PoliticalGraveyard.com
The Political Graveyard: A Database of American History
Mercer County
New Jersey

Cemeteries and Memorial Sites of Politicians in Mercer County

Index to Locations

  • Private or family graveyards
  • Ewing Ewing Cemetery
  • Ewing Ewing Church Cemetery
  • Hamilton Square First Presbyterian Churchyard
  • Hamilton Square Presbyterian Church Cemetery
  • Hopewell First Baptist Church Cemetery
  • Lawrenceville Lawrenceville Cemetery
  • Princeton Unknown location
  • Princeton Princeton Cemetery
  • Princeton St. Paul's Roman Catholic Church Cemetery
  • Princeton Stony Brook Quaker Meeting House Cemetery
  • Trenton First Baptist Church Cemetery
  • Trenton First Presbyterian Churchyard
  • Trenton First Presbyterian Churchyard
  • Trenton Friends Burying Ground
  • Trenton Friends Graveyard
  • Trenton Friends Meeting House Burial Ground
  • Trenton Greenwood Cemetery
  • Trenton Mercer Cemetery
  • Trenton Our Lady of Lourdes Cemetery
  • Trenton Riverview Cemetery
  • Trenton St. Mary's Cemetery
  • Trenton St. Michael's Episcopal Churchyard


    Private or family graveyard
    Mercer County, New Jersey
    Politicians formerly buried here:
      John Hart (1713-1779) — also known as "Honest John" — of Hopewell, Hunterdon County (now Mercer County), N.J. Born in Stonington, New London County, Conn., 1713. Hunterdon County Judge, 1768-75; Delegate to Continental Congress from New Jersey, 1776; signer, Declaration of Independence, 1776; member of New Jersey state house of assembly from Hunterdon County, 1776-78; Speaker of the New Jersey State House of Assembly, 1776-78. Died, from kidney failure, in Hopewell, Hunterdon County (now Mercer County), N.J., May 11, 1779 (age about 65 years). Original interment at in a private or family graveyard; reinterment in 1865 at First Baptist Church Cemetery, Hopewell, N.J.
      Relatives: Son of Edward Hart (1683-1752) and Martha (Furman) Hart (1691-1745); married to Deborah Scudder (1712-1776); second great-grandfather of John Hart Brewer and Lummie J. Earle; first cousin thrice removed of Absalom Price Lanning; first cousin four times removed of William Mershon Lanning; second cousin twice removed of Hanford Nichols Lockwood; second cousin thrice removed of James Lockwood Conger and Homer Nichols Lockwood; second cousin four times removed of Frederick B. Piatt; second cousin five times removed of Alfred Collins Lockwood (1875-1951).
      Political families: Conger family of New York; Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York; Lockwood-Lanning family of New Jersey (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial


    Ewing Cemetery
    78 Scotch Road
    Ewing, Mercer County, New Jersey
    See also Findagrave page for this location.
    Politicians buried here:
      Edward Lawrence Katzenbach (1878-1934) — also known as Edward L. Katzenbach — of Trenton, Mercer County, N.J. Born in Trenton, Mercer County, N.J., October 21, 1878. Lawyer; counsel for banks and paper companies; New Jersey state attorney general, 1924-29. Episcopalian. Member, American Bar Association; Society of Colonial Wars; Sons of the Revolution; Phi Beta Kappa; Rotary. Died in Trenton, Mercer County, N.J., December 18, 1934 (age 56 years, 58 days). Interment at Ewing Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Frank Snowden Katzenbach (1844-1921) and Augusta Susan (Mushbach) Katzenbach (1844-1922); brother of Frank Snowden Katzenbach, Jr.; married, November 7, 1911, to Marie Louise Hunt Hilson; father of Nicholas de Belleville Katzenbach; uncle of Frank Snowden Katzenbach III; third great-grandnephew of John Imlay; first cousin four times removed of James Henderson Imlay (1764-1823).
      Political family: Katzenbach family of New Jersey.
      See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
      Marie Hilson Katzenbach (1882-1970) — also known as Marie H. Katzenbach; Marie Louise Hunt Hilson — of Trenton, Mercer County, N.J. Born in Trenton, Mercer County, N.J., December 8, 1882. Librarian; member, New Jersey State Board of Education, 1921-64; delegate to New Jersey state constitutional convention from Mercer County, 1947. Female. French ancestry. Member, Daughters of the American Revolution; Colonial Dames. Died in Princeton, Mercer County, N.J., February 4, 1970 (age 87 years, 58 days). Interment at Ewing Cemetery.
      Relatives: Daughter of Cleveland Hilson (1842-1899) and Matilda Emily (Hunt) Hilson (1854-1924); married, November 7, 1911, to Edward Lawrence Katzenbach (1878-1934); mother of Nicholas de Belleville Katzenbach; second great-granddaughter of Moore Furman.
      Political family: Katzenbach family of New Jersey.
      The Marie Katzenbach School for the Deaf, in Trenton, New Jersey, is named for her.
      See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
      Samuel Howard Woodson, Jr. (1916-1999) — also known as S. Howard Woodson, Jr. — of Trenton, Mercer County, N.J. Born in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., May 8, 1916. Democrat. Pastor; delegate to Democratic National Convention from New Jersey, 1964; member of New Jersey state house of assembly, 1964-76 (Mercer County 1964-67, District 6-B 1968-73, 13th District 1974-76); resigned 1976. Baptist. African ancestry. Died in Trenton, Mercer County, N.J., July 28, 1999 (age 83 years, 81 days). Interment at Ewing Cemetery.
      Epitaph: "He devoted his life to preaching, teaching and living the Word of God."
      See also Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail


