Paul Buchanan (1867-1937) — also known as James P. Buchanan — of Brenham, Washington County, Tex. Born in Midway, Barnwell District (now Bamberg County), S.C., April 30, 1867. Democrat. Member of Texas state house of representatives, 1906-13; U.S. Representative from Texas 10th District, 1913-37; died in office 1937. Died in Washington, D.C., February 22, 1937 (age 69 years, 298 days). Interment at Prairie Lea Cemetery, Brenham, Tex.
  Relatives: Cousin *** of Edward William Pou (1863-1934).
  Buchanan Dam on the Colorado River, and Lake Buchanan, in Burnet and Llano counties, Texas, are named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
John C. Calhoun John Caldwell Calhoun (1782-1850) — also known as John C. Calhoun — of Pickens District (now Pickens County), S.C. Born in Abbeville District (part now in McCormick County), S.C., March 18, 1782. Member of South Carolina state house of representatives, 1808; U.S. Representative from South Carolina 6th District, 1811-17; U.S. Secretary of War, 1817-25; Vice President of the United States, 1825-32; resigned 1832; U.S. Senator from South Carolina, 1832-43, 1845-50; died in office 1850; U.S. Secretary of State, 1844-45. Scotch-Irish ancestry. Slaveowner. Died in Washington, D.C., March 31, 1850 (age 68 years, 13 days). Interment at St. Philip's Churchyard, Charleston, S.C.; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery, Washington, D.C.; memorial monument at Marion Park, Charleston, S.C.
  Relatives: Son of James Patrick Calhoun (1727-1795) and Martha (Caldwell) Calhoun (1750-1802); married, December 27, 1809, to Floride Bonneau (1792-1866) and Floride Calhoun (daughter of John Ewing Colhoun (c.1749-1802)); father of Anna Maria Calhoun (1817-1875; who married Thomas Green Clemson (1807-1888)); uncle of John Alfred Calhoun and Martha Catherine Calhoun (1809-1869; who married Armistead Burt); great-granduncle of John Temple Graves; first cousin of John Ewing Colhoun (c.1749-1802) and Joseph Calhoun; first cousin once removed of Andrew Pickens; first cousin twice removed of Francis Wilkinson Pickens; second cousin once removed of Sarah Ann Calhoun (1811-1892; who married Alexander Henry Brown); second cousin twice removed of William Francis Calhoun.
  Political family: Calhoun-Pickens family of South Carolina (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Calhoun counties in Ala., Ark., Fla., Ga., Ill., Iowa, Mich., Miss., S.C., Tex. and W.Va. are named for him.
  The John C. Calhoun State Office Building (opened 1926), in Columbia, South Carolina, is named for him.  — Lake Calhoun (now known by its Dakota name, Bde Maka Ska), in Minneapolis, Minnesota, was named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS John C. Calhoun (built 1941-42 at Wilmington, North Carolina; destroyed in cargo explosion at Finchhafen, Papua New Guinea, 1944) was named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: John C. JohnsonJohn Calhoun NichollsJohn Calhoun CookJohn C. SheppardJohn C. BellJohn C. C. MayoJohn C. Phillips
  Coins and currency: His portrait appeared on Confederate States $1,000 notes (1861) and $100 notes (1862).
  Campaign slogan: "Liberty dearer than union."
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about John C. Calhoun: Margaret L. Coit, John C. Calhoun : American Portrait — Clyde N. Wilson, John C. Calhoun — Merrill D. Peterson, The Great Triumvirate: Webster, Clay, and Calhoun — Warren Brown, John C. Calhoun (for young readers)
  Image source: James Smith Noel Collection, Louisiana State University in Shreveport
Lewis Cass Lewis Cass (1782-1866) — of Detroit, Wayne County, Mich. Born in Exeter, Rockingham County, N.H., October 9, 1782. Democrat. Member of Ohio state house of representatives, 1806; general in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812; Governor of Michigan Territory, 1813-31; U.S. Secretary of War, 1831-36; U.S. Minister to France, 1836-42; member of University of Michigan board of regents, 1843-44; appointed 1843; candidate for Democratic nomination for President, 1844, 1852; U.S. Senator from Michigan, 1845-48, 1849-57; resigned 1848; candidate for President of the United States, 1848; U.S. Secretary of State, 1857-60. Member, Freemasons. Died in Detroit, Wayne County, Mich., June 17, 1866 (age 83 years, 251 days). Interment at Elmwood Cemetery, Detroit, Mich.
  Relatives: Second great-grandfather of Thomas Cass Ballenger (1926-2015).
  Cass counties in Ill., Ind., Iowa, Mich., Minn., Mo., Neb. and Tex. are named for him.
  The town and village of Cassville, Wisconsin, is named for him.  — The village of Cass City, Michigan, is named for him.  — The village of Cassopolis, Michigan, is named for him.  — The city of Cassville, Missouri, is named for him.  — Cass Lake, and the adjoining city of Cass Lake, Minnesota, are named for him.  — Cass Lake, in Oakland County, Michigan, is named for him.  — The Cass River, in Tuscola and Saginaw counties, Michigan, is named for him.  — The Lewis Cass Building (opened 1921 as the State Office Building; damaged in a fire in 1951; rebuilt and named for Lewis Cass; changed to Elliott-Larsen Building in 2020), in Lansing, Michigan, was named for him.  — Cass Avenue, Cass Park, and Cass Technical High School, in Detroit, Michigan, are named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: Lewis Cass WilmarthLewis C. CarpenterLewis C. VandergriftLewis C. TidballLewis Cass WickLewis Cass Tidball IILewis C. Gabbert
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Books about Lewis Cass: Willard Carl Klunder, Lewis Cass and the Politics of Moderation — Frank Bury Woodford, Lewis Cass, the Last Jeffersonian
  Image source: Library of Congress
  Bertram Thomas Combs (1911-1991) — also known as Bert T. Combs — of Prestonsburg, Floyd County, Ky. Born in Manchester, Clay County, Ky., August 13, 1911. Democrat. Lawyer; served in the U.S. Army during World War II; Judge, Kentucky Court of Appeals, 1951-55; state court judge in Kentucky, 1957-59; Governor of Kentucky, 1959-63; defeated, 1955, 1971; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Kentucky, 1960, 1964; member of Democratic National Committee from Kentucky, 1966; Judge of U.S. Court of Appeals for the 6th Circuit, 1967-70. Baptist. Member, American Bar Association; Freemasons; Shriners; Order of the Coif; Phi Delta Phi. Drowned when his automobile was washed from the roadway into the Red River, during a flood, near Rosslyn, Powell County, Ky., December 4, 1991 (age 80 years, 113 days). Interment at Beech Creek Cemetery, Manchester, Ky.
