PoliticalGraveyard.com
The Political Graveyard: A Database of American History
New York County
New York

Cemeteries and Memorial Sites of Politicians in New York County

Index to Locations

  • Private or family graveyards
  • Manhattan Alfred E. Smith Park
  • Manhattan Brick Presbyterian Church
  • Manhattan Church of the Heavenly Rest
  • Manhattan City Hall Park
  • Manhattan Columbia University
  • Manhattan Dutch Church Burial Ground
  • Manhattan First Presbyterian Churchyard
  • Manhattan General Grant Memorial
  • Manhattan Hartman Triangle
  • Manhattan Herald Square
  • Manhattan Madison Square Park
  • Manhattan Morningside Park
  • Manhattan National September 11 Memorial
  • Manhattan New York City Marble Cemetery
  • Manhattan New York Marble Cemetery
  • Manhattan Old Collegiate Dutch Church Cemetery
  • Manhattan Old St. Patrick's Cathedral
  • Manhattan Old St. Thomas Church
  • Manhattan Riverside Park
  • Manhattan St. Andrew's Cemetery
  • Manhattan St. Luke's Cemetery
  • Manhattan St. Mark's-in-the-Bowery Churchyard
  • Manhattan St. Patrick's Cathedral
  • Manhattan St. Patrick's Old Cathedral
  • Manhattan St. Paul's Cemetery
  • Manhattan St. Paul's Chapel
  • Manhattan St. Paul's Churchyard
  • Manhattan St. Stephen's Cemetery
  • Manhattan Straus Park
  • Manhattan Tompkins Square Park
  • Manhattan Trinity Cemetery
  • Manhattan Trinity Churchyard
  • Greenwich Village, Manhattan Church of the Ascension Cemetery


    Private or family graveyard
    New York County,
    Politicians formerly buried here:
      Jacob Leisler (c.1640-1691) — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in Bockenheim, Holy Roman Empire (now part of Frankfurt am Main, Germany), about 1640. Fur trader; tobacco business; following the English Revolution of 1688, which brought Protestant rulers William and Mary to power, he led "Leisler's Rebellion" and seized control of the colony; Colonial Governor of New York, 1689-91; provided land for a settlement of French Huguenot refugees (now the city of New Rochelle); following the arrival of a new royal governor, he was ousted. Arrested, charged with treason, tried, convicted, and sentenced to death; executed by hanging and decapitation, in New York, New York County, N.Y., May 16, 1691 (age about 51 years). Four years later, he was posthumously exonerated by an act of Parliament. Original interment at in a private or family graveyard; subsequent interment at Dutch Church Burial Ground, Manhattan, N.Y.; reinterment to unknown location; statue at Broadview Avenue, New Rochelle, N.Y.
      Relatives: Great-grandfather of Nicholas Bayard (1736-1802).
      Political family: Livingston-Schuyler family of New York (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial


    Alfred E. Smith Park
    Manhattan, New York County, New York

    Politicians who have monuments here:
    Alfred E. Smith Alfred Emanuel Smith (1873-1944) — also known as Alfred E. Smith; Al Smith; "The Happy Warrior"; "The Brown Derby"; "The King of Oliver Street"; "The First Citizen" — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born in New York, New York County, N.Y., December 30, 1873. Democrat. Real estate business; member of New York state assembly from New York County 2nd District, 1904-15; Speaker of the New York State Assembly, 1913; delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1912 (alternate), 1916, 1920, 1932, 1936; delegate to New York state constitutional convention 11th District, 1915; Governor of New York, 1919-21, 1923-29; defeated, 1920; candidate for Democratic nomination for President, 1920, 1932; candidate for President of the United States, 1928; delegate to New York convention to ratify 21st amendment, 1933; delegate to New York state constitutional convention 12th District, 1938. Catholic. Irish, German, and Italian ancestry. Died October 4, 1944 (age 70 years, 279 days). Interment at Calvary Cemetery, Woodside, Queens, N.Y.; statue at Alfred E. Smith Park.
      Relatives: Son of Alfred Emanuel Smith and Catherine (Mulvihill) Smith; married, May 6, 1900, to Catherine A. Dunn.
      Cross-reference: Raymond V. Ingersoll — Joseph M. Proskauer — George R. Van Namee — John Roach Straton — Clarence J. Shearn
      The World War II Liberty ship SS Alfred E. Smith (built 1944, scrapped 1970) was named for him.
      See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile
      Books about Alfred E. Smith: Robert A. Slayton, Empire Statesman: The Rise and Redemption of Al Smith — Christopher M. Finan, Alfred E. Smith : The Happy Warrior — Scott Farris, Almost President: The Men Who Lost the Race but Changed the Nation
      Image source: New York Red Book 1924


    Brick Presbyterian Church
    Manhattan, New York County, New York
    Politicians formerly buried here:
    Samuel Osgood Samuel Osgood (1748-1813) — of Andover (part now in North Andover), Essex County, Mass.; New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in Andover (part now in North Andover), Essex County, Mass., February 3, 1748. Colonel in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; delegate to Massachusetts state constitutional convention, 1779-80; member of Massachusetts state senate, 1780; Delegate to Continental Congress from Massachusetts, 1781-84; member of Massachusetts state house of representatives, 1784; U.S. Postmaster General, 1789-91; Presidential Elector for New York, 1792; member of New York state assembly from New York County, 1800-02. Member, American Philosophical Society. Died in New York, New York County, N.Y., August 12, 1813 (age 65 years, 190 days). Original interment at Brick Presbyterian Church; reinterment in 1856 at Green-Wood Cemetery, Brooklyn, N.Y.
      Relatives: Son of Peter Osgood (1717-1801) and Sarah (Johnson) Osgood (1719-1804); married 1786 to Mary Browne (1754-1814); granduncle of George Bailey Loring; third cousin twice removed of William Crowninshield Endicott (1826-1900).
      Political families: Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York; Roosevelt family; Crowninshield-Adams family of Savannah, Georgia (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
      Image source: U.S. Postal Museum


    Church of the Heavenly Rest
    Manhattan, New York County, New York
    Politicians buried here:
      Thomas Lemuel James (1831-1916) — also known as Thomas L. James — of Tenafly, Bergen County, N.J.; Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born in Utica, Oneida County, N.Y., March 29, 1831. Republican. Canal toll collector; newspaper publisher; customs inspector; postmaster at New York City, N.Y., 1873-81; U.S. Postmaster General, 1881-82; bank director; mayor of Tenafly, N.J., 1896. Welsh ancestry. Member, Union League. Died, following several strokes of apoplexy, in Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., September 11, 1916 (age 85 years, 166 days). Entombed at Church of the Heavenly Rest.
      Relatives: Son of William James and Jane Maria (Price) James; married 1852 to Emily Ida Freeburn (died 1895); married, April 29, 1896, to Jeane (Freeburn) Barden (sister of first wife; died 1902); married, February 3, 1904, to Edith Colbourne (died 1910); married, May 10, 1911, to Flora (MacDonnell) Gaffney; father of Ella James (who married Henry George Pearson (1844-1889)).
      See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial


    City Hall Park
    Manhattan, New York County, New York

    Politicians who have monuments here:
    Horace Greeley Horace Greeley (1811-1872) — also known as "Old Honesty"; "Old White Hat" — of New York, New York County, N.Y.; Chappaqua, Westchester County, N.Y. Born in Amherst, Hillsborough County, N.H., February 3, 1811. Founder and editor of the New York Tribune newspaper; U.S. Representative from New York 6th District, 1848-49; defeated (Republican), 1870; delegate to Republican National Convention from Oregon, 1860; after the Civil War, became advocate of universal amnesty for Confederates; offered bail in May 1867 for Jefferson Davis; member of Republican National Committee from New York, 1866-70; delegate to New York state constitutional convention, 1867; candidate for New York state comptroller, 1869; Democratic candidate for President of the United States, 1872. Died in Pleasantville, Westchester County, N.Y., November 29, 1872 (age 61 years, 300 days). Interment at Green-Wood Cemetery, Brooklyn, N.Y.; statue at City Hall Park; statue at Herald Square.
      Relatives: Son of Zaccheus Greeley (1782-1867) and Mary (Woodburn) Greeley (1788-1855); married, July 5, 1836, to Mary Y. Cheney (1811-1872); second cousin of Wallace M. Greeley (1838-?).
      Cross-reference: Josiah B. Grinnell
      Greeley counties in Kan. and Neb. are named for him.
      The city of Greeley, Colorado, is named for him.  — Horace Greeley High School, in Chappaqua, New York, is named for him.  — Mount Horace Greeley, in Keweenaw County, Michigan, is named for him.
      Other politicians named for him: Horace G. SnoverHorace G. KnowlesHorace Greeley Dawson, Jr.
      Personal motto: "Go West, young man."
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
      Books by Horace Greeley: American conflict: A history of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-1865 (1869) — Recollections Of A Busy Life
      Books about Horace Greeley: Glyndon G. Van Deusen, Horace Greeley, Nineteenth Century Crusader — Harry J. Maihafer, The General and the Journalists: Ulysses S. Grant, Horace Greeley, and Charles Dana — Wilbur J. Granberg, Spread the truth : The life of Horace Greeley — Doris Faber, Horace Greeley: The People's Editor — Coy F. Cross, Go West Young Man! : Horace Greeley's Vision for America — J. Parton, The Life of Horace Greeley, Editor of the New York Tribune
      Image source: Life and Work of James G. Blaine (1893)


    Columbia University
    Manhattan, New York County, New York

    Politicians who have monuments here:
    John Purroy Mitchel John Purroy Mitchel (1879-1918) — of New York. Born in New York, New York County, N.Y., July 19, 1879. Republican. Lawyer; law partner of George V. Mullan, 1902-13; U.S. Collector of Customs, 1913; mayor of New York City, N.Y., 1914-17; defeated in primary, 1917; on April 17, 1914, at Park Row, New York, he was shot at by an Michael P. Mahoney, an unemployed carpenter; the bullet missed the mayor, but struck and wounded Frank L. Polk, the city's Corporation Counsel. Catholic. Irish ancestry. Killed in a plane crash during World War I military training, at Gerstner Field, near Holmwood, Calcasieu Parish, La., July 6, 1918 (age 38 years, 352 days). Interment at Woodlawn Cemetery, Bronx, N.Y.; memorial monument at Columbia University.
      Relatives: Son of James Mitchel and Mary (Purroy) Mitchel; married, April 5, 1909, to Olive Child; nephew of Henry D. Purroy (1848-1903).
      See also Wikipedia article
      Image source: Library of Congress


    Dutch Church Burial Ground
    Manhattan, New York County, New York
    Politicians formerly buried here:
      Theodorus Bailey (1758-1828) — of Dutchess County, N.Y. Born near Fishkill, Dutchess County, N.Y., October 12, 1758. Democrat. Lawyer; U.S. Representative from New York 5th District, 1793-97, 1799-1801, 1801-03; member of New York state assembly from Dutchess County, 1801-02; U.S. Senator from New York, 1803-04; postmaster at New York City, N.Y., 1804-28. Died in New York, New York County, N.Y., September 6, 1828 (age 69 years, 330 days). Original interment at Dutch Church Burial Ground; reinterment in 1864 at Poughkeepsie Rural Cemetery, Poughkeepsie, N.Y.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
      Jacob Leisler (c.1640-1691) — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in Bockenheim, Holy Roman Empire (now part of Frankfurt am Main, Germany), about 1640. Fur trader; tobacco business; following the English Revolution of 1688, which brought Protestant rulers William and Mary to power, he led "Leisler's Rebellion" and seized control of the colony; Colonial Governor of New York, 1689-91; provided land for a settlement of French Huguenot refugees (now the city of New Rochelle); following the arrival of a new royal governor, he was ousted. Arrested, charged with treason, tried, convicted, and sentenced to death; executed by hanging and decapitation, in New York, New York County, N.Y., May 16, 1691 (age about 51 years). Four years later, he was posthumously exonerated by an act of Parliament. Original interment at a private or family graveyard, New York County, N.Y.; subsequent interment at Dutch Church Burial Ground; reinterment to unknown location; statue at Broadview Avenue, New Rochelle, N.Y.
      Relatives: Great-grandfather of Nicholas Bayard (1736-1802).
      Political family: Livingston-Schuyler family of New York (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial


    First Presbyterian Churchyard
    Manhattan, New York County, New York
    Politicians buried here:
      David Gelston (1744-1828) — of Suffolk County, N.Y.; New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in Bridgehampton, Suffolk County, Long Island, N.Y., July 4, 1744. Delegate to New York state constitutional convention, 1777; member of New York state assembly from Suffolk County, 1777-85; Speaker of the New York State Assembly, 1784-85; New York County Surrogate, 1787-1801; Delegate to Continental Congress from New York, 1789; member of New York state senate Southern District, 1790-94, 1798-1802; member of New York council of appointment, 1793; U.S. Collector of Customs, 1801-20. Died in New York, New York County, N.Y., August 21, 1828 (age 84 years, 48 days). Interment at First Presbyterian Churchyard.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
      John Laurance (1750-1810) — of New York. Born near Falmouth, England, 1750. Lawyer; served in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; Delegate to Continental Congress from New York, 1785-87; member of New York state senate Southern District, 1787-89; U.S. Representative from New York 2nd District, 1789-93; U.S. District Judge for New York, 1794-96; resigned 1796; U.S. Senator from New York, 1796-1800. Died in New York, New York County, N.Y., November 11, 1810 (age about 60 years). Interment at First Presbyterian Churchyard.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — federal judicial profile — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
      Walter Lowrie (1784-1868) — of Butler, Butler County, Pa. Born in Edinburgh, Scotland, December 10, 1784. Democrat. Member of Pennsylvania state house of representatives, 1811; member of Pennsylvania state senate 19th District, 1815-19; U.S. Senator from Pennsylvania, 1819-25. Presbyterian. Scottish ancestry. Died in New York, New York County, N.Y., December 14, 1868 (age 84 years, 4 days). Entombed at First Presbyterian Churchyard.
      Relatives: Father of Walter Hoge Lowrie (1807-1876).
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
      Alexander McDougall (1731-1786) — of New York. Born in Scotland, 1731. Banker; general in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; Delegate to Continental Congress from New York, 1781; member of New York state senate Southern District, 1783-86; died in office 1786. Presbyterian. Scottish ancestry. Member, Society of the Cincinnati. Died in New York, New York County, N.Y., June 9, 1786 (age about 54 years). Entombed at First Presbyterian Churchyard.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      John Broome (1738-1810) — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in Staten Island, Richmond County, N.Y., July 19, 1738. Importer and exporter; delegate to New York state constitutional convention, 1777; colonel in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; member of New York state assembly from New York County, 1800-02; member of New York state senate Southern District, 1803-04; Lieutenant Governor of New York, 1804-10; died in office 1810. Died in New York, New York County, N.Y., August 8, 1810 (age 72 years, 20 days). Interment at First Presbyterian Churchyard.
      Relatives: Son of Samuel Broome and Marie (LaTourette) Broome; married, October 19, 1769, to Rebecca Lloyd (1746-1800); married 1806 to Ruth Hunter (1755-1840).
      Broome County, N.Y. is named for him.
      The town of Broome, New York, is named for him.  — Broome Street, in Manhattan, New York, is named for him.
      See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial


    General Grant Memorial
    122nd St. & Riverside Dr.
    Manhattan, New York County, New York
    Politicians buried here:
    Ulysses S. Grant Ulysses Simpson Grant (1822-1885) — also known as Ulysses S. Grant; Hiram Ulysses Grant; "Savior of the Union"; "Lion of Vicksburg"; "The Austerlitz of American Politics"; "Unconditional Surrender Grant"; "The Galena Tanner"; "The Silent Soldier"; "The Silent General" — of Galena, Jo Daviess County, Ill. Born in Point Pleasant, Clermont County, Ohio, April 27, 1822. Republican. General in the Union Army during the Civil War; President of the United States, 1869-77; candidate for Republican nomination for President, 1880. Methodist. Scottish ancestry. Member, Loyal Legion. Elected to the Hall of Fame for Great Americans in 1900. Died of throat cancer, at Mt. McGregor, Saratoga County, N.Y., July 23, 1885 (age 63 years, 87 days). Interment at General Grant Memorial.
      Relatives: Son of Jesse Root Grant (1794-1873) and Hannah (Simpson) Grant (1798-1883); married, August 22, 1848, to Julia Boggs Dent (1826-1902; sister-in-law of Alexander Sharp; sister of George Wrenshall Dent and Lewis Dent); father of Frederick Dent Grant (1850-1912) and Ulysses Simpson Grant, Jr.; grandfather of Nellie Grant (1881-1972; who married William Pigott Cronan); first cousin twice removed of Augustus Seymour Porter (1769-1849) and Peter Buell Porter; second cousin once removed of Augustus Seymour Porter (1798-1872), Peter Buell Porter, Jr. and Peter Augustus Porter (1827-1864); second cousin four times removed of Benjamin Huntington; third cousin of Peter Augustus Porter (1853-1925); third cousin twice removed of John Davenport, Joshua Coit, James Davenport, Henry Huntington, Gurdon Huntington, Samuel Lathrop, Abel Huntington and William Rush Merriam; third cousin thrice removed of Samuel Huntington and Henry Scudder; fourth cousin once removed of Ebenezer Huntington, Theodore Davenport, Benjamin Nicoll Huntington, Jesse Monroe Hatch, Franklin Delano Roosevelt and Warren Delano Robbins.
      Political families: Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York; Grant-Dent family of San Francisco, California (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      Cross-reference: Horace Porter — Ayres Phillips Merrill — Robert Martin Douglas — Thomas L. Hamer — James Arkell
      Grant counties in Ark., Kan., La., Minn., Neb., N.M., N.Dak., Okla., Ore., S.Dak., Wash. and W.Va. are named for him.
      Other politicians named for him: Ulysses G. PalmerUlysses S. G. BieberUlysses G. DenmanUlysses G. CrandellUlysses S. G. BlakelyS. U. G. RhodesUlysses G. BordenU. Grant MengelUlysses G. FosterUlysses G. ByersU. S. Grant Leverett
      Coins and currency: His portrait appears on the U.S. $50 bill, and also appeared on $1 and $5 silver certificates in 1887-1927.
      Personal motto: "When in doubt, fight."
      See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
      Books about Ulysses S. Grant: Jean Edward Smith, Grant — Frank J. Scaturro, President Grant Reconsidered — William S. McFeely, Grant — Brooks D. Simpson, Ulysses S. Grant: Triumph Over Adversity, 1822-1865 — Brooks D. Simpson, Let Us Have Peace: Ulysses S. Grant and the Politics of War and Reconstruction, 1861-1868 — James S. Brisbin, The campaign lives of Ulysses S. Grant and Schuyler Colfax — Josiah Bunting III, Ulysses S. Grant — Michael Korda, Ulysses S. Grant : The Unlikely Hero — Edward H. Bonekemper, A Victor, Not a Butcher: Ulysses S. Grant's Overlooked Military Genius — Harry J. Maihafer, The General and the Journalists: Ulysses S. Grant, Horace Greeley, and Charles Dana — H. W. Brands, The Man Who Saved the Union: Ulysses Grant in War and Peace — Charles Bracelen Flood, Grant's Final Victory: Ulysses S. Grant's Heroic Last Year — Joan Waugh, U. S. Grant: American Hero, American Myth
      Critical books about Ulysses S. Grant: Nathan Miller, Star-Spangled Men : America's Ten Worst Presidents
      Fiction about Ulysses S. Grant: Newt Gingrich & William R. Forstchen, Grant Comes East — Newt Gingrich & William R. Forstchen, Never Call Retreat : Lee and Grant: The Final Victory
      Image source: Portrait & Biographical Album of Washtenaw County (1891)


    Hartman Triangle
    Manhattan, New York County, New York

    Politicians who have monuments here:
    Gustave Hartman Gustave Hartman (1880-1936) — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born in Hungary, August 12, 1880. Republican. Lawyer; member of New York state assembly from New York County 16th District, 1905-06; candidate for U.S. Representative from New York 10th District, 1908; municipal judge in New York, 1913-17, 1921-29; candidate for Justice of New York Supreme Court 1st District, 1923, 1924, 1929; alternate delegate to Republican National Convention from New York, 1932. Jewish. Member, American Jewish Congress; B'nai B'rith; Zionist Organization of America; American Arbitration Association; Freemasons; Knights of Pythias; Elks; Woodmen. Founder and president, Israel Orphan Asylum, New York City. Died, of a heart ailment, in Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., November 12, 1936 (age 56 years, 92 days). Interment at Mt. Carmel Cemetery, Glendale, Queens, N.Y.; memorial monument at Hartman Triangle.
      Relatives: Son of Kalman Hartman and Sarah 'Sallie' (Luchs) Hartman; married, September 9, 1928, to May Weisser (1899-1997).
      Epitaph: "Beloved husband, devoted brother, a life of service."
      See also Find-A-Grave memorial
      Image source: New York Times, November 13, 1936


    Herald Square
    Manhattan, New York County, New York

    Politicians who have monuments here:
    Horace Greeley Horace Greeley (1811-1872) — also known as "Old Honesty"; "Old White Hat" — of New York, New York County, N.Y.; Chappaqua, Westchester County, N.Y. Born in Amherst, Hillsborough County, N.H., February 3, 1811. Founder and editor of the New York Tribune newspaper; U.S. Representative from New York 6th District, 1848-49; defeated (Republican), 1870; delegate to Republican National Convention from Oregon, 1860; after the Civil War, became advocate of universal amnesty for Confederates; offered bail in May 1867 for Jefferson Davis; member of Republican National Committee from New York, 1866-70; delegate to New York state constitutional convention, 1867; candidate for New York state comptroller, 1869; Democratic candidate for President of the United States, 1872. Died in Pleasantville, Westchester County, N.Y., November 29, 1872 (age 61 years, 300 days). Interment at Green-Wood Cemetery, Brooklyn, N.Y.; statue at City Hall Park; statue at Herald Square.
      Relatives: Son of Zaccheus Greeley (1782-1867) and Mary (Woodburn) Greeley (1788-1855); married, July 5, 1836, to Mary Y. Cheney (1811-1872); second cousin of Wallace M. Greeley (1838-?).
      Cross-reference: Josiah B. Grinnell
      Greeley counties in Kan. and Neb. are named for him.
      The city of Greeley, Colorado, is named for him.  — Horace Greeley High School, in Chappaqua, New York, is named for him.  — Mount Horace Greeley, in Keweenaw County, Michigan, is named for him.
      Other politicians named for him: Horace G. SnoverHorace G. KnowlesHorace Greeley Dawson, Jr.
      Personal motto: "Go West, young man."
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
      Books by Horace Greeley: American conflict: A history of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-1865 (1869) — Recollections Of A Busy Life
      Books about Horace Greeley: Glyndon G. Van Deusen, Horace Greeley, Nineteenth Century Crusader — Harry J. Maihafer, The General and the Journalists: Ulysses S. Grant, Horace Greeley, and Charles Dana — Wilbur J. Granberg, Spread the truth : The life of Horace Greeley — Doris Faber, Horace Greeley: The People's Editor — Coy F. Cross, Go West Young Man! : Horace Greeley's Vision for America — J. Parton, The Life of Horace Greeley, Editor of the New York Tribune
      Image source: Life and Work of James G. Blaine (1893)


    Madison Square Park
    Manhattan, New York County, New York

    Politicians who have monuments here:
    Chester A. Arthur Chester Alan Arthur (1829-1886) — also known as Chester A. Arthur; Chester Abell Arthur; "The Gentleman Boss"; "His Accidency"; "Elegant Arthur"; "Our Chet"; "Dude President" — of New York. Born in Fairfield, Franklin County, Vt., October 5, 1829. Republican. Lawyer; U.S. Collector of Customs, 1870-78; New York Republican state chair, 1879-81; delegate to Republican National Convention from New York, 1880; Vice President of the United States, 1881; President of the United States, 1881-85; candidate for Republican nomination for President, 1884. Episcopalian. Member, Loyal Legion; Psi Upsilon; Union League. Died, of Bright's disease and a cerebral hemorrhage, in New York, New York County, N.Y., November 18, 1886 (age 57 years, 44 days). Interment at Albany Rural Cemetery, Menands, N.Y.; statue at Madison Square Park.
      Relatives: Son of Rev. William Arthur (1796-1875) and Malvina (Stone) Arthur (1802-1869); married, October 25, 1859, to Ellen Lewis "Nell" Herndon (1837-1880); fourth cousin once removed of Benjamin Franklin Flanders (1816-1896) and Cassius Montgomery Clay Twitchell.
      Political families: Eastman family; Flanders family of Vermont; Sargent-Arnold-Pike-Davis family of New Hampshire; Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      Arthur County, Neb. is named for him.
      Other politicians named for him: Chester A. HeitmanChester Arthur PikeChester A. Johnson
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
      Books about Chester A. Arthur: Thomas C. Reeves, Gentleman Boss : The Life of Chester Alan Arthur — Justus D. Doenecke, The Presidencies of James A. Garfield and Chester A. Arthur — George Frederick Howe, Chester A. Arthur, A Quarter-Century of Machine Politics — Zachary Karabell, Chester Alan Arthur — Paul Joseph, Chester Arthur (for young readers)
      Image source: Portrait & Biographical Album of Washtenaw County (1891)
    William H. Seward William Henry Seward (1801-1872) — also known as William H. Seward — of Auburn, Cayuga County, N.Y. Born in Florida, Orange County, N.Y., May 16, 1801. Lawyer; co-founded (with Thurlow Weed), the Albany Evening Journal newspaper in 1830; member of New York state senate 7th District, 1831-34; Governor of New York, 1839-43; defeated (Whig), 1834; U.S. Senator from New York, 1849-61; candidate for Republican nomination for President, 1856, 1860; U.S. Secretary of State, 1861-69; as Secretary of State in 1867, he made a treaty with Russia for the purchase of Alaska; critics dubbed the territory "Seward's Folly". Survived an assassination attempt on April 14, 1865 (the same night Abraham Lincoln was shot), when Lewis Payne, an associate of John Wilkes Booth, broke into his bedroom and stabbed him repeatedly. Payne was arrested, tried with the other conspirators, and hanged. Died in Auburn, Cayuga County, N.Y., October 16, 1872 (age 71 years, 153 days). Interment at Fort Hill Cemetery, Auburn, N.Y.; statue at Madison Square Park; statue at Volunteer Park, Seattle, Wash.
      Relatives: Son of Samuel Swayze Seward and Mary (Jennings) Seward (1769-1845); married to Frances Adeline Miller (1805-1865); father of Frederick William Seward and William Henry Seward, Jr.; uncle of Caroline Cornelia Canfield (1834-1922; who married John Lawrence Schoolcraft) and George Frederick Seward (1840-1910); granduncle of Frederick Whittlesey Seward, Jr..
      Political family: Seward family of New York (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      Cross-reference: George W. Jones — Samuel J. Barrows — Frederick W. Seward — Elias P. Pellet
      Seward counties in Kan. and Neb. are named for him.
      Seward Mountain, in the Adirondack Mountains, Franklin County, New York, is named for him.
      Other politicians named for him: W. Seward WhittleseyW. H. Seward ThomsonWilliam S. Shanahan
      Coins and currency: His portrait appeared on the $50 U.S. Treasury note in the 1890s.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
      Books about William H. Seward: Doris Kearns Goodwin, Team of Rivals : The Political Genius of Abraham Lincoln — Walter Stahr, Seward: Lincoln's Indispensable Man — Walter Stahr, Seward: Lincoln's Indispensable Man — Michael Burgan, William Henry Seward : Senator and Statesman (for young readers)
      Image source: New York Public Library
    Roscoe Conkling Roscoe Conkling (1829-1888) — also known as "The Oneida Chieftan"; "My Lord Roscoe" — of Utica, Oneida County, N.Y. Born in Albany, Albany County, N.Y., October 30, 1829. Republican. Lawyer; mayor of Utica, N.Y., 1858-59; U.S. Representative from New York, 1859-63, 1865-67 (20th District 1859-63, 21st District 1865-67); U.S. Senator from New York, 1867, 1869-81; resigned 1881; candidate for Republican nomination for President, 1876; delegate to Republican National Convention from New York, 1880. Died, from mastoiditis, in New York, New York County, N.Y., April 18, 1888 (age 58 years, 171 days). Interment at Forest Hill Cemetery, Utica, N.Y.; statue at Madison Square Park.
      Relatives: Son of Alfred Conkling and Eliza (Cockburn) Conkling; brother of Frederick Augustus Conkling; married, June 25, 1855, to Julia Catherine Seymour (1827-1893; daughter of Henry Seymour; sister of Horatio Seymour; granddaughter of Moses Seymour; first cousin once removed of Morris Woodruff Seymour); uncle of Alfred Conkling Coxe, Alfred Ronald Conkling and Howard Conkling; granduncle of Alfred Conkling Coxe, Jr. (1880-1957).
      Political family: Conkling-Seymour family of Utica and New York City, New York (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      Other politicians named for him: Roscoe C. ChandleyRoscoe C. PattersonRoscoe C. WaterburyRoscoe C. McCullochRoscoe C. MarcumRoscoe C. EmeryRoscoe Conkling SimmonsRoscoe Conkling FitchRoscoe C. Van MarterRoscoe C. SummersRoscoe C. RoweRoscoe C. LennonRoscoe C. AustinRoscoe C. HobbsRoscoe C. StaceyRoscoe C. Brown, Jr.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
      Books about Roscoe Conkling: Donald Barr Chidsey, The gentleman from New York: A life of Roscoe Conkling
      Image source: James G. Blaine, Twenty Years of Congress, vol. 2 (1886)


    Morningside Park
    Manhattan, New York County, New York

    Politicians who have monuments here:
    Carl Schurz Carl Schurz (1829-1906) — of Watertown, Jefferson County, Wis.; Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, Wis.; St. Louis, Mo.; New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in Liblar (now part of Erfstadt), Germany, March 2, 1829. Republican. Lawyer; candidate for Lieutenant Governor of Wisconsin, 1857; delegate to Republican National Convention from Wisconsin, 1860; U.S. Minister to Spain, 1861; general in the Union Army during the Civil War; delegate to Republican National Convention from Missouri, 1868 (Temporary Chair; speaker); U.S. Senator from Missouri, 1869-75; U.S. Secretary of the Interior, 1877-81. German ancestry. Died in New York City (unknown county), N.Y., May 14, 1906 (age 77 years, 73 days). Interment at Sleepy Hollow Cemetery, Sleepy Hollow, N.Y.; statue at Morningside Park.
      Politician named for him: Carl S. Thompson
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary
      Books about Carl Schurz: Hans Louis Trefousse, Carl Schurz: A Biography
      Image source: William C. Roberts, Leading Orators (1884)


    National September 11 Memorial
    Manhattan, New York County, New York

    Politicians who have monuments here:
      Jasper Baxter (1957-2001) — of Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa. Born in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., January 28, 1957. Democrat. Candidate in primary for Pennsylvania state house of representatives 186th District, 1986. African ancestry. Was conducting a seminar on the 93rd floor of 2 World Trade Center, when an airliner hijacked by terrorists was deliberately crashed into the building, causing an explosion, fire, and collapse of the structure, killing almost 3,000, in Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., September 11, 2001 (age 44 years, 226 days). Cenotaph at National September 11 Memorial.
      See also Find-A-Grave memorial