    Ewing Church Cemetery
    100 Scotch Road
    Ewing, Mercer County, New Jersey
    See also Findagrave page for this location.
    Politicians buried here:
      William Mershon Lanning (1849-1912) — also known as William M. Lanning — of Trenton, Mercer County, N.J. Born in Ewingville, Mercer County, N.J., January 1, 1849. Republican. School teacher; lawyer; district judge in New Jersey, 1887-91; delegate to New Jersey state constitutional convention, 1894; president, Mechanics' National Bank of Trenton, 1899; U.S. Representative from New Jersey 4th District, 1903-04; resigned 1904; U.S. District Judge for New Jersey, 1904-09; Judge of U.S. Court of Appeals for the 3rd Circuit, 1909-12; died in office 1912. Presbyterian. Died in Trenton, Mercer County, N.J., February 16, 1912 (age 63 years, 46 days). Interment at Ewing Church Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Elijah Webster Lanning (1821-1906) and Cornelia Ann (Mershon) Lanning (1825-1854); married, August 3, 1881, to Jennie Hemenway (1848-1935); first cousin four times removed of John Hart (1713-1779); third cousin once removed of Absalom Price Lanning; third cousin twice removed of Samuel Laning and John Lanning.
      Political families: Conger family of New York; Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York; Lockwood-Lanning family of New Jersey; Coberly-Hovermale family of West Virginia; Hendricks family (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — federal judicial profile — Find-A-Grave memorial
      Alfred Reed (1839-1918) — of Trenton, Mercer County, N.J. Born in Mercer County, N.J., December 23, 1839. Lawyer; mayor of Trenton, N.J., 1867-68; common pleas court judge in New Jersey, 1869; associate justice of New Jersey state supreme court, 1875-95; vice-chancellor of New Jersey court of chancery, 1895-1904. Died December 6, 1918 (age 78 years, 348 days). Interment at Ewing Church Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of George B. Reed and Mary (Hepburn) Reed; married, August 1, 1878, to Rosalba Ellmaker Souder.
      See also Find-A-Grave memorial
      Frank Snowden Katzenbach, Jr. (1868-1929) — also known as Frank S. Katzenbach, Jr. — of Trenton, Mercer County, N.J. Born in Trenton, Mercer County, N.J., November 5, 1868. Democrat. Lawyer; mayor of Trenton, N.J., 1902-06; candidate for Governor of New Jersey, 1907; associate justice of New Jersey state supreme court, 1920-29; died in office 1929. Presbyterian. German ancestry. Died, from sepsis resulting from a leg infection, in Mercer Hospital, Trenton, Mercer County, N.J., March 13, 1929 (age 60 years, 128 days). Interment at Ewing Church Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Frank Snowden Katzenbach (1844-1921) and Augusta Susan (Mushbach) Katzenbach (1844-1922); brother of Edward Lawrence Katzenbach; married, November 10, 1904, to Natalie (McNeal) Grunn (1872-1964); father of Frank Snowden Katzenbach III; uncle of Nicholas de Belleville Katzenbach; third great-grandnephew of John Imlay; first cousin four times removed of James Henderson Imlay (1764-1823).
      Political family: Katzenbach family of New Jersey.
      See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
      Frank Snowden Katzenbach III (1907-1964) — also known as Frank S. Katzenbach III — of Princeton, Mercer County, N.J. Born in Florence, Burlington County, N.J., June 7, 1907. Democrat. Delegate to Democratic National Convention from New Jersey, 1940. Died in 1964 (age about 57 years). Interment at Ewing Church Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Frank Snowden Katzenbach, Jr. and Natalie (McNeal) Katzenbach (1872-1964); nephew of Edward Lawrence Katzenbach; fourth great-grandnephew of John Imlay; first cousin of Nicholas de Belleville Katzenbach; first cousin five times removed of James Henderson Imlay (1764-1823).
      Political family: Katzenbach family of New Jersey.
      See also Find-A-Grave memorial


    First Presbyterian Churchyard
    Hamilton Square, Mercer County, New Jersey
    Politicians buried here:
      Charles Skelton (1806-1879) — of Trenton, Mercer County, N.J. Born in New Jersey, 1806. Democrat. U.S. Representative from New Jersey 2nd District, 1851-55. Died in 1879 (age about 73 years). Interment at First Presbyterian Churchyard.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page


    Presbyterian Church Cemetery
    Hamilton Square, Mercer County, New Jersey
    Politicians buried here:
      George Robbins Robbins (1808-1875) — of New Jersey. Born in New Jersey, 1808. U.S. Representative from New Jersey 2nd District, 1855-59. Died in 1875 (age about 67 years). Interment at Presbyterian Church Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page


    First Baptist Church Cemetery
    Hopewell, Mercer County, New Jersey
    Founded 1715
    See also Findagrave page for this location.
    Politicians buried here:
      John Hart (1713-1779) — also known as "Honest John" — of Hopewell, Hunterdon County (now Mercer County), N.J. Born in Stonington, New London County, Conn., 1713. Hunterdon County Judge, 1768-75; Delegate to Continental Congress from New Jersey, 1776; signer, Declaration of Independence, 1776; member of New Jersey state house of assembly from Hunterdon County, 1776-78; Speaker of the New Jersey State House of Assembly, 1776-78. Died, from kidney failure, in Hopewell, Hunterdon County (now Mercer County), N.J., May 11, 1779 (age about 65 years). Original interment at a private or family graveyard, Mercer County, N.J.; reinterment in 1865 at First Baptist Church Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Edward Hart (1683-1752) and Martha (Furman) Hart (1691-1745); married to Deborah Scudder (1712-1776); second great-grandfather of John Hart Brewer and Lummie J. Earle; first cousin thrice removed of Absalom Price Lanning; first cousin four times removed of William Mershon Lanning; second cousin twice removed of Hanford Nichols Lockwood; second cousin thrice removed of James Lockwood Conger and Homer Nichols Lockwood; second cousin four times removed of Frederick B. Piatt; second cousin five times removed of Alfred Collins Lockwood (1875-1951).
      Political families: Conger family of New York; Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York; Lockwood-Lanning family of New Jersey (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
      Jonathan Hunt Blackwell (1841-1919) — also known as Jonathan H. Blackwell — of Trenton, Mercer County, N.J. Born in Hopewell, Mercer County, N.J., December 20, 1841. Democrat. Merchant; member of New Jersey state senate from Mercer County, 1875-77; New Jersey state treasurer, 1885; appointed 1885. English ancestry. Member, Sons of the Revolution. Died in 1919 (age about 77 years). Interment at First Baptist Church Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Stephen Blackwell (1808-1883) and Francenia (Hunt) Blackwell (1811-1888); married, October 5, 1865, to Susan Weart (1841-1916).
      See also Find-A-Grave memorial