  Relatives: Son of Stephen Gibson Combs and Martha (Jones) Combs; married, June 15, 1937, to Mabel Hall.
  The Bert T. Combs Mountain Parkway, which runs through Clark, Powell, Wolfe, Morgan, and Magoffin counties in Kentucky, is named for him.  — Bert T. Combs Lake, in Clay County, Kentucky, is named for him.
  See also National Governors Association biography — NNDB dossier
  George N. Culmback (1888-1960) — of Everett, Snohomish County, Wash. Born in Jedsted, Denmark, December 30, 1888. Republican. Member of Washington state house of representatives 38th District, 1926-32; mayor of Everett, Wash., 1956-60; died in office 1960. Died in Everett, Snohomish County, Wash., July 6, 1960 (age 71 years, 189 days). Burial location unknown.
  Culmback Dam, on the Sultan River, in Snohomish County, Washington, is named for him.
  Glenn Clarence Cunningham (1912-2003) — also known as Glenn Cunningham — of Omaha, Douglas County, Neb. Born in Omaha, Douglas County, Neb., September 10, 1912. Republican. Insurance agent; mayor of Omaha, Neb., 1948-54; delegate to Republican National Convention from Nebraska, 1948, 1952; U.S. Representative from Nebraska 2nd District, 1957-71. Episcopalian. Member, Pi Kappa Alpha. Died in Omaha, Douglas County, Neb., December 18, 2003 (age 91 years, 99 days). Interment at Westlawn-Hillcrest Memorial Park, Omaha, Neb.
  Relatives: Son of Emma Wilhelmina (Seefus) Cunningham (1883-1971) and George Warner Cunningham (1889-1976); married 1941 to Janis Lucille Thelen (1914-1987).
  Glenn Cunningham Lake, in Omaha, Nebraska, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Henry Dearborn (1751-1829) — of Massachusetts. Born in North Hampton, Rockingham County, N.H., February 23, 1751. Democrat. U.S. Representative from Massachusetts, 1793-97 (4th District 1793-95, 1st District 1795-97); U.S. Secretary of War, 1801-09; U.S. Minister to Portugal, 1822-24. Member, Freemasons. Died in Roxbury, Norfolk County (now part of Boston, Suffolk County), Mass., June 6, 1829 (age 78 years, 103 days). Original interment in unknown location; subsequent interment in 1834 at Mt. Auburn Cemetery, Cambridge, Mass.; reinterment in 1848 at Forest Hills Cemetery, Jamaica Plain, Boston, Mass.
  Relatives: Father of Henry Alexander Scammell Dearborn (1783-1851).
  Dearborn County, Ind. is named for him.
  The city of Dearborn, Michigan, is named for him.  — The Dearborn River, in Lewis & Clark and Cascade counties, Montana, is named for him.  — Mount Dearborn, a former military arsenal on an island in the Catawba River, Chester County, South Carolina, is named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS Henry Dearborn (built 1942 at Portland, Oregon; scrapped 1959) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary
Roswell P. Flower Roswell Pettibone Flower (1835-1899) — also known as Roswell P. Flower — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in Theresa, Jefferson County, N.Y., August 7, 1835. Democrat. Jeweler; banker; U.S. Representative from New York, 1881-83, 1889-91 (11th District 1881-83, 12th District 1889-91); delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1888 (speaker), 1892, 1896; Governor of New York, 1892-95. Scotch-Irish ancestry. Died in Eastport, Suffolk County, Long Island, N.Y., May 12, 1899 (age 63 years, 278 days). Interment at Brookside Cemetery, Watertown, N.Y.; statue at Washington Street Median, Watertown, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Nathan Monroe Flower and Mary Ann Flower.
  The Flower Memorial Library (opened 1904), in Watertown, New York, is named for him.  — Lake Flower, in Franklin and Essex counties, New York, is named for him.  — The town of Roswell, now part of Colorado Springs, Colorado, was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: The Parties and The Men (1896)
Albert Gallatin Albert Gallatin (1761-1849) — also known as Abraham Albert Alphonse de Gallatin — of Fayette County, Pa.; New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in Geneva, Switzerland, January 29, 1761. Democrat. Delegate to Pennsylvania state constitutional convention, 1790; member of Pennsylvania state house of representatives, 1790-92; U.S. Senator from Pennsylvania, 1793-94; U.S. Representative from Pennsylvania 11th District, 1795-1801; U.S. Secretary of the Treasury, 1801-14; U.S. Minister to France, 1815-23; Great Britain, 1826-27. Swiss ancestry. Died in Astoria, Queens, Queens County, N.Y., August 12, 1849 (age 88 years, 195 days). Entombed at Trinity Churchyard, Manhattan, N.Y.; statue at Treasury Building Grounds, Washington, D.C.
  Relatives: Son of Jean Gallatin and Sophia Albertina Rolaz du Rosey Gallatin; married 1789 to Sophie Allègre (1766-1789); married, November 11, 1793, to Hannah Nicholson (1766-1849); second great-grandfather of May Preston Davie; cousin by marriage of Joseph Hopper Nicholson (1770-1817).