    New York City Marble Cemetery
    52-74 East 2nd Street, between 1st and 2nd Avenues
    Manhattan, New York County, New York
    Founded 1832
    Politicians buried here:
    Stephen Allen Stephen Allen (1767-1852) — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Born July 2, 1767. Mayor of New York City, N.Y., 1821-24; member of New York state assembly from New York County, 1826; member of New York state senate 1st District, 1829-32. Killed when the steamboat Henry Clay burned and sank, killing about eighty passengers, in the Lower Hudson River, next to what is now the Riverdale section of the Bronx, July 28, 1852 (age 85 years, 26 days). Entombed at New York City Marble Cemetery.
      See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
      Image source: New York Public Library
      Isaac Leggett Varian (1793-1864) — also known as Isaac L. Varian — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in New York, New York County, N.Y., June 25, 1793. Democrat. Member of New York state assembly from New York County, 1831-33; mayor of New York City, N.Y., 1839-41; member of New York state senate 1st District, 1842-45. Member, Tammany Hall. Died in Peekskill, Westchester County, N.Y., August 10, 1864 (age 71 years, 46 days). Interment at New York City Marble Cemetery.
      Relatives: Married 1811 to Catharine Hopper Dusenbury (1789-1870).
      See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
      Marinus Willet (1740-1830) — of New York, New York County, N.Y.; Schenectady County, N.Y. Born in Jamaica, Queens, Queens County, N.Y., July 31, 1740. Colonel in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; member of New York state assembly, 1783-84, 1819-20 (New York County 1783-84, Schenectady County 1819-20); mayor of New York City, N.Y., 1807-08. Died in New York, New York County, N.Y., August 22, 1830 (age 90 years, 22 days). Interment at New York City Marble Cemetery.
      See also Wikipedia article
      Thomas Addis Emmet (1764-1827) — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in Cork, Ireland, April 24, 1764. Lawyer; New York state attorney general, 1812-13; appointed 1812. Irish ancestry. Died in New York, New York County, N.Y., November 15, 1827 (age 63 years, 205 days). Interment at New York City Marble Cemetery; cenotaph at St. Paul's Churchyard.
      Relatives: Brother of Robert Emmet (1778-1803; Irish nationalist and rebel leader); married, January 11, 1791, to Jane Patten; father of Robert Emmet (1792-1873); grandfather of William Colville Emmet; great-grandfather of William Temple Emmet (1869-1918) and Grenville Temple Emmet.
      Political families: Emmet-Morton family of New York City, New York; Winthrop-Hamlin family of Massachusetts and Connecticut (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      See also Wikipedia article
      David Sherwood Jackson (1813-1872) — also known as David S. Jackson — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in New York, New York County, N.Y., 1813. Democrat. U.S. Representative from New York 6th District, 1847-49. Died in New York, New York County, N.Y., January 20, 1872 (age about 58 years). Interment at New York City Marble Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
    Politicians formerly buried here:
    James Monroe James Monroe (1758-1831) — of Spotsylvania County, Va. Born in Westmoreland County, Va., April 28, 1758. Colonel in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; lawyer; member of Virginia state house of delegates, 1782, 1786, 1810-11; Delegate to Continental Congress from Virginia, 1783-86; delegate to Virginia convention to ratify U.S. constitution from Spotsylvania County, 1788; U.S. Senator from Virginia, 1790-94; U.S. Minister to France, 1794-96; Great Britain, 1803-07; Governor of Virginia, 1799-1802, 1811; U.S. Secretary of State, 1811-17; U.S. Secretary of War, 1814-15; President of the United States, 1817-25; delegate to Virginia state constitutional convention, 1829. Episcopalian. English ancestry. Member, Freemasons. Elected to the Hall of Fame for Great Americans in 1930. Died, probably of tuberculosis, in New York, New York County, N.Y., July 4, 1831 (age 73 years, 67 days). Originally entombed at New York Marble Cemetery; subsequently entombed at New York City Marble Cemetery; reinterment in 1858 at Hollywood Cemetery, Richmond, Va.
      Relatives: Son of Andrew Spence Monroe (1727-1774) and Elizabeth (Jones) Monroe (1727-1758); married, February 16, 1786, to Eliza Kortright (1768-1830); nephew of Joseph Jones; uncle of James Monroe; second great-granduncle of Theodore Douglas Robinson (1883-1934) and Corinne Robinson Alsop; distant cousin *** of Thomas Bell Monroe.
      Political families: Roosevelt family of New York City, New York; Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York; Monroe family of Virginia and Washington (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      Monroe counties in Ala., Ark., Fla., Ga., Ill., Ind., Iowa, Ky., Mich., Miss., Mo., N.Y., Ohio, Pa., Tenn., W.Va. and Wis. are named for him.
      The city of Monrovia, Liberia, is named for him.  — Mount Monroe, in the White Mountains, Coos County, New Hampshire, is named for him.  — Fort Monroe (military installation 1819-2011), at Old Point Comfort, Hampton, Virginia, is named for him.
      Other politicians named for him: James MonroeJames MonroeJames M. PendletonJames M. JacksonJames Monroe LettsJames M. RitchieJames M. RosseJames M. ComlyJames Monroe BufordJames M. SeibertJames M. LownJames M. MillerJames Monroe JonesJames Monroe HaleJames Monroe SpearsJ. M. AlfordJames M. Lown, Jr.James M. Miley
      Coins and currency: His portrait appeared on the U.S. $100 silver certificate in the 1880s and 1890s.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier
      Books about James Monroe: Harry Ammon, James Monroe: The Quest for National Identity
      Image source: Portrait & Biographical Album of Washtenaw County (1891)
      Lorenzo Bingham Shepard (1821-1856) — also known as Lorenzo B. Shepard — of New York. Born in Cairo, Greene County, N.Y., May 27, 1821. Democrat. Lawyer; delegate to New York state constitutional convention, 1846; U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York, 1849-50; delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1852, 1856; New York County District Attorney, 1854; New York City Corporation Counsel, 1855-56. Member, Tammany Hall. Died in New York, New York County, N.Y., September 18, 1856 (age 35 years, 114 days). Original interment at New York City Marble Cemetery; reinterment at Green-Wood Cemetery, Brooklyn, N.Y.
      Relatives: Son of David Shepard; married, July 5, 1842, to Lucy Morse; father of Edward Morse Shepard (1850-1911).
      Epitaph: "This monument Is erected by the voluntary subscriptions of Citizens who valued him as a public officer, of Associates and Clients Who trusted him as a Counsellor, of Friends who loved him as a man, Just, generous and true, In all the relations of Life."
      See also Wikipedia article


    New York Marble Cemetery
    Manhattan, New York County, New York
    Founded 1830
    Listed in National Register of Historic Places, 1980
    Politicians buried here:
      Aaron Clark (1787-1861) — also known as "King of the Lotteries"; "Dancing Mayor" — of New York, New York County, N.Y.; Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y. Born in Worthington, Hampshire County, Mass., October 16, 1787. Whig. Served in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812; mayor of New York City, N.Y., 1837-39. Died in Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y., August 2, 1861 (age 73 years, 290 days). Interment at New York Marble Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of David Clark and Lydia (Benjamin) Clark; married, May 18, 1815, to Catherine Maria Lamb (1795-1832).
      See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
    James Tallmadge, Jr. James Tallmadge, Jr. (1778-1853) — of Dutchess County, N.Y. Born in Stanford, Dutchess County, N.Y., January 28, 1778. Democrat. Lawyer; served in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812; U.S. Representative from New York 4th District, 1817-19; delegate to New York state constitutional convention, 1821; member of New York state assembly from Dutchess County, 1824; Lieutenant Governor of New York, 1825-26; president of New York University, 1830-46; delegate to New York state constitutional convention, 1846. Died in New York, New York County, N.Y., September 29, 1853 (age 75 years, 244 days). Interment at New York Marble Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Image source: New York Public Library
      Myndert Van Schaick (1782-1865) — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in 1782. Member of New York state assembly from New York County, 1832; member of New York state senate 1st District, 1833-36. One of the founders of New York University. Died in 1865 (age about 83 years). Interment at New York Marble Cemetery.
    Politicians formerly buried here:
    James Monroe James Monroe (1758-1831) — of Spotsylvania County, Va. Born in Westmoreland County, Va., April 28, 1758. Colonel in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; lawyer; member of Virginia state house of delegates, 1782, 1786, 1810-11; Delegate to Continental Congress from Virginia, 1783-86; delegate to Virginia convention to ratify U.S. constitution from Spotsylvania County, 1788; U.S. Senator from Virginia, 1790-94; U.S. Minister to France, 1794-96; Great Britain, 1803-07; Governor of Virginia, 1799-1802, 1811; U.S. Secretary of State, 1811-17; U.S. Secretary of War, 1814-15; President of the United States, 1817-25; delegate to Virginia state constitutional convention, 1829. Episcopalian. English ancestry. Member, Freemasons. Elected to the Hall of Fame for Great Americans in 1930. Died, probably of tuberculosis, in New York, New York County, N.Y., July 4, 1831 (age 73 years, 67 days). Originally entombed at New York Marble Cemetery; subsequently entombed at New York City Marble Cemetery; reinterment in 1858 at Hollywood Cemetery, Richmond, Va.
      Relatives: Son of Andrew Spence Monroe (1727-1774) and Elizabeth (Jones) Monroe (1727-1758); married, February 16, 1786, to Eliza Kortright (1768-1830); nephew of Joseph Jones; uncle of James Monroe; second great-granduncle of Theodore Douglas Robinson (1883-1934) and Corinne Robinson Alsop; distant cousin *** of Thomas Bell Monroe.
      Political families: Roosevelt family of New York City, New York; Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York; Monroe family of Virginia and Washington (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      Monroe counties in Ala., Ark., Fla., Ga., Ill., Ind., Iowa, Ky., Mich., Miss., Mo., N.Y., Ohio, Pa., Tenn., W.Va. and Wis. are named for him.
      The city of Monrovia, Liberia, is named for him.  — Mount Monroe, in the White Mountains, Coos County, New Hampshire, is named for him.  — Fort Monroe (military installation 1819-2011), at Old Point Comfort, Hampton, Virginia, is named for him.
      Other politicians named for him: James MonroeJames MonroeJames M. PendletonJames M. JacksonJames Monroe LettsJames M. RitchieJames M. RosseJames M. ComlyJames Monroe BufordJames M. SeibertJames M. LownJames M. MillerJames Monroe JonesJames Monroe HaleJames Monroe SpearsJ. M. AlfordJames M. Lown, Jr.James M. Miley
      Coins and currency: His portrait appeared on the U.S. $100 silver certificate in the 1880s and 1890s.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier
      Books about James Monroe: Harry Ammon, James Monroe: The Quest for National Identity
      Image source: Portrait & Biographical Album of Washtenaw County (1891)
    Stevens T. Mason Stevens Thomson Mason (1811-1843) — also known as Stevens T. Mason; Tom Mason; "The Boy Governor"; "Young Hotspur"; "The Stripling" — of Detroit, Wayne County, Mich. Born near Leesburg, Loudoun County, Va., October 27, 1811. Secretary of Michigan Territory, 1831; Governor of Michigan Territory, 1834-35; Governor of Michigan, 1835-40. Died in New York, New York County, N.Y., January 4, 1843 (age 31 years, 69 days). Originally entombed at New York Marble Cemetery; reinterment in 1905 at Capitol Park, Detroit, Mich.
      Relatives: Son of John Thomson Mason (1787-1850) and Elizabeth Baker (Moir) Mason (1789-1839); married, November 1, 1838, to Julia Elizabeth Phelps (1818-1870); nephew of Armistead Thomson Mason; grandson of Stevens Thomson Mason; grandnephew of John Thomson Mason (1765-1824); great-grandson of Thomson Mason; great-grandfather of Jerauld Wright (1898-1995); great-grandnephew of George Mason; first cousin once removed of John Thomson Mason, Jr.; second cousin once removed of Thomson Francis Mason and James Murray Mason; third cousin twice removed of Charles O'Conor Goolrick.
      Political family: Mason family of Virginia (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      Mason County, Mich. is named for him.
      Books about Stevens T. Mason: Harlan L. Hagman, Bright Michigan Morning : The Years of Governor Tom Mason
      Image source: Portrait & Biographical Album of Washtenaw County (1891)
      Peter Sharpe (1777-1842) — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in New York, New York County, N.Y., December 10, 1777. Member of New York state assembly from New York County, 1814-15, 1816-21; Speaker of the New York State Assembly, 1820-21; delegate to New York state constitutional convention, 1821; U.S. Representative from New York, 1821, 1823-25 (2nd District 1821, 3rd District 1823-25); defeated, 1824. Died in Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y., August 3, 1842 (age 64 years, 236 days). Original interment at New York Marble Cemetery; reinterment at Green-Wood Cemetery, Brooklyn, N.Y.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
      Philip Jeremiah Schuyler (1768-1835) — also known as Philip J. Schuyler — of Dutchess County, N.Y. Born in Albany, Albany County, N.Y., January 21, 1768. Republican. Member of New York state assembly from Dutchess County, 1797-98; U.S. Representative from New York 5th District, 1817-19. Died, of consumption (tuberculosis), in New York, New York County, N.Y., February 21, 1835 (age 67 years, 31 days). Original interment at New York Marble Cemetery; subsequent interment at a private or family graveyard, Dutchess County, N.Y.; reinterment at Poughkeepsie Rural Cemetery, Poughkeepsie, N.Y.
      Relatives: Son of Philip John Schuyler and Catherine (Van Rensselaer) Schuyler (1734-1803); brother of Elizabeth Schuyler (1757-1854; who married Alexander Hamilton); nephew of Stephen John Schuyler, Jeremiah Van Rensselaer and Robert Van Rensselaer; uncle of Philip Schuyler and James Alexander Hamilton; grandson of Johannes Schuyler (1697-1746); great-grandson of Stephanus Van Cortlandt, Robert Livingston the Younger and Johannes Schuyler (1668-1747); great-grandnephew of Jacobus Van Cortlandt; great-granduncle of Robert Ray Hamilton; second great-grandson of Pieter Schuyler (1657-1724); second great-grandnephew of Robert Livingston the Elder; second great-granduncle of John Eliot Thayer, Jr.; first cousin of Pieter Schuyler (1746-1792) and Jacob Rutsen Van Rensselaer; first cousin once removed of Stephanus Bayard, Volkert Petrus Douw, Hendrick Kiliaen Van Rensselaer, James Livingston, Killian Killian Van Rensselaer and Henry Walter Livingston; first cousin twice removed of John Livingston, Robert Livingston (1688-1775), Gilbert Livingston, Philip P. Schuyler, Edward Livingston (1796-1840) and Cortlandt Schuyler Van Rensselaer; first cousin thrice removed of David Davidse Schuyler and Myndert Davidtse Schuyler; first cousin four times removed of Charles Ludlow Livingston (1870-?) and Bronson Murray Cutting; first cousin five times removed of Brockholst Livingston; second cousin of Nicholas Bayard, Robert R. Livingston (1746-1813), Leonard Gansevoort, Leonard Gansevoort, Jr., Edward Livingston (1764-1836), Peter Robert Livingston (1766-1847) and Maturin Livingston; second cousin once removed of Robert Livingston (1708-1790), Peter Van Brugh Livingston, Robert Gilbert Livingston, Philip Livingston, Robert R. Livingston (1718-1775), William Livingston, James Jay, John Jay, Frederick Jay, Peter Samuel Schuyler, Stephen Van Rensselaer, Philip Schuyler Van Rensselaer, Peter Gansevoort, Peter Robert Livingston (1789-1859), Gerrit Smith and Elizabeth Cady Stanton; second cousin twice removed of Matthew Clarkson (1733-1800), Henry Bell Van Rensselaer, James Adams Ekin and John Jacob Astor III; second cousin thrice removed of Kiliaen Van Rensselaer, William Waldorf Astor and John Sluyter Wirt; second cousin four times removed of William Astor Chanler, Lewis Stuyvesant Chanler, Robert Reginald Livingston and John Hubner II; third cousin of Peter Robert Livingston (1737-1794), Walter Livingston, Philip Peter Livingston, Henry Brockholst Livingston, Pierre Van Cortlandt, Jr., Peter Augustus Jay (1776-1843) and William Jay; third cousin once removed of Matthew Clarkson (1758-1825), Rensselaer Westerlo, Edward Philip Livingston, Charles Ludlow Livingston (1800-1873), Hamilton Fish, George Washington Schuyler, John Jay II and Philip N. Schuyler; third cousin twice removed of Gilbert Livingston Thompson, Charles Pinckney Brown, Eugene Schuyler, Nicholas Fish and Hamilton Fish, Jr. (1849-1936); third cousin thrice removed of John Kean, Hamilton Fish Kean, Jonathan Mayhew Wainwright, Karl Cortlandt Schuyler, Peter Augustus Jay (1877-1933) and Hamilton Fish, Jr. (1888-1991).
      Political family: Livingston-Schuyler family of New York (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article