    Lawrenceville Cemetery
    Lawrenceville, Mercer County, New Jersey
    Politicians buried here:
      Joseph Lamb Bodine (1883-1950) — also known as Joseph L. Bodine — of Trenton, Mercer County, N.J. Born in Trenton, Mercer County, N.J., November 6, 1883. Democrat. Lawyer; U.S. Attorney for New Jersey, 1919-20; U.S. District Judge for New Jersey, 1920-29; resigned 1929; associate justice of New Jersey state supreme court, 1929-48; superior court judge in New Jersey, 1948. Presbyterian. Member, American Bar Association. Died June 10, 1950 (age 66 years, 216 days). Interment at Lawrenceville Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Joseph L. Bodine (M.D.) and Frances P. (Davis) Bodine; married, December 24, 1918, to Gertrude Scudder.
      See also federal judicial profile
      Absalom Price Lanning (1809-1886) — also known as Absalom P. Lanning — of Mercer County, N.J. Born in Lawrenceville, Mercer County, N.J., September 18, 1809. Member of New Jersey state house of assembly from Mercer County, 1868-69. Died in Lawrenceville, Mercer County, N.J., September 26, 1886 (age 77 years, 8 days). Interment at Lawrenceville Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Edward Lanning (1774-1859) and Nancy Ann (Bryant) Lanning (1775-1857); married, December 27, 1836, to Henrietta Drake (1813-1896); first cousin thrice removed of John Hart (1713-1779); third cousin once removed of Samuel Laning, John Lanning and William Mershon Lanning; fourth cousin once removed of Hanford Nichols Lockwood and Lummie J. Earle.
      Political families: Conger family of New York; Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York; Lockwood-Lanning family of New Jersey; Coberly-Hovermale family of West Virginia; Hendricks family (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      See also Find-A-Grave memorial