  Political families: Pendleton-Lee family of Maryland; Davie family of Maryland (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Cross-reference: John L. Dawson
  Gallatin counties in Ill., Ky. and Mont. are named for him.
  The city of Gallatin, Tennessee, is named for him.  — The village of Galatia, Illinois, is named for him.  — The Gallatin River, which flows through Gallatin County, Montana, is named for him.  — Gallatin Hall (dormitory, built 1926), at Harvard University Business School, Boston, Massachusetts, is named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS Albert Gallatin (built 1941 at Terminal Island, Los Angeles, California; torpedoed and sunk 1944 in the Arabian Sea) was named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: Albert Galliton HarrisonAlbert G. JewettAlbert G. HawesAlbert G. WakefieldAlbert Gallatin TalbottAlbert G. DowAlbert G. DoleAlbert Gallatin KelloggAlbert Gallatin MarchandAlbert G. BrownAlbert G. Brodhead, Jr.Albert G. AllisonAlbert G. RiddleAlbert Galiton WatkinsAlbert G. PorterAlbert Gallatin EgbertAlbert Gallatin JenkinsAlbert Gallatin CalvertAlbert G. LawrenceAlbert G. FosterAlbert G. Simms
  Coins and currency: His portrait appeared on the U.S. $500 note in 1862-63.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about Albert Gallatin: John Austin Stevens, Albert Gallatin: An American Statesman — L. B. Kuppenheimer, Albert Gallatin's Vision of Democratic Stability — Nicholas Dungan, Gallatin: America's Swiss Founding Father — Raymond Walters, Albert Gallatin: Jeffersonian Financier and Diplomat
  Image source: New York Public Library
  William Gilpin (1813-1894) — of Colorado. Born in New Castle County, Del., October 4, 1813. Lawyer; newspaper editor; explorer; major in the U.S. Army during the Mexican War; Governor of Colorado Territory, 1861-62; candidate for Delegate to U.S. Congress from Colorado Territory, 1862. Run over by a horse and buggy, and later died as a result, in Denver, Colo., January 20, 1894 (age 80 years, 108 days). Interment at Mt. Olivet Cemetery, Wheat Ridge, Colo.
  Relatives: Son of Joshua Gilpin (1765-1841) and Mary (Dilworth) Gilpin (1777-1864); brother of Henry Dilworth Gilpin (1801-1860); married to Julia Pratte (1836-1912).
  Gilpin County, Colo. is named for him.
  Gilpin Peak, in the Sneffels Range of the Rocky Mountains, in Ouray County and San Miguel County, Colorado, is named for him.  — Gilpin Lake, in the Mount Zirkel Wilderness, Routt County, Colorado, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Andrew Haswell Green (1820-1903) — also known as Andrew H. Green; "Father of Greater New York"; "Handy Andy" — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Born near Worcester, Worcester County, Mass., October 6, 1820. Democrat. Delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1880; delegate to New York state constitutional convention 13th District, 1894. Protestant. Guided creation of Central Park in New York, and Niagara State Preserve (first state park in the U.S.); led crusade to consolidate the five boroughs into today's New York City; helped create the New York Public Library, the Bronx Zoo, and other cultural institutions. Shot and killed, by a murderer who mistook him for someone else, in front of his home, on Park Avenue, Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., November 13, 1903 (age 83 years, 38 days). Interment at Worcester Rural Cemetery, Worcester, Mass.
  Green Island, in the Niagara River, at Niagara Falls, New York, is named for him.
Herbert Hoover Herbert Clark Hoover (1874-1964) — also known as Herbert Hoover; "The Great Engineer"; "The Grand Old Man" — of Palo Alto, Santa Clara County, Calif.; Pasadena, Los Angeles County, Calif. Born in West Branch, Cedar County, Iowa, August 10, 1874. Republican. Mining engineer; candidate for Republican nomination for President, 1920; U.S. Secretary of Commerce, 1921-28; President of the United States, 1929-33; defeated, 1932; speaker, Republican National Convention, 1940, 1952, 1960. Quaker. Swiss and Dutch ancestry. Inducted into the National Mining Hall of Fame, Leadville, Colorado. Died, of intestinal cancer, in his suite at the Waldorf Towers Hotel, Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., October 20, 1964 (age 90 years, 71 days). Interment at Herbert Hoover National Historic Site, West Branch, Iowa.
  Relatives: Son of Jesse Clark Hoover (1846-1880) and Hulda Randall (Minthorn) Hoover (1848-1883); married, February 10, 1899, to Lou Hoover (1874-1944); father of Herbert Clark Hoover Jr.; distant cousin *** of Charles Lewis Hoover.
  Political family: Hoover family of Palo Alto, California.
  Cross-reference: Horace A. Mann — Walter H. Newton — Christian A. Herter — Lewis L. Strauss — Clarence C. Stetson
  Hoover Dam (built 1931-36 as Boulder Dam; renamed 1947), on the Colorado River between Clark County, Nevada, and Mohave County, Arizona, is named for him.  — Herbert Hoover High School, in Glendale, California, is named for him.  — Herbert Hoover High School, in Des Moines, Iowa, is named for him.  — Herbert Hoover High School, in San Diego, California, is named for him.  — Herbert Hoover High School, in Fresno, California, is named for him.  — Herbert Hoover High School, in Elkview, West Virginia, is named for him.  — The minor planets (asteroids) 932 Hooveria (discovered 1920), and 1363 Herberta (discovered 1935), are named for him.
  Campaign slogan (1928): "A chicken in every pot."
