PoliticalGraveyard.com
The Political Graveyard: A Database of American History
Politicians in the Hall of Fame
(the Hall of Fame for Great Americans, Bronx, N.Y.)

in chronological order

John Adams John Adams (1735-1826) — also known as "His Rotundity"; "The Duke of Braintree"; "American Cato"; "Old Sink and Swim"; "The Colossus of Independence"; "Father of the American Navy" — of Quincy, Norfolk County, Mass. Born in Braintree (part now in Quincy), Norfolk County, Mass., October 30, 1735. Lawyer; Delegate to Continental Congress from Massachusetts, 1774-78; signer, Declaration of Independence, 1776; U.S. Minister to Netherlands, 1781-88; Great Britain, 1785-88; Vice President of the United States, 1789-97; President of the United States, 1797-1801; defeated (Federalist), 1800; delegate to Massachusetts state constitutional convention, 1820. Unitarian. English ancestry. Member, American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Elected to the Hall of Fame for Great Americans in 1900. Died in Quincy, Norfolk County, Mass., July 4, 1826 (age 90 years, 247 days). Original interment at Hancock Cemetery, Quincy, Mass.; reinterment at United First Parish Church, Quincy, Mass.
  Relatives: Son of John Adams (1691-1761) and Susanna (Boylston) Adams (1699-1797); married, October 25, 1764, to Abigail Smith (1744-1818; aunt of William Cranch); father of Abigail Amelia Adams (1765-1813; who married William Stephens Smith) and John Quincy Adams (1767-1848); grandfather of George Washington Adams and Charles Francis Adams (1807-1886); great-grandfather of John Quincy Adams (1833-1894) and Brooks Adams; second great-grandfather of Charles Francis Adams (1866-1954); third great-grandfather of Thomas Boylston Adams; first cousin thrice removed of Edward M. Chapin; first cousin four times removed of Arthur Chapin; first cousin six times removed of Denwood Lynn Chapin; second cousin of Samuel Adams; second cousin once removed of Joseph Allen; second cousin twice removed of John Milton Thayer; second cousin thrice removed of William Vincent Wells; second cousin four times removed of Lyman Kidder Bass, Daniel T. Hayden, Arthur Laban Bates and Almur Stiles Whiting; second cousin five times removed of Charles Grenfill Washburn, Lyman Metcalfe Bass and Emerson Richard Boyles; third cousin once removed of Jeremiah Mason and George Bailey Loring; third cousin twice removed of Asahel Otis, Erastus Fairbanks, Charles Stetson, Henry Brewster Stanton, Charles Adams, Jr., Isaiah Stetson, Joshua Perkins, Eli Thayer and Bailey Frye Adams; third cousin thrice removed of Day Otis Kellogg, Dwight Kellogg, Caleb Stetson (1801-1885), Oakes Ames, Oliver Ames, Jr., Benjamin W. Waite, Alfred Elisha Ames, George Otis Fairbanks, Austin Wells Holden, Horace Fairbanks, Ebenezer Oliver Grosvenor, Joseph Washburn Yates, Augustus Brown Reed Sprague, Franklin Fairbanks, Erskine Mason Phelps, Arthur Newton Holden, John Alden Thayer, Irving Hall Chase, Isaiah Kidder Stetson and Giles Russell Taggart.
  Political families: Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York; Kidder family of Connecticut (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Adams counties in Idaho, Iowa, Miss., Neb., Ohio, Pa., Wash. and Wis. are named for him.
  Mount Adams (second highest peak in the Northeast), in the White Mountains, Coos County, New Hampshire, is named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: John Adams HarperJohn A. CameronJohn A. DixJohn Adams FisherJohn A. TaintorJohn A. GilmerJohn A. PerkinsJohn Adams HymanJohn A. DamonJohn A. LeeJohn A. SandersJohn Adams Hurson
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Books about John Adams: John Ferling, John Adams: A Life — Joseph J. Ellis, The Passionate Sage: The Character and Legacy of John Adams — David McCullough, John Adams — Gore Vidal, Inventing A Nation: Washington, Adams, Jefferson — John Ferling, Adams vs. Jefferson: The Tumultuous Election of 1800 — James Grant, John Adams : Party of One
  Image source: Portrait & Biographical Album of Washtenaw County (1891)
Henry Clay Henry Clay (1777-1852) — also known as "The Sage of Ashland"; "The Great Compromiser" — of Lexington, Fayette County, Ky. Born in Hanover County, Va., April 12, 1777. Member of Kentucky state house of representatives, 1803; U.S. Senator from Kentucky, 1806-07, 1810-11, 1831-42, 1849-52; died in office 1852; U.S. Representative from Kentucky, 1811-14, 1815-21, 1823-25 (5th District 1811-13, at-large 1813-14, 2nd District 1815-21, 3rd District 1823-25); Speaker of the U.S. House, 1811-14, 1815-20, 1823-25; candidate for President of the United States, 1824, 1832 (National Republican), 1844 (Whig); U.S. Secretary of State, 1825-29; candidate for Whig nomination for President, 1839. Member, Freemasons. In 1809, he fought a duel with Humphrey Marshall, in which both men were wounded. Elected to the Hall of Fame for Great Americans in 1900. Died in Washington, D.C., June 29, 1852 (age 75 years, 78 days). Interment at Lexington Cemetery, Lexington, Ky.; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery, Washington, D.C.
  Relatives: Son of John Clay and Elizabeth (Hudson) Clay (1750-1829); brother of Porter Clay; married, April 11, 1799, to Lucretia (Hart) Erwin (1781-1864); father of Thomas Hart Clay, Henry Clay, Jr. and James Brown Clay; grandfather of Henry Clay; granduncle of Ellen Hart Ross (who married James Reily (1811-1863)); first cousin once removed of Matthew Clay (1754-1815) and Green Clay; second cousin of Matthew Clay (1795?-1827), Brutus Junius Clay (1808-1878) and Cassius Marcellus Clay; second cousin once removed of Brutus Junius Clay (1847-1932); second cousin thrice removed of Oliver Carroll Clay; second cousin four times removed of Archer Woodford; third cousin of Clement Comer Clay; third cousin once removed of Clement Claiborne Clay, Jr..
  Political family: Clay family of Kentucky (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Clay counties in Ala., Fla., Ga., Ill., Ind., Kan., Minn., Miss., Mo., Neb., N.C., S.Dak., Tenn., Tex. and W.Va. are named for him.
  Mount Clay (also called Mount Reagan), in the White Mountains, Coos County, New Hampshire, is named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: Henry Clay LongneckerHenry Clay DeanH. Clay DickinsonHenry C. BrockmeyerH. Clay CockerillHenry Clay EwingHenry Clay CaldwellHenry Clay HallHenry Clay GoodingHenry Clay NaillHenry C. MyersHenry C. ColeH. Clay HarrisHenry C. MinerHenry C. WarmothHenry Clay ClevelandH. Clay EvansHenry C. PayneHenry C. BatesH. Clay FosterHenry C. McCormickHenry C. IdeHenry Clay WilliamsHenry C. SimmsHenry Clay FergusonHenry C. GloverH. Clay ParkHenry C. HansbroughHenry C. SnodgrassH. Clay MaydwellHenry C. GleasonHenry C. LoudenslagerH. Clay Van VoorhisHenry C. ClippingerH. Clay CrawfordH. Clay BascomH. Clay MichieH. Clay ChisolmH. Clay HowardHenry C. HallHenry Clay McDowellH. Clay JonesH. Clay DayHenry Clay HinesH. Clay HeatherHenry Clay MeachamHenry Clay CallowayH. Clay SuterH. Clay WarthHenry Clay ElwoodH. Clay KennedyH. Clay DavisH. Clay NeedhamHenry Clay EthertonH. Clay MaceH. Clay ArmstrongH. Clay BaldwinH. Clay HaynesH. Clay BurkholderMrs. H. Clay KauffmanH. Clay BentleyHenry C. GreenbergH. Clay Gardenhire, Jr.Henry Clay CoxH. Clay Myers, Jr.H. Clay Johnson
  Coins and currency: His portrait appeared on some U.S. currency issued in the 19th and early 20th centuries.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Books about Henry Clay: Robert Vincent Remini, Henry Clay: Statesman for the Union — Maurice G. Baxter, Henry Clay the Lawyer — Richard B. Cheney & Lynne V. Cheney, Kings Of The Hill : How Nine Powerful Men Changed The Course of American History — Merrill D. Peterson, The Great Triumvirate: Webster, Clay, and Calhoun — Scott Farris, Almost President: The Men Who Lost the Race but Changed the Nation — David S. Heidler & Jeanne T. Heidler, Henry Clay: The Essential American — Fergus M. Bordewich, America's Great Debate: Henry Clay, Stephen A. Douglas, and the Compromise That Preserved the Union
  Image source: James Smith Noel Collection, Louisiana State University in Shreveport
  Peter Cooper (1791-1883) — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in New York, New York County, N.Y., February 12, 1791. Manufacturer, inventor, philanthropist, creator of first U.S. steam locomotive; founder of Cooper Union; Greenback candidate for President of the United States, 1876. Unitarian. Elected to the Hall of Fame for Great Americans in 1900. Died in New York, New York County, N.Y., April 4, 1883 (age 92 years, 51 days). Interment at Green-Wood Cemetery, Brooklyn, N.Y.
  Relatives: Father of Sarah Amelia Cooper (who married Abram Stevens Hewitt) and Edward Cooper; uncle of Martha Clowes (who married Daniel Fawcett Tiemann (1805-1899)).
  Political family: Cooper-Ashley family of New York City, New York.
  See also Wikipedia article
Benjamin Franklin Benjamin Franklin (1706-1790) — also known as "Silence Dogood"; "Anthony Afterwit"; "Poor Richard"; "Alice Addertongue"; "Polly Baker"; "Harry Meanwell"; "Timothy Turnstone"; "Martha Careful"; "Benevolus"; "Caelia Shortface" — of Pennsylvania. Born in Boston, Suffolk County, Mass., January 17, 1706. Delegate to Continental Congress from Pennsylvania, 1775; U.S. Postmaster General, 1775-76; signer, Declaration of Independence, 1776; delegate to Pennsylvania state constitutional convention, 1776; U.S. Minister to France, 1778-85; Sweden, 1782-83; President of Pennsylvania, 1785-88; member, U.S. Constitutional Convention, 1787. Deist. Member, Freemasons; American Philosophical Society; American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Famed for his experiments with electricity; invented bifocal glasses and the harmonica. Elected to the Hall of Fame for Great Americans in 1900. Died in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., April 17, 1790 (age 84 years, 90 days). Interment at Christ Church Burial Ground, Philadelphia, Pa.; statue erected 1856 at Old City Hall Grounds, Boston, Mass.; statue at La Arcata Court, Santa Barbara, Calif.
  Relatives: Son of Josiah Franklin (1657-1745) and Abiah Lee (Folger) Franklin (1667-1752); married, September 1, 1730, to Deborah Read; father of Sarah 'Sally' Franklin (1743-1808; who married Richard Bache); uncle of Franklin Davenport; grandfather of Richard Bache, Jr. and Deborah Franklin Bache (1891-1863; who married William John Duane); great-grandfather of Alexander Dallas Bache (1806-1867; physicist), Mary Blechenden Bache (1808-1873; who married Robert John Walker) and Sophia Arabella Bache (1815-1904; who married William Wallace Irwin); second great-grandfather of Robert Walker Irwin; fifth great-grandfather of Daniel Baugh Brewster and Elise du Pont; first cousin four times removed of Charles James Folger, Benjamin Dexter Sprague and Wharton Barker (1846-1921); first cousin six times removed of Thomas Mott Osborne; first cousin seven times removed of Charles Devens Osborne and Lithgow Osborne; second cousin five times removed of George Hammond Parshall.