    Unknown Location
    Princeton, Mercer County, New Jersey


    Princeton Cemetery
    Witherspoon Street
    Princeton, Mercer County, New Jersey
    Founded 1760
    Politicians buried here:
    Grover Cleveland Grover Cleveland (1837-1908) — also known as Stephen Grover Cleveland; "Uncle Jumbo"; "The Veto Mayor"; "Grover The Good"; "The Sage of Princeton"; "Dumb Prophet"; "Buffalo Hangman"; "The Veto President"; "Beast of Buffalo"; "Big Steve" — of Buffalo, Erie County, N.Y.; Princeton, Mercer County, N.J.; Tamworth, Carroll County, N.H. Born in Caldwell, Essex County, N.J., March 18, 1837. Democrat. Lawyer; Erie County Sheriff, 1870-73; mayor of Buffalo, N.Y., 1882; Governor of New York, 1883-85; President of the United States, 1885-89, 1893-97; defeated, 1888. Presbyterian. Member, Sigma Chi. Elected to the Hall of Fame for Great Americans in 1935. Died in Princeton, Mercer County, N.J., June 24, 1908 (age 71 years, 98 days). Interment at Princeton Cemetery; statue at City Hall Grounds, Buffalo, N.Y.
      Relatives: Son of Rev. Richard Falley Cleveland (1804-1853) and Anne (Neal) Cleveland (1806-1882); married, June 2, 1886, to Frances Folsom (1864-1947); father of Richard Folsom Cleveland (1897-1974) (son-in-law of Thomas Frank Gailor; brother-in-law of Frank Hoyt Gailor); first cousin once removed of Francis Landon Cleveland; second cousin of James Harlan Cleveland; second cousin once removed of James Harlan Cleveland, Jr.; second cousin twice removed of Jonathan Usher and Joseph Wheeler Bloodgood; third cousin once removed of John Palmer Usher and Robert Cleveland Usher; third cousin thrice removed of Ephraim Safford and Isaiah Kidder; fourth cousin once removed of Samuel Lord and Rollin Usher Tyler.
      Political families: Kidder family of Connecticut; Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      Cross-reference: Henry T. Ellett — Wilson S. Bissell — David King Udall — Edward S. Bragg — Thomas F. Grady — Lyman K. Bass — George B. Cortelyou
      Cleveland counties in Ark. and Okla. are named for him.
      Mount Cleveland, a volcano on Chuginadak Island, Alaska, is named for him.  — The town of Grover, North Carolina, is named for him.  — The Cleveland National Forest (established 1908), in San Diego, Riverside, Orange counties, California, is named for him.
      Other politicians named for him: Grover C. CookGrover C. MeyrsGrover C. TalbotGrover C. HelmGrover C. RobertsonG. C. CooleyGrover A. WhalenGrover C. TaylorGrover C. WinnGrover C. LukeGrover C. AlbrightGrover Cleveland WelshGrover C. BelknapGrover C. WorrellGrover B. HillGrover C. DillmanGrover C. BrennemanGrover C. GeorgeGrover C. MitchellGrover C. LadnerGrover C. HallGrover C. TyeGrover C. CiselGrover C. HedrickGrover C. HunterGrover C. MontgomeryGrover C. FarwellGrover C. GillinghamGrover C. StudivanGrover C. LayneGrover C. HudsonGrover C. CombsGrover C. SnyderGrover C. GuernseyGrover C. HendersonGrover C. SmithGrover C. JacksonGrover C. HunterGrover C. BowerGrover C. LandGrover C. MoritzGrover C. GreggGrover C. Richman, Jr.Grover C. AndersonGrover C. ChrissGrover C. CriswellGrover C. BrownGrover C. Robinson III
      Coins and currency: His portrait appeared on the U.S. $20 bill (1914-28), and on the $1,000 bill (1928-46).
      Campaign slogan (1884): "We love him for the enemies he has made."
      Opposition slogan (1884): "Ma, Ma, Where's My Pa?"
      See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — Find-A-Grave memorial
      Books about Grover Cleveland: Alyn Brodsky, Grover Cleveland : A Study in Character — H. Paul Jeffers, An Honest President: The Life and Presidencies of Grover Cleveland — Mark Wahlgren Summers, Rum, Romanism, & Rebellion : The Making of a President, 1884 — Henry F. Graff, Grover Cleveland — Jeff C. Young, Grover Cleveland (for young readers)
      Critical books about Grover Cleveland: Matthew Algeo, The President Is a Sick Man: the Supposedly Virtuous Grover Cleveland Survives a Secret Surgery at Sea and Vilifies the Courageous Newspaperman Who Dared Expose the Truth — Charles Lachman, A Secret Life : The Lies and Scandals of President Grover Cleveland
      Image source: New York Red Book 1896
      Aaron Burr (1756-1836) — also known as Aaron Edwards — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in Newark, Essex County, N.J., February 6, 1756. Democrat. Colonel in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; lawyer; member of New York state assembly, 1784-85, 1797-99, 1800-01 (New York County 1784-85, 1797-99, Orange County 1800-01); New York state attorney general, 1789-91; appointed 1789; U.S. Senator from New York, 1791-97; Vice President of the United States, 1801-05. Presbyterian. Killed Alexander Hamilton in a duel, July 11, 1804. Tried for treason in 1807 and acquitted. Died, after several strokes, at the Winants or Port Richmond Hotel, Port Richmond, Staten Island, Richmond County, N.Y., September 14, 1836 (age 80 years, 221 days). Interment at Princeton Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Aaron Burr (1716-1757) and Esther (Edwards) Burr (1732-1758); brother of Sarah Burr (1754-1797; who married Tapping Reeve); married, July 2, 1782, to Theodosia (Bartow) Prevost (1746-1794; first cousin twice removed of Francis Stebbins Bartow); married 1833 to Eliza (Bowen) Jumel (1775-1865); father of Theodosia Burr (1783-1813; who married Joseph Alston); nephew of Pierpont Edwards; third great-grandson of Thomas Willett; ancestor of Karla Ballard; first cousin of Theodore Dwight and Henry Waggaman Edwards; first cousin four times removed of Anson Foster Keeler (1887-1943); second cousin of John Davenport and James Davenport; second cousin once removed of Theodore Davenport; second cousin twice removed of Charles Robert Sherman; second cousin thrice removed of Charles Taylor Sherman, William Tecumseh Sherman, Lampson Parker Sherman, John Sherman and Evert Harris Kittell; second cousin four times removed of Chauncey Mitchell Depew, Ezekiel Gilbert Stoddard, Stillman Stephen Light and Blanche M. Woodward; second cousin five times removed of Alfred Walstein Bangs, John Clarence Keeler, Louis Ezekiel Stoddard, John Cecil Purcell and Arthur Callen Kittell, Jr.; third cousin of Benjamin Tallmadge; third cousin once removed of Frederick Augustus Tallmadge; third cousin twice removed of Eli Thacher Hoyt, George Smith Catlin, John Appleton, Howkin Bulkley Beardslee, Joseph Pomeroy Root and Edward Williams Hooker; third cousin thrice removed of Greene Carrier Bronson, Abijah Catlin, David Munson Osborne, George Landon Ingraham, Dwight Arthur Silliman and Charles Dunsmore Millard; fourth cousin of Noah Phelps and Hezekiah Case; fourth cousin once removed of Parmenio Adams, Elisha Phelps, Ambrose Tuttle, Jesse Hoyt, Abiel Case, Henry Fisk Janes, Jairus Case, George Washington Wolcott, William Dean Kellogg and Almon Case.
      Political families: Keeler-Floyd-Sherman-Bangs family of New York; Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      Cross-reference: Jonathan Dayton — Nathaniel Pendleton — John Smith — John Tayler — Walter D. Corrigan, Sr. — Cowles Mead — Luther Martin — William P. Van Ness — Samuel Swartwout — William Wirt — Theophilus W. Smith
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
      Books about Aaron Burr: Milton Lomask, Aaron Burr: The Years from Princeton to Vice President, 1756-1805 — Milton Lomask, Aaron Burr: The Conspiracy and Years of Exile, 1805-1836 — Joseph Wheelan, Jefferson's Vendetta : The Pursuit of Aaron Burr and the Judiciary — Buckner F. Melton Jr., Aaron Burr : Conspiracy to Treason — Thomas Fleming, Duel: Alexander Hamilton, Aaron Burr, and the Future of America — Arnold A. Rogow, A Fatal Friendship: Alexander Hamilton and Aaron Burr — H. W. Brands, The Heartbreak of Aaron Burr — David O. Stewart, American Emperor: Aaron Burr's Challenge to Jefferson's America — Donald Barr Chidsey, The great conspiracy: Aaron Burr and his strange doings in the West
      Fiction about Aaron Burr: Gore Vidal, Burr
      John Witherspoon (1723-1794) — of Princeton, Somerset County (now Mercer County), N.J. Born in Gifford, Haddingtonshire, Scotland, February 5, 1723. Presbyterian minister; Delegate to Continental Congress from New Jersey, 1776; signer, Declaration of Independence, 1776; member of New Jersey state house of assembly from Somerset County, 1783, 1789; delegate to New Jersey convention to ratify U.S. constitution from Somerset County, 1787. Presbyterian. Scottish ancestry. Became blind in 1792. Died near Princeton, Mercer County, N.J., November 15, 1794 (age 71 years, 283 days). Interment at Princeton Cemetery.
      Relatives: Married to Elizabeth Montgomery (1722-1789); married 1791 to Ann (Marshall) Dill (1768-1811); father of James Witherspoon (1751-1777; major in Continental army during the Revolutionary War; killed in action at the battle of Germantown, Pa.); great-grandfather of John Cabell Breckinridge (1821-1875); second great-grandfather of Clifton Rodes Breckinridge.
      Political families: Marshall-Harrison-Randolph-Cabell family of Virginia; Breckinridge-Preston-Cabell-Henry family of Virginia; Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