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Books by Herbert Hoover: The Ordeal of Woodrow Wilson
  Books about Herbert Hoover: Martin L. Fausold, The Presidency of Herbert C. Hoover — Joan Hoff Wilson, Herbert Hoover : Forgotten Progressive — George H. Nash, Life of Herbert Hoover : The Humanitarian, 1914-1917 — George H. Nash, The Life of Herbert Hoover : Masters of Emergencies, 1917-1918 — William E. Leuchtenburg, Herbert Hoover: The 31st President, 1929-1933 — Glen Jeansonne, The Life of Herbert Hoover: Fighting Quaker, 1928-1933 — Kendrick A. Clements, The Life of Herbert Hoover: Imperfect Visionary, 1918-1928 — David Holford, Herbert Hoover (for young readers)
  Image source: U.S. postage stamp (1965)
  Edward J. Howard — of Sylacauga, Talladega County, Ala. Mayor of Sylacauga, Ala., 1948-59; resigned 1959. Interment somewhere in Sylacauga, Ala.
  Relatives: Son of H. H. Howard (born c.1880); nephew of W. L. Howard.
  Political family: Howard family of Sylacauga, Alabama.
  Lake Howard, in Sylacauga, Alabama, is named for him.
  Henry Edwards Huntington (1850-1927) — also known as Henry E. Huntington — of Oneonta, Otsego County, N.Y.; San Francisco, Calif.; San Marino, Los Angeles County, Calif. Born in Oneonta, Otsego County, N.Y., February 27, 1850. Republican. Owned and expanded the streetcar and trolley system in Southern California; real estate developer; Presidential Elector for New York, 1908. Member, Sons of the Revolution. Died, from kidney disease and pneumonia, in Lankenau Hospital, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., May 23, 1927 (age 77 years, 85 days). Entombed in mausoleum at Huntington Library and Botanical Gardens, San Marino, Calif.
  Relatives: Son of Solon Huntington (1812-1890) and Harriet (Saunders) Huntington (1821-1906); married 1873 to Mary Alice Prentice (1852-1916); married 1913 to Arabella Duval 'Belle' (Yarrington) Huntington (1850-1924; his uncle's widow).
  The city of Huntington Beach, California, is named for him.  — The city of Huntington Park, California, is named for him.  — Huntington Lake, in Fresno County, California, is named for him.  — The Huntington Hotel (built 1907 as Hotel Wentworth; expanded and reopened 1914 as the Huntington Hotel; demolished 1989 and rebuilt; now Langham Huntington hotel) in Pasadena, California, is named for him.  — The Huntington Library, Art Museum, and Botanical Gardens, on his former estate, in San Marino, California, is named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS Henry E. Huntington (built 1943-44 at Terminal Island, California; scrapped 1961) was named for him.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
Lyndon B. Johnson Lyndon Baines Johnson (1908-1973) — also known as Lyndon B. Johnson; "L.B.J."; "Landslide Lyndon"; "Preacher Lyndon"; "The Accidental President"; "Volunteer"; "Light Bulb Johnson" — of Johnson City, Blanco County, Tex. Born near Stonewall, Gillespie County, Tex., August 27, 1908. Democrat. U.S. Representative from Texas 10th District, 1937-49; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Texas, 1940, 1956; U.S. Senator from Texas, 1949-61; candidate for Democratic nomination for President, 1956, 1960, 1968; Vice President of the United States, 1961-63; President of the United States, 1963-69. Disciples of Christ. Member, American Legion; Council on Foreign Relations. Awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom posthumously in 1980. Died from a heart attack, in Gillespie County, Tex., January 22, 1973 (age 64 years, 148 days). Interment at LBJ Ranch, Stonewall, Tex.
  Relatives: Son of Sam Ealy Johnson (1877-1937) and Rebekah (Baines) Johnson (1881-1958); married, November 17, 1934, to Claudia Alta 'Lady Bird' Taylor (1912-2007) and Claudia Alta Taylor; father of Lynda Bird Johnson (who married Charles Spittal Robb (born1939)).
  Political family: Johnson family of Stonewall, Texas.
  Cross-reference: Roger Kent — Irvine H. Sprague — A. W. Moursund — Eliot Janeway — Barefoot Sanders
  Lake LBJ (created as Lake Granite Shoals; renamed in 1965), in Burnet and Llano counties, Texas, is named for him.  — The village of Kampung LB Johnson, Malaysia, is named for him.
  Campaign slogan (1964): "All The Way With L.B.J."
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Books about Lyndon B. Johnson: Doris Kearns Goodwin, Lyndon Johnson and the American Dream — Robert Dallek, Flawed Giant : Lyndon Johnson and His Times, 1961-1973 — Sean J. Savage, JFK, LBJ, and the Democratic Party — Robert A. Caro, The Passage of Power: The Years of Lyndon Johnson — Mark Updegrove, Indomitable Will: LBJ in the Presidency — Nicholas deB. Katzenbach, Some of It Was Fun: Working with RFK and LBJ — Robert A. Caro, The Passage of Power: The Years of Lyndon Johnson, Vol. IV — Michael A. Schuman, Lyndon B. Johnson (for young readers)
  Critical books about Lyndon B. Johnson: Robert A. Caro, Years of Lyndon Johnson : The Path to Power — Robert A. Caro, Years of Lyndon Johnson : Means of Ascent — Robert A. Caro, Years of Lyndon Johnson : Master of the Senate — Lance Morrow, The Best Year of Their Lives: Kennedy, Johnson, and Nixon in 1948: Learning the Secrets of Power
  Image source: U.S. postage stamp (1973)
  John Hosea Kerr (1873-1958) — also known as John H. Kerr — of Warrenton, Warren County, N.C. Born in Yanceyville, Caswell County, N.C., December 31, 1873. Democrat. Lawyer; mayor of Warrenton, N.C., 1897-98; superior court judge in North Carolina 3rd District, 1916-21; U.S. Representative from North Carolina 2nd District, 1923-53; delegate to Democratic National Convention from North Carolina, 1940. Baptist. Member, Freemasons. Died in Warrenton, Warren County, N.C., June 21, 1958 (age 84 years, 172 days). Interment at Fairview Cemetery, Warrenton, N.C.