  Political families: Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York; Bache-Dallas family of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Franklin counties in Ala., Ark., Fla., Ga., Ill., Ind., Iowa, Kan., Ky., La., Maine, Mass., Miss., Mo., Neb., N.Y., N.C., Ohio, Pa., Tenn., Vt., Va. and Wash. are named for him.
  Mount Franklin, in the White Mountains, Coos County, New Hampshire, is named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: Benjamin F. ButlerBenjamin F. WadeBenjamin Franklin WallaceBenjamin Cromwell FranklinBenjamin Franklin PerryBenjamin Franklin RobinsonBenjamin F. RandolphBenjamin Franklin MasseyBenjamin F. RawlsBenjamin Franklin LeiterBenjamin Franklin ThomasBenjamin F. HallBenjamin F. AngelBenjamin Franklin RossBenjamin F. FlandersBenjamin F. BomarBenjamin F. MudgeBenjamin F. ButlerBenjamin F. LoanBenjamin F. SimpsonBenjamin Franklin TerryBenjamin Franklin JunkinBenjamin F. PartridgeB. F. LangworthyBenjamin F. HardingBenjamin MebaneB. F. WhittemoreBenjamin Franklin BradleyBenjamin Franklin ClaypoolBenjamin F. CoatesB. Franklin MartinBenjamin Franklin HoweyBenjamin F. MartinBenjamin Franklin RiceBenjamin F. RandolphBenjamin F. HopkinsBenjamin F. TracyBenjamin F. GradyBenjamin F. FarnhamBenjamin F. MeyersBenjamin Franklin WhiteBenjamin Franklin PrescottBenjamin F. JonasB. Franklin FisherBenjamin Franklin PottsBenjamin F. FunkBenjamin F. MarshFrank B. ArnoldBenjamin F. HeckertBenjamin F. BradleyBenjamin F. HowellBenjamin F. MahanBen Franklin CaldwellBenjamin Franklin TilleyBenjamin F. HackneyB. F. McMillanBenjamin F. ShivelyB. Frank HiresB. Frank MebaneB. Frank MurphyBenjamin F. StarrBenjamin Franklin Jones, Jr.Benjamin F. WeltyBenjamin F. JonesBenjamin Franklin BoleyBen Franklin LooneyBenjamin F. BledsoeBenjamin Franklin WilliamsBenjamin Franklin KelleyBenjamin Franklin ButlerBenjamin F. JamesFrank B. HeintzlemanBenjamin F. FeinbergB. Franklin BunnBen F. CameronBen F. BlackmonB. Frank WhelchelB. F. Merritt, Jr.Ben F. HornsbyBen Dillingham II
  Coins and currency: His portrait appears on the U.S. $100 bill, and formerly on the U.S. half dollar coin (1948-63).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial — Early American Foreign Service Database
  Books by Benjamin Franklin: The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin — An Account of the Newly Invented Pennsylvanian Fire-Place (1744)
  Books about Benjamin Franklin: H. W. Brands, The First American: The Life and Times of Benjamin Franklin — Edmund S. Morgan, Benjamin Franklin — Stacy Schiff, A Great Improvisation : Franklin, France, and the Birth of America — Gordon S. Wood, The Americanization of Benjamin Franklin — Walter Isaacson, Benjamin Franklin : An American Life — Carl Van Doren, Benjamin Franklin — Philip Dray, Stealing God's Thunder : Benjamin Franklin's Lightning Rod and the Invention of America
  Image source: Library of Congress
Ulysses S. Grant Ulysses Simpson Grant (1822-1885) — also known as Ulysses S. Grant; Hiram Ulysses Grant; "Savior of the Union"; "Lion of Vicksburg"; "The Austerlitz of American Politics"; "Unconditional Surrender Grant"; "The Galena Tanner"; "The Silent Soldier"; "The Silent General" — of Galena, Jo Daviess County, Ill. Born in Point Pleasant, Clermont County, Ohio, April 27, 1822. Republican. General in the Union Army during the Civil War; President of the United States, 1869-77; candidate for Republican nomination for President, 1880. Methodist. Scottish ancestry. Member, Loyal Legion. Elected to the Hall of Fame for Great Americans in 1900. Died of throat cancer, at Mt. McGregor, Saratoga County, N.Y., July 23, 1885 (age 63 years, 87 days). Interment at General Grant Memorial, Manhattan, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Jesse Root Grant (1794-1873) and Hannah (Simpson) Grant (1798-1883); married, August 22, 1848, to Julia Boggs Dent (1826-1902; sister-in-law of Alexander Sharp; sister of George Wrenshall Dent and Lewis Dent); father of Frederick Dent Grant (1850-1912) and Ulysses Simpson Grant, Jr.; grandfather of Nellie Grant (1881-1972; who married William Pigott Cronan); first cousin twice removed of Augustus Seymour Porter (1769-1849) and Peter Buell Porter; second cousin once removed of Augustus Seymour Porter (1798-1872), Peter Buell Porter, Jr. and Peter Augustus Porter (1827-1864); second cousin four times removed of Benjamin Huntington; third cousin of Peter Augustus Porter (1853-1925); third cousin twice removed of John Davenport, Joshua Coit, James Davenport, Henry Huntington, Gurdon Huntington, Samuel Lathrop, Abel Huntington and William Rush Merriam; third cousin thrice removed of Samuel Huntington and Henry Scudder; fourth cousin once removed of Ebenezer Huntington, Theodore Davenport, Benjamin Nicoll Huntington, Jesse Monroe Hatch, Franklin Delano Roosevelt and Warren Delano Robbins.
  Political families: Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York; Grant-Dent family of San Francisco, California (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Cross-reference: Horace Porter — Ayres Phillips Merrill — Robert Martin Douglas — Thomas L. Hamer — James Arkell
  Grant counties in Ark., Kan., La., Minn., Neb., N.M., N.Dak., Okla., Ore., S.Dak., Wash. and W.Va. are named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: Ulysses G. PalmerUlysses S. G. BieberUlysses G. DenmanUlysses G. CrandellUlysses S. G. BlakelyS. U. G. RhodesUlysses G. BordenU. Grant MengelUlysses G. FosterUlysses G. ByersU. S. Grant Leverett
  Coins and currency: His portrait appears on the U.S. $50 bill, and also appeared on $1 and $5 silver certificates in 1887-1927.
  Personal motto: "When in doubt, fight."
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Books about Ulysses S. Grant: Jean Edward Smith, Grant — Frank J. Scaturro, President Grant Reconsidered — William S. McFeely, Grant — Brooks D. Simpson, Ulysses S. Grant: Triumph Over Adversity, 1822-1865 — Brooks D. Simpson, Let Us Have Peace: Ulysses S. Grant and the Politics of War and Reconstruction, 1861-1868 — James S. Brisbin, The campaign lives of Ulysses S. Grant and Schuyler Colfax — Josiah Bunting III, Ulysses S. Grant — Michael Korda, Ulysses S. Grant : The Unlikely Hero — Edward H. Bonekemper, A Victor, Not a Butcher: Ulysses S. Grant's Overlooked Military Genius — Harry J. Maihafer, The General and the Journalists: Ulysses S. Grant, Horace Greeley, and Charles Dana — H. W. Brands, The Man Who Saved the Union: Ulysses Grant in War and Peace — Charles Bracelen Flood, Grant's Final Victory: Ulysses S. Grant's Heroic Last Year — Joan Waugh, U. S. Grant: American Hero, American Myth
  Critical books about Ulysses S. Grant: Nathan Miller, Star-Spangled Men : America's Ten Worst Presidents
  Fiction about Ulysses S. Grant: Newt Gingrich & William R. Forstchen, Grant Comes East — Newt Gingrich & William R. Forstchen, Never Call Retreat : Lee and Grant: The Final Victory
  Image source: Portrait & Biographical Album of Washtenaw County (1891)
Washington Irving Washington Irving (1783-1859) — also known as "Dietrich Knickerbocker"; "Jonathan Oldstyle"; "Geoffrey Crayon" — of New York. Born in New York, New York County, N.Y., April 3, 1783. Essayist; historian; author of The Legend of Sleepy Hollow and other stories; U.S. Minister to Spain, 1842-46. Elected to the Hall of Fame for Great Americans in 1900. Died in Tarrytown, Westchester County, N.Y., November 28, 1859 (age 76 years, 239 days). Interment at Sleepy Hollow Cemetery, Sleepy Hollow, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of William Irving (1731-1807) and Sarah (Sanders) Irving (1738-1817); brother of William Irving (1766-1821), Peter Irving and John Treat Irving; great-granduncle of Robert Broadnax Glenn (1854-1920).
  Political family: Irving family of New York City, New York.
  Cross-reference: William P. Duval
  The city of Irving, Texas, is named for him.  — The village of Irvington, New York, is named for him.  — Washington Irving Elementary School, in Edmond, Oklahoma, is named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: Washington Irving HowardW. Irving BabcockWashington I. WallaceW. I. BabbWashington Irving GadboisWashington I. SmithW. Irving VanderpoelWashington I. Kilpatrick
  See also Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about Washington Irving: George S. Hellman, Washington Irving Esquire : Ambassador at Large from the New World to the Old
  Image source: U.S. postage stamp (1940)
Thomas Jefferson Thomas Jefferson (1743-1826) — also known as "Apostle of Liberty"; "Sage of Monticello"; "Friend of the People"; "Father of the University of Virginia" — of Albemarle County, Va. Born in Albemarle County, Va., April 13, 1743. Lawyer; Delegate to Continental Congress from Virginia, 1775-76, 1783-84; signer, Declaration of Independence, 1776; Governor of Virginia, 1779-81; member of Virginia state legislature, 1782; U.S. Minister to France, 1785-89; U.S. Secretary of State, 1790-93; Vice President of the United States, 1797-1801; President of the United States, 1801-09; defeated (Democratic-Republican), 1796. Deist. English ancestry. Member, American Philosophical Society; American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He was elected to the Hall of Fame for Great Americans in 1900. Died near Charlottesville, Albemarle County, Va., July 4, 1826 (age 83 years, 82 days). Interment at Monticello Graveyard, Near Charlottesville, Albemarle County, Va.; cenotaph at University of Missouri Quadrangle, Columbia, Mo.; memorial monument at West Potomac Park, Washington, D.C.
  Relatives: Son of Peter Jefferson (1707-1757) and Jane (Randolph) Jefferson (1720-1776); married, January 1, 1772, to Martha Wayles Skelton (1748-1782); father of Martha Jefferson (1772-1836; who married Thomas Mann Randolph, Jr.) and Maria Jefferson (1778-1804; who married John Wayles Eppes); uncle of Dabney Carr; grandfather of Francis Wayles Eppes, Virginia Jefferson Randolph (who married Nicholas Philip Trist), Benjamin Franklin Randolph, Meriwether Lewis Randolph and George Wythe Randolph; grandnephew of Richard Randolph; granduncle of Dabney Smith Carr (1802-1854); great-grandfather of Thomas Jefferson Coolidge and Frederick Madison Roberts; second great-grandfather of John Gardner Coolidge; first cousin once removed of Richard Bland and Peyton Randolph (1721-1775); first cousin twice removed of John Jordan Crittenden, Thomas Turpin Crittenden, Robert Crittenden and Carter Henry Harrison; first cousin thrice removed of Alexander Parker Crittenden, Thomas Leonidas Crittenden, Thomas Theodore Crittenden and Carter Henry Harrison II; first cousin four times removed of Thomas Theodore Crittenden, Jr.; second cousin of Theodorick Bland, Edmund Jenings Randolph, Beverley Randolph and John Randolph of Roanoke; second cousin once removed of John Marshall, Henry Lee, Charles Lee, James Markham Marshall, Alexander Keith Marshall, Edmund Jennings Lee, Peyton Randolph (1779-1828), Henry St. George Tucker and William Segar Archer; second cousin twice removed of Thomas Marshall, James Keith Marshall, Nathaniel Beverly Tucker and Edmund Randolph; second cousin thrice removed of Fitzhugh Lee and John Augustine Marshall; second cousin four times removed of William Marshall Bullitt, Alexander Scott Bullitt and Francis Beverley Biddle; second cousin five times removed of William Welby Beverley; third cousin thrice removed of William Henry Robertson.