    George McAneny George Francis McAneny (1869-1953) — also known as George McAneny — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born in Greenville (now part of Jersey City), Hudson County, N.J., December 24, 1869. Borough president of Manhattan, New York, 1910-13; executive manager, New York Times, 1916-21. Died in Princeton, Mercer County, N.J., July 29, 1953 (age 83 years, 217 days). Interment at Princeton Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of George Francis McAneny and Katherine (Dilaway) McAneny; married, January 4, 1900, to Marjorie Jacobi (1878-1966).
      See also Find-A-Grave memorial
      Image source: Library of Congress
    Norman Armour Norman Armour (1887-1982) — of Gladstone, Somerset County, N.J.; Princeton, Mercer County, N.J. Born in Brighton, England of American parents, October 14, 1887. Lawyer; Foreign Service officer; U.S. Minister to Haiti, 1932-33, 1933-35; Canada, 1935-38; U.S. Ambassador to Chile, 1938-39; Argentina, 1939-44; Spain, 1945; Venezuela, 1950-51; Guatemala, 1954-55. Episcopalian. Member, Council on Foreign Relations. One of five retired diplomats who co-signed a famous 1954 letter protesting U.S. Sen. Joe McCarthy's attacks on the Foreign Service. Died in Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., September 27, 1982 (age 94 years, 348 days). Interment at Princeton Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of George Allison Armour and Harriette (Foote) Armour; married, February 2, 1919, to Princess Myra Koudacheff.
      See also Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — Find-A-Grave memorial
      Image source: Library of Congress
      Robert Francis Goheen (1919-2008) — also known as Robert F. Goheen — of Princeton, Mercer County, N.J. Born, of American parents, in Vengurla, India, August 15, 1919. Colonel in the U.S. Army during World War II; university professor; president, Princeton University, 1957-72; U.S. Ambassador to India, 1977-80. Died in Princeton, Mercer County, N.J., March 31, 2008 (age 88 years, 229 days). Interment at Princeton Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Robert H. H. Goheen and Anne (Ewing) Goheen; married 1942 to Margaret Skelly.
      See also Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
      John Potter Stockton (1826-1900) — also known as John P. Stockton — of Trenton, Mercer County, N.J. Born in Princeton, Mercer County, N.J., August 2, 1826. Democrat. U.S. Minister to Papal States, 1858-61; delegate to Democratic National Convention from New Jersey, 1864, 1876 (member, Credentials Committee), 1880; U.S. Senator from New Jersey, 1865-66, 1869-75; New Jersey state attorney general, 1877-92. Died in New York City (unknown county), N.Y., January 22, 1900 (age 73 years, 173 days). Interment at Princeton Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Robert Field Stockton; father of Richard Stockton (1857?-1929); grandson of Richard Stockton (1764-1828); great-grandson of Richard Stockton (1730-1781).
      Political family: Stockton family of Princeton, New Jersey (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — U.S. State Dept career summary
      William Stryker Gummere (1852-1933) — also known as William S. Gummere; "Dollar-A-Life Gummere" — of Newark, Essex County, N.J. Born in Trenton, Mercer County, N.J., June 24, 1852. Republican. Lawyer; circuit judge in New Jersey, 1890; associate justice of New Jersey state supreme court, 1895-1901; appointed 1895; chief justice of New Jersey state supreme court, 1901-33. Died, of pneumonia, in St. Barnabas Hospital, Newark, Essex County, N.J., January 26, 1933 (age 80 years, 216 days). Interment at Princeton Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Barker Gummere and Elizabeth (Stryker) Gummere (1826-1898); brother of Samuel René Gummeré and Barker Gummere, Jr. (1860?-?); father of Elizabeth Gummere (who married Thomas Lynch Raymond, Jr.).
      Political family: Gummere family of Trenton, New Jersey.
      See also Wikipedia article
      George Frost Kennan (1904-2005) — also known as George F. Kennan — of Pennsylvania. Born in Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, Wis., February 16, 1904. Foreign Service officer; U.S. Vice Consul in Tallinn, as of 1929; U.S. Consul in Berlin, as of 1932; U.S. Ambassador to Soviet Union, 1952; Yugoslavia, 1961; the government of the Soviet Union declared him persona non grata on October 3, 1952; received the 1956 Pulitzer Prize in History for his book Russia Leaves the War; received the 1968 Pulitzer Prize in Biography for his Memoirs; received the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1989. Member, Council on Foreign Relations. Died in Princeton, Mercer County, N.J., March 17, 2005 (age 101 years, 29 days). Interment at Princeton Cemetery.
      See also U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — Find-A-Grave memorial
      Books about George Kenan: Walter Isaacson, The Wise Men : Six Friends and the World They Made — John Lewis Gaddis, George F. Kennan: An American Life
      George Wildman Ball (1909-1994) — also known as George W. Ball — of Princeton, Mercer County, N.J. Born in Des Moines, Polk County, Iowa, December 21, 1909. U.S. Representative to United Nations, 1968. Died at New York Hospital, Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., May 26, 1994 (age 84 years, 156 days). Interment at Princeton Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Amos Ball and Edna (Wildman) Ball; married, September 16, 1932, to Ruth Murdoch.
      See also U.S. State Dept career summary — Find-A-Grave memorial
      John Renshaw Thomson (1800-1862) — also known as John R. Thomson — of Princeton, Mercer County, N.J. Born in Pennsylvania, 1800. Democrat. U.S. Senator from New Jersey, 1853-62; died in office 1862. Died in 1862 (age about 62 years). Interment at Princeton Cemetery.
      Relatives: Father of Amelia Thomson (who married John Meredith Read (1797-1874)).
      Political family: Read family of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Alexander Taggart McGill (1845-1900) — also known as Alexander T. McGill — of Jersey City, Hudson County, N.J. Born in Allegheny (now part of Pittsburgh), Allegheny County, Pa., October 20, 1845. Democrat. Lawyer; member of New Jersey state house of assembly from Hudson County, 1874-75; Hudson County Prosecutor of the Pleas, 1877-82; Hudson County Law Judge, 1882-87; chancellor of New Jersey court of chancery, 1887-1900; died in office 1900; candidate for Governor of New Jersey, 1895. Died in Jersey City, Hudson County, N.J., April 21, 1900 (age 54 years, 183 days). Interment at Princeton Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Rev. Alexander T. McGill (died 1880).
      Howard Alexander Smith (1880-1966) — also known as H. Alexander Smith — of Colorado Springs, El Paso County, Colo.; Princeton, Mercer County, N.J. Born in New York, New York County, N.Y., January 30, 1880. Republican. Lawyer; treasurer of New Jersey Republican Party, 1934-41; delegate to Republican National Convention from New Jersey, 1940 (alternate), 1948, 1956; New Jersey Republican state chair, 1941-43; member of Republican National Committee from New Jersey, 1942-44; U.S. Senator from New Jersey, 1944-59. Member, Council on Foreign Relations; Society of Colonial Wars. Died in Princeton, Mercer County, N.J., October 27, 1966 (age 86 years, 270 days). Interment at Princeton Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Dr. Abram Alexander Smith and Sue Lehn (Bender) Smith; married, June 21, 1902, to Helen Dominick; uncle of Peter Hoyt Dominick (1915-1981).
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
    Henry van_Dyke Henry van Dyke (1852-1933) — of Princeton, Mercer County, N.J. Born in Germantown, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., November 10, 1852. Poet; U.S. Minister to Netherlands, 1913-17; Luxembourg, 1913-17. Presbyterian. Died April 10, 1933 (age 80 years, 151 days). Interment at Princeton Cemetery.
      Relatives: Cousin *** of Woodbridge Strong Van Dyke II (1889-1943).
      See also U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier
      Image source: Library of Congress
      Richard Stockton (1764-1828) — of New Jersey. Born in New Jersey, April 17, 1764. U.S. Attorney for New Jersey, 1789-91; U.S. Senator from New Jersey, 1796-99; U.S. Representative from New Jersey 2nd District, 1813-15; member of New Jersey state legislature, 1810; received 8 electoral votes for Vice-President, 1820. Died March 7, 1828 (age 63 years, 325 days). Interment at Princeton Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Richard Stockton (1730-1781); father of Robert Field Stockton; uncle of Richard Stockton Field (1803-1870); grandfather of John Potter Stockton; great-grandfather of Richard Stockton (1857?-1929).
      Political family: Stockton family of Princeton, New Jersey (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