  Relatives: Son of Capt. John H. Kerr and Eliza Katherine (Yancey) Kerr; married to Ella Foote; grandnephew of John Kerr (1782-1842).
  Political family: Kerr-Settle family of North Carolina.
  The John H. Kerr dam, in Mecklenburg County, Virginia, is named for him.  — Kerr Lake, an impoundment on the Roanoke River, in Mecklenburg, Charlotte, and Halifax counties, Virginia, and Vance, Granville, and Warren counties, North Carolina, is named for him.
  Epitaph: "He Loved God And His Fellow Man."
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Jack Griffith London (1876-1916) — also known as Jack London; John Griffith Chaney — of Oakland, Alameda County, Calif.; Glen Ellen, Sonoma County, Calif. Born in San Francisco, Calif., January 12, 1876. Socialist. Novelist; candidate for mayor of Oakland, Calif., 1901 (Social Democratic), 1905 (Socialist). Died in Glen Ellen, Sonoma County, Calif., November 22, 1916 (age 40 years, 315 days). Interment at Jack London State Historic Park Cemetery, Glen Ellen, Calif.
  Relatives: Son of William Henry Chaney (1821-1903) and Flora (Wellman) London (1843-1922); married 1900 to Elizabeth May Maddern (1876-1947); married 1905 to Charmian 'Clara' Kittredge (1871-1955).
  Mount London, on the border between British Columbia, Canada, and Haines Borough, Alaska, is named for him.  — Jack London Square (entertainment and business development), and the surrounding Jack London District neighborhood, in Oakland, California, are named for him.  — Jack London Lake (Ozero Dzheja Londona), and the surrounding Jack London Nature Park, in Magadan Oblast, Russia, are named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS Jack London (built 1943 at Sausalito, California; scrapped 1968) was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Robert Thomas Miller (1893-1962) — also known as Tom Miller — of Austin, Travis County, Tex. Born in Austin, Travis County, Tex., September 21, 1893. Democrat. Mayor of Austin, Tex., 1933-49, 1955-61; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Texas, 1940, 1944, 1956. Died April 30, 1962 (age 68 years, 221 days). Interment at Oakwood Cemetery, Austin, Tex.
  Tom Miller Dam (completed 1940), in Austin, Texas, is named for him.
George W. Norris George William Norris (1861-1944) — also known as George W. Norris — of McCook, Red Willow County, Neb. Born in Sandusky County, Ohio, July 11, 1861. Lawyer; district judge in Nebraska 14th District, 1896-1903; resigned 1903; U.S. Representative from Nebraska 5th District, 1903-13; U.S. Senator from Nebraska, 1913-43; defeated (Independent), 1942; candidate for Republican nomination for President, 1928. Methodist. Member, Freemasons. Died in McCook, Red Willow County, Neb., September 2, 1944 (age 83 years, 53 days). Interment at Memorial Park Cemetery, McCook, Neb.
  Relatives: Married 1890 to Pluma Lashley (died 1901); married 1903 to Ella Leonard; grandfather of Harvey Frans Nelson Jr. (born1924).
  Norris Dam (built 1933-36), on the Clinch River, in Anderson and Campbell counties, Tennessee, and the Norris Lake reservoir, which also extends into Claiborne, Grainger, and Union counties, are named for him.  — The city of Norris, Tennessee, is named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS George W. Norris (built 1944 at Brunswick, Georgia; wrecked and lost in the North Pacific Ocean, 1946) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — NNDB dossier
  Image source: U.S. postage stamp (1961)
  Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis (1929-1994) — also known as Jackie Onassis; Jaqueline Lee Bouvier; Jacqueline Kennedy — Born in Southampton, Suffolk County, Long Island, N.Y., July 28, 1929. First Lady of the United States, 1961-63. Female. Catholic. Died, from non-Hodgkin lymphoma, in Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., May 19, 1994 (age 64 years, 295 days). Interment at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Va.
  Relatives: Step-daughter of Hugh Dudley Auchincloss; daughter of John Vernou Bouvier (1891-1957) and Janet Norton (Lee) Bouvier (1907-1989); step-sister of Eugene Luther Gore Vidal Jr. and Hugh Dudley Auchincloss III; married, September 12, 1953, to John Fitzgerald Kennedy (son of Joseph Patrick Kennedy, Sr. (1888-1969); brother of Jean Kennedy Smith; grandson of John Francis Fitzgerald); married 1968 to Aristotle Socrates Onassis (1906-1975); mother of John Fitzgerald Kennedy Jr..
  Political family: Kennedy family.
  The Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis High School for International Careers, in Manhattan, New York, is named for her.  — Jacqueline Bouvier Kennedy Onassis Hall, at George Washington University, Washington, D.C., is named for her.  — Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis Reservoir, in Central Park, Manhattan, New York, is named for her.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
George C. Pardee George Cooper Pardee (1857-1941) — also known as George C. Pardee — of Oakland, Alameda County, Calif. Born in San Francisco, Calif., July 25, 1857. Physician; mayor of Oakland, Calif., 1893-95; delegate to Republican National Convention from California, 1900, 1904, 1912, 1924; Governor of California, 1903-07; Presidential Elector for California, 1912; Presidential Elector for California, 1924. Member, Freemasons; Scottish Rite Masons; Knights Templar; Order of the Eastern Star; Shriners; Knights of Pythias; Kiwanis; Native Sons of the Golden West. Died in Oakland, Alameda County, Calif., September 1, 1941 (age 84 years, 38 days). Interment at Mountain View Cemetery, Oakland, Calif.
  Relatives: Son of Enoch Homer Pardee (1826-1896) and Mary Elizabeth (Pardee) Pardee (1830-1870); married, January 25, 1887, to Helen Newhall Penniman (1857-1947); grandnephew and second cousin twice removed of Aaron Pardee; first cousin once removed and third cousin once removed of Don Albert Pardee; third cousin twice removed of Jared Whitfield Pardee; fourth cousin once removed of Dwight Whitfield Pardee.