    Old Collegiate Dutch Church Cemetery
    Manhattan, New York County, New York
    Politicians buried here:
      Gurdon Saltonstall Mumford (1764-1831) — also known as Gurdon S. Mumford — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in Connecticut, 1764. U.S. Representative from New York, 1805-11 (3rd District 1805-09, 2nd District 1809-11). Died in 1831 (age about 67 years). Interment at Old Collegiate Dutch Church Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page


    Old St. Patrick's Cathedral
    Mott Street
    Manhattan, New York County, New York
    Politicians buried here:
      John Kelly (1822-1886) — also known as "Honest John" — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in New York, New York County, N.Y., April 20, 1822. Democrat. U.S. Representative from New York 4th District, 1855-58; New York County Sheriff, 1859-62, 1865-67; delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1864, 1868, 1872, 1876, 1884; candidate for mayor of New York City, N.Y., 1868. Member, Tammany Hall. Leader of Tammany Hall for many years. Died in New York, New York County, N.Y., June 1, 1886 (age 64 years, 42 days). Interment at Old St. Patrick's Cathedral.
      Cross-reference: Thomas F. Grady
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
      John McKeon (1808-1883) — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in Albany, Albany County, N.Y., March 29, 1808. Democrat. Member of New York state assembly from New York County, 1832-34; U.S. Representative from New York 3rd District, 1835-37, 1841-43; New York County District Attorney, 1846-50, 1882-83; U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York, 1854-58; delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1864. Catholic. Died in New York, New York County, N.Y., November 22, 1883 (age 75 years, 238 days). Entombed at Old St. Patrick's Cathedral.
      Relatives: Son of Capt. James McKeon.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article


    Old St. Thomas Church
    Manhattan, New York County, New York
    Politicians formerly buried here:
      William Duer (1747-1799) — of New York County, N.Y. Born in England, March 18, 1747. Member of New York state senate Eastern District, 1777; Delegate to Continental Congress from New York, 1777; member of New York state assembly from New York County, 1785-86. Died April 18, 1799 (age 52 years, 31 days). Originally entombed at Old St. Thomas Church; reinterment somewhere in Jamaica, Queens, N.Y.
      Relatives: Nephew by marriage of Robert Livingston, Peter Van Brugh Livingston, Philip Livingston and William Livingston; grandfather of William Duer (1805-1879); first cousin by marriage of Peter Robert Livingston, Walter Livingston, Philip Peter Livingston and Henry Brockholst Livingston.
      Political family: Livingston-Schuyler family of New York (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page


    Riverside Park
    Manhattan, New York County, New York

    Politicians who have monuments here:
    Samuel J. Tilden Samuel Jones Tilden (1814-1886) — also known as Samuel J. Tilden; "The Great Reformer"; "The Great Forecloser" — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in New Lebanon, Columbia County, N.Y., February 9, 1814. Democrat. Delegate to New York state constitutional convention, 1846; member of New York state assembly, 1846, 1872 (New York County 1846, New York County 18th District 1872); delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1864; New York Democratic state chair, 1872-82; Governor of New York, 1875-77; candidate for President of the United States, 1876. Died near Yonkers, Westchester County, N.Y., August 4, 1886 (age 72 years, 176 days). Interment at Cemetery of the Evergreens, New Lebanon, N.Y.; statue erected 1926 at Riverside Park.
      Relatives: Son of Elam Tilden (1781-1842) and Polly Younglove (Jones) Tilden (1782-1860); brother of Moses Younglove Tilden (1811-1876); second cousin once removed of Calvin Tilden Hulburd; third cousin of Stephen Daniel Tilden; third cousin once removed of Daniel Rose Tilden; third cousin twice removed of George Galen Tilden; third cousin thrice removed of Lucien Cooper Tilden, Julius Galen Tilden and Fred Chester Tilden; fourth cousin of Asahel Otis; fourth cousin once removed of Day Otis Kellogg and Dwight Kellogg.
      Political families: Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York; Otis family of Connecticut (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      Cross-reference: John Bigelow — Pulaski F. Hyatt — Daniel S. Lamont
      Samuel J. Tilden High School (opened 1930), in Brooklyn, New York, is named for him.
      Other politicians named for him: Samuel T. MontagueSamuel T. Munson
      Epitaph: "I still trust the people."
      See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
      Books about Samuel J. Tilden: Alexander C. Flick & Gustav Lobrano, Samuel Jones Tilden — William Severn, Samuel J. Tilden and the Stolen Election — William H. Rehnquist, Centennial Crisis : The Disputed Election of 1876
      Image source: Library of Congress


    St. Andrew's Cemetery
    Manhattan, New York County, New York
    Politicians buried here:
      Charles McVean (1802-1848) — of Canajoharie, Montgomery County, N.Y.; New York, New York County, N.Y. Born near Johnstown, Fulton County, N.Y., 1802. Democrat. Lawyer; newspaper editor; U.S. Representative from New York 15th District, 1833-35; Montgomery County District Attorney, 1836-39; U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York, 1848; died in office 1848. Died December 22, 1848 (age about 46 years). Interment at St. Andrew's Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial


    St. Luke's Cemetery
    Manhattan, New York County, New York
    Politicians formerly buried here:
      Henry Meigs (1782-1861) — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in New Haven, New Haven County, Conn., October 28, 1782. Democrat. Lawyer; served in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812; member of New York state assembly from New York County, 1817-18; U.S. Representative from New York 2nd District, 1819-21. Died in New York, New York County, N.Y., May 20, 1861 (age 78 years, 204 days). Original interment at St. Luke's Cemetery; reinterment at St. Peter's Churchyard, Perth Amboy, N.J.
      Relatives: Son of Josiah Meigs (1757-1822) and Clara (Benjamin) Meigs (1762-1849); married, February 19, 1806, to Julia Austin (1783-1841); father of Henry Meigs, Jr.; nephew of Return Jonathan Meigs, Sr.; first cousin of Return Jonathan Meigs, Jr.; first cousin once removed of Return Jonathan Meigs III; second cousin once removed of Timothy Pitkin; second cousin twice removed of Benjamin Lewis Fairchild; third cousin of William Whiting Boardman; third cousin twice removed of Mabel Thorp Boardman; fourth cousin of William Woodbridge, Bela Edgerton, Isaac Backus, Heman Ticknor, Martin Olds, Eliphalet Adams Bulkeley, Henry Titus Backus and Joshua Perkins; fourth cousin once removed of Alfred Peck Edgerton, Joseph Ketchum Edgerton, Morgan Gardner Bulkeley, William Henry Bulkeley (1840-1902) and Hiram Bingham.
      Political families: Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York; Pendleton family of Connecticut (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article


    St. Mark's-in-the-Bowery Churchyard
    Tenth Street & Second Avenue
    Manhattan, New York County, New York
    See also Findagrave page for this location.
    Politicians buried here:
    Daniel D. Tompkins Daniel D. Tompkins (1774-1825) — of New York, New York County, N.Y.; Staten Island, Richmond County, N.Y. Born in Scarsdale, Westchester County, N.Y., June 21, 1774. Democrat. Lawyer; delegate to New York state constitutional convention, 1801; member of New York state assembly from New York County, 1802-03; U.S. Representative from New York 3rd District, 1805; Governor of New York, 1807-17; Vice President of the United States, 1817-25; delegate to New York state constitutional convention, 1821. Presbyterian or Christian Reformed. Member, Freemasons. Died in Staten Island, Richmond County, N.Y., June 11, 1825 (age 50 years, 355 days). Entombed at St. Mark's-in-the-Bowery Churchyard.
      Relatives: Son of Jonathan Griffin Tompkins (1733-1823) and Sarah Ann (Hyatt) Tompkins (1740-1810); brother of Caleb Tompkins (1759-1846); married, February 20, 1798, to Hannah Minthorne (1781-1829); father of Arietta Minthorne Tompkins (1800-1837; who married Gilbert Livingston Thompson); grandfather of Hannah Minthorne Tompkins (who married Theodore Chardavoyne Vermilye); great-grandfather of Guy Vernor Henry.
      Political family: Livingston-Schuyler family of New York (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      Tompkins County, N.Y. is named for him.
      Tompkins Square Park, in Manhattan, New York, is named for him.
      Politician named for him: Daniel D. T. Farnsworth
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
      Image source: New York Red Book 1896
    Philip Hone Philip Hone (1780-1851) — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in New York, New York County, N.Y., October 25, 1780. Whig. Merchant; president, Delaware and Hudson Canal Company; mayor of New York City, N.Y., 1826-27. German ancestry. Kept a famous diary of New York life in the 19th century. Died in New York, New York County, N.Y., May 5, 1851 (age 70 years, 192 days). Interment at St. Mark's-in-the-Bowery Churchyard.
      Relatives: Son of Esther (Bourdet) Hone (1742-1798) and Philip Hone (1743-1798); married to Catherine Dunscombe.
      The borough of Honesdale, Pennsylvania, is named for him.
      See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
      Image source: New York Public Library
      Ogden Hoffman (1794-1856) — also known as Josiah Ogden Hoffman — of Goshen, Orange County, N.Y.; New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in New York, New York County, N.Y., October 13, 1794. Whig. Lawyer; member of New York state assembly, 1826, 1828 (Orange County 1826, New York County 1828); U.S. Representative from New York 3rd District, 1837-41; U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York, 1841-45; New York state attorney general, 1854-55. Died in New York, New York County, N.Y., May 1, 1856 (age 61 years, 201 days). Entombed at St. Mark's-in-the-Bowery Churchyard.
      Relatives: Son of Josiah Ogden Hoffman and Mary (Colden) Hoffman; married, December 27, 1819, to Emily Burrall; married 1838 to Virginia E. Southard (daughter of Samuel Lewis Southard); father of Charles Fenno Hoffman (1806-1884; author) and Ogden Hoffman, Jr. (1822-1891).
      Political family: Southard-Hoffman family of New York and New Jersey.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
      George Folsom (1802-1869) — of New York. Born in Kennebunk, York County, Maine, May 23, 1802. Lawyer; member of New York state senate 1st District, 1845-47; U.S. Charge d'Affaires to Netherlands, 1850-53. Died in Rome, Italy, March 27, 1869 (age 66 years, 308 days). Interment at St. Mark's-in-the-Bowery Churchyard.
      Relatives: Son of Thomas Folsom (1769-1851) and Edna (Ela) Folsom (1775-1851); married, November 20, 1839, to Margaret Cornelia Winthrop (1801-1863; second great-granddaughter of John Winthrop and Pieter Stuyvesant (1612?-1672); first cousin of Hamilton Fish); grandfather of Winifred Folsom (1882-1927; who married Edward Henry Delafield).
      Political families: Livingston-Schuyler family of New York; Winthrop-Folsom family of New York City, New York (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      See also U.S. State Dept career summary — Find-A-Grave memorial
      Nicholas Fish (1758-1833) — Born in Newtown, Queens, Queens County, N.Y., August 28, 1758. Colonel in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; Adjutant General of New York, 1786; Federalist candidate for U.S. Representative from New York, 1804, 1806; candidate for Lieutenant Governor of New York, 1810 (Federalist), 1811. Died June 20, 1833 (age 74 years, 296 days). Entombed at St. Mark's-in-the-Bowery Churchyard.
      Relatives: Married to Elizabeth Stuyvesant (1775-1854; great-granddaughter of Robert Livingston the Elder; second great-granddaughter of Pieter Stuyvesant); father of Hamilton Fish (1808-1893); grandfather of Nicholas Fish and Hamilton Fish, Jr. (1849-1936); great-grandfather of Hamilton Fish, Jr. (1888-1991); second great-grandfather of Hamilton Fish, Jr. (1926-1996); third great-grandfather of Hamilton Fish (1951-) and Alexa Fish Ward.
      Political families: Livingston-Schuyler family of New York; Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York; Roosevelt family of New York City, New York (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
    Peter Stuyvesant Pieter Stuyvesant (c.1612-1672) — also known as Peter Stuyvesant; "Old Silver Leg" — of Nieuw Amsterdam, Niew Neederlandt (now part of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y.); New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in Peperga, Friesland, Netherlands, about 1612. Dutch Director-General (colonial governor) of New Netherland, 1647-64. Frisian ancestry. Lost his right leg in battle in 1644. Died in New York, New York County, N.Y., 1672 (age about 60 years). Entombed at St. Mark's-in-the-Bowery Churchyard.
      Relatives: Married to Judith Bayard (1608-1686); uncle of Nicholas Bayard (1644?-1707); great-granduncle of Stephanus Bayard; second great-grandfather of Elizabeth Stuyvesant (1775-1854; who married Nicholas Fish (1758-1833)) and Margaret Cornelia Winthrop (1801-1863; who married George Folsom); second great-granduncle of Nicholas Bayard (1736-1802) and John Bubenheim Bayard; third great-grandfather of Hamilton Fish (1808-1893); third great-granduncle of James Asheton Bayard, Sr.; fourth great-grandfather of Nicholas Fish (1848-1902) and Hamilton Fish, Jr. (1849-1936); fourth great-granduncle of Richard Henry Bayard, Littleton Kirkpatrick, James Asheton Bayard, Jr. and James Adams Ekin; fifth great-grandfather of Jonathan Mayhew Wainwright, Winifred Folsom (1882-1927; who married Edward Henry Delafield) and Hamilton Fish, Jr. (1888-1991); fifth great-granduncle of Thomas Francis Bayard, Sr., Andrew Kirkpatrick and John Sluyter Wirt; sixth great-grandfather of Hamilton Fish, Jr. (1926-1996); sixth great-granduncle of Thomas Francis Bayard, Jr.; seventh great-grandfather of Hamilton Fish (1951-) and Alexa Fish Ward; seventh great-granduncle of John Eliot Thayer, Jr., Bronson Murray Cutting, Thomas Francis Bayard III and Alexis Irenee du Pont Bayard (1918-1985).
      Political families: DuPont family of Wilmington, Delaware; Livingston-Schuyler family of New York; Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
      Image source: New York Public Library


    St. Patrick's Cathedral
    Manhattan, New York County, New York
    Politicians buried here:
      Patrick Joseph Hayes (1867-1938) — Born in New York, New York County, N.Y., November 20, 1867. Democrat. Catholic priest; archbishop of New York, 1919-38; cardinal, 1924-38; offered prayer, Democratic National Convention, 1924. Catholic. Irish ancestry. Died, from a heart attack caused by coronary thrombosis, in Monticello, Sullivan County, N.Y., September 4, 1938 (age 70 years, 288 days). Originally entombed at St. Joseph's Camp Grotto Chapel, Near Forestburgh, Sullivan County, N.Y.; re-entombed at St. Patrick's Cathedral.
      Relatives: Son of Daniel Hayes and Mary (Gleason) Hayes.
      See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial


    St. Patrick's Old Cathedral
    233 Mott Street
    Manhattan, New York County, New York
    Politicians buried here:
      Charles O'Conor (1804-1884) — of New York, New York County, N.Y.; Nantucket, Nantucket County, Mass. Born in New York, New York County, N.Y., January 4, 1804. Democrat. Lawyer; U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York, 1853-54; senior counsel for Jefferson Davis during his treason trial; as special deputy attorney general for New York State, was counsel for the prosecution in the trial of William M. Tweed; Straight Out Democratic candidate for President of the United States, 1872. Catholic. Irish ancestry. Died in Nantucket, Nantucket County, Mass., May 12, 1884 (age 80 years, 129 days). Entombed at St. Patrick's Old Cathedral.
      Relatives: Son of Thomas O'Conor (1770-1855).
      See also Wikipedia article


    St. Paul's Cemetery
    Manhattan, New York County, New York
    Politicians buried here:
      Campbell Patrick White (1787-1859) — also known as Campbell P. White — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in Ireland, November 30, 1787. U.S. Representative from New York 3rd District, 1829-35; delegate to New York state constitutional convention, 1845. Died in New York, New York County, N.Y., February 12, 1859 (age 71 years, 74 days). Interment at St. Paul's Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page


    St. Paul's Chapel
    Manhattan, New York County, New York
    Politicians buried here:
      William Houstoun (1755-1813) — of Georgia. Born in Savannah, Chatham County, Ga., 1755. Delegate to Continental Congress from Georgia, 1784-86; member, U.S. Constitutional Convention, 1787. Episcopalian. Died in Savannah, Chatham County, Ga., March 17, 1813 (age about 57 years). Interment at St. Paul's Chapel.
      Relatives: Father-in-law of Duncan Lamont Clinch (1787-1849).
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page