  Political families: Lee-Randolph family of Maryland and Virginia; Marshall-Harrison-Randolph-Cabell family of Virginia (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Cross-reference: Jefferson M. Levy — Joshua Fry
  Jefferson counties in Ala., Ark., Colo., Fla., Ga., Idaho, Ill., Ind., Iowa, Kan., Ky., La., Miss., Mo., Mont., Neb., N.Y., Ohio, Okla., Ore., Pa., Tenn., Tex., Wash., W.Va. and Wis. are named for him.
  Mount Jefferson (third highest peak in the Northeast), in Coos County, New Hampshire, is named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: Thomas Jefferson KennardThomas Jefferson CampbellThomas J. GazleyThomas Jefferson WordThomas J. DrakeThomas Jefferson HeardThomas Jefferson GreenThomas J. RuskThomas Jefferson WithersThomas J. ParsonsThomas J. DryerThomas J. FosterThomas J. HenleyThomas J. BarrThomas Jefferson JenningsThomas J. HendersonThomas J. Van AlstyneThomas Jefferson CasonThomas Jefferson BufordT. Jefferson CoolidgeThomas J. MegibbenThomas J. BunnThomas J. HardinThomas J. McLain, Jr.Thomas J. BrownThomas Jefferson SpeerThomas J. BoyntonThomas J. HudsonThomas J. BradyThomas J. SelbyThomas Jefferson DeavittThomas Jefferson MajorsThomas Jefferson WoodT. J. JarrattThomas Jefferson NunnThomas J. StraitThomas J. HumesT. J. AppleyardThomas J. ClunieThomas J. SteeleThomas J. BoyntonThomas J. O'DonnellThomas J. HalseyThomas J. GrahamT. J. MartinThomas Jefferson LillyThomas J. RandolphTom J. TerralT. Jeff BusbyThomas Jefferson MurphyThomas J. HamiltonTom ManganThomas J. RyanTom J. MurrayTom SteedThomas Jefferson Edmonds, Jr.Thomas J. AndersonThomas Jefferson RobertsThomas J. Barlow III
  Coins and currency: His portrait has appeared on the U.S. nickel (five cent coin) since 1938, and on the $2 bill since the 1860s.
  Personal motto: "Rebellion to tyrants is obedience to God."
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about Thomas Jefferson: Joseph J. Ellis, American Sphinx: The Character of Thomas Jefferson — Willard Sterne Randall, Thomas Jefferson : A Life — R. B. Bernstein, Thomas Jefferson — Joyce Appleby, Thomas Jefferson — Gore Vidal, Inventing A Nation: Washington, Adams, Jefferson — John Ferling, Adams vs. Jefferson: The Tumultuous Election of 1800 — Susan Dunn, Jefferson's Second Revolution : The Election Crisis of 1800 — Andrew Burstein, Jefferson's Secret: Death and Desire at Monticello — Christopher Hitchens, Thomas Jefferson : Author of America — David Barton, The Jefferson Lies: Exposing the myths you've always believed about Thomas Jefferson — David Barton, The Jefferson Lies: Exposing the Myths You've Always Believed About Thomas Jefferson — Donald Barr Chidsey, Mr. Hamilton and Mr. Jefferson
  Critical books about Thomas Jefferson: Joseph Wheelan, Jefferson's Vendetta : The Pursuit of Aaron Burr and the Judiciary
  Image source: Portrait & Biographical Album of Washtenaw County (1891)
James Kent James Kent (1763-1847) — of Poughkeepsie, Dutchess County, N.Y.; New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in Doansburg, Putnam County, N.Y., July 31, 1763. Lawyer; member of New York state assembly, 1790-91, 1792-93, 1796-97 (Dutchess County 1790-91, 1792-93, New York County 1796-97); candidate for U.S. Representative from New York, 1793; Justice of New York Supreme Court, 1798. Member, Phi Beta Kappa. Author of Commentaries on American Law, the first comprehensive treatment of the subject. Elected to the Hall of Fame for Great Americans in 1900. Died in New York, New York County, N.Y., December 12, 1847 (age 84 years, 134 days). Interment somewhere in Fishkill, N.Y.
  Relatives: Married to Elizabeth Bailey.
  Kent County, Mich. is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Image source: New York Public Library
Abraham Lincoln Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865) — also known as "Honest Abe"; "Old Abe"; "The Rail-Splitter"; "The Illinois Baboon" — of New Salem, Menard County, Ill.; Springfield, Sangamon County, Ill. Born in a log cabin, Hardin County (part now in Larue County), Ky., February 12, 1809. Republican. Served in the U.S. Army during the Black Hawk War; postmaster; lawyer; member of Illinois state house of representatives, 1834-41; U.S. Representative from Illinois 7th District, 1847-49; candidate for Republican nomination for Vice President, 1856; candidate for U.S. Senator from Illinois, 1858; President of the United States, 1861-65; died in office 1865; His election as president in 1860 precipitated the Civil War; determined to preserve the Union, he led the North to victory on the battlefield, freed the slaves in the conquered states, and in doing this, redefined American nationhood. He was. English ancestry. Elected in 1900 to the Hall of Fame for Great Americans. Shot by the assassin John Wilkes Booth, during a play at Ford's Theater, in Washington, D.C., April 14, 1865; died at Peterson's Boarding House, across the street, the following day, April 15, 1865 (age 56 years, 62 days). Interment at Oak Ridge Cemetery, Springfield, Ill.; memorial monument at National Mall, Washington, D.C.; statue erected 1868 at Judiciary Park, Washington, D.C.
  Relatives: Son of Thomas Lincoln (1778-1851) and Nancy (Hanks) Lincoln (1784-1818); married, November 4, 1842, to Mary Ann Todd (1818-1882; sister-in-law of Ninian Wirt Edwards (1809-1889); half-sister-in-law of N. H. R. Dawson; aunt of Martha Dee Todd; grandniece of David Rittenhouse Porter); father of Robert Todd Lincoln; second cousin four times removed of Richard Henry Lee, Francis Lightfoot Lee and Arthur Lee; third cousin twice removed of Levi Lincoln; third cousin thrice removed of Thomas Sim Lee, Henry Lee, Charles Lee, Edmund Jennings Lee and Zachary Taylor; fourth cousin once removed of Levi Lincoln, Jr. and Enoch Lincoln.
  Political families: Lincoln-Lee family; Edwards-Cook family of Illinois and Nebraska (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Cross-reference: Clement Claiborne Clay, Jr. — Isham N. Haynie — William M. Stone — John Pitcher — Stephen Miller — John T. Stuart — William H. Seward — Henry L. Burnett — Judah P. Benjamin — Robert Toombs — Richard Taylor Jacob — George W. Jones — James Adams — John G. Nicolay — Edward Everett — Stephen T. Logan — Francis P. Blair — John Hay — Henry Reed Rathbone — James A. Ekin — Frederick W. Seward — John H. Surratt — John H. Surratt, Jr. — James Shields
  Lincoln counties in Ark., Colo., Idaho, Kan., La., Minn., Miss., Mont., Neb., Nev., N.M., Okla., Ore., Wash., W.Va., Wis. and Wyo. are named for him.
  The city of Lincoln, Nebraska, is named for him.  — Lincoln Memorial University, in Harrogate, Tennessee, is named for him.  — Lincoln University, in Jefferson City, Missouri, is named for him.  — Lincoln University, near Oxford, Pennsylvania, is named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: Abraham L. KeisterAbraham L. TuckerAbraham L. BrickAbraham L. KelloggAbraham Lincoln BernsteinA. Lincoln ReileyA. L. HelmickAbraham L. SuttonA. Lincoln AckerAbraham L. OsgoodAbraham L. WitmerAbraham L. PhillipsAbraham L. PaytonA. L. AuthA. Lincoln MooreA. Lincoln NiditchAbraham L. RubensteinAbraham L. Davis, Jr.Abraham L. FreedmanA. L. MarovitzLincoln GordonAbraham L. BannerAbraham Lincoln Tosti
  Coins and currency: His portrait has appeared on the U.S. penny (one cent coin) since 1909, and on the $5 bill since 1913. From the 1860s until 1927, his portrait also appeared on U.S. notes and certificates of various denominations from $1 to $500.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about Abraham Lincoln: David Herbert Donald, Lincoln — George Anastaplo, Abraham Lincoln : A Constitutional Biography — G. S. Boritt, ed., The Lincoln Enigma : The Changing Faces of an American Icon — Albert J. Beveridge, Abraham Lincoln 1809-1858 — Geoffrey Perret, Lincoln's War : The Untold Story of America's Greatest President as Commander in Chief — David Herbert Donald, We Are Lincoln Men : Abraham Lincoln and His Friends — Edward Steers, Jr., Blood on the Moon: The Assassination of Abraham Lincoln — Mario Cuomo, Why Lincoln Matters : Today More Than Ever — Michael W. Kauffman, American Brutus : John Wilkes Booth and the Lincoln Conspiracies — Doris Kearns Goodwin, Team of Rivals : The Political Genius of Abraham Lincoln — Joshua Wolf Shenk, Lincoln's Melancholy : How Depression Challenged a President and Fueled His Greatness — John Channing Briggs, Lincoln's Speeches Reconsidered — Ronald C. White, Jr., The Eloquent President : A Portrait of Lincoln Through His Words — Harold Holzer, Lincoln at Cooper Union : The Speech That Made Abraham Linco ln President — Michael Lind, What Lincoln Believed : The Values and Convictions of America's Greatest President — Doris Kearns Goodwin, Team of Rivals : The Political Genius of Abraham Lincoln — Michael Burlingame, ed., Abraham Lincoln: The Observations of John G. Nicolay and John Hay — Thomas J. Craughwell, Stealing Lincoln's Body — Roy Morris, Jr., The Long Pursuit: Abraham Lincoln's Thirty-Year Struggle with Stephen Douglas for the Heart and Soul of America — John Stauffer, Giants: The Parallel Lives of Frederick Douglass and Abraham Lincoln — Karen Judson, Abraham Lincoln (for young readers) — Maira Kalman, Looking at Lincoln (for young readers)
  Critical books about Abraham Lincoln: Thomas J. DiLorenzo, The Real Lincoln : A New Look at Abraham Lincoln, His Agenda, and an Unnecessary War
  Fiction about Abraham Lincoln: Gore Vidal, Lincoln: A Novel
  Image source: Portrait & Biographical Album of Washtenaw County (1891)
Horace Mann Horace Mann (1796-1859) — also known as "The Father of American Public Education" — of Dedham, Norfolk County, Mass.; Boston, Suffolk County, Mass. Born in Franklin, Norfolk County, Mass., May 4, 1796. Lawyer; member of Massachusetts state house of representatives, 1827-33; member of Massachusetts state senate, 1833-37; secretary, Massachusetts Board of Education, 1837-48; founder and editor of The Common School Journal; became a national leader in improving and reforming public schools; U.S. Representative from Massachusetts 8th District, 1848-53; Free Soil candidate for Governor of Massachusetts, 1852; president and professor at Antioch College, 1852-59. Elected to the Hall of Fame for Great Americans in 1900. Died in Yellow Springs, Greene County, Ohio, August 2, 1859 (age 63 years, 90 days). Original interment somewhere in Yellow Springs, Ohio; reinterment at North Burial Ground, Providence, R.I.; statue at State House Grounds, Boston, Mass.