  Political family: Pardee family of New York.
  Pardee Dam (built 1929), and the Pardee Reservoir, on the Mokelumne River between Calaveras County and Amador County, California, are named for him.
  See also National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: American Monthly Review of Reviews, December 1902
  James Percy Priest (1900-1956) — also known as J. Percy Priest — of Nashville, Davidson County, Tenn. Born in Carter's Creek, Maury County, Tenn., April 1, 1900. Democrat. School teacher; newspaper work; U.S. Representative from Tennessee, 1941-56 (5th District 1941-43, 6th District 1943-53, 5th District 1953-56); died in office 1956. Died, in a hospital at Nashville, Davidson County, Tenn., October 12, 1956 (age 56 years, 194 days). Interment at Woodlawn Memorial Park, Nashville, Tenn.
  The J. Percy Priest Dam, and Percy Priest Lake, on the Stones River, in Davidson County, Tennessee, are named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  Harmon Liveright Remmel (1852-1927) — also known as H. L. Remmel — of Newport, Jackson County, Ark.; Little Rock, Pulaski County, Ark. Born in Stratford, Fulton County, N.Y., January 15, 1852. Republican. Lumber business; postmaster at Newport, Ark., 1877-79; financier; insurance executive; candidate for U.S. Representative from Arkansas 1st District, 1884; member of Arkansas Republican State Central Committee, 1884-1927; member of Arkansas state house of representatives, 1887; delegate to Republican National Convention from Arkansas, 1892, 1896 (member, Committee on Permanent Organization), 1908, 1912, 1916, 1920, 1924; candidate for Governor of Arkansas, 1894, 1896, 1900; U.S. Collector of Internal Revenue for Arkansas, 1897-1902, 1921-27; died in office 1927; Arkansas Republican state chair, 1900-03, 1910-16, 1921-25; member of Republican National Committee from Arkansas, 1912-24; candidate for U.S. Senator from Arkansas, 1916. Died, from pneumonia, while recovering from a stroke, in Hot Springs, Garland County, Ark., October 14, 1927 (age 75 years, 272 days). Interment at Oakland and Fraternal Historic Cemetery Park, Little Rock, Ark.
  Relatives: Son of Gottlieb 'Godlove' Remmel (1813-1892) and Henrietta (Bever) Remmel (1814-1896); brother of Louesa Remmel (1841-1904; who married William Burdick Empie), Augustus Caleb Remmel (1847-1883) and Ada E. Remmel (1853-1946); married, March 13, 1878, to Laura Lee Stafford (1853-1913); married 1915 to Elizabeth I. Cameron (1878-1926); uncle of Augustus Caleb Remmel (1882-1920); granduncle of Pratt Cates Remmel and Roland Rowe Remmel.
  Political family: Remmel family of Little Rock, Arkansas.
  Remmel Dam (built 1924), on the Ouachita River, in Hot Spring County, Arkansas, is named for him.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  James Delmage Ross (1872-1939) — also known as J. D. Ross — of Seattle, King County, Wash. Born in Chatham, Ontario, November 9, 1872. Electrical engineer; Seattle superintendent of lighting (electric power), 1911-39; member, U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, 1935-37; administrator, Bonneville Power Administration, 1937. Died, from a heart attack, following surgery for stomach and intestinal ailments, in the Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Olmsted County, Minn., March 14, 1939 (age 66 years, 125 days). Interment at Ross Family Burial Site, Newhalem, Wash.
  Relatives: Married 1907 to Alice M. Wilson.
  Mount Ross, in Whatcom County, Washington, is named for him.  — Ross Dam (built 1937-49), on the Skagit River, in Whatcom County, Washington, is named for him.  — Ross Lake, a reservoir in Whatcom County, Washington, which also extends into British Columbia, Canada, is named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS J. D. Ross (built 1943 at Portland, Oregon; sold and renamed SS Lampsis; sank during a storm in the North Atlantic Ocean, 1966) was originally named for him.
  Epitaph: "J.D. Ross, one of the greatest Americans of our generation, was an outstanding mathematician and equally great engineer. He had also the practical ability to make things work in the spirit of public opinion and successful business. More than that, he was a philosopher and lover and student of trees and flowers. His successful career and especially his long service in behalf of the public interest are worthy of study by every American boy."
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Merrell Quentin Sharpe (1888-1962) — also known as M. Q. Sharpe — of Kennebec, Lyman County, S.Dak. Born in Marysville, Marshall County, Kan., January 11, 1888. Republican. Lawyer; served in the U.S. Army during World War I; South Dakota state attorney general, 1929-33; Governor of South Dakota, 1943-47; candidate in inconclusive primary 1942; delegate to Republican National Convention from South Dakota, 1952 (Honorary Vice-President). Died in Kennebec, Lyman County, S.Dak., January 22, 1962 (age 74 years, 11 days). Interment at Graceland Cemetery, Oacoma, S.Dak.
  Lake Sharpe, on a portion of the Missouri River impounded by the Big Bend Dam (built 1959-63), and extending into Buffalo, Lyman, Hyde, Hughes, and Stanley counties, South Dakota, is named for him.
  See also National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Adolph Bernard Spreckels (1857-1924) — also known as Adolph B. Spreckels — of San Francisco, Calif. Born in San Francisco, Calif., January 5, 1857. Republican. President, Spreckels Sugar Company; delegate to Republican National Convention from California, 1884; angered by an article in the San Francisco Chronicle, on November 19, 1884, he shot and badly wounded the paper's publisher, M. H. de Young; arrested and charged with attempted murder; pleaded temporary insanity; tried in 1885 and found not guilty; president, San Francisco and San Mateo Electric Railway; vice-president, Western Sugar Company; vice-president, Oceanic Steamship Company. German ancestry. Died, from pneumonia and syphilis, in San Francisco, Calif., June 28, 1924 (age 67 years, 175 days). Entombed at Cypress Lawn Memorial Park, Colma, Calif.