    St. Paul's Churchyard
    Manhattan, New York County, New York

    Politicians buried here:
      William Denning (1740-1819) — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in St. John's, Newfoundland, April, 1740. Member of New York state assembly from New York County, 1784-87, 1797-98; member of New York state senate Southern District, 1798-1808; member of New York council of appointment, 1799; U.S. Representative from New York 2nd District, 1809. Died in New York, New York County, N.Y., October 30, 1819 (age 79 years, 0 days). Interment at St. Paul's Churchyard.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
    Politicians formerly buried here:
      Abner Nash (1740-1786) — of Jones County, N.C. Born near Farmville, Prince Edward County, Va., August 8, 1740. Lawyer; member of Virginia House of Burgesses, 1761-65; member of North Carolina house of commons, 1777-78, 1782, 1784-85; member of North Carolina state senate from Jones County, 1779; Governor of North Carolina, 1780-81; Delegate to Continental Congress from North Carolina, 1782-86; died in office 1786. Welsh ancestry. Died while attending a session of the Continental Congress, in New York, New York County, N.Y., December 2, 1786 (age 46 years, 116 days). Original interment at St. Paul's Churchyard; reinterment at Pembroke Plantation Cemetery, New Bern, N.C.
      Relatives: Son of Abner Nash (1685-1732) and Elizabeth (Hinton) Nash (1688-1711); brother of Francis Nash (1742-1777); married 1766 to Justina Davis Dobbs (1747-1771); married 1774 to Mary Whiting Jones (1757-1799).
      The World War II Liberty ship SS Abner Nash (built 1942, scrapped 1964) was named for him.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
    Other politicians who have monuments here:
      Thomas Addis Emmet (1764-1827) — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in Cork, Ireland, April 24, 1764. Lawyer; New York state attorney general, 1812-13; appointed 1812. Irish ancestry. Died in New York, New York County, N.Y., November 15, 1827 (age 63 years, 205 days). Interment at New York City Marble Cemetery; cenotaph at St. Paul's Churchyard.
      Relatives: Brother of Robert Emmet (1778-1803; Irish nationalist and rebel leader); married, January 11, 1791, to Jane Patten; father of Robert Emmet (1792-1873); grandfather of William Colville Emmet; great-grandfather of William Temple Emmet (1869-1918) and Grenville Temple Emmet.
      Political families: Emmet-Morton family of New York City, New York; Winthrop-Hamlin family of Massachusetts and Connecticut (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      See also Wikipedia article


    St. Stephen's Cemetery
    Manhattan, New York County, New York
    Politicians formerly buried here:
      John Henry Hobart Haws (1809-1858) — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in New York, New York County, N.Y., 1809. Whig. Lawyer; U.S. Representative from New York 4th District, 1851-53. Died in New York, New York County, N.Y., January 27, 1858 (age about 48 years). Original interment at St. Stephen's Cemetery; reinterment in 1866 at Green-Wood Cemetery, Brooklyn, N.Y.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial


    Straus Park
    Manhattan, New York County, New York

    Politicians who have monuments here:
      Isidor Straus (1845-1912) — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in Otterberg, Germany, February 6, 1845. Democrat. U.S. Representative from New York 15th District, 1894-95. Jewish. One of the owners of the R. H. Macy & Co. department store in New York. Perished in the wreck of the steamship Titanic, in the North Atlantic Ocean, April 15, 1912 (age 67 years, 69 days); his body was subsequently recovered. Originally entombed at Beth El Cemetery, Glendale, Queens, N.Y.; later interred at Woodlawn Cemetery, Bronx, N.Y.; memorial monument at Straus Park.
      Relatives: Son of Lazarus Straus (1809-1898) and Sara (Straus) Straus (1823-1876); brother of Oscar Solomon Straus; married, July 12, 1871, to Ida Blum (1849-1912); father of Jesse Isidor Straus (1872-1936); uncle of Nathan Straus, Jr.; grandfather of Stuart Scheftel; granduncle of Ronald Peter Straus.
      Political family: Straus family of New York City, New York (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      Straus Hall (built 1926), a dormitory at Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts, is named for him and his wife.  — Straus Park (established 1895 as Schuyler Square; renamed 1907 as Bloomingdale Square; renamed 1915 as Straus Park), at Broadway and West End Avenue in Morningside Heights, Manhattan, New York, is named for him and his wife.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
      Books about Isidor Straus: June Hall McCash, A Titanic Love Story: Ida and Isidor Straus


    Tompkins Square Park
    Manhattan, New York County, New York

    Politicians who have monuments here:
      Samuel Sullivan Cox (1824-1889) — also known as Samuel S. Cox; "Sunset Cox" — of Columbus, Franklin County, Ohio; New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in Zanesville, Muskingum County, Ohio, September 30, 1824. Democrat. U.S. Representative from Ohio, 1857-65 (12th District 1857-63, 7th District 1863-65); delegate to Democratic National Convention from Ohio, 1864; delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1868, 1876; U.S. Representative from New York, 1869-73, 1873-85, 1886-89 (6th District 1869-73, 1873-85, 9th District 1885, 1886-89); defeated, 1872; died in office 1889; U.S. Minister to Turkey, 1885-86. Died in New York, New York County, N.Y., September 10, 1889 (age 64 years, 345 days). Interment at Green-Wood Cemetery, Brooklyn, N.Y.; statue at Tompkins Square Park.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — U.S. State Dept career summary — Find-A-Grave memorial


    Trinity Cemetery
    Amsterdam Avenue at 155th Street
    Manhattan, New York County, New York
    Founded 1842
    Politicians buried here:
      Fernando Wood (1812-1881) — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., June 14, 1812. Democrat. U.S. Representative from New York, 1841-43, 1863-65, 1867-81 (3rd District 1841-43, 5th District 1863-65, 9th District 1867-73, 10th District 1873-75, 9th District 1875-81); died in office 1881; mayor of New York City, N.Y., 1855-58, 1860-62; censured by the House of Representatives in 1868 for using unparliamentary language. Died in Hot Springs, Garland County, Ark., February 14, 1881 (age 68 years, 245 days). Interment at Trinity Cemetery.
      Relatives: Brother of Benjamin Wood (1820-1900).
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
      Books about Fernando Wood: Jerome Mushkat, Fernando Wood : A Political Biography
    Cadwallader D. Colden Cadwallader David Colden (1769-1834) — also known as Cadwallader D. Colden — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in Flushing, Queens, Queens County, N.Y., April 4, 1769. Colonel in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812; member of New York state assembly from New York County, 1817-18; mayor of New York City, N.Y., 1818-21; U.S. Representative from New York 2nd District, 1821-23; member of New York state senate 1st District, 1825-27; resigned 1827. Died in Jersey City, Hudson County, N.J., February 7, 1834 (age 64 years, 309 days). Original interment at Grace Church Cemetery, Jamaica, Queens, N.Y.; reinterment at Trinity Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
      Image source: New York Public Library
      Abraham Oakey Hall (1826-1898) — also known as A. Oakey Hall; "Elegant Oakey" — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in Albany, Albany County, N.Y., July 26, 1826. Republican. Newspaper reporter; lawyer; delegate to Republican National Convention from New York, 1856; mayor of New York City, N.Y., 1869-72; indicted and tried in 1871-73 on charges of covering up corruption during his mayoralty; acquitted. Presbyterian; later Catholic. English, Welsh, and French ancestry. Died, of heart disease, in Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., October 7, 1898 (age 72 years, 73 days). Entombed at Trinity Cemetery.
      See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
      John Adams Dix (1798-1879) — also known as John A. Dix — of Cooperstown, Otsego County, N.Y.; Albany, Albany County, N.Y.; New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in Boscawen, Merrimack County, N.H., July 24, 1798. Democrat. Secretary of state of New York, 1833-39; member of New York state assembly from Albany County, 1842; U.S. Senator from New York, 1845-49; postmaster at New York City, N.Y., 1860-61; U.S. Secretary of the Treasury, 1861; general in the Union Army during the Civil War; U.S. Minister to France, 1866-69; Governor of New York, 1873-75; defeated, 1848, 1874; candidate for mayor of New York City, N.Y., 1876. Died in New York, New York County, N.Y., April 21, 1879 (age 80 years, 271 days). Interment at Trinity Cemetery.
      Presumably named for: John Adams
      Relatives: Son-in-law of John Jordan Morgan; son of Col. Timothy Dix, Jr. (1770-1813) and Abigail (Wilkins) Dix; married to Catharine Waine Morgan (1802-1884); first cousin thrice removed of Roger Sherman; second cousin once removed of Nathan Read; third cousin once removed of Roger Sherman Baldwin, Sherman Day, Ebenezer Rockwood Hoar, William Maxwell Evarts, George Frisbie Hoar, John Hill Walbridge and Henry E. Walbridge; third cousin twice removed of Aaron Kellogg and Charles Kirk Tilden; fourth cousin of Simeon Eben Baldwin, Rockwood Hoar, Sherman Hoar, Maxwell Evarts and Arthur Outram Sherman; fourth cousin once removed of Abel Merrill, Samuel Laning, Orsamus Cook Merrill, John Lanning, Timothy Merrill (1781-1836), Daniel Putnam Tyler, Chauncey Mitchell Depew, John Frederick Addis and Roger Sherman Hoar.
      Political families: Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York; Woodruff-Hornblower-Seymour-Wadsworth family of Connecticut; Hoar-Sherman family of Massachusetts; Murphy-Merrill family of Harbor Beach, Michigan (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      Fort Dix (established 1917 as Camp Dix; later Fort Dix; now Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst), a U.S. Army post in Burlington County, New Jersey, is named for him.  — Dix Mountain, in the Ardirondack Mountains, Essex County, New York, is named for him.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
      Samuel Seabury (1873-1958) — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y.; East Hampton, Suffolk County, Long Island, N.Y. Born in New York, New York County, N.Y., February 22, 1873. Lawyer; Justice of New York Supreme Court 1st District, 1907-14; defeated, 1905; judge of New York Court of Appeals, 1914-16; defeated (Progressive), 1913; Democratic candidate for Governor of New York, 1916; alternate delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1920. Episcopalian. Member, American Bar Association. Died in East Hampton, Suffolk County, Long Island, N.Y., May 7, 1958 (age 85 years, 74 days). Interment at Trinity Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Rev. William Jones Seabury and Alice Van Wyck (Beare) Seabury; married, June 6, 1900, to Josephine Maud Richey.
      Samuel Seabury Playground (opened 1962, renamed 1989), Lexington Avenue at 96th Street, Manhattan, New York, is named for him.
      See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
      John Winthrop Chanler (1826-1877) — also known as John W. Chanler — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in New York, New York County, N.Y., September 14, 1826. Democrat. Lawyer; member of New York state assembly from New York County 10th District, 1858-59; U.S. Representative from New York 7th District, 1863-69. On May 14, 1866, he offered a resolution defending President Andrew Johnson's veto of Reconstruction enactments, which he called "the wicked and revolutionary acts of a few malignant and mischievous men." On motion of Rep. Robert C. Schenck, he was censured for insulting the House of Representatives. Died in Barrytown, Dutchess County, N.Y., October 19, 1877 (age 51 years, 35 days). Interment at Trinity Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of John White Chanler (1785-1853) and Elizabeth Sheriffe (Winthrop) Chanler (1791-1866); married, January 22, 1862, to Margaret Astor Ward (1838-1875; first cousin of William Waldorf Astor); father of William Astor Chanler and Lewis Stuyvesant Chanler (1869-1942).
      Political family: Livingston-Schuyler family of New York (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