  Relatives: Married 1830 to Charlotte Messer (1809-1832); married, May 1, 1843, to Mary Tyler Peabody (1806-1887; sister-in-law of Nathaniel Hawthorne (1804-1864)).
  Political families: Roosevelt family; Deming family of Maryland and New York (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: U.S. postage stamp (1940)
John Marshall John Marshall (1755-1835) — of Virginia. Born in Germantown, Fauquier County, Va., September 24, 1755. Served in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; lawyer; member of Virginia state house of delegates, 1782-96; U.S. Attorney for Virginia, 1789; U.S. Representative from Virginia at-large, 1799-1800; U.S. Secretary of State, 1800-01; Chief Justice of U.S. Supreme Court, 1801-35; died in office 1835; received 4 electoral votes for Vice-President, 1816. Episcopalian. Scottish ancestry. Member, Freemasons; Phi Beta Kappa. Elected to the Hall of Fame for Great Americans in 1900. Died in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., July 6, 1835 (age 79 years, 285 days). Interment at Shockoe Hill Cemetery, Richmond, Va.
  Relatives: Son of Thomas Marshall (1730-1802) and Mary Randolph (Keith) Marshall (1737-1809); brother-in-law of William McClung, George Keith Taylor and Joseph Hamilton Daviess; brother of James Markham Marshall and Alexander Keith Marshall (1770-1825); married, January 3, 1783, to Mary Willis Ambler (1766-1831; daughter of Jacquelin Ambler); father of Thomas Marshall (1784-1835), Mary Marshall (who married Jacquelin Burwell Harvie) and James Keith Marshall; uncle and first cousin once removed of Thomas Alexander Marshall; uncle of Edward Colston, Thomas Francis Marshall, Alexander Keith Marshall (1808-1884), Alexander Keith McClung, Charles Alexander Marshall and Edward Colston Marshall; granduncle by marriage of Humphrey Marshall (1812-1872); granduncle of John Augustine Marshall; great-grandfather of Lewis Minor Coleman; great-grandnephew of Richard Randolph; great-granduncle of Hudson Snowden Marshall (1870-1931), William Marshall Bullitt and Alexander Scott Bullitt; first cousin and brother-in-law of Humphrey Marshall (1760-1841); first cousin once removed of William Marshall Anderson and Charles Anderson; first cousin twice removed of Richard Bland and Peyton Randolph (1721-1775); second cousin of Thomas Mann Randolph, Jr.; second cousin once removed of Theodorick Bland, Thomas Jefferson, Edmund Jenings Randolph, Beverley Randolph, John Randolph of Roanoke, Benjamin Franklin Randolph, Meriwether Lewis Randolph and George Wythe Randolph; second cousin twice removed of Thomas Jefferson Coolidge; second cousin thrice removed of John Gardner Coolidge; third cousin of Henry Lee, Charles Lee, Edmund Jennings Lee, Dabney Carr, Peyton Randolph (1779-1828) and Henry St. George Tucker; third cousin once removed of Francis Wayles Eppes, Dabney Smith Carr, Edmund Randolph, Nathaniel Beverly Tucker and Carter Henry Harrison; third cousin twice removed of Fitzhugh Lee, Carter Henry Harrison II and Frederick Madison Roberts; third cousin thrice removed of Francis Beverley Biddle; fourth cousin of John Wayles Eppes.
  Political family: Marshall-Harrison-Randolph-Cabell family of Virginia (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Marshall counties in Ala., Ill., Ind., Iowa, Ky., Miss., Tenn. and W.Va. are named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: John Marshall StoneJohn Marshall MartinJohn Marshall HarlanJ. Marshall HagansJohn M. ClaiborneJohn M. HamiltonJohn Marshall RaymondJohn M. RoseJohn M. SlatonJohn M. WolvertonJohn M. RobsionJohn Marshall HutchesonJohn M. ButlerJohn Marshall HarlanJohn M. Robsion, Jr.John Marshall BrileyJohn Marshall Lindley
  Coins and currency: His portrait appeared on the $20 U.S. Treasury note in the 1880s, and on the $500 bill in the early 20th century.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — federal judicial profile — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about John Marshall: Jean Edward Smith, John Marshall : Definer of a Nation — Charles F. Hobson, The Great Chief Justice : John Marshall and the Rule of Law — Albert J. Beveridge, The Life of John Marshall: The Building of the Nation 1815-1835 — Albert J. Beveridge, The Life of John Marshall: Conflict and Construction 1800-1815 — Albert J. Beveridge, The Life of John Marshall: Politician, Diplomatist, Statesman 1789-1801 — Albert J. Beveridge, The Life of John Marshall: Frontiersman, Soldier, Lawmaker — David Scott Robarge, A Chief Justice's Progress: John Marshall from Revolutionary Virginia to the Supreme Court — R. Kent Newmyer, John Marshall and the Heroic Age of the Supreme Court
  Image source: New York Public Library
  Joseph Story (1779-1845) — of Salem, Essex County, Mass.; Cambridge, Middlesex County, Mass. Born in Marblehead, Essex County, Mass., September 18, 1779. Democrat. Lawyer; member of Massachusetts state house of representatives, 1805-07, 1811; Speaker of the Massachusetts State House of Representatives, 1811; U.S. Representative from Massachusetts 2nd District, 1808-09; Associate Justice of U.S. Supreme Court, 1811-45; died in office 1845; delegate to Massachusetts state constitutional convention, 1820. Unitarian. Elected to the Hall of Fame for Great Americans in 1900. Died in Cambridge, Middlesex County, Mass., September 10, 1845 (age 65 years, 357 days). Interment at Mt. Auburn Cemetery, Cambridge, Mass.
  Relatives: Married to Sarah Waldo Wetmore (1784-1855); granduncle of Bert J. Storey (1880-1958).
  Cross-reference: Harry A. Blackmun
  Story County, Iowa is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — federal judicial profile — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
George Washington George Washington (1732-1799) — also known as "Father of His Country"; "The American Fabius" — of Virginia. Born in Westmoreland County, Va., February 22, 1732. Delegate to Continental Congress from Virginia, 1774-75; general in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; member, U.S. Constitutional Convention, 1787; President of the United States, 1789-97. Episcopalian. English ancestry. Member, Freemasons; Society of the Cincinnati; American Academy of Arts and Sciences. As the leader of the Revolution, he could have been King; instead, he served as the first President and voluntarily stepped down after two terms. Elected to the Hall of Fame for Great Americans in 1900. Died, probably from acute bacterial epiglottitis, at Mt. Vernon, Fairfax County, Va., December 14, 1799 (age 67 years, 295 days). Entombed at Mt. Vernon, Mt. Vernon, Va.; memorial monument at National Mall, Washington, D.C.; statue erected 1860 at Washington Circle, Washington, D.C.; statue erected 1869 at Boston Public Garden, Boston, Mass.
  Relatives: Son of Augustine Washington (1694-1743) and Mary (Ball) Washington (c.1709-1789); married, January 6, 1759, to Martha (Dandridge) Custis (1731-1802; aunt of Burwell Bassett); uncle of Bushrod Washington; granduncle by marriage of Charles Magill Conrad; granduncle of John Thornton Augustine Washington and George Corbin Washington; first cousin six times removed of Archer Woodford; second cousin once removed of Meriwether Lewis (1774-1809); second cousin twice removed of Sulifand Sutherland Ross; second cousin five times removed of Thomas Henry Ball, Jr., William de Bruyn Kops, Horace Lee Washington, Edwin McPherson Holden, Claude C. Ball, Arthur Wesley Holden and Franklin Delano Roosevelt; third cousin thrice removed of Samuel Bullitt Churchill and Thomas Leonidas Crittenden.
  Political families: Pendleton-Lee family; Demarest-Meriwether family of New Jersey; Marshall-Harrison-Randolph-Cabell family of Virginia; Meriwether-Kellogg-Tyler family of Virginia and Connecticut; Washington family; Clay family of Kentucky (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Cross-reference: Henry Lee — Joshua Fry — Alexander Dimitry — Tobias Lear — David Mathews — Rufus Putnam
  Washington counties in Ala., Ark., Colo., Fla., Ga., Idaho, Ill., Ind., Iowa, Kan., Ky., La., Maine, Md., Minn., Miss., Mo., Neb., N.Y., N.C., Ohio, Okla., Ore., Pa., R.I., Tenn., Tex., Utah, Vt., Va. and Wis. are named for him.
  The city of Washington, D.C., is named for him.  — The state of Washington is named for him.  — Mount Washington (highest peak in the Northeast), in the White Mountains, Coos County, New Hampshire, is named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: George Washington Lent MarrGeorge Washington HeardGeorge Washington BarnettGeorge Washington DavisGeorge W. OwenGeorge W. TolandGeorge W. LayGeorge W. PattersonGeorge W. B. TownsGeorge Washington AdamsGeorge Washington HockleyGeorge W. SmythG. W. IngersollGeorge W. HopkinsGeorge Washington MontgomeryGeorge W. KittredgeGeorge W. JonesGeorge W. HarrisonGeorge Washington EwingGeorge Washington SeabrookGeorge W. MorrisonGeorge Washington WoodwardGeorge Washington WrightGeorge Washington TriplettGeorge Washington GlasscockGeorge W. SchuylerGeorge Washington HolmanGeorge W. GreeneGeorge W. WolcottGeorge W. PaschalGeorge Washington DunlapGeorge Washington WarrenGeorge Washington HillGeorge Washington LoganGeorge W. GetchellGeorge Washington WrightGeorge W. JulianGeorge Washington DyalGeorge W. LaddGeorge W. PeckGeorge Washington NesmithGeorge W. MorganGeorge Washington BrooksGeorge Washington CowlesGeorge W. GeddesGeorge Washington WhitmoreGeorge Washington BridgesGeorge W. CateGeorge W. HoukGeorge W. WebberGeorge W. BemisGeorge Washington FairbrotherGeorge Washington GlickGeorge W. JonesGeorge W. BakerGeorge W. ShellGeorge W. AndersonGeorge W. CrouseGeorge W. HulickGeorge W. AllenGeorge W. F. HarperGeorge Washington ClarkGeorge Washington McCraryGeorge W. GordonGeorge W. KingsburyGeorge W. CovingtonGeorge Washington FleegerGeorge W. SteeleGeorge W. WilsonGeorge Washington MartinGeorge W. E. DorseyGeorge W. PlunkittGeorge W. FurbushGeorge W. SuttonGeorge W. CurtinGeorge W. RayGeorge W. RooseveltGeorge W. SmithGeorge W. KippGeorge W. CampbellGeorge W. TaylorGeorge W. StoneGeorge W. BartchGeorge W. ShonkGeorge W. CookGeorge W. MurrayGeorge W. FarisGeorge W. FithianGeorge W. PrinceGeorge W. BucknerGeorge W. CromerGeorge W. DonagheyGeorge W. AldridgeGeorge Washington WagonerGeorge Washington GoethalsGeorge W. ArmstrongGeorge W. LovejoyGeorge W. OakesGeorge W. HaysGeorge W. EdmondsGeorge W. LindsayGeorge Washington JonesT. G. W. TarverGeorge W. DardenGeorge W. MeadGeorge W. GibbonsGeorge W. ListGeorge W. CalkinGeorge W. RauchGeorge W. MichellGeorge Washington JacksonGeorge W. BlanchardGeorge Washington HerzGeorge W. BristowGeorge Washington HardyGeorge W. BallardGeorge W. McKownGeorge Thomas WashingtonGeorge W. CollinsGeorge A. Washington
  Coins and currency: His portrait appears on the U.S. quarter (25 cent coin), and on the $1 bill. His portrait also appeared on various other denominations of U.S. currency, and on the Confederate States $50 note during the Civil War.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Books about George Washington: Richard Brookhiser, Founding Father: Rediscovering George Washington — James Thomas Flexner, Washington: The Indispensable Man — Willard Sterne Randall, George Washington : A Life — Richard Norton Smith, Patriarch : George Washington and the New American Nation — Henry Wiencek, An Imperfect God : George Washington, His Slaves, and the Creation of America — James MacGregor Burns, George Washington — Joseph J. Ellis, His Excellency, George Washington — Gore Vidal, Inventing A Nation: Washington, Adams, Jefferson — David Barton, The Bulletproof George Washington: An Account of God's Providential Care — Wendie C. Old, George Washington (for young readers)
  Image source: Portrait & Biographical Album of Washtenaw County (1891)
Daniel Webster Daniel Webster (1782-1852) — also known as "Black Dan"; "Defender of the Constitution"; "Great Expounder of the Constitution" — of Boston, Suffolk County, Mass.; Marshfield, Plymouth County, Mass. Born in Salisbury (part now in Franklin), Merrimack County, N.H., January 18, 1782. Whig. Lawyer; U.S. Representative from New Hampshire at-large, 1813-17; delegate to New Hampshire state constitutional convention, 1820; Presidential Elector for New Hampshire, 1820; U.S. Representative from Massachusetts 1st District, 1823-27; resigned 1827; U.S. Senator from Massachusetts, 1827-41, 1845-50; candidate for President of the United States, 1836; U.S. Secretary of State, 1841-43, 1850-52; died in office 1852. Presbyterian. English ancestry. Elected to the Hall of Fame for Great Americans in 1900. Died in Marshfield, Plymouth County, Mass., October 24, 1852 (age 70 years, 280 days). Interment at Winslow Cemetery, Marshfield, Mass.; statue erected 1900 at Scott Circle, Washington, D.C.; statue at State House Grounds, Boston, Mass.