      Robert Field Stockton (1795-1866) — also known as Robert F. Stockton — of New Jersey. Born in Princeton, Mercer County, N.J., August 20, 1795. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Navy during the War of 1812; served in the U.S. Navy during the Mexican War; Military Governor of California, 1846-47; U.S. Senator from New Jersey, 1851-53. Died in Princeton, Mercer County, N.J., October 7, 1866 (age 71 years, 48 days). Interment at Princeton Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Richard Stockton (1764-1828); father of John Potter Stockton; grandson of Richard Stockton (1730-1781); grandfather of Richard Stockton (1857?-1929).
      Political family: Stockton family of Princeton, New Jersey (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      The city of Stockton, California, is named for him.  — The city of Stockton, Missouri, is named for him.  — The borough of Stockton, New Jersey, is named for him.  — The city of Fort Stockton, Texas, is named for him.  — Stockton Creek, a tidal channel in Monrovia, Liberia, is named for him.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
      Edward Parke Custis Lewis (1837-1892) — also known as Edward P. C. Lewis — of Hudson County, N.J. Born in 1837. Democrat. Member of New Jersey state house of assembly from Hudson County, 1878; delegate to Democratic National Convention from New Jersey, 1880; U.S. Minister to Portugal, 1885-89. Died in 1892 (age about 55 years). Interment at Princeton Cemetery.
      See also U.S. State Dept career summary
      Richard Stockton Field (1803-1870) — of Salem, Salem County, N.J.; Princeton, Mercer County, N.J. Born in Burlington County, N.J., December 31, 1803. Republican. Lawyer; New Jersey state attorney general, 1838-41; delegate to New Jersey state constitutional convention, 1844; U.S. Senator from New Jersey, 1862-63; U.S. District Judge for New Jersey, 1863-70; resigned 1870. Died in Princeton, Mercer County, N.J., May 25, 1870 (age 66 years, 145 days). Interment at Princeton Cemetery.
      Relatives: Nephew of Richard Stockton (1764-1828); grandson of Richard Stockton (1730-1781).
      Political family: Stockton family of Princeton, New Jersey (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — federal judicial profile — Wikipedia article
    Roger A. Pryor Roger Atkinson Pryor (1828-1919) — also known as Roger A. Pryor — of Petersburg, Va.; New York, New York County, N.Y. Born near Petersburg, Dinwiddie County, Va., July 19, 1828. Democrat. U.S. Representative from Virginia 4th District, 1859-61; Delegate from Virginia to the Confederate Provisional Congress, 1861-62; Representative from Virginia in the Confederate Congress, 1862; general in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1876, 1888; common pleas court judge in New York, 1890-95; Justice of New York Supreme Court 1st District, 1896-99. Died, of pneumonia, in Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., March 14, 1919 (age 90 years, 238 days). Interment at Princeton Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Rev. Theodorick Bland Pryor and Lucy (Atkinson) Pryor; married, November 8, 1848, to Sara Agnes Rice (died 1912).
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Image source: Empire State Notables (1914)
      Barbara Boggs Sigmund (1939-1990) — also known as Barbara B. Sigmund; "Mayor Barbara" — of Princeton, Mercer County, N.J. Born May 27, 1939. Democrat. Delegate to Democratic National Convention from New Jersey, 1980; candidate in primary for U.S. Senator from New Jersey, 1982; mayor of Princeton, N.J., 1984-90; died in office 1990; candidate in primary for Governor of New Jersey, 1989. Female. Lost her left eye to cancer in 1982. Died October 10, 1990 (age 51 years, 136 days). Interment at Princeton Cemetery.
      Relatives: Daughter of Thomas Hale Boggs, Sr. and Corinne Claiborne Boggs; sister of Cokie Roberts (National Public Radio reporter and commentator) and Thomas Hale Boggs, Jr.; second great-grandniece of John Francis Hamtramck Claiborne; third great-granddaughter of Ferdinand Leigh Claiborne; third great-grandniece of William Charles Cole Claiborne and Nathaniel Herbert Claiborne; first cousin twice removed of Jacob Haight Morrison IV and de Lesseps Story Morrison; first cousin six times removed of Thomas Claiborne (1749-1812); second cousin five times removed of John Claiborne and Thomas Claiborne (1780-1856); third cousin once removed of Herbert Claiborne Pell, Jr. (1884-1961); fourth cousin of Claiborne de Borda Pell.
      Political family: Claiborne-Dallas family of Virginia and Louisiana (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      Epitaph: "A passion for beauty and justice."
      See also Wikipedia article
      Edward Dickinson Duffield (1871-1938) — also known as Edward D. Duffield — of South Orange, Essex County, N.J. Born in Princeton, Mercer County, N.J., March 3, 1871. Republican. Lawyer; member of New Jersey state house of assembly from Essex County, 1904-05; village president of South Orange, New Jersey, 1917; delegate to Republican National Convention from New Jersey, 1920 (chair, Credentials Committee), 1936; president, Prudential Insurance Company, 1922-38; acting president, Princeton University, 1932-33; director, American Telephone and Telegraph Company. Presbyterian. Member, American Bar Association. Suffered a stroke, and died the next day, in South Orange, Essex County, N.J., September 17, 1938 (age 67 years, 198 days). Interment at Princeton Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of John Thomas Duffield and Sarah Elizabeth (Green) Duffield; married, April 21, 1897, to Josephine Reade Curtis; married 1916 to Barbara Freeman.
      Joseph Ross Stevenson (1866-1939) — also known as J. Ross Stevenson — of Sedalia, Pettis County, Mo.; Chicago, Cook County, Ill.; New York City (unknown county), N.Y.; Baltimore, Md.; Princeton, Mercer County, N.J. Born in Ligonier, Westmoreland County, Pa., March 1, 1866. Democrat. Pastor; college professor; offered prayer, Democratic National Convention, 1912 ; president, Princeton Theological Seminary, 1914-36. Presbyterian. Died in Princeton, Mercer County, N.J., August 13, 1939 (age 73 years, 165 days). Interment at Princeton Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Rev. Ross Stevenson and Martha A. (Harbison) Stevenson; married, May 16, 1899, to Florence Day.
      See also Find-A-Grave memorial
      John Milton Fessenden (1804-1883) — also known as John M. Fessenden — Born in Warren, Bristol County, R.I., December 21, 1804. Civil engineer; worked on canals and railroads; U.S. Consul in Dresden, 1850-54. Died in Washington, D.C., February 8, 1883 (age 78 years, 49 days). Interment at Princeton Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of John Fessenden (1770-1845) and Abigail Miller (Child) Fessenden (1783-1865); married, May 21, 1834, to Mary Pierce Bumstead (1808-1856); married, June 25, 1868, to Sarah Ann Murphy; third cousin of Samuel Clement Fessenden (1784-1869), Benjamin Fessenden and Charles Backus Hyde Fessenden; third cousin once removed of William Pitt Fessenden, Walter Fessenden, Samuel Clement Fessenden (1815-1882), Thomas Amory Deblois Fessenden, William Fessenden Allen, Joseph Palmer Fessenden and Samuel Fessenden (1845-1903); third cousin twice removed of James Deering Fessenden, Francis Fessenden, Joshua Abbe Fessenden, Samuel Fessenden (1847-1908) and Oliver Grosvenor Fessenden; third cousin thrice removed of Charles Milton Fessenden; fourth cousin once removed of Timothy Pitkin, Peter Rawson Taft, Ebenezer Oliver Grosvenor (1820-1910) and Charles Grenfill Washburn.
      Political family: Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
      Hezekiah Mount (1813-1886) — of Princeton, Mercer County, N.J. Born in New Jersey, July 24, 1813. Mayor of Princeton, N.J., 1864-65. Died in New Jersey, July 4, 1886 (age 72 years, 345 days). Interment at Princeton Cemetery.
      See also Find-A-Grave memorial
      Charles Beatty Alexander (1849-1927) — also known as Charles B. Alexander — of Tuxedo Park, Orange County, N.Y.; Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born in New York, New York County, N.Y., December 6, 1849. Democrat. Lawyer; director and counsel for Equitable Life insurance company; director of the Middletown & Unionville Railroad, the Hocking Valley Railroad, and several banks; delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1912, 1916 (alternate), 1920; member, New York State Board of Regents, 1913-27. Presbyterian. Member, Society of Colonial Wars; Sons of the American Revolution; Sons of the Revolution; Society of the Cincinnati; American Bar Association. Died in Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., February 7, 1927 (age 77 years, 63 days). Interment at Princeton Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Henry Martyn Alexander and Susan Mary (Brown) Alexander; married, April 26, 1887, to Harriet Crocker (daughter of Charles Crocker (1822-1888)); father of Mary Alexander (who married Sheldon Whitehouse (1883-1965)) and Harriet Crocker Alexander (1888-1972; who married Winthrop Williams Aldrich); grandfather of Charles Sheldon Whitehouse; great-grandfather of Sheldon Whitehouse (1955-).
      Political families: Rockefeller family of New York City, New York; Crocker-Whitehouse family (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).