      William Astor Chanler (1867-1934) — of New York, New York County, N.Y.; Barrytown, Dutchess County, N.Y.; Paris, France. Born in Newport, Newport County, R.I., June 11, 1867. Democrat. Explorer; author; member of New York state assembly from New York County 5th District, 1898; served in the U.S. Army during the Spanish-American War; U.S. Representative from New York 14th District, 1899-1901. Member, Tammany Hall. Injured in an automobile accident in France, 1915, and lost a lower leg. Died in Mentone (Menton), France, March 4, 1934 (age 66 years, 266 days). Interment at Trinity Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of John Winthrop Chanler and Margaret Astor (Ward) Chanler (1838-1875); brother of Lewis Stuyvesant Chanler (1869-1942); married 1903 to Minnie 'Beatrice' Ashley (actress, comedienne, sculptor); grandnephew of John Jacob Astor III; second great-grandson of John Armstrong, Jr.; second great-grandnephew of Robert R. Livingston (1746-1813), James Armstrong and Edward Livingston; third great-grandson of John Armstrong and Robert R. Livingston (1718-1775); fourth great-grandson of Robert Livingston (1688-1775); fourth great-grandnephew of John Livingston and Gilbert Livingston; fifth great-grandson of Robert Livingston the Elder and Robert Livingston the Younger; fifth great-grandnephew of Johannes Schuyler (1668-1747); sixth great-grandson of Pieter Schuyler (1657-1724); first cousin once removed of William Waldorf Astor; first cousin five times removed of Robert Livingston (1708-1790), Peter Van Brugh Livingston, Robert Gilbert Livingston, Philip Livingston, William Livingston, Jeremiah Van Rensselaer, Robert Van Rensselaer and James Livingston; first cousin six times removed of Johannes Schuyler (1697-1746) and Philip P. Schuyler; first cousin seven times removed of David Davidse Schuyler and Myndert Davidtse Schuyler; second cousin four times removed of Peter Robert Livingston (1737-1794), Walter Livingston, Philip Peter Livingston, Henry Brockholst Livingston, Pierre Van Cortlandt, Jr., Peter Robert Livingston (1766-1847), Jacob Rutsen Van Rensselaer, Philip Jeremiah Schuyler and Maturin Livingston; second cousin five times removed of Stephanus Bayard, Philip John Schuyler, Stephen John Schuyler, Pieter Schuyler (1746-1792) and Peter Samuel Schuyler; third cousin thrice removed of Stephen Van Rensselaer, Philip Schuyler Van Rensselaer, Henry Walter Livingston, Peter Augustus Jay, Rensselaer Westerlo, Edward Philip Livingston, Philip Schuyler, James Alexander Hamilton, Peter Robert Livingston (1789-1859), William Jay, Gerrit Smith, Charles Ludlow Livingston, Hamilton Fish and Elizabeth Cady Stanton; fourth cousin of Robert Reginald Livingston.
      Political family: Livingston-Schuyler family of New York (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
      James Monroe (1799-1870) — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in Virginia, 1799. U.S. Representative from New York 3rd District, 1839-41; member of New York state assembly from New York County 10th District, 1850, 1852. Died in 1870 (age about 71 years). Interment at Trinity Cemetery.
      Presumably named for: James Monroe
      Relatives: Nephew of James Monroe; great-grandfather of Theodore Douglas Robinson (1883-1934) and Corinne Robinson Alsop.
      Political families: Roosevelt family of New York City, New York; Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York; Monroe family of Virginia and Washington (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
      Edward Haight (1817-1885) — of New York. Born in New York City (unknown county), N.Y., March 26, 1817. Democrat. U.S. Representative from New York 9th District, 1861-63; defeated, 1862. Died in Bronx, Bronx County, N.Y., September 15, 1885 (age 68 years, 173 days). Interment at Trinity Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
      William Augustus Darling (1817-1895) — also known as William A. Darling — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in Newark, Essex County, N.J., December 27, 1817. Republican. U.S. Representative from New York 9th District, 1865-67; defeated, 1872. Died in New York, New York County, N.Y., May 26, 1895 (age 77 years, 150 days). Interment at Trinity Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
      Alexander Isaac Cotheal (1804-1894) — also known as Alexander Cotheal — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in New York, New York County, N.Y., November 5, 1804. Shipping executive; linguist; Consul-General for Nicaragua in New York, N.Y., 1871-94. Episcopalian. English ancestry. Member, Sons of the Revolution. Died in New York, New York County, N.Y., February 26, 1894 (age 89 years, 113 days). Interment at Trinity Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Henry Cotheal (1779-1849) and Phebe Berrian (Warner) Cotheal (1786-1844).
      See also Find-A-Grave memorial
      Seth C. Hawley (1810-1884) — of Buffalo, Erie County, N.Y. Born in Glens Falls, Warren County, N.Y., February 10, 1810. Lawyer; newspaper editor; member of New York state assembly from Erie County, 1840-41; railroad builder; U.S. Consul in Nassau, 1863; chief clerk, New York City Police Department; the New York Times called him "the brains of the department.". English ancestry. Died, of pneumonia, in New York, New York County, N.Y., November 10, 1884 (age 74 years, 274 days). Interment at Trinity Cemetery.
      John Jacob Astor III (1822-1890) — Born in New York, New York County, N.Y., June 10, 1822. Republican. General in the Union Army during the Civil War; Presidential Elector for New York, 1880; Presidential Elector for New York, 1880. Died in New York, New York County, N.Y., February 22, 1890 (age 67 years, 257 days). Interment at Trinity Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of William Backhouse Astor (1792-1875) and Margaret Alida Rebecca (Armstrong) Astor (1800-1872); married to Charlotte Augusta Gibbes (1825-1887); father of William Waldorf Astor (1848-1919); grandson of John Armstrong, Jr. and John Jacob Astor (1763-1848; first American multi-millionaire); grandnephew of Robert R. Livingston (1746-1813), James Armstrong and Edward Livingston (1764-1836); granduncle of William Astor Chanler and Lewis Stuyvesant Chanler; great-grandson of John Armstrong and Robert R. Livingston (1718-1775); second great-grandson of Robert Livingston (1688-1775); second great-grandnephew of John Livingston and Gilbert Livingston; third great-grandson of Robert Livingston the Elder and Robert Livingston the Younger; third great-grandnephew of Johannes Schuyler (1668-1747); fourth great-grandson of Pieter Schuyler (1657-1724); first cousin thrice removed of Robert Livingston (1708-1790), Peter Van Brugh Livingston, Robert Gilbert Livingston, Philip Livingston, William Livingston, Jeremiah Van Rensselaer, Robert Van Rensselaer and James Livingston; first cousin four times removed of Johannes Schuyler (1697-1746) and Philip P. Schuyler; first cousin five times removed of David Davidse Schuyler and Myndert Davidtse Schuyler; second cousin twice removed of Peter Robert Livingston (1737-1794), Walter Livingston, Philip Peter Livingston, Henry Brockholst Livingston, Pierre Van Cortlandt, Jr., Peter Robert Livingston (1766-1847), Jacob Rutsen Van Rensselaer, Philip Jeremiah Schuyler, Maturin Livingston and Robert Reginald Livingston; second cousin thrice removed of Stephanus Bayard, Philip John Schuyler, Stephen John Schuyler, Pieter Schuyler (1746-1792) and Peter Samuel Schuyler; second cousin four times removed of Matthew Clarkson (1733-1800); third cousin once removed of Stephen Van Rensselaer, Philip Schuyler Van Rensselaer, Henry Walter Livingston, Peter Augustus Jay, Rensselaer Westerlo, Edward Philip Livingston, Philip Schuyler, James Alexander Hamilton, Peter Robert Livingston (1789-1859), William Jay, Gerrit Smith, Charles Ludlow Livingston (1800-1873), Hamilton Fish and Elizabeth Cady Stanton; third cousin twice removed of Nicholas Bayard; third cousin thrice removed of Matthew Clarkson (1758-1825); fourth cousin of Gilbert Livingston Thompson, Edward Livingston (1796-1840), Henry Bell Van Rensselaer, John Jay II, Nicholas Fish, Hamilton Fish, Jr. (1849-1936) and Cortlandt Schuyler Van Rensselaer; fourth cousin once removed of George Washington Schuyler, Philip N. Schuyler, Kiliaen Van Rensselaer, Robert Ray Hamilton, John Kean, Hamilton Fish Kean, Jonathan Mayhew Wainwright, Charles Ludlow Livingston (1870-?) and Hamilton Fish, Jr. (1888-1991).
      Political families: Livingston-Schuyler family of New York; Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
      Herbert Livingston Satterlee (1863-1947) — also known as Herbert L. Satterlee — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y.; Greenwich, Fairfield County, Conn. Born in New York, New York County, N.Y., October 31, 1863. Republican. Lawyer; private secretary for U.S. Senator William M. Evarts, 1887-89; served in the U.S. Navy during the Spanish-American War; counsel for Missouri, Kansas & Texas Railroad, 1898-1902; U.S. Assistant Secretary of the Treasury, 1906-07; U.S. Assistant Secretary of the Navy, 1908-09; alternate delegate to Republican National Convention from Maryland, 1920. Episcopalian. Member, American Bar Association; Union League; Navy League; Society of Colonial Wars. Died, from a self-inflicted gunshot, in Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., July 14, 1947 (age 83 years, 256 days). Interment at Trinity Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of George LeRoy Bowen Satterlee (1833-1903) and Sarah Bradley (Wilcox) Satterlee (1833-1921); married, November 15, 1909, to Louisa Pierpont Morgan (1866-1946; daughter of J. Pierpont Morgan (1837-1913; financier)); second great-grandnephew of Peter Robert Livingston (1737-1794) and Walter Livingston; third great-grandson of Robert Livingston (1708-1790); third great-grandnephew of Peter Van Brugh Livingston, Philip Livingston and William Livingston; fourth great-grandnephew of John Livingston, Robert Livingston (1688-1775) and Gilbert Livingston; fifth great-grandson of Robert Livingston the Elder and Pieter Van Brugh; fifth great-grandnephew of Pieter Schuyler, Johannes Cuyler and Johannes Schuyler (1668-1747); first cousin thrice removed of Henry Walter Livingston; first cousin four times removed of Philip Peter Livingston and Henry Brockholst Livingston; first cousin five times removed of Robert Gilbert Livingston and Robert R. Livingston (1718-1775); first cousin six times removed of Robert Livingston the Younger, Johannes Schuyler (1697-1746), Cornelis Cuyler and John Cruger, Jr.; first cousin seven times removed of David Davidse Schuyler and Myndert Davidtse Schuyler; second cousin twice removed of Peter Robert Livingston (1789-1859) and Edward Livingston (1796-1840); second cousin thrice removed of Stephen Van Rensselaer, Philip Schuyler Van Rensselaer, Peter Augustus Jay, Rensselaer Westerlo, Edward Philip Livingston, William Jay and Charles Ludlow Livingston (1800-1873); second cousin four times removed of Robert R. Livingston (1746-1813), Pierre Van Cortlandt, Jr. and Edward Livingston (1764-1836); second cousin five times removed of Stephanus Bayard, Philip John Schuyler, Philip P. Schuyler, Stephen John Schuyler and Henry Cruger (1739-1827); third cousin twice removed of Philip Schuyler, Henry Bell Van Rensselaer and John Jay II; third cousin thrice removed of Hamilton Fish; fourth cousin of Charles Ludlow Livingston (1870-?) and Bronson Murray Cutting; fourth cousin once removed of Kiliaen Van Rensselaer, Nicholas Fish, Hamilton Fish, Jr., John Kean, Hamilton Fish Kean and Brockholst Livingston.
      Political family: Livingston-Schuyler family of New York (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
    Politicians formerly buried here:
    John C. Fremont John Charles Frémont (1813-1890) — also known as "The Pathfinder"; "The Champion of Freedom" — Born in Savannah, Chatham County, Ga., January 21, 1813. Republican. Explorer; Military Governor of California, 1847; arrested for mutiny, 1847; court-martialed; found guilty of mutiny, disobedience, and conduct prejudicial to order; penalty remitted by Pres. James K. Polk; U.S. Senator from California, 1850-51; candidate for President of the United States, 1856; general in the Union Army during the Civil War; Governor of Arizona Territory, 1878-81; speaker, Republican National Convention, 1888. Episcopalian. French ancestry. Died, of peritonitis, in a hotel room at New York, New York County, N.Y., July 13, 1890 (age 77 years, 173 days). Original interment at Trinity Cemetery; reinterment in 1891 at Rockland Cemetery, Nyack, N.Y.
      Relatives: Son of Jean Charles Frémont and Ann Whiting (Pryor) Frémont; married, October 19, 1841, to Jessie Benton (daughter of Thomas Hart Benton (1782-1858)).
      Political families: Benton family; Breckinridge-Preston-Cabell-Henry family of Virginia (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      Cross-reference: Selah Hill
      Fremont County, Colo., Fremont County, Idaho, Fremont County, Iowa and Fremont County, Wyo. are named for him.
      Fremont Peak, in Monterey County and San Benito County, California, is named for him.  — Fremont Peak, in Coconino County, Arizona, is named for him.  — The city of Fremont, California, is named for him.  — The city of Fremont, Ohio, is named for him.  — The city of Fremont, Nebraska, is named for him.
      Politician named for him: John F. Hill
      Campaign slogan (1856): "Free Soil, Free Men, Fremont."
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
      Books by John C. Fremont: Memoirs of My Life and Times
      Books about John C. Fremont: Tom Chaffin, Pathfinder: John Charles Fremont and the Course of American Empire — David Roberts, A Newer World : Kit Carson, John C. Fremont and the Claiming of the American West — Andrew Rolle, John Charles Fremont: Character As Destiny
      Image source: Life and Work of James G. Blaine (1893)