  Relatives: Son of Ebenezer Webster (1739-1806) and Abigail (Eastman) Webster (1759-1836); married, May 29, 1808, to Grace Fletcher (1781-1828); second cousin once removed of Hiram Augustus Huse; second cousin twice removed of Edwin George Eastman; third cousin twice removed of Alonzo Mark Leffingwell; third cousin thrice removed of John Leffingwell Randolph; fourth cousin once removed of Jedediah Sabin, Charles Rowell and Amos Tuck (1810-1879).
  Political families: Saltonstall-Weeks family of Massachusetts; Vanderbilt-Tuck-Pickering-Webster family; Eastman-Webster-Rowell family; Vanderbilt-Colby-Burden-French family of New York City, New York (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Webster counties in Ga., Iowa, Ky., La., Miss., Mo., Neb. and W.Va. are named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: Daniel Webster WilderDaniel W. MillsDaniel W. JonesDaniel Webster ComstockDaniel Webster WaughDaniel Webster HeagyDaniel W. WhitmoreDaniel W. HamiltonDaniel W. AllamanWebster TurnerDan W. TurnerDaniel W. HoanDaniel W. Ambrose, Jr.
  Coins and currency: His portrait appeared on the $10 U.S. note from the 1860s until the early 20th century.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Books about Daniel Webster: Robert Vincent Remini, Daniel Webster : The Man and His Time — Maurice G. Baxter, One and Inseparable : Daniel Webster and the Union — Robert A. Allen, Daniel Webster, Defender of the Union — Richard N. Current, Daniel Webster and the Rise of National Conservatism — Merrill D. Peterson, The Great Triumvirate: Webster, Clay, and Calhoun
  Image source: Life and Work of James G. Blaine (1893)
John Quincy Adams John Quincy Adams (1767-1848) — also known as "Old Man Eloquent"; "The Accidental President"; "The Massachusetts Madman" — of Boston, Suffolk County, Mass.; Quincy, Norfolk County, Mass. Born in Braintree (part now in Quincy), Norfolk County, Mass., July 11, 1767. Lawyer; U.S. Minister to Netherlands, 1794-97; Prussia, 1797-1801; Russia, 1809-14; Great Britain, 1815-17; member of Massachusetts state senate, 1802; U.S. Senator from Massachusetts, 1803-08; resigned 1808; U.S. Secretary of State, 1817-25; President of the United States, 1825-29; U.S. Representative from Massachusetts, 1831-48 (11th District 1831-33, 12th District 1833-43, 8th District 1843-48); died in office 1848; candidate for Governor of Massachusetts, 1834. Unitarian. English ancestry. Member, American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Elected to the Hall of Fame for Great Americans in 1905. Suffered a stroke while speaking on the floor of the U.S. House of Representatives, February 21, 1848, and died two days later in the Speaker's office, U.S. Capitol Building, Washington, D.C., February 23, 1848 (age 80 years, 227 days). Original interment at Hancock Cemetery, Quincy, Mass.; reinterment at United First Parish Church, Quincy, Mass.; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery, Washington, D.C.
  Relatives: Son of John Adams and Abigail (Smith) Adams (1744-1818); brother of Abigail Amelia Adams (1765-1813; who married William Stephens Smith); married, July 26, 1797, to Louisa Catherine Johnson (1775-1852; daughter of Joshua Johnson; sister-in-law of John Pope; niece of Thomas Johnson); father of George Washington Adams and Charles Francis Adams (1807-1886); grandfather of John Quincy Adams and Brooks Adams; great-grandfather of Charles Francis Adams (1866-1954); second great-grandfather of Thomas Boylston Adams; first cousin of William Cranch; second cousin once removed of Samuel Adams; second cousin twice removed of Edward M. Chapin; second cousin thrice removed of Arthur Chapin; second cousin five times removed of Denwood Lynn Chapin; third cousin of Joseph Allen; third cousin once removed of Samuel Sewall, Josiah Quincy and John Milton Thayer; third cousin twice removed of William Vincent Wells; third cousin thrice removed of Lyman Kidder Bass, Daniel T. Hayden, Arthur Laban Bates and Almur Stiles Whiting; fourth cousin of Jeremiah Mason, Josiah Quincy, Jr. and George Bailey Loring; fourth cousin once removed of Asahel Otis, Erastus Fairbanks, Charles Stetson, Henry Brewster Stanton, Charles Adams, Jr., Isaiah Stetson (1812-1880), Joshua Perkins, Eli Thayer, Bailey Frye Adams and Samuel Miller Quincy.
  Political families: Kidder family of Connecticut; Greene family of Providence, Rhode Island; DuPont family of Wilmington, Delaware; Thayer-Capron-Aldrich-Stetson family; Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York; Stetson family of New York and Massachusetts (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Cross-reference: John Smith — Thurlow Weed
  Adams counties in Ill. and Ind. are named for him.
  Mount Quincy Adams, in the White Mountains, Coos County, New Hampshire, is named for him.  — Mount Quincy Adams, on the border between British Columbia, Canada, and Hoonah-Angoon Census Area, Alaska, is named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: John Q. A. BrackettJohn Q. A. SheldenJ. Q. A. Reber
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Books about John Quincy Adams: Paul C. Nagel, John Quincy Adams : A Public Life, a Private Life — Lynn Hudson Parsons, John Quincy Adams — Robert V. Remini, John Quincy Adams — Joseph Wheelan, Mr. Adams's Last Crusade: John Quincy Adams's Extraordinary Post-Presidential Life in Congress
  Image source: Portrait & Biographical Album of Washtenaw County (1891)
James Russell Lowell James Russell Lowell (1819-1891) — of Cambridge, Middlesex County, Mass. Born in Cambridge, Middlesex County, Mass., February 22, 1819. Writer, poet, critic, professor, and abolitionist; U.S. Minister to Spain, 1877-80; Great Britain, 1880-85. Elected to the Hall of Fame for Great Americans in 1905. Died of cancer, in Cambridge, Middlesex County, Mass., August 12, 1891 (age 72 years, 171 days). Interment at Mt. Auburn Cemetery, Cambridge, Mass.
  Relatives: Married, December 26, 1844, to Maria White (1821-1853); married, September 16, 1857, to Frances Dunlap (1826-1885; niece of Robert Pinckney Dunlap); father of Mabel Lowell (who married Edward Burnett (1849-1925)).
  Political family: Lowell-Dunlap family of Massachusetts.
  See also Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: U.S. postage stamp (1940)
James Madison James Madison (1751-1836) — also known as "Father of the Constitution and the Bill of Rights" — of Virginia. Born in Port Conway, King George County, Va., March 16, 1751. Democrat. Served in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; member of Virginia state legislature, 1776; Delegate to Continental Congress from Virginia, 1780-83, 1787-88; member, U.S. Constitutional Convention, 1787; U.S. Representative from Virginia, 1789-97 (at-large 1789-91, 5th District 1791-93, 15th District 1793-97); U.S. Secretary of State, 1801-09; President of the United States, 1809-17. Episcopalian. English ancestry. He was elected in 1905 to the Hall of Fame for Great Americans. Died in Montpelier, Orange County, Va., June 28, 1836 (age 85 years, 104 days). Interment at Montpelier Plantation, Montpelier Station, Va.
  Relatives: Son of James Madison (1723-1801) and Eleanor Rose (Conway) Madison (1731-1829); brother of William Taylor Madison; married, September 15, 1794, to Dolly (Payne) Todd (sister-in-law of Richard Cutts and John George Jackson); first cousin once removed of George Madison; first cousin twice removed of Edmund Pendleton; second cousin of Zachary Taylor; second cousin once removed of Nathaniel Pendleton and Coleby Chew; second cousin twice removed of John Strother Pendleton, Albert Gallatin Pendleton and Samuel Bullitt Churchill; second cousin thrice removed of George Cassety Pendleton, Hubbard T. Smith, Charles M. Pendleton, Elliot Woolfolk Major, Edgar Bailey Woolfolk and Daniel Micajah Pendleton; second cousin four times removed of Charles Sumner Pendleton and Sidney Fletcher Taliaferro; third cousin of Clement F. Dorsey, Philip Clayton Pendleton, Edmund Henry Pendleton and Nathanael Greene Pendleton; third cousin once removed of Gabriel Slaughter, Andrew Dorsey, Philip Coleman Pendleton, George Hunt Pendleton and Joseph Henry Pendleton; third cousin twice removed of Robert Pryor Henry, John Flournoy Henry, Gustavus Adolphus Henry, Alexander Warfield Dorsey, William Barret Pendleton, Francis Key Pendleton, Charles Rittenhouse Pendleton and John Overton Pendleton; third cousin thrice removed of Charles Rice Slaughter (1819-1862) and Eli Huston Brown, Jr.; fourth cousin once removed of Charles Willing Byrd.
  Political families: Blackburn-Slaughter-Buckner-Madison family of Kentucky; Pendleton-Lee family (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Madison counties in Ala., Ark., Fla., Ga., Idaho, Ill., Ind., Iowa, Ky., La., Miss., Mo., Mont., Neb., N.Y., N.C., Ohio, Tenn., Tex. and Va. are named for him.
  The city of Madison, Wisconsin, is named for him.  — Mount Madison, in the White Mountains, Coos County, New Hampshire, is named for him.  — Fort Madison (1808-13), and the subsequent city of Fort Madison, Iowa, were named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: James Madison BroomJames Madison Hite BealeJames Madison PorterJames M. BuchananJames Madison GreggJ. Madison WellsJames M. TarletonJames Madison HughesJames M. MarvinJames Madison GaylordJames M. LeachJames TurnerJames M. HarveyJames M. SeymourJames Madison BarkerJames Madison MullenJames Madison McKinneyJames M. MortonJames Madison Barrett, Sr.James M. Gudger, Jr.James Madison Morton, Jr.James Madison WoodardJames M. Waddell, Jr.