    St. Paul's Roman Catholic Church Cemetery
    Nassau Street
    Princeton, Mercer County, New Jersey
    Politicians buried here:
      Joseph Stanislaus Hoff (1868-1960) — also known as Joseph S. Hoff — of Princeton, Mercer County, N.J. Born December 9, 1868. Democrat. Chair of Mercer County Democratic Party, 1913-20, 1925; mayor of Princeton, N.J., 1930-36; alternate delegate to Democratic National Convention from New Jersey, 1940. Died July 25, 1960 (age 91 years, 229 days). Interment at St. Paul's Roman Catholic Church Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Ignatz Hoff and Bridget Della (Dowd) Hoff; married, September 11, 1907, to Emily Louisa Thompson (1867-1943).


    Stony Brook Quaker Meeting House Cemetery
    Princeton, Mercer County, New Jersey
    Politicians buried here:
      Richard Stockton (1730-1781) — of New Jersey. Born near Princeton, Mercer County, N.J., October 1, 1730. Associate justice of New Jersey state supreme court, 1774; Delegate to Continental Congress from New Jersey, 1776; signer, Declaration of Independence, 1776. Presbyterian. Member, Freemasons. Died February 28, 1781 (age 50 years, 150 days). Interment at Stony Brook Quaker Meeting House Cemetery.
      Relatives: Brother of Hannah Stockton (1736-1808; who married Elias Boudinot); father of Julia Stockton (1759-1848; who married Benjamin Rush and William Bradford (1755-1795)) and Richard Stockton (1764-1828); grandfather of Robert Field Stockton and Richard Stockton Field; great-grandfather of John Potter Stockton; second great-grandfather of Richard Stockton (1857?-1929).
      Political family: Stockton family of Princeton, New Jersey (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
      Charles Smith Olden (1799-1876) — also known as Charles S. Olden — of Mercer County, N.J. Born in Princeton, Mercer County, N.J., February 19, 1799. Member of New Jersey state senate from Mercer County, 1845-50; Governor of New Jersey, 1860-63; Presidential Elector for New Jersey, 1872. Died in Princeton, Mercer County, N.J., April 7, 1876 (age 77 years, 48 days). Interment at Stony Brook Quaker Meeting House Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Hart Olden and Temperance (Smith) Olden; married 1832 to Phoebe Ann Smith.


    First Baptist Church Cemetery
    Trenton, Mercer County, New Jersey
    Politicians buried here:
      James Jefferson Wilson (1775-1824) — also known as James J. Wilson — of Trenton, Hunterdon County (now Mercer County), N.J. Born in Essex County, N.J., 1775. Democrat. Newspaper editor and publisher; Hunterdon County Surrogate, 1808; member of New Jersey state house of assembly from Hunterdon County, 1809-11, 1822; U.S. Senator from New Jersey, 1815-21; resigned 1821; postmaster at Trenton, N.J., 1821-24. Died in Trenton, Hunterdon County (now Mercer County), N.J., July 28, 1824 (age about 49 years). Interment at First Baptist Church Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page