    Trinity Churchyard
    74 Trinity Place
    Manhattan, New York County, New York
    Founded 1697
    Listed in National Register of Historic Places, 1976
    See also Findagrave page for this location.
    Politicians buried here:
    Albert Gallatin Albert Gallatin (1761-1849) — also known as Abraham Albert Alphonse de Gallatin — of Fayette County, Pa.; New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in Geneva, Switzerland, January 29, 1761. Democrat. Delegate to Pennsylvania state constitutional convention, 1790; member of Pennsylvania state house of representatives, 1790-92; U.S. Senator from Pennsylvania, 1793-94; U.S. Representative from Pennsylvania 11th District, 1795-1801; U.S. Secretary of the Treasury, 1801-14; U.S. Minister to France, 1815-23; Great Britain, 1826-27. Swiss ancestry. Died in Astoria, Queens, Queens County, N.Y., August 12, 1849 (age 88 years, 195 days). Entombed at Trinity Churchyard; statue at Treasury Building Grounds, Washington, D.C.
      Relatives: Son of Jean Gallatin and Sophia Albertina Rolaz du Rosey Gallatin; married 1789 to Sophie Allègre (1766-1789); married, November 11, 1793, to Hannah Nicholson (1766-1849); second great-grandfather of May Preston Davie; cousin by marriage of Joseph Hopper Nicholson (1770-1817).
      Political families: Key family of Maryland; Davie family of Maryland (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      Cross-reference: John L. Dawson
      Gallatin counties in Ill., Ky. and Mont. are named for him.
      The city of Gallatin, Tennessee, is named for him.  — The village of Galatia, Illinois, is named for him.  — The Gallatin River, which flows through Gallatin County, Montana, is named for him.  — Gallatin Hall (dormitory, built 1926), at Harvard University Business School, Boston, Massachusetts, is named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS Albert Gallatin (built 1941, torpedoed and sunk 1944) was named for him.
      Other politicians named for him: Albert Galliton HarrisonAlbert G. JewettAlbert G. HawesAlbert G. WakefieldAlbert Gallatin TalbottAlbert G. DowAlbert Gallatin KelloggAlbert Gallatin MarchandAlbert G. BrownAlbert G. Brodhead, Jr.Albert G. AllisonAlbert G. RiddleAlbert Galiton WatkinsAlbert G. PorterAlbert Gallatin EgbertAlbert Gallatin JenkinsAlbert Gallatin CalvertAlbert G. LawrenceAlbert G. FosterAlbert G. Simms
      Coins and currency: His portrait appeared on the U.S. $500 note in 1862-63.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
      Books about Albert Gallatin: John Austin Stevens, Albert Gallatin: An American Statesman — L. B. Kuppenheimer, Albert Gallatin's Vision of Democratic Stability — Nicholas Dungan, Gallatin: America's Swiss Founding Father — Raymond Walters, Albert Gallatin: Jeffersonian Financier and Diplomat
      Image source: New York Public Library
      Paul Richard (1697-1756) — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in 1697. Mayor of New York City, N.Y., 1735-39. Died in 1756 (age about 59 years). Interment at Trinity Churchyard.
      See also Wikipedia article
    Alexander Hamilton Alexander Hamilton (1757-1804) — also known as "Alexander the Coppersmith" — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in Charles Town, Nevis, January 11, 1757. Delegate to Continental Congress from New York, 1782; member of New York state assembly from New York County, 1786-87; member, U.S. Constitutional Convention, 1787; delegate to New York convention to ratify U.S. constitution from New York County, 1788; U.S. Secretary of the Treasury, 1789-95. Episcopalian. Scottish and French ancestry. Member, Freemasons; Society of the Cincinnati. Elected to the Hall of Fame for Great Americans in 1915. Shot and mortally wounded in a duel with Aaron Burr, on July 11, 1804, and died the next day in New York, New York County, N.Y., July 12, 1804 (age 47 years, 183 days). Interment at Trinity Churchyard; statue at Treasury Building Grounds, Washington, D.C.; statue at Commonwealth Avenue Mall, Boston, Mass.
      Relatives: Son of James Hamilton and Rachel (Faucette) Hamilton; married, December 14, 1780, to Elizabeth Schuyler (1757-1854; daughter of Philip John Schuyler; sister of Philip Jeremiah Schuyler); father of Alexander Hamilton, Jr., James Alexander Hamilton (1788-1878) and William Stephen Hamilton; great-grandfather of Robert Ray Hamilton; second great-grandfather of Laurens M. Hamilton; ancestor *** of Robert Hamilton Woodruff.
      Political families: Livingston-Schuyler family of New York; VanRensselaer family of Albany, New York (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      Cross-reference: Nathaniel Pendleton — Robert Troup — John Tayler — William P. Van Ness
      Hamilton counties in Fla., Ill., Ind., Kan., Neb., N.Y., Ohio and Tenn. are named for him.
      The city of Hamilton, Ohio, is named for him.  — Hamilton Hall (dormitory, built 1926), at Harvard University Business School, Boston, Massachusetts, is named for him.
      Other politicians named for him: Alexander H. BuellAlexander H. HolleyHamilton FishAlexander H. StephensAlexander H. BullockAlexander H. BaileyAlexander H. RiceAlexander Hamilton JonesAlexander H. WatermanAlexander H. CoffrothAlexander H. DudleyAlexander H. RevellAlexander Hamilton HargisAlexander Hamilton PhillipsAlex Woodle
      Coins and currency: His portrait appears on the U.S. $10 bill; from the 1860s to the 1920s, his portrait also appeared on U.S. notes and certificates of various denominations from $2 to $1,000.
      Personal motto: "Do it better yet."
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
      Books about Alexander Hamilton: Richard Brookhiser, Alexander Hamilton, American — Forrest McDonald, Alexander Hamilton: A Biography — Gertrude Atherton, Conqueror : Dramatized Biography of Alexander Hamilton — Ron Chernow, Alexander Hamilton — Thomas Fleming, Duel: Alexander Hamilton, Aaron Burr, and the Future of America — Arnold A. Rogow, A Fatal Friendship: Alexander Hamilton and Aaron Burr — Willard Sterne Randall, Alexander Hamilton: A Life — John Harper, American Machiavelli : Alexander Hamilton and the Origins of U.S. Foreign Policy — Stephen F. Knott, Alexander Hamilton and the Persistence of Myth — Charles Cerami, Young Patriots: The Remarkable Story of Two Men. Their Impossible Plan and The Revolution That Created The Constitution — Donald Barr Chidsey, Mr. Hamilton and Mr. Jefferson
      Critical books about Alexander Hamilton: Thomas DiLorenzo, Hamilton's Curse : How Jefferson's Arch Enemy Betrayed the American Revolution -- and What It means for Americans Today
      Image source: U.S. postage stamp (1957)
      Francis Lewis (1713-1803) — of New York. Born in Llandaff, Wales, March 21, 1713. Delegate to Continental Congress from New York, 1775; signer, Declaration of Independence, 1776. Welsh ancestry. Died December 30, 1803 (age 90 years, 284 days). Interment at Trinity Churchyard.
      Relatives: Father of Morgan Lewis (1754-1844).
      Political families: Livingston-Schuyler family of New York; Gerry family (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
      Hugh Williamson (1735-1819) — of Edenton, Chowan County, N.C. Born in West Nottingham, Chester County, Pa., December 5, 1735. Preacher; university professor; physician; member of North Carolina state legislature, 1782; Delegate to Continental Congress from North Carolina, 1782; member, U.S. Constitutional Convention, 1787; delegate to North Carolina convention to ratify U.S. constitution, 1788; U.S. Representative from North Carolina at-large, 1789-93. Presbyterian. Died in New York, New York County, N.Y., May 22, 1819 (age 83 years, 168 days). Entombed at Trinity Churchyard.
      Relatives: Son of John Williamson, Sr. and Mary (Davison) Williamson; married 1789 to Maria Apthorpe; granduncle of Joseph Pomeroy; great-granduncle of John Means Pomeroy and William Culbertson Pomeroy; second great-granduncle of Albert Nevin Pomeroy (1859-1927).
      Political family: Pomeroy family of Pennsylvania.
      Williamson County, Tenn. is named for him.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
    Luther Martin Luther Martin (1748-1826) — of Somerset County, Md. Born in New Brunswick, Middlesex County, N.J., February 20, 1748. Lawyer; Maryland state attorney general, 1778-1805, 1818-22; Delegate to Continental Congress from Maryland, 1784; member, U.S. Constitutional Convention, 1787; defense attorney for Samuel Chase in his 1805 impeachment trial, and for Aaron Burr in his 1807 treason trial. Episcopalian. Died in New York, New York County, N.Y., July 10, 1826 (age 78 years, 140 days). Interment at Trinity Churchyard.
      Relatives: Son of Benjamin Martin and Hannah Martin; married, December 25, 1783, to Maria Cresap (c.1766-1796; first cousin of Joseph Cresap, James Cresap and Thomas Cresap (1772-1845)).
      Political family: Cresap family of Maryland.
      See also congressional biography — Wikipedia article
      Image source: The South in the Building of the Nation (1909)
      Samuel Swartwout (1783-1856) — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in Poughkeepsie, Dutchess County, N.Y., November 17, 1783. He was participant in Aaron Burr's "Western Conspiracy"; delivered a message from Burr to Gen. James Wilkinson in New Orleans; subsequently arrested in November 1806 for misprision of treason, but released a few months later; early promoter of railroads; openly supported the Texas Republic in its war for independence from Mexico; served in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812; U.S. Collector of Customs, 1829-38; in 1838, it was alleged that he had embezzled more than $1.2 million from the New York customs house, and fled to England; later investigation implicated a subordinate of his as having obtained most of that money; forfeited his property and returned to the U.S. in 1841. Died in New York, New York County, N.Y., November 21, 1856 (age 73 years, 4 days). Interment at Trinity Churchyard.
      Relatives: Son of Abraham Swartwout and Maria (North) Swartwout; married 1814 to Alice Ann Cooper.
      See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
      John Morin Scott (1730-1784) — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in New York, New York County, N.Y., 1730. Lawyer; general in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; member of New York council of appointment, 1777; member of New York state senate Southern District, 1777-82; secretary of state of New York, 1778-84; died in office 1784; Delegate to Continental Congress from New York, 1780-82. Scottish and French Huguenot ancestry. Died in New York, New York County, N.Y., September 14, 1784 (age about 54 years). Interment at Trinity Churchyard.
      Relatives: Son of John Scott (1702-1733) and Marian (Morin) Scott (1703-1755); father of Lewis Allaire Scott (1759-1798).
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
      John Alsop (1724-1794) — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in New Windsor, Orange County, N.Y., 1724. Merchant; Delegate to Continental Congress from New York, 1774-76. Died in Newtown, Queens, Queens County, N.Y., November 22, 1794 (age about 70 years). Interment at Trinity Churchyard.
      Relatives: Son of John Alsop, Sr. and Abigail (Sackett) Alsop (1695-1752); married, June 6, 1766, to Mary Frogat (1744-1772); father of Mary Alsop (who married Rufus King (1755-1827)); grandfather of John Alsop King, James Gore King and Edward King; great-grandfather of Rufus King (1814-1876) and Rufus King (1817-1891); first cousin once removed of Ebenezer Hazard; first cousin twice removed of Erskine Hazard; first cousin seven times removed of John Forbes Kerry; third cousin twice removed of Benjamin Hard, Reuben Bostwick Heacock, Elisha Hotchkiss, Jr., Gideon Hard (1797-1885) and Graham Hurd Chapin; third cousin thrice removed of Walter Booth, Truman Hotchkiss, James Lockwood Conger, Austin George Nettleton, Charles M. Hotchkiss and George Winthrop Fairchild.
      Political families: Hatch family of Connecticut; Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York; Sherman family of Connecticut; King family; Beakes-Greene-Jennings family of Michigan (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
      Walter Livingston (1740-1797) — of Albany County, N.Y. Born November 27, 1740. Albany County Judge, 1774-75; member of New York state assembly from Albany County, 1777-79, 1784-85; Speaker of the New York State Assembly, 1777-79; Delegate to Continental Congress from New York, 1784-85. Died in New York, New York County, N.Y., May 14, 1797 (age 56 years, 168 days). Interment at Trinity Churchyard.
      Relatives: Son of Robert Livingston (1708-1790) and Maria (Thong) Livingston (1711-1765); brother-in-law of James Duane; brother of Peter Robert Livingston (1737-1794); married, March 13, 1767, to Cornelia Schuyler (1746-1822); father of Henry Walter Livingston; nephew of Peter Van Brugh Livingston, Philip Livingston and William Livingston; grandfather of Edward Livingston (1796-1840); grandnephew of John Livingston, Robert Livingston (1688-1775) and Gilbert Livingston; granduncle of Peter Robert Livingston (1789-1859); great-grandson of Robert Livingston the Elder and Pieter Van Brugh; great-grandnephew of Pieter Schuyler (1657-1724), Johannes Cuyler and Johannes Schuyler (1668-1747); second great-grandfather of Charles Ludlow Livingston (1870-?) and Bronson Murray Cutting; second great-granduncle of Herbert Livingston Satterlee; third great-grandfather of Brockholst Livingston; first cousin by marriage of William Duer; first cousin of Philip Peter Livingston, Catherine Livingston (1743-1775; who married Nicholas Bayard), Susannah Livingston (1748-1840; who married John Cleves Symmes (1742-1814)), Susanna Livingston (1755-1833; who married John Kean (1756-1795)), Sarah Van Brugh Livingston (1756-1802; who married John Jay) and Henry Brockholst Livingston; first cousin once removed of Robert Gilbert Livingston, Robert R. Livingston (1718-1775), Stephen Van Rensselaer, Philip Schuyler Van Rensselaer, Peter Augustus Jay (1776-1843), Rensselaer Westerlo, Edward Philip Livingston, William Jay and Charles Ludlow Livingston (1800-1873); first cousin twice removed of Robert Livingston the Younger, Johannes Schuyler (1697-1746), Cornelis Cuyler, John Cruger, Jr., Philip Schuyler, Henry Bell Van Rensselaer and John Jay II; first cousin thrice removed of David Davidse Schuyler, Myndert Davidtse Schuyler, Kiliaen Van Rensselaer, Nicholas Fish, Hamilton Fish, Jr. (1849-1936), John Kean (1852-1914) and Hamilton Fish Kean; first cousin four times removed of Peter Augustus Jay (1877-1933), Robert Reginald Livingston, Hamilton Fish, Jr. (1888-1991) and Robert Winthrop Kean; first cousin five times removed of John Eliot Thayer, Jr., Hamilton Fish, Jr. (1926-1996) and Thomas Howard Kean; first cousin six times removed of Hamilton Fish (1951-), Alexa Fish Ward and Thomas Howard Kean, Jr.; second cousin of Robert R. Livingston (1746-1813), Pierre Van Cortlandt, Jr. and Edward Livingston (1764-1836); second cousin once removed of Stephanus Bayard, Philip John Schuyler, Philip P. Schuyler, Stephen John Schuyler, Henry Cruger and Hamilton Fish (1808-1893); second cousin twice removed of Gilbert Livingston Thompson and John Jacob Astor III; second cousin thrice removed of William Waldorf Astor and Jonathan Mayhew Wainwright; second cousin four times removed of Guy Vernor Henry, William Astor Chanler, Lewis Stuyvesant Chanler and Montgomery Schuyler, Jr.; third cousin of Jeremiah Van Rensselaer, Robert Van Rensselaer, Pieter Schuyler (1746-1792), James Livingston, Peter Samuel Schuyler and Philip Jeremiah Schuyler; third cousin once removed of Peter Robert Livingston (1766-1847), Jacob Rutsen Van Rensselaer, Maturin Livingston, James Alexander Hamilton, George Washington Schuyler and Philip N. Schuyler; third cousin twice removed of Gerrit Smith, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, James Adams Ekin and Eugene Schuyler; third cousin thrice removed of Robert Ray Hamilton, John Sluyter Wirt, Cortlandt Schuyler Van Rensselaer and Karl Cortlandt Schuyler.
      Political families: Livingston-Schuyler family of New York; Marshall-Harrison-Randolph-Cabell family of Virginia (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      John Sloss Hobart (1738-1805) — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in Fairfield, Fairfield County, Conn., May 6, 1738. Justice of New York Supreme Court, 1777-98; delegate to New York convention to ratify U.S. constitution from New York County, 1788; U.S. Senator from New York, 1798; U.S. District Judge for New York, 1798. Died in New York, New York County, N.Y., February 4, 1805 (age 66 years, 274 days). Interment at Trinity Churchyard.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      John Jordan Morgan (1770-1849) — also known as John J. Morgan — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in Queens County, N.Y., 1770. Democrat. Member of New York state assembly from New York County, 1818-19, 1836, 1840; U.S. Representative from New York, 1821-25, 1834-35 (2nd District 1821-23, 3rd District 1823-25, 1834-35); U.S. Collector of Customs, 1841. Died in Port Chester, Westchester County, N.Y., July 29, 1849 (age about 79 years). Interment at Trinity Churchyard.
      Relatives: Father-in-law of John Adams Dix (1798-1879).
      Political families: Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York; Sherman family of Connecticut; Weeks-Bigelow-Andrew-Prescott family; Roosevelt family; Hoar-Sherman family of Massachusetts; Baldwin-Greene-Upson-Hoar family of Connecticut; Lockwood-Lanning family of New Jersey (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
      Thomas Jackson Oakley (1783-1857) — also known as Thomas J. Oakley — of Poughkeepsie, Dutchess County, N.Y. Born near Poughkeepsie, Dutchess County, N.Y., November 10, 1783. U.S. Representative from New York, 1813-15, 1827-28 (4th District 1813-15, 5th District 1827-28); member of New York state assembly from Dutchess County, 1815-16, 1817-20; New York state attorney general, 1819-21; appointed 1819; superior court judge in New York, 1828-47. Died in 1857 (age about 73 years). Interment at Trinity Churchyard.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
      Richard Harison (1747-1829) — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in 1747. Member of New York state assembly from New York County, 1787-89; delegate to New York convention to ratify U.S. constitution from New York County, 1788; U.S. Attorney for New York, 1789-1801. Died in 1829 (age about 82 years). Entombed at Trinity Churchyard.
      John R. Fellows (1832-1896) — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in Troy, Rensselaer County, N.Y., July 29, 1832. Democrat. Delegate to Arkansas secession convention, 1861; served in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; member of Arkansas state senate, 1866-67; delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1880, 1888 (speaker), 1892, 1896; U.S. Representative from New York, 1891-93 (6th District 1891-93, 14th District 1893); Gold Democratic candidate for Presidential Elector for New York, 1896. Died in New York, New York County, N.Y., December 7, 1896 (age 64 years, 131 days). Interment at Trinity Churchyard.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