  Coins and currency: His portrait appeared on the U.S. $5,000 bill in 1915-46.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Books about James Madison: Ralph Louis Ketcham, James Madison : A Biography — Garry Wills, James Madison — Robert Allen Rutland, The Presidency of James Madison — Charles Cerami, Young Patriots: The Remarkable Story of Two Men. Their Impossible Plan and The Revolution That Created The Constitution — Samuel Kernell, ed., James Madison: The Theory and Practice of Republican Government — Kevin R. C. Gutzman, James Madison and the Making of America
  Image source: Portrait & Biographical Album of Washtenaw County (1891)
  William Tecumseh Sherman (1820-1891) — Born in Lancaster, Fairfield County, Ohio, February 8, 1820. Served in the U.S. Army during the Mexican War; general in the Union Army during the Civil War; U.S. Secretary of War, 1869. Member, Loyal Legion. In 1864, he led Union troops who attacked and burned Atlanta, Georgia. Elected to the Hall of Fame for Great Americans in 1905. Died in New York, New York County, N.Y., February 14, 1891 (age 71 years, 6 days). Interment at Calvary Cemetery, St. Louis, Mo.
  Relatives: Son of Mary (Hoyt) Sherman (1787-1852) and Charles Robert Sherman; brother of Charles Taylor Sherman, Lampson Parker Sherman and John Sherman; married, May 1, 1850, to Eleanor Boyle Ewing (1824-1888; daughter of Thomas Ewing); father of Eleanor M. Sherman (1859-1915; who married Alexander Montgomery Thackara); uncle of Mary Hoyt Sherman (1842-1904; who married Nelson Appleton Miles) and Elizabeth Sherman (who married James Donald Cameron); sixth great-grandson of Thomas Welles; second cousin of David Munson Osborne; second cousin once removed of Thomas Mott Osborne; second cousin twice removed of Charles Devens Osborne and Lithgow Osborne; second cousin thrice removed of Pierpont Edwards and Aaron Burr; third cousin of Phineas Taylor Barnum; third cousin once removed of Ezekiel Gilbert Stoddard and Blanche M. Woodward; third cousin twice removed of John Davenport, James Davenport, Theodore Dwight, Henry Waggaman Edwards, Ira Yale, Louis Ezekiel Stoddard and Asbury Elliott Kellogg; third cousin thrice removed of Jonathan Brace, Chauncey Goodrich and Elizur Goodrich; fourth cousin of Philo Fairchild Barnum, Andrew Gould Chatfield (1810-1875), Henry Jarvis Raymond and Edwin Olmstead Keeler; fourth cousin once removed of Charles Yale, Theodore Davenport, David Lowrey Seymour, Chauncey Mitchell Depew, Fred Lockwood Keeler and Thomas McKeen Chidsey.
  Political families: Otis family of Connecticut; Sherman family of Connecticut; Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Politician named for him: W. T. S. Rath
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Books about William T. Sherman: Stanley P. Hirshson, The White Tecumseh : A Biography of General William T. Sherman
  John Greenleaf Whittier (1807-1892) — of Amesbury, Essex County, Mass. Born in Haverhill, Essex County, Mass., December 17, 1807. Poet; newspaper editor; member of Massachusetts state house of representatives, 1835; Liberty candidate for U.S. Representative from Massachusetts, 1842. Quaker. Member, American Anti-Slavery Society. Elected to the Hall of Fame for Great Americans in 1905. Died in Hampton Falls, Rockingham County, N.H., September 7, 1892 (age 84 years, 265 days). Interment at Union Cemetery, Amesbury, Mass.
  Relatives: Son of John Whittier (1760-1830) and Abigail (Hussey) Whittier (1780-1857); third cousin twice removed of Robert Foss Fernald; fourth cousin once removed of Daniel Davis, William Henry Barnum (1818-1889), George Winthrop Maston Pitman and Joseph Pitman.
  Political families: Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York; Kidder family of Connecticut; Pitman family of Bartlett, New Hampshire (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Cross-reference: Abraham Davenport
  The city of Whittier, California, is named for him.  — Whittier College, in Whittier, California, is named for him.
  Politician named for him: John Greenleaf Whittier Lewis
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  George Bancroft (1800-1891) — of Massachusetts. Born in Worcester, Worcester County, Mass., October 3, 1800. Democrat. U.S. Collector of Customs, 1832-34; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Massachusetts, 1844; candidate for Governor of Massachusetts, 1844; U.S. Secretary of the Navy, 1845-46; U.S. Minister to Great Britain, 1846-49; Prussia, 1867-71; Germany, 1871-74. Congregationalist. Elected to the Hall of Fame for Great Americans in 1910. Died in Washington, D.C., January 17, 1891 (age 90 years, 106 days). Interment at Worcester Rural Cemetery, Worcester, Mass.
  Relatives: Son of Rev. Aaron Bancroft (1755-1839) and Lucretia (Chandler) Bancroft (1765-1839); brother of Elizabeth 'Eliza' Bancroft (1791-1872; who married John Davis (1787-1854)); married, March 1, 1827, to Sarah H. Dwight (1803-1837); married, August 16, 1838, to Elizabeth (Davis) Bliss (1803-1886); uncle of John Chandler Bancroft Davis (1822-1907) and Horace Davis; granduncle of John Davis (1851-1902); second great-granduncle of Henry Cabot Lodge, Jr. and John Davis Lodge; third great-granduncle of George Cabot Lodge.
  Political families: Holden-Davis-Lawrence-Garcelon family of Massachusetts; Saltonstall-Davis-Frelinghuysen-Appleton family of Massachusetts; Davis family (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
Andrew Jackson Andrew Jackson (1767-1845) — also known as "Old Hickory"; "The Farmer of Tennessee"; "King Andrew the First" — of Nashville, Davidson County, Tenn. Born, in a log cabin, in The Waxhaws, Lancaster County, S.C., March 15, 1767. Democrat. Lawyer; U.S. Attorney for Tennessee, 1790-97; U.S. Representative from Tennessee at-large, 1796-97; U.S. Senator from Tennessee, 1797-98, 1823-25; justice of Tennessee state supreme court, 1798; general in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812; Governor of Florida Territory, 1821; President of the United States, 1829-37; censured by the U.S. Senate in 1834 over his removal of federal deposits from the Bank of the United States; on January 30, 1835, while attending funeral services at the Capitol Building for Rep. Warren R. Davis of South Carolina, he was shot at with two guns -- which both misfired -- by Richard Lawrence, a house painter (later found not guilty by reason of insanity). Presbyterian. Scotch-Irish ancestry. Member, Freemasons. Killed Charles Dickinson in a pistol duel, May 30, 1806; also dueled with Thomas Hart Benton and Waightstill Avery. Elected in 1910 to the Hall of Fame for Great Americans. Died, of dropsy (congestive heart failure), in Nashville, Davidson County, Tenn., June 8, 1845 (age 78 years, 85 days). Interment at The Hermitage, Nashville, Tenn.; statue erected 1853 at Lafayette Park, Washington, D.C.; statue erected 1856 at Jackson Square, New Orleans, La.
  Relatives: Son of Andrew Jackson (1730-1767) and Elizabeth (Hutchinson) Jackson (1737-1781); married, January 17, 1794, to Rachel (Donelson) Robards (1767-1828; aunt of Andrew Jackson Donelson (1799-1871)).
  Political families: Marshall-Harrison-Randolph-Cabell family of Virginia; Caffery family of Louisiana (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Cross-reference: Francis P. Blair
  Jackson counties in Ala., Ark., Colo., Fla., Ill., Ind., Iowa, Kan., Ky., La., Mich., Miss., Mo., N.C., Ohio, Okla., Ore., Tenn., Tex., W.Va. and Wis., and Hickory County, Mo., are named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: Andrew J. DonelsonAndrew Jackson MillerAndrew J. FaulkAndrew Jackson TitusAndrew Jackson IsacksAndrew Jackson HamiltonAndrew J. HarlanAndrew J. KuykendallAndrew J. ThayerElam A. J. GreeleyAndrew Jackson IngleAndrew J. OgleAndrew Jackson CarrAndrew J. WatermanAndrew J. BentleyAndrew J. RogersWilliam A. J. SparksAndrew Jackson PoppletonAndrew J. HunterAndrew Jackson BryantAndrew J. BealeA. J. ClementsAndrew Jackson BakerAndrew J. FeltA. J. KingAndrew J. SawyerAndrew Jackson GreenfieldAndrew Jackson CaldwellAndrew Jackson GahaganAndrew Jackson BishipAndrew Jackson HoustonAndrew J. CobbAndrew J. MontagueAndrew J. BarchfeldAndrew J. BallietAndrew J. KirkAndrew J. LivingstonA. J. SherwoodAndrew Jackson StewartAndrew J. MayAndrew J. McConnicoAndrew J. SawyerAndrew J. BrewerAndrew BettwyAndrew J. TransueAndrew Jackson GravesAndrew Jackson GilbertAndrew J. GoodwinAndrew J. HinshawAndy YoungAndrew Jackson Kupper
  Coins and currency: His portrait appears on the U.S. $20 bill; from the 1860s until 1927, his portrait appeared on on U.S. notes and certificates of various denominations from $5 to $10,000. In 1861, his portrait appeared on Confederate States $1,000 notes.
  Campaign slogan: "Let the people rule."
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial — Tennessee Encyclopedia
  Books about Andrew Jackson: Robert Vincent Remini, The Life of Andrew Jackson — Robert Vincent Remini, Andrew Jackson : The Course of American Freedom, 1822-1832 — Robert Vincent Remini, Andrew Jackson : The Course of American Democracy, 1833-1845 — Robert Vincent Remini, Andrew Jackson : The Course of American Empire, 1767-1821 — Andrew Burstein, The Passions of Andrew Jackson — David S. Heidler & Jeanne T. Heidler, Old Hickory's War: Andrew Jackson and the Quest for Empire — Donald B. Cole, The Presidency of Andrew Jackson — H. W. Brands, Andrew Jackson : His Life and Times — Jon Meacham, American Lion: Andrew Jackson in the White House — Donald Barr Chidsey, Andrew Jackson, Hero
  Image source: Portrait & Biographical Album of Washtenaw County (1891)
  John Lothrop Motley (1814-1877) — also known as J. Lothrop Motley — of Massachusetts. Born in Dorchester, Boston, Suffolk County, Mass., April 15, 1814. Member of Massachusetts state house of representatives, 1840; U.S. Minister to Austria, 1861-67; Great Britain, 1869-70. Elected to the Hall of Fame for Great Americans in 1910. Died in Dorset, England, May 29, 1877 (age 63 years, 44 days). Interment at Kensal Green Cemetery, London, England.
  See also Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier
  Rufus Choate (1799-1859) — of Salem, Essex County, Mass. Born in Hog Island, Ipswich, Essex County, Mass., October 1, 1799. Lawyer; member of Massachusetts state legislature, 1830; U.S. Representative from Massachusetts 2nd District, 1831-35; U.S. Senator from Massachusetts, 1841-45; Massachusetts state attorney general, 1853-54; resigned 1854. Elected to the Hall of Fame for Great Americans in 1915. Died in Halifax, Nova Scotia, July 13, 1859 (age 59 years, 285 days). Interment at Mt. Auburn Cemetery, Cambridge, Mass.
  Relatives: Brother of George Choate; uncle of Joseph Hodges Choate (1832-1917).
  Political family: Choate family of Salem, Massachusetts.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
Alexander Hamilton Alexander Hamilton (1757-1804) — also known as "Alexander the Coppersmith" — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in Charles Town, Nevis, January 11, 1757. Delegate to Continental Congress from New York, 1782; member of New York state assembly from New York County, 1786-87; member, U.S. Constitutional Convention, 1787; delegate to New York convention to ratify U.S. constitution from New York County, 1788; U.S. Secretary of the Treasury, 1789-95. Episcopalian. Scottish and French ancestry. Member, Freemasons; Society of the Cincinnati. Elected to the Hall of Fame for Great Americans in 1915. Shot and mortally wounded in a duel with Aaron Burr, on July 11, 1804, and died the next day in New York, New York County, N.Y., July 12, 1804 (age 47 years, 183 days). Interment at Trinity Churchyard, Manhattan, N.Y.; statue at Treasury Building Grounds, Washington, D.C.; statue at Commonwealth Avenue Mall, Boston, Mass.