  Relatives: Son of Claus Spreckels and Anna Christina (Mangels) Spreckels (1830-1910); brother of John Diedrich Spreckels (1853-1926); married to Alma de Bretteville (1881-1968).
  Political family: Spreckels family of San Francisco, California.
  Spreckels Lake, in Golden Gate Park, San Francisco, California, is named for him.  — The Spreckels Organ Pavilion, an outdoor performance venue, in Balboa Park, San Diego, California, is named for him and his brother.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Isaac Ingalls Stevens (1818-1862) — also known as Isaac I. Stevens — of Washington. Born in North Andover, Essex County, Mass., March 25, 1818. Major in the U.S. Army during the Mexican War; Governor of Washington Territory, 1853-57; Delegate to U.S. Congress from Washington Territory, 1857-61; general in the Union Army during the Civil War. Shot and killed at the Civil War battle of Chantilly, Fairfax County, Va., September 1, 1862 (age 44 years, 160 days). Interment at Island Cemetery, Newport, R.I.; memorial monument at Ox Hill Battlefield Park, Fairfax County, Va.
  Relatives: Cousin *** of Charles Abbot Stevens (1816-1892) and Moses Tyler Stevens.
  Political family: Stevens-Woodhull family of New York City, New York.
  Stevens counties in Minn. and Wash. are named for him.
  Fort Stevens (established 1863; decomissioned 1947; now a state park) in Warrenton, Oregon, was named for him.  — Fort Stevens (active during the Civil War, 1861-65; site now a park) in Washington, D.C., was named for him.  — The city (and lake) of Lake Stevens, Washington, is named for him.  — The town of Stevensville, Montana, is named for him.  — Stevens Peak (6,838 feet), in Shoshone County, Idaho, is named for him.  — Stevens Peak (5,372 feet), in Bingham County, Idaho, is named for him.  — Upper Stevens Lake, and Lower Stevens Lake, in Shoshone County, Idaho, are named for him.  — The Stevens Hall dormitory, at Washington State University, Pullman, Washington, is named for him.  — Isaac I. Stevens Elementary School (opened 1906, expanded 1928, renovated and reopened 2001), in Seattle, Washington, is named for him.  — Stevens Middle School, in Port Angeles, Washington, is named for him.  — Stevens Junior High School (now Middle School), in Pasco, Washington, is named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS Isaac I. Stevens (built 1943 at Portland, Oregon; scrapped 1967) was named for him.
  Epitaph: "Who gave to the service of his country a quick and comprehensive mind, a warm and generous heart, a firm will, and a strong arm, and who fell while rallying his command, with the flag of the Republic in his dying grasp, at the battle of Chantilly, Va."
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about Isaac Ingalls Stevens: Joseph Taylor Hazard, Companion of Adventure: A Biography of Isaac Ingalls Stevens, First Governor of Washington
  Robert Field Stockton (1795-1866) — also known as Robert F. Stockton — of New Jersey. Born in Princeton, Mercer County, N.J., August 20, 1795. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Navy during the War of 1812; served in the U.S. Navy during the Mexican War; Military Governor of California, 1846-47; U.S. Senator from New Jersey, 1851-53. Slaveowner. Died in Princeton, Mercer County, N.J., October 7, 1866 (age 71 years, 48 days). Interment at Princeton Cemetery, Princeton, N.J.
  Relatives: Son of Richard Stockton (1764-1828); father of John Potter Stockton; grandson of Richard Stockton (1730-1781); grandfather of Richard Stockton (c.1857-1929).
  Political family: Stockton family of Princeton, New Jersey (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  The city of Stockton, California, is named for him.  — The city of Stockton, Missouri, is named for him.  — The borough of Stockton, New Jersey, is named for him.  — The city of Fort Stockton, Texas, is named for him.  — Stockton Creek, a tidal channel in Monrovia, Liberia, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  Lurleen Burns Wallace (1926-1968) — also known as Lurleen B. Wallace; Lurleen Brigham Burns — of Montgomery, Montgomery County, Ala. Born in Tuscaloosa, Tuscaloosa County, Ala., September 19, 1926. Democrat. Governor of Alabama, 1967-68; died in office 1968. Female. Methodist. Died, of uterine cancer, in Montgomery, Montgomery County, Ala., May 7, 1968 (age 41 years, 231 days). Interment at Greenwood Cemetery, Montgomery, Ala.
  Relatives: Daughter of Henry Burns and Estelle (Burroughs) Burns; married, May 21, 1943, to George Corley Wallace Jr. (1919-1998).
  Political family: Wallace-Folsom family of Montgomery, Alabama.
  The Lurleen Wallace Tumor Institute, at the University of Alabama Birmingham, is named for her.  — Lurleen B. Wallace Community College (established 1967 as Lurleen B. Wallace Junior College), with campuses in Covington, Butler, and Crenshaw counties, Alabama, is named for her.  — Lake Lurleen, and Lake Lurleen State Park, in Tuscaloosa County, Alabama, are named for her.
  See also National Governors Association biography — NNDB dossier
  Paul Allen Wallace (1901-1958) — also known as Paul A. Wallace — of Wallace, Marlboro County, S.C. Born in Bennettsville, Marlboro County, S.C., July 15, 1901. Democrat. Member of South Carolina state senate from Marlboro County, 1947-58; died in office 1958; delegate to Democratic National Convention from South Carolina, 1956. On the night of the 1958 Democratic primary, he and others gathered in the sheriff's office at the Marlboro County Courthouse to hear election returns on the radio; he had just learned he had won renomination, when Court Clerk Henry A. Rogers entered the room and shot him four times; he died about twenty minutes later, in the emergency room of a nearby hospital, in Bennettsville, Marlboro County, S.C., June 10, 1958 (age 56 years, 330 days). On June 27, Rogers hanged himself in the South Carolina state mental hospital. Interment at Wallace Baptist Church Cemetery, Wallace, S.C.