    First Presbyterian Churchyard
    Trenton, Mercer County, New Jersey
    Politicians buried here:
      Charles Ewing (1780-1832) — of Trenton, Mercer County, N.J. Born in Bridgeton, Cumberland County, N.J., June 8, 1780. Lawyer; Federalist candidate for New Jersey state house of assembly, 1815; chief justice of New Jersey state supreme court, 1824-32. Died, from cholera, in Trenton, Mercer County, N.J., August 5, 1832 (age 52 years, 58 days). Interment at First Presbyterian Churchyard; cenotaph at Riverview Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of James Ewing (1744-1823) and Martha (Boyd) Ewing (1745-1782); married to Eleanor Graeme Armstrong (1783-1816).
      The township of Ewing, New Jersey, is named for him.
      See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
      John Beatty (1749-1826) — of Middlesex County, N.J. Born in Neshaminy, Bucks County, Pa., December 10, 1749. Colonel in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; member of New Jersey State Council from Middlesex County, 1781-82; Delegate to Continental Congress from New Jersey, 1784-85; delegate to New Jersey convention to ratify U.S. constitution from Middlesex County, 1787; member of New Jersey state house of assembly from Middlesex County, 1789; U.S. Representative from New Jersey at-large, 1793-95; secretary of state of New Jersey, 1795-1805. Died in Trenton, Mercer County, N.J., May 30, 1826 (age 76 years, 171 days). Interment at First Presbyterian Churchyard.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Aaron Dickinson Woodruff (1762-1817) — also known as Aaron D. Woodruff — of Trenton, Hunterdon County (now Mercer County), N.J. Born in Elizabeth, Union County, N.J., September 12, 1762. Lawyer; member of New Jersey state house of assembly from Hunterdon County, 1791, 1793-98, 1800, 1802; New Jersey state attorney general, 1793-1811, 1812-17; died in office 1817; mayor of Trenton, N.J., 1794-97. Died in Changewater, Warren County, N.J., 1817 (age about 54 years). Interment at First Presbyterian Churchyard.
      Relatives: Son of Elias Woodruff (1739-1802) and Mary (Joline) Woodruff (1741-1815); married, September 14, 1786, to Grace Lowrey (1766-1815).


    First Presbyterian Churchyard
    Trenton, Mercer County, New Jersey
    Politicians buried here:
      Isaac Smith (1740-1807) — of New Jersey. Born in Trenton, Mercer County, N.J., 1740. Associate justice of New Jersey state supreme court, 1777; U.S. Representative from New Jersey at-large, 1795-97. Died August 29, 1807 (age about 67 years). Interment at First Presbyterian Churchyard.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page


    Friends Burying Ground
    Trenton, Mercer County, New Jersey
    Politicians buried here:
      Richard Howell (1754-1802) — of Gloucester County, N.J. Born in Newark, New Castle County, Del., October 23, 1754. Major in Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; lawyer; delegate to New Jersey convention to ratify U.S. constitution from Gloucester County, 1787; Governor of New Jersey, 1793-1801; chancellor of New Jersey court of chancery, 1793-1801. Member, Society of the Cincinnati. Died in Burlington, Burlington County, N.J., April 28, 1802 (age 47 years, 187 days). Interment at Friends Burying Ground.
      Relatives: Son of Ebenezer Howell and Sarah (Bond) Howell; married 1799 to Keziah Burr; grandfather of Daniel Agnew and Varina Howell (who married Jefferson Finis Davis); second great-grandfather of Howell Morgan (1863-1952); third great-grandfather of Cecil Morgan.
      Political family: Davis-Howell-Morgan-Agnew family of New Orleans and Shreveport, Louisiana (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      Lambert Cadwalader (1742-1823) — of Pennsylvania; New Jersey. Born in Trenton, Mercer County, N.J., 1742. Delegate to Pennsylvania state constitutional convention, 1776; served in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; Delegate to Continental Congress from New Jersey, 1784-87; U.S. Representative from New Jersey at-large, 1789-91, 1793-95. Died in Trenton, Mercer County, N.J., September 13, 1823 (age about 81 years). Interment at Friends Burying Ground.
      Relatives: Son of Dr. Thomas Cadwalader and Hannah (Lambert) Cadwalader; brother of Margaret Cadwalader (who married Samuel Meredith (1741-1817)); married 1793 to Mary McCall.
      Political families: Read family of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Shippen-Middleton family of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page


    Friends Graveyard
    Trenton, Mercer County, New Jersey
    Politicians buried here:
      George Clymer (1739-1813) — of Pennsylvania. Born in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., March 16, 1739. Delegate to Continental Congress from Pennsylvania, 1776; signer, Declaration of Independence, 1776; delegate to Pennsylvania state constitutional convention, 1776; member of Pennsylvania state house of representatives, 1785; member, U.S. Constitutional Convention, 1787; U.S. Representative from Pennsylvania at-large, 1789-91. Episcopalian. Died in Morrisville, Bucks County, Pa., January 23, 1813 (age 73 years, 313 days). Interment at Friends Graveyard.
      Relatives: Son of Christopher Clymer (1711-1746) and Deborah (Fitzwater) Clymer (1712-1740); married, March 18, 1765, to Elizabeth Meredith (1740-1815; sister of Samuel Meredith); great-grandfather of Edward Overton, Jr. (1836-1903); second great-grandfather of James Rieman Macfarlane.
      Political families: Shippen-Middleton family of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Marshall-Harrison-Randolph-Cabell family of Virginia (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial


    Friends Meeting House Burial Ground
    Trenton, Mercer County, New Jersey
    Politicians buried here:
      Philemon Dickinson (1739-1809) — of Delaware; New Jersey. Born near Trappe, Talbot County, Md., April 5, 1739. General in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; Delegate to Continental Congress from Delaware, 1782-83; U.S. Senator from New Jersey, 1790-93. Died near Trenton, Mercer County, N.J., February 4, 1809 (age 69 years, 305 days). Interment at Friends Meeting House Burial Ground.
      Relatives: Son of Samuel Dickinson and Mary (Cadwalader) Dickinson; brother of John Dickinson (1732-1808).
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page


    Greenwood Cemetery
    Trenton, Mercer County, New Jersey
    Politicians buried here:
      Elijah Cubberley Hutchinson (1855-1932) — also known as Elijah C. Hutchinson — of Trenton, Mercer County, N.J. Born in Windsor, Mercer County, N.J., August 7, 1855. Republican. Merchant miller; member of New Jersey state house of assembly from Mercer County, 1896-97; member of New Jersey state senate from Mercer County, 1899-1904; alternate delegate to Republican National Convention from New Jersey, 1912; U.S. Representative from New Jersey 4th District, 1915-23; defeated, 1922. Died in Trenton, Mercer County, N.J., June 25, 1932 (age 76 years, 323 days). Interment at Greenwood Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page


    Mercer Cemetery
    Trenton, Mercer County, New Jersey
    Politicians buried here:
      Ira Wells Wood (1856-1931) — also known as Ira W. Wood — of Trenton, Mercer County, N.J. Born in Pennsylvania, 1856. Republican. Member of New Jersey state house of assembly from Mercer County, 1899-1900; U.S. Representative from New Jersey 4th District, 1904-13. Died in 1931 (age about 75 years). Interment at Mercer Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      John Manners (1786-1853) — of Hunterdon County, N.J. Born in Hunterdon County, N.J., April 8, 1786. Member of New Jersey state senate from Hunterdon County, 1850-52. Baptist. Died, from "affection of the