  Relatives: Son of James Hamilton and Rachel (Faucette) Hamilton; married, December 14, 1780, to Elizabeth Schuyler (1757-1854; daughter of Philip John Schuyler; sister of Philip Jeremiah Schuyler); father of Alexander Hamilton, Jr., James Alexander Hamilton (1788-1878) and William Stephen Hamilton; great-grandfather of Robert Ray Hamilton; second great-grandfather of Laurens M. Hamilton; ancestor *** of Robert Hamilton Woodruff.
  Political families: Livingston-Schuyler family of New York; VanRensselaer family of Albany, New York (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Cross-reference: Nathaniel Pendleton — Robert Troup — John Tayler — William P. Van Ness
  Hamilton counties in Fla., Ill., Ind., Kan., Neb., N.Y., Ohio and Tenn. are named for him.
  The city of Hamilton, Ohio, is named for him.  — Hamilton Hall (dormitory, built 1926), at Harvard University Business School, Boston, Massachusetts, is named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: Alexander H. BuellAlexander H. HolleyHamilton FishAlexander H. StephensAlexander H. BullockAlexander H. BaileyAlexander H. RiceAlexander Hamilton JonesAlexander H. WatermanAlexander H. CoffrothAlexander H. DudleyAlexander H. RevellAlexander Hamilton HargisAlexander Hamilton PhillipsAlex Woodle
  Coins and currency: His portrait appears on the U.S. $10 bill; from the 1860s to the 1920s, his portrait also appeared on U.S. notes and certificates of various denominations from $2 to $1,000.
  Personal motto: "Do it better yet."
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about Alexander Hamilton: Richard Brookhiser, Alexander Hamilton, American — Forrest McDonald, Alexander Hamilton: A Biography — Gertrude Atherton, Conqueror : Dramatized Biography of Alexander Hamilton — Ron Chernow, Alexander Hamilton — Thomas Fleming, Duel: Alexander Hamilton, Aaron Burr, and the Future of America — Arnold A. Rogow, A Fatal Friendship: Alexander Hamilton and Aaron Burr — Willard Sterne Randall, Alexander Hamilton: A Life — John Harper, American Machiavelli : Alexander Hamilton and the Origins of U.S. Foreign Policy — Stephen F. Knott, Alexander Hamilton and the Persistence of Myth — Charles Cerami, Young Patriots: The Remarkable Story of Two Men. Their Impossible Plan and The Revolution That Created The Constitution — Donald Barr Chidsey, Mr. Hamilton and Mr. Jefferson
  Critical books about Alexander Hamilton: Thomas DiLorenzo, Hamilton's Curse : How Jefferson's Arch Enemy Betrayed the American Revolution -- and What It means for Americans Today
  Image source: U.S. postage stamp (1957)
Patrick Henry Patrick Henry (1736-1799) — of Prince Edward County, Va. Born in Studley, Hanover County, Va., May 29, 1736. Lawyer; planter; member of Virginia House of Burgesses, 1765; Delegate to Continental Congress from Virginia, 1774; general in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; Governor of Virginia, 1776-79, 1784-86; delegate to Virginia convention to ratify U.S. constitution from Prince Edward County, 1788; member of Virginia state senate, 1799. Scottish and English ancestry. Elected to the Hall of Fame for Great Americans in 1920. Died near Brookneal, Campbell County, Va., June 6, 1799 (age 63 years, 8 days). Interment a private or family graveyard, Charlotte County, Va.
  Relatives: Son of John Henry (1704-1773) and Sarah (Syme) Henry (1710-1784); brother of Anne Henry (1738-1790; who married William Christian) and Elizabeth Henry (1749-1825; who married William Russell and William Campbell); married 1754 to Sarah Shelton (died 1775); married, October 25, 1777, to Dorothea Dandridge (1755-1831); father of Anne Henry (who married Spencer Roane); uncle of Priscilla Christian (who married Alexander Scott Bullitt) and Sarah Buchanan Campbell (1778-1846; who married Francis Smith Preston); grandfather of William Henry Roane; granduncle of Valentine Wood Southall, William Campbell Preston and John Smith Preston; great-granduncle of Stephen Valentine Southall (1830-1913), Robert Jefferson Breckinridge, Jr. and William Campbell Preston Breckinridge; second great-granduncle of Levin Irving Handy, Desha Breckinridge and Henry Skillman Breckinridge; third great-grandfather of Robert Lee Henry; cousin *** of Isaac Coles.
  Political family: Breckinridge-Preston-Cabell-Henry family of Virginia (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Henry counties in Ala., Ga., Ill., Ind., Ky., Mo., Ohio, Tenn. and Va. are named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: Patrick H. DavisPatrick HenryPatrick H. RochePatrick H. McCarrenPatrick H. McGarryPatrick HenryPatrick Henry McCarthyPatrick Henry CallahanPatrick H. KelleyPatrick H. O'BrienP. H. MoynihanPatrick H. QuinnPatrick H. DrewryPatrick Henry KennedyJ. H. CulkinDat Barthel
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about Patrick Henry: Harlow Giles Unger, Lion of Liberty: Patrick Henry and the Call to a New Nation — Thomas S. Kidd, Patrick Henry: First Among Patriots
  Image source: The South in the Building of the Nation (1909)
James Monroe James Monroe (1758-1831) — of Spotsylvania County, Va. Born in Westmoreland County, Va., April 28, 1758. Colonel in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; lawyer; member of Virginia state house of delegates, 1782, 1786, 1810-11; Delegate to Continental Congress from Virginia, 1783-86; delegate to Virginia convention to ratify U.S. constitution from Spotsylvania County, 1788; U.S. Senator from Virginia, 1790-94; U.S. Minister to France, 1794-96; Great Britain, 1803-07; Governor of Virginia, 1799-1802, 1811; U.S. Secretary of State, 1811-17; U.S. Secretary of War, 1814-15; President of the United States, 1817-25; delegate to Virginia state constitutional convention, 1829. Episcopalian. English ancestry. Member, Freemasons. Elected to the Hall of Fame for Great Americans in 1930. Died, probably of tuberculosis, in New York, New York County, N.Y., July 4, 1831 (age 73 years, 67 days). Originally entombed at New York Marble Cemetery, Manhattan, N.Y.; subsequently entombed at New York City Marble Cemetery, Manhattan, N.Y.; reinterment in 1858 at Hollywood Cemetery, Richmond, Va.
  Relatives: Son of Andrew Spence Monroe (1727-1774) and Elizabeth (Jones) Monroe (1727-1758); married, February 16, 1786, to Eliza Kortright (1768-1830); nephew of Joseph Jones; uncle of James Monroe; second great-granduncle of Theodore Douglas Robinson (1883-1934) and Corinne Robinson Alsop; distant cousin *** of Thomas Bell Monroe.
  Political families: Roosevelt family of New York City, New York; Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York; Monroe family of Virginia and Washington (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Monroe counties in Ala., Ark., Fla., Ga., Ill., Ind., Iowa, Ky., Mich., Miss., Mo., N.Y., Ohio, Pa., Tenn., W.Va. and Wis. are named for him.
  The city of Monrovia, Liberia, is named for him.  — Mount Monroe, in the White Mountains, Coos County, New Hampshire, is named for him.  — Fort Monroe (military installation 1819-2011), at Old Point Comfort, Hampton, Virginia, is named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: James MonroeJames MonroeJames M. PendletonJames M. JacksonJames Monroe LettsJames M. RitchieJames M. RosseJames M. ComlyJames Monroe BufordJames M. SeibertJames M. LownJames M. MillerJames Monroe JonesJames Monroe HaleJames Monroe SpearsJ. M. AlfordJames M. Lown, Jr.James M. Miley
  Coins and currency: His portrait appeared on the U.S. $100 silver certificate in the 1880s and 1890s.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier
  Books about James Monroe: Harry Ammon, James Monroe: The Quest for National Identity
  Image source: Portrait & Biographical Album of Washtenaw County (1891)
Grover Cleveland Grover Cleveland (1837-1908) — also known as Stephen Grover Cleveland; "Uncle Jumbo"; "The Veto Mayor"; "Grover The Good"; "The Sage of Princeton"; "Dumb Prophet"; "Buffalo Hangman"; "The Veto President"; "Beast of Buffalo"; "Big Steve" — of Buffalo, Erie County, N.Y.; Princeton, Mercer County, N.J.; Tamworth, Carroll County, N.H. Born in Caldwell, Essex County, N.J., March 18, 1837. Democrat. Lawyer; Erie County Sheriff, 1870-73; mayor of Buffalo, N.Y., 1882; Governor of New York, 1883-85; President of the United States, 1885-89, 1893-97; defeated, 1888. Presbyterian. Member, Sigma Chi. Elected to the Hall of Fame for Great Americans in 1935. Died in Princeton, Mercer County, N.J., June 24, 1908 (age 71 years, 98 days). Interment at Princeton Cemetery, Princeton, N.J.; statue at City Hall Grounds, Buffalo, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Rev. Richard Falley Cleveland (1804-1853) and Anne (Neal) Cleveland (1806-1882); married, June 2, 1886, to Frances Folsom (1864-1947); father of Richard Folsom Cleveland (1897-1974) (son-in-law of Thomas Frank Gailor; brother-in-law of Frank Hoyt Gailor); first cousin once removed of Francis Landon Cleveland; second cousin of James Harlan Cleveland; second cousin once removed of James Harlan Cleveland, Jr.; second cousin twice removed of Jonathan Usher and Joseph Wheeler Bloodgood; third cousin once removed of John Palmer Usher and Robert Cleveland Usher; third cousin thrice removed of Ephraim Safford and Isaiah Kidder; fourth cousin once removed of Samuel Lord and Rollin Usher Tyler.
  Political families: Kidder family of Connecticut; Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Cross-reference: Henry T. Ellett — Wilson S. Bissell — David King Udall — Edward S. Bragg — Thomas F. Grady — Lyman K. Bass — George B. Cortelyou
  Cleveland counties in Ark. and Okla. are named for him.
  Mount Cleveland, a volcano on Chuginadak Island, Alaska, is named for him.  — The town of Grover, North Carolina, is named for him.  — The Cleveland National Forest (established 1908), in San Diego, Riverside, Orange counties, California, is named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: Grover C. CookGrover C. MeyrsGrover C. TalbotGrover C. HelmGrover C. RobertsonG. C. CooleyGrover A. WhalenGrover C. TaylorGrover C. WinnGrover C. LukeGrover C. AlbrightGrover Cleveland WelshGrover C. BelknapGrover C. WorrellGrover B. HillGrover C. DillmanGrover C. BrennemanGrover C. GeorgeGrover C. MitchellGrover C. LadnerGrover C. HallGrover C. TyeGrover C. CiselGrover C. HedrickGrover C. HunterGrover C. MontgomeryGrover C. FarwellGrover C. GillinghamGrover C. StudivanGrover C. LayneGrover C. HudsonGrover C. CombsGrover C. SnyderGrover C. GuernseyGrover C. HendersonGrover C. SmithGrover C. JacksonGrover C. HunterGrover C. BowerGrover C. LandGrover C. MoritzGrover C. GreggGrover C. Richman, Jr.Grover C. AndersonGrover C. ChrissGrover C. CriswellGrover C. BrownGrover C. Robinson III
  Coins and currency: His portrait appeared on the U.S. $20 bill (1914-28), and on the $1,000 bill (1928-46).
  Campaign slogan (1884): "We love him for the enemies he has made."
  Opposition slogan (1884): "Ma, Ma, Where's My Pa?"