  Relatives: Son of James Percy Wallace and Lillie (Allen) Wallace; married, May 25, 1920, to Ethelyne Gardner (1900-1986); father of William Paul Wallace (1921-2013).
  Lake Paul Wallace, in Marlboro County, South Carolina, is named for him.
  Epitaph: "With forgetfulness of self, humility of spirit, and nobility of character, he followed in his Master's footsteps in service to his fellowman."
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Carlton Weaver (1881-1947) — of Wilburton, Latimer County, Okla. Born in Mt. Vernon, Franklin County, Tex., August 25, 1881. Newspaper editor and publisher; delegate to Oklahoma state constitutional convention, 1906; Speaker of the Oklahoma State House of Representatives, 1930-31. Died in Wilburton, Latimer County, Okla., August 17, 1947 (age 65 years, 357 days). Interment at Robbers Cave State Park, Near Wilburton, Latimer County, Okla.
  Lake Carlton (created by a dam on Fouche Maline Creek), in Robbers Cave State Park, Latimer County, Oklahoma, is named for him.
Joseph Wheeler Joseph Wheeler (1836-1906) — also known as "Fighting Joe" — of Wheeler, Lawrence County, Ala. Born in Augusta, Richmond County, Ga., September 10, 1836. Democrat. General in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; planter; lawyer; U.S. Representative from Alabama 8th District, 1881-82, 1885-1900; served in the U.S. Army during the Spanish-American War. Episcopalian. Member, Society of Colonial Wars; Sons of the American Revolution; Sons of the War of 1812. Died in Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y., January 25, 1906 (age 69 years, 137 days). Interment at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Va.
  Relatives: Son of Joseph Wheeler and Julia Knox (Hull) Wheeler; married, February 6, 1866, to Daniella Jones (died 1896; granddaughter of Peter Early (1773-1817)); father of Thomas Harrison Wheeler (served in U.S. Navy during the Spanish-American War; drowned at Camp Wikoff, 1898).
  Wheeler County, Ga. is named for him.
  Wheeler Dam (built 1933-36), on the Tennessee River in Lauderdale and Lawrence counties, Alabama, and the Wheeler Lake reservoir, which extends into Limestone, Morgan, and Madison counties, are named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  Image source: Men of Mark in America (1906)
Woodrow Wilson Woodrow Wilson (1856-1924) — also known as Thomas Woodrow Wilson; "Schoolmaster in Politics" — of New Jersey. Born in Staunton, Va., December 28, 1856. Democrat. University professor; president of Princeton University, 1902-10; Governor of New Jersey, 1911-13; President of the United States, 1913-21. Presbyterian. Member, Phi Kappa Psi; Phi Alpha Delta. Recipient of Nobel Peace Prize in 1919; elected to the Hall of Fame for Great Americans in 1950. Died in Washington, D.C., February 3, 1924 (age 67 years, 37 days). Entombed at Washington National Cathedral, Washington, D.C.
  Relatives: Son of Rev. Joseph Ruggles Wilson (1822-1903) and Janet 'Jessie' (Woodrow) Wilson (1826-1888); married, June 24, 1885, to Ellen Wilson; married, December 18, 1915, to Edith Wilson; father of Eleanor Randolph Wilson (1889-1967; who married William Gibbs McAdoo (1863-1941)); grandfather of Woodrow Wilson Sayre.
  Political family: Harrison-Randolph-Marshall-Cabell family of Virginia (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Cross-reference: William C. Bullitt — Bainbridge Colby — Joseph E. Davies — Joseph P. Tumulty — Thomas H. Birch — Byron R. Newton
  Mount Woodrow Wilson, in Fremont County and Sublette County, Wyoming, is named for him.  — Woodrow Wilson Plaza, in the Federal Triangle, Washington, D.C., is is named for him.  — Wilson Dam (built 1924), on the Tennessee River in Colbert and Lauderdale counties, Alabama, as well as the Wilson Lake reservoir, which extends into Lawrence county, are named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: Woodrow W. BeanWoodrow W. JonesWoodrow W. ScottTom Woodrow PayneW. W. DumasWoodrow Wilson MannWoodrow W. BairdWoodrow W. MathnaWoodrow W. HulmeWoodrow W. KlineWoodrow W. McDonaldWoodrow W. HollanWoodrow W. CarterWoodrow W. FergusonW. Wilson GoodeWoodrow Wilson StoreyWoodrow W. Bean III
  Coins and currency: His portrait appeared on the U.S. $100,000 gold certificate, which was issued in 1934-45 for cash transactions between banks.
  Campaign slogan (1916): "He kept us out of war."
  See also National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Books about Woodrow Wilson: Louis Auchincloss, Woodrow Wilson — Herbert Hoover, The Ordeal of Woodrow Wilson — James Chace, 1912 : Wilson, Roosevelt, Taft and Debs : The Election that Changed the Country — John Milton Cooper, Reconsidering Woodrow Wilson: Progressivism, Internationalism, War, and Peace — A. Scott Berg, Wilson — Anne Schraff, Woodrow Wilson (for young readers)
  Critical books about Woodrow Wilson: Jim Powell, Wilson's War : How Woodrow Wilson's Great Blunder Led to Hitler, Lenin, Stalin, and World War II
  Image source: American Monthly Review of Reviews, July 1902
"Enjoy the hospitable entertainment of a political graveyard."
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The Political Graveyard

The Political Graveyard is a web site about U.S. political history and cemeteries. Founded in 1996, it is the Internet's most comprehensive free source for American political biography, listing 315,917 politicians, living and dead.
 
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