      Silas Talbot (1751-1813) — of Montgomery County, N.Y. Born in Dighton, Bristol County, Mass., January 11, 1751. Colonel in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; member of New York state assembly from Montgomery County, 1791-93; U.S. Representative from New York 10th District, 1793-95. Died in New York, New York County, N.Y., June 30, 1813 (age 62 years, 170 days). Interment at Trinity Churchyard.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      John Watts (1749-1836) — of New York County, N.Y. Born in New York, 1749. Member of New York state assembly from New York County, 1788-93; U.S. Representative from New York 1st District, 1793-95. Died in 1836 (age about 87 years). Entombed at Trinity Churchyard.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Aaron Hackley, Jr. (1783-1868) — of Herkimer County, N.Y. Born in Wallingford, New Haven County, Conn., May 6, 1783. Member of New York state assembly from Herkimer County, 1813-15, 1817-18, 1837; U.S. Representative from New York 17th District, 1819-21; county judge in New York, 1823-24. Died in New York, New York County, N.Y., December 28, 1868 (age 85 years, 236 days). Interment at Trinity Churchyard.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
      William Hogan (1792-1874) — of Hogansburg, Franklin County, N.Y. Born in England, July 17, 1792. Member of New York state assembly from Franklin County, 1823; state court judge in New York, 1829; U.S. Representative from New York 19th District, 1831-33. Died November 25, 1874 (age 82 years, 131 days). Interment at Trinity Churchyard.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
      Lewis Allaire Scott (1759-1798) — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Born February 11, 1759. Secretary of state of New York, 1784-93. Died in New York, New York County, N.Y., March 17, 1798 (age 39 years, 34 days). Interment at Trinity Churchyard.
      Relatives: Son of John Morin Scott (1730-1784).
      See also Find-A-Grave memorial
      John Ward (1767-1816) — of Charleston, Charleston County, S.C. Born in Charleston, Charleston County, S.C., February 14, 1767. Lawyer; member of South Carolina state house of representatives, 1791-97; member of South Carolina state senate, 1798-1809; intendant of Charleston, South Carolina, 1801-02. Died in New York, New York County, N.Y., September 19, 1816 (age 49 years, 218 days). Interment at Trinity Churchyard.
      See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
      John Church Cruger (1807-1879) — of Dutchess County, N.Y. Born in New York, New York County, N.Y., 1807. Whig. Candidate for U.S. Representative from New York, 1852. Died in New York, New York County, N.Y., November 17, 1879 (age about 72 years). Entombed at Trinity Churchyard.
      Charles Ludlow Livingston (1800-1873) — also known as Charles L. Livingston — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in 1800. Lawyer; member of New York state assembly from New York County, 1829-33; member of New York state senate 1st District, 1834-37. Died in 1873 (age about 73 years). Interment at Trinity Churchyard.
      Relatives: Son of Philip Peter Livingston and Cornelia (Van Horne) Livingston; married to Margaret Allen (1804-1873); nephew of Catherine Livingston (1743-1775; who married Nicholas Bayard) and Susanna Livingston (1755-1833; who married John Kean (1756-1795)); grandson of Peter Van Brugh Livingston; grandnephew of Robert Livingston (1708-1790), Philip Livingston and William Livingston; great-grandnephew of John Livingston, Robert Livingston (1688-1775) and Gilbert Livingston; second great-grandson of Robert Livingston the Elder and Pieter Van Brugh; second great-grandnephew of Pieter Schuyler (1657-1724), Abraham de Peyster, Johannes Cuyler, Johannes de Peyster and Johannes Schuyler (1668-1747); first cousin once removed of Peter Robert Livingston (1737-1794), Walter Livingston and Henry Brockholst Livingston; first cousin twice removed of Robert Gilbert Livingston, Robert R. Livingston (1718-1775), Nicholas Fish, Hamilton Fish, Jr. (1849-1936), John Kean (1852-1914) and Hamilton Fish Kean; first cousin thrice removed of Robert Livingston the Younger, Johannes DePeyster, Cornelis Cuyler, Johannes Schuyler (1697-1746), John Cruger, Jr., Hamilton Fish, Jr. (1888-1991) and Robert Winthrop Kean; first cousin four times removed of David Davidse Schuyler, Myndert Davidtse Schuyler, Hamilton Fish, Jr. (1926-1996) and Thomas Howard Kean; first cousin five times removed of Hamilton Fish (1951-), Alexa Fish Ward and Thomas Howard Kean, Jr.; second cousin of Stephen Van Rensselaer, Philip Schuyler Van Rensselaer, Henry Walter Livingston, Peter Augustus Jay (1776-1843), Rensselaer Westerlo, Edward Philip Livingston and William Jay; second cousin once removed of Robert R. Livingston (1746-1813), Pierre Van Cortlandt, Jr., Edward Livingston (1764-1836), Philip Schuyler, Peter Robert Livingston (1789-1859), Edward Livingston (1796-1840), Henry Bell Van Rensselaer and John Jay II; second cousin twice removed of Stephanus Bayard, Matthew Clarkson, Philip John Schuyler, Philip P. Schuyler, Stephen John Schuyler, Henry Cruger, Kiliaen Van Rensselaer and Charles Ludlow Livingston; second cousin thrice removed of Herbert Livingston Satterlee, Peter Augustus Jay (1877-1933), Bronson Murray Cutting, Robert Reginald Livingston and Brockholst Livingston; second cousin four times removed of John Eliot Thayer, Jr.; third cousin of Hamilton Fish (1808-1893); third cousin once removed of Jeremiah Van Rensselaer, Robert Van Rensselaer, Pieter Schuyler (1746-1792), James Livingston, Peter Samuel Schuyler, Philip Jeremiah Schuyler, Philip DePeyster, Gilbert Livingston Thompson and John Jacob Astor III; third cousin twice removed of William Waldorf Astor and Jonathan Mayhew Wainwright; third cousin thrice removed of Guy Vernor Henry, William Astor Chanler, Lewis Stuyvesant Chanler (1869-1942) and Montgomery Schuyler, Jr.; fourth cousin of Peter Robert Livingston (1766-1847), Jacob Rutsen Van Rensselaer, Maturin Livingston, James Alexander Hamilton, George Washington Schuyler and Philip N. Schuyler; fourth cousin once removed of Gerrit Smith, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, James Adams Ekin and Eugene Schuyler.
      Political family: Livingston-Schuyler family of New York (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      See also Find-A-Grave memorial
      Horatio Gates (1726-1806) — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in 1726. General in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; member of New York state assembly from New York County, 1800-01. Died in 1806 (age about 80 years). Interment at Trinity Churchyard.
      Gates County, N.C. is named for him.
    Politicians formerly buried here:
      Edward Holland (1702-1756) — of Albany, Albany County, N.Y.; New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in Albany, Albany County, N.Y., 1702. Mayor of Albany, N.Y., 1733-41; mayor of New York City, N.Y., 1747-56; died in office 1756. Anglican. English ancestry. Died in New York, New York County, N.Y., November 10, 1756 (age about 54 years). Original interment at Trinity Churchyard; reinterment at Albany Rural Cemetery, Menands, N.Y.
      Relatives: Son of Henry Holland (1661-1736) and Jenny (Seeley) Holland (1676-1756); married, June 24, 1726, to Magdalena Bayeux (1706-1737); married 1739 to Frances Nicoll (1704-1787).
      See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
      William Livingston (1723-1790) — of Elizabethtown, Essex County (now Elizabeth, Union County), N.J. Born in Albany, Albany County, N.Y., November 30, 1723. Lawyer; member of New York colonial assembly, 1759-61; Delegate to Continental Congress from New Jersey, 1774-76; Governor of New Jersey, 1776-90; died in office 1790; chancellor of New Jersey court of chancery, 1776-90; died in office 1790; member, U.S. Constitutional Convention, 1787. Presbyterian. Died in Elizabethtown, Essex County (now Elizabeth, Union County), N.J., July 25, 1790 (age 66 years, 237 days). Originally entombed at Trinity Churchyard; re-entombed in 1846 at Green-Wood Cemetery, Brooklyn, N.Y.
      Relatives: Son of Philip Livingston (1686-1749) and Catherine (Van Brugh) Livingston (1689-1756); brother of Robert Livingston (1708-1790), Peter Van Brugh Livingston and Philip Livingston (1716-1778); married 1745 to Susannah French (1723-1789; granddaughter of Phillip French); father of Susannah Livingston (1748-1840; who married John Cleves Symmes (1742-1814)), Sarah Van Brugh Livingston (1756-1802; who married John Jay) and Henry Brockholst Livingston; nephew of John Livingston, Robert Livingston (1688-1775) and Gilbert Livingston; uncle by marriage of James Duane and William Duer; uncle of Peter Robert Livingston (1737-1794), Walter Livingston, Philip Peter Livingston, Catherine Livingston (1743-1775; who married Nicholas Bayard) and Susanna Livingston (1755-1833; who married John Kean (1756-1795)); grandson of Robert Livingston the Elder and Pieter Van Brugh; grandfather of Peter Augustus Jay (1776-1843) and William Jay; grandnephew of Pieter Schuyler (1657-1724), Johannes Cuyler and Johannes Schuyler (1668-1747); granduncle of Stephen Van Rensselaer, Philip Schuyler Van Rensselaer, Henry Walter Livingston, Rensselaer Westerlo, Edward Philip Livingston and Charles Ludlow Livingston (1800-1873); great-grandfather of John Jay II; great-granduncle of Philip Schuyler, Peter Robert Livingston (1789-1859), Edward Livingston (1796-1840) and Henry Bell Van Rensselaer; second great-grandfather of Charles Ludlow Livingston (1870-?); second great-granduncle of Kiliaen Van Rensselaer, Nicholas Fish, Hamilton Fish, Jr. (1849-1936), John Kean (1852-1914) and Hamilton Fish Kean; third great-grandfather of Peter Augustus Jay (1877-1933) and Brockholst Livingston; third great-granduncle of Herbert Livingston Satterlee, Bronson Murray Cutting, Robert Reginald Livingston, Hamilton Fish, Jr. (1888-1991) and Robert Winthrop Kean; fourth great-granduncle of John Eliot Thayer, Jr., Hamilton Fish, Jr. (1926-1996) and Thomas Howard Kean; fifth great-granduncle of Hamilton Fish (1951-), Alexa Fish Ward and Thomas Howard Kean, Jr.; first cousin of Robert Gilbert Livingston and Robert R. Livingston (1718-1775); first cousin once removed of Robert Livingston the Younger, Cornelis Cuyler, Johannes Schuyler (1697-1746), John Cruger, Jr., Robert R. Livingston (1746-1813), Pierre Van Cortlandt, Jr. and Edward Livingston (1764-1836); first cousin twice removed of David Davidse Schuyler, Myndert Davidtse Schuyler and Hamilton Fish (1808-1893); first cousin thrice removed of Gilbert Livingston Thompson and John Jacob Astor III; first cousin four times removed of William Waldorf Astor and Jonathan Mayhew Wainwright; first cousin five times removed of Guy Vernor Henry, William Astor Chanler, Lewis Stuyvesant Chanler and Montgomery Schuyler, Jr.; second cousin of Stephanus Bayard, Philip John Schuyler, Philip P. Schuyler, Stephen John Schuyler and Henry Cruger; second cousin once removed of Jeremiah Van Rensselaer, Robert Van Rensselaer, Pieter Schuyler (1746-1792), James Livingston, Peter Samuel Schuyler and Philip Jeremiah Schuyler; second cousin twice removed of Peter Robert Livingston (1766-1847), Jacob Rutsen Van Rensselaer, Maturin Livingston, James Alexander Hamilton, George Washington Schuyler and Philip N. Schuyler; second cousin thrice removed of Gerrit Smith, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, James Adams Ekin and Eugene Schuyler; second cousin four times removed of Robert Ray Hamilton, John Sluyter Wirt, Cortlandt Schuyler Van Rensselaer and Karl Cortlandt Schuyler.
      Political families: Livingston-Schuyler family of New York; Marshall-Harrison-Randolph-Cabell family of Virginia (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Theodorick Bland (1742-1790) — of Prince George County, Va. Born in Cawsons, Prince George County, Va., March 21, 1742. Physician; planter; served in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; Delegate to Continental Congress from Virginia, 1780-83; delegate to Virginia convention to ratify U.S. constitution from Prince George County, 1788; U.S. Representative from Virginia at-large, 1789-90; died in office 1790. Died in New York, New York County, N.Y., June 1, 1790 (age 48 years, 72 days). Original interment at Trinity Churchyard; reinterment in 1828 at Congressional Cemetery, Washington, D.C.
      Relatives: Son of Theodorick Bland (1708-1803) and Frances Elizabeth (Bolling) Bland (1724-1774); married 1768 to Martha Dangerfield; nephew of Richard Bland; uncle of John Randolph of Roanoke and Henry St. George Tucker; grandnephew of Richard Randolph; granduncle of Nathaniel Beverly Tucker; first cousin once removed of Peyton Randolph (1721-1775), Henry Lee, Charles Lee and Edmund Jennings Lee; first cousin thrice removed of Fitzhugh Lee; first cousin five times removed of William Welby Beverley (1889-1969); second cousin of Thomas Jefferson, Edmund Jenings Randolph and Beverley Randolph; second cousin once removed of John Marshall, James Markham Marshall, Thomas Mann Randolph, Jr., Alexander Keith Marshall, Dabney Carr, John Wayles Eppes, Theodorick Bland (1776-1846) and Peyton Randolph (1779-1828); second cousin twice removed of Thomas Marshall, Benjamin William Sheridan Cabell, James Keith Marshall, Francis Wayles Eppes, Dabney Smith Carr, Benjamin Franklin Randolph, Meriwether Lewis Randolph, George Wythe Randolph, Edmund Randolph and Carter Henry Harrison; second cousin thrice removed of William Lewis Cabell, Thomas Jefferson Coolidge, George Craighead Cabell, John Augustine Marshall, Carter Henry Harrison II, Frederick Madison Roberts and Douglass Townshend Bolling; second cousin four times removed of Thomas Lawton Davis, Connally Findlay Trigg, Benjamin Earl Cabell, John Gardner Coolidge, William Marshall Bullitt, Alexander Scott Bullitt, Francis Beverley Biddle and Richard Walker Bolling; second cousin five times removed of Henry De La Warr Flood, Joel West Flood and Earle Cabell; third cousin of David Meriwether (1755-1822), James Meriwether (1755-1817) and Meriwether Lewis; third cousin once removed of James Meriwether (1788-1852), David Meriwether (1800-1893) and James Archibald Meriwether; third cousin twice removed of George Rockingham Gilmer and Reuben Handy Meriwether; third cousin thrice removed of William Henry Robertson.
      Political families: Lee-Randolph family of Maryland and Virginia; Marshall-Harrison-Randolph-Cabell family of Virginia; Blackburn-Slaughter-Buckner-Madison family of Kentucky (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
      Henry Brockholst Livingston (1757-1823) — also known as Brockholst Livingston — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in New York, New York County, N.Y., November 25, 1757. Member of New York state assembly from New York County, 1788-89, 1800-02; Associate Justice of U.S. Supreme Court, 1806-23. Presbyterian. Member, Society of the Cincinnati. Died in New York, New York County, N.Y., March 18, 1823 (age 65 years, 113 days). Original interment at Trinity Churchyard; reinterment at Green-Wood Cemetery, Brooklyn, N.Y.
      Relatives: Son of Susannah (French) Livingston (1723-1789) and William Livingston; brother of Susannah Livingston (1748-1840; who married John Cleves Symmes (1742-1814)) and Sarah Van Brugh Livingston (1756-1802; who married John Jay); married 1774 to Ann Ludlow (1753-1778); nephew of Robert Livingston (1708-1790), Peter Van Brugh Livingston and Philip Livingston; uncle of Peter Augustus Jay (1776-1843) and William Jay; grandnephew of John Livingston, Robert Livingston (1688-1775) and Gilbert Livingston; granduncle of John Jay II; great-grandson of Robert Livingston the Elder, Anthony Brockholls, Pieter Van Brugh and Phillip French; great-grandfather of Charles Ludlow Livingston (1870-?); great-grandnephew of Pieter Schuyler (1657-1724), Johannes Cuyler and Johannes Schuyler (1668-1747); second great-grandfather of Brockholst Livingston; second great-granduncle of Peter Augustus Jay (1877-1933); first cousin by marriage of James Duane and William Duer; first cousin of Peter Robert Livingston (1737-1794), Walter Livingston, Philip Peter Livingston, Catherine Livingston (1743-1775; who married Nicholas Bayard), Susanna Livingston (1755-1833; who married John Kean (1756-1795)) and Matthew Clarkson; first cousin once removed of Robert Gilbert Livingston, Robert R. Livingston (1718-1775), Stephen Van Rensselaer, Philip Schuyler Van Rensselaer, Henry Walter Livingston, Rensselaer Westerlo, Edward Philip Livingston and Charles Ludlow Livingston (1800-1873); first cousin twice removed of Robert Livingston the Younger, Cornelis Cuyler, Johannes Schuyler (1697-1746), John Cruger, Jr., Philip Schuyler, Peter Robert Livingston (1789-1859), Edward Livingston (1796-1840) and Henry Bell Van Rensselaer; first cousin thrice removed of David Davidse Schuyler, Myndert Davidtse Schuyler, Kiliaen Van Rensselaer, Nicholas Fish, Hamilton Fish, Jr. (1849-1936), John Kean (1852-1914) and Hamilton Fish Kean; first cousin four times removed of Herbert Livingston Satterlee, Bronson Murray Cutting, Robert Reginald Livingston, Hamilton Fish, Jr. (1888-1991) and Robert Winthrop Kean; first cousin five times removed of John Eliot Thayer, Jr., Hamilton Fish, Jr. (1926-1996) and Thomas Howard Kean; first cousin six times removed of Hamilton Fish (1951-), Alexa Fish Ward and Thomas Howard Kean, Jr.; second cousin of Robert R. Livingston (1746-1813), Pierre Van Cortlandt, Jr. and Edward Livingston (1764-1836); second cousin once removed of Stephanus Bayard, James Jay, Philip John Schuyler, Philip P. Schuyler, Stephen John Schuyler, Henry Cruger, Frederick Jay and Hamilton Fish (1808-1893); second cousin twice removed of Gilbert Livingston Thompson and John Jacob Astor III; second cousin thrice removed of William Waldorf Astor and Jonathan Mayhew Wainwright; second cousin four times removed of Guy Vernor Henry, William Astor Chanler, Lewis Stuyvesant Chanler and Montgomery Schuyler, Jr.; third cousin of Jeremiah Van Rensselaer, Robert Van Rensselaer, Pieter Schuyler (1746-1792), James Livingston, Peter Samuel Schuyler and Philip Jeremiah Schuyler; third cousin once removed of Peter Robert Livingston (1766-1847), Jacob Rutsen Van Rensselaer, Maturin Livingston, James Alexander Hamilton, George Washington Schuyler and Philip N. Schuyler; third cousin twice removed of Gerrit Smith, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, James Adams Ekin and Eugene Schuyler; third cousin thrice removed of Robert Ray Hamilton, John Sluyter Wirt, Cortlandt Schuyler Van Rensselaer and Karl Cortlandt Schuyler.
      Political families: Livingston-Schuyler family of New York; Marshall-Harrison-Randolph-Cabell family of Virginia (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      See also NNDB dossier


    Church of the Ascension Cemetery
    Greenwich Village, Manhattan, New York County, New York
    Politicians buried here:
    Peggy Cass Peggy Cass (1924-1999) — also known as Margaret Mary Cass — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born in Boston, Suffolk County, Mass., May 21, 1924. Democrat. Actor; comedian; delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1972. Female. Died, from heart failure, in Memorial Sloan-Kettering Hospital, Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., March 8, 1999 (age 74 years, 291 days). Interment at Church of the Ascension Cemetery.
      Relatives: Daughter of Raymond James Cass and Margaret Gertrude (McLaughlin) Cass; married 1979 to Eugene Michael Feeney (1924-2013).
      See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — Find-A-Grave memorial
      Image source: Playbill, March 10, 1999


  • "Enjoy the hospitable entertainment of a political graveyard."
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    The Political Graveyard

    The Political Graveyard is a web site about U.S. political history and cemeteries. Founded in 1996, it is the Internet's most comprehensive free source for American political biography, listing 312,576 politicians, living and dead.
      The listings are incomplete; development of the database is a continually ongoing project.  
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