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about Grover Cleveland: Alyn Brodsky, Grover Cleveland : A Study in Character — H. Paul Jeffers, An Honest President: The Life and Presidencies of Grover Cleveland — Mark Wahlgren Summers, Rum, Romanism, & Rebellion : The Making of a President, 1884 — Henry F. Graff, Grover Cleveland — Jeff C. Young, Grover Cleveland (for young readers)
  Critical books about Grover Cleveland: Matthew Algeo, The President Is a Sick Man: the Supposedly Virtuous Grover Cleveland Survives a Secret Surgery at Sea and Vilifies the Courageous Newspaperman Who Dared Expose the Truth — Charles Lachman, A Secret Life : The Lies and Scandals of President Grover Cleveland
  Image source: New York Red Book 1896
Theodore Roosevelt Theodore Roosevelt (1858-1919) — also known as "T.R."; "Teddy"; "The Colonel"; "The Hero of San Juan Hill"; "The Rough Rider"; "Trust-Buster"; "The Happy Warrior"; "The Bull Moose" — of New York, New York County, N.Y.; Oyster Bay, Nassau County, Long Island, N.Y. Born in New York, New York County, N.Y., October 27, 1858. Member of New York state assembly from New York County 21st District, 1882-84; delegate to Republican National Convention from New York, 1884, 1900; candidate for mayor of New York City, N.Y., 1886; colonel in the U.S. Army during the Spanish-American War; Governor of New York, 1899-1901; Vice President of the United States, 1901; President of the United States, 1901-09; defeated (Progressive), 1912; candidate for Republican nomination for President, 1916. Christian Reformed. Dutch ancestry. Member, Freemasons; Phi Beta Kappa; Delta Kappa Epsilon; Alpha Delta Phi; Union League. Received the Medal of Honor for leading a charge up San Juan Hill during battle there, July 1, 1898. While campaigning for president in Milwaukee, Wis., on October 14, 1912, was shot in the chest by John F. Schrank; despite the injury, he continued his speech for another hour and a half before seeking medical attention. Awarded Nobel Peace Prize in 1906; elected to the Hall of Fame for Great Americans in 1950. Died in Oyster Bay, Nassau County, Long Island, N.Y., January 6, 1919 (age 60 years, 71 days). Interment at Youngs Memorial Cemetery, Oyster Bay, Long Island, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Theodore Roosevelt, Sr. (1831-1878) and Martha (Bulloch) Roosevelt (1835-1884); brother of Corinne Roosevelt Robinson and Anna L. Roosevelt (1855-1931; who married William Sheffield Cowles (1846-1923)); married, October 27, 1880, to Alice Hathaway Lee (1861-1884); married, December 2, 1886, to Edith Kermit Carow (1861-1948; first cousin once removed of Daniel Putnam Tyler); father of Alice Lee Roosevelt (who married Nicholas Longworth) and Theodore Roosevelt, Jr.; nephew of Robert Barnwell Roosevelt; uncle of Theodore Douglas Robinson (1883-1934), Eleanor Roosevelt (who married Franklin Delano Roosevelt (1882-1945)), Corinne Robinson Alsop and William Sheffield Cowles (1898-1986); grandnephew of James I. Roosevelt; granduncle of James Roosevelt, Elliott Roosevelt, Corinne A. Chubb, Franklin Delano Roosevelt, Jr. and John deKoven Alsop; great-grandfather-in-law of William Floyd Weld; great-grandnephew of William Bellinger Bulloch; second great-grandson of Archibald Bulloch; second cousin twice removed of Philip DePeyster; second cousin thrice removed of Nicholas Roosevelt, Jr.; third cousin twice removed of Martin Van Buren; fourth cousin once removed of Franklin Delano Roosevelt (1882-1945).
  Political families: Roosevelt family of New York City, New York; Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York; Monroe family of Virginia and Washington (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Cross-reference: Gifford Pinchot — David J. Leahy — William Barnes, Jr. — Oliver D. Burden — William J. Youngs — George B. Cortelyou — Mason Mitchell — Frederic MacMaster — John Goodnow — William Loeb, Jr.
  Roosevelt counties in Mont. and N.M. are named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: Theodore BassettTheodore R. McKeldinTheodore R. KupfermanTheodore Roosevelt Britton, Jr.
  Personal motto: "Speak softly and carry a big stick."
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about Theodore Roosevelt: James MacGregor Burns & Susan Dunn, The Three Roosevelts: Patrician Leaders Who Transformed America — H. W. Brands, T.R : The Last Romantic — Edmund Morris, Theodore Rex — Edmund Morris, The Rise of Theodore Roosevelt — John Morton Blum, The Republican Roosevelt — Richard D. White, Jr., Roosevelt the Reformer : Theodore Roosevelt as Civil Service Commissioner, 1889-1895 — Frederick W. Marks III, Velvet on Iron : The Diplomacy of Theodore Roosevelt — James Chace, 1912 : Wilson, Roosevelt, Taft and Debs : The Election that Changed the Country — Patricia O'Toole, When Trumpets Call : Theodore Roosevelt After the White House — Candice Millard, The River of Doubt : Theodore Roosevelt's Darkest Journey — Lewis Einstein, Roosevelt : His Mind in Action — Rick Marshall, Bully!: The Life and Times of Theodore Roosevelt: Illustrated with More Than 250 Vintage Political Cartoons
  Image source: American Monthly Review of Reviews, October 1901
Woodrow Wilson Woodrow Wilson (1856-1924) — also known as Thomas Woodrow Wilson; "Schoolmaster in Politics" — of New Jersey. Born in Staunton, Va., December 28, 1856. Democrat. University professor; president of Princeton University, 1902-10; Governor of New Jersey, 1911-13; President of the United States, 1913-21. Presbyterian. Member, Phi Kappa Psi; Phi Alpha Delta. Recipient of Nobel Peace Prize in 1919; elected to the Hall of Fame for Great Americans in 1950. Died in Washington, D.C., February 3, 1924 (age 67 years, 37 days). Interment at Washington National Cathedral, Washington, D.C.
  Relatives: Son of Rev. Joseph Ruggles Wilson (1822-1903) and Janet 'Jessie' (Woodrow) Wilson (1826-1888); married, June 24, 1885, to Ellen Louise Axson (1860-1914); married, December 18, 1915, to Edith (Bolling) Galt (1872-1961); father of Eleanor Randolph Wilson (1889-1967; who married William Gibbs McAdoo (1863-1941)).
  Political family: Wilson-Floyd-McAdoo family.
  Cross-reference: William C. Bullitt — Bainbridge Colby — Joseph E. Davies — Joseph P. Tumulty — Thomas H. Birch — Byron R. Newton
  Mount Woodrow Wilson, in Fremont County and Sublette County, Wyoming, is named for him.  — The Woodrow Wilson Plaza, in the Federal Triangle, Washington, D.C., is named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: Woodrow W. BeanWoodrow W. JonesWoodrow W. ScottTom Woodrow PayneW. W. DumasWoodrow Wilson MannWoodrow W. BairdWoodrow W. MathnaWoodrow W. HulmeWoodrow W. KlineWoodrow W. McDonaldWoodrow W. HollanWoodrow W. CarterWoodrow W. FergusonW. Wilson GoodeWoodrow Wilson StoreyWoodrow W. Bean III
  Coins and currency: His portrait appeared on the U.S. $100,000 gold certificate, which was issued in 1934-45 for cash transactions between banks.
  Campaign slogan (1916): "He kept us out of war."
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about Woodrow Wilson: Louis Auchincloss, Woodrow Wilson — Herbert Hoover, The Ordeal of Woodrow Wilson — James Chace, 1912 : Wilson, Roosevelt, Taft and Debs : The Election that Changed the Country — John Milton Cooper, Reconsidering Woodrow Wilson: Progressivism, Internationalism, War, and Peace — A. Scott Berg, Wilson — Anne Schraff, Woodrow Wilson (for young readers)
  Critical books about Woodrow Wilson: Jim Powell, Wilson's War : How Woodrow Wilson's Great Blunder Led to Hitler, Lenin, Stalin, and World War II
  Image source: American Monthly Review of Reviews, July 1902
Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr. Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr. (1841-1935) — also known as "The Great Dissenter" — of Massachusetts. Born in Boston, Suffolk County, Mass., March 8, 1841. Colonel in the Union Army during the Civil War; lawyer; justice of Massachusetts state supreme court, 1882-1902; chief justice of Massachusetts supreme judicial court, 1899-1902; Associate Justice of U.S. Supreme Court, 1902-32; retired 1932. Unitarian. Elected to the Hall of Fame for Great Americans in 1965. Died, of pneumonia, in Washington, D.C., March 6, 1935 (age 93 years, 363 days). Interment at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Va.
  Relatives: Son of Dr. Oliver Wendell Holmes (1809-1894) and Amelia Lee (Jackson) Holmes; married, June 17, 1872, to Fanny Bowditch Dixwell (1840-1929); nephew of Ann Susan Holmes (who married Charles Wentworth Upham (1802-1875)).
  Political family: Upham family of Massachusetts.
  Cross-reference: Francis Biddle — Laurence Curtis — Lewis Einstein — Erland F. Fish
  See also federal judicial profile — Wikipedia article — Ballotpedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books by Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr.: The Common Law
  Books about Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr.: Gary J. Aichele, Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr. : Soldier, Scholar, Judge — G. Edward White, Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes: Law and the Inner Self — Sheldon M. Novick, Honorable Justice: The Life of Oliver Wendell Holmes — Liva Baker, The Justice from Beacon Hill: The Life and Times of Oliver Wendell Holmes — James Bishop Peabody, The Holmes-Einstein Letters : Correspondence of Mr. Justice Holmes and Lewis Einstein 1903-1935
  Critical books about Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr.: Albert W. Alschuler, Law Without Values : The Life, Work, and Legacy of Justice Holmes
  Image source: American Monthly Review of Reviews, September 1902
  John Philip Sousa (1854-1932) — Born in Washington, D.C., November 6, 1854. Republican. Band conductor; composer; honored guest, Republican National Convention, 1924. Bavarian and Portugese ancestry. Member, Freemasons; Knights Templar; Shriners; Elks; Audubon Society. He was elected to the Hall of Fame for Great Americans in 1973. Died, in his room at the Abraham Lincoln Hotel, Reading, Berks County, Pa., March 6, 1932 (age 77 years, 121 days). Interment at Congressional Cemetery, Washington, D.C.
  Relatives: Son of Antonio John Sousa (1824-1892) and Marie Elizabeth (Trinkhaus) Sousa (1826-1908); married to Jane van Middlesworth Bellis (1862-1944); great-grandfather of John Philip Sousa IV (1950?-).
  The John Philip Sousa Bridge (built 1938-41), which takes Pennsylvania Avenue over the Anacostia River in Washington, D.C., is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
"Enjoy the hospitable entertainment of a political graveyard."
Henry L. Clinton, Apollo Hall, New York City, February 3, 1872
The Political Graveyard

The Political Graveyard is a web site about U.S. political history and cemeteries. Founded in 1996, it is the Internet's most comprehensive free source for American political biography, listing 312,576 politicians, living and dead.
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Copyright notices: (1) Facts are not subject to copyright; see Feist v. Rural Telephone. (2) Politician portraits displayed on this site are 70-pixel-wide monochrome thumbnail images, which I believe to constitute fair use under applicable copyright law. Where possible, each image is linked to its online source. However, requests from owners of copyrighted images to delete them from this site are honored. (3) Original material, programming, selection and arrangement are © 1996-2019 Lawrence Kestenbaum. (4) This work is also licensed for free non-commercial re-use, with attribution, under a Creative Commons License.
Site information: The Political Graveyard is created and maintained by Lawrence Kestenbaum, who is solely responsible for its structure and content. — The mailing address is The Political Graveyard, P.O. Box 2563, Ann Arbor MI 48106. — This site is hosted by HDL. — The Political Graveyard opened on July 1, 1996; the last full revision was done on March 10, 2021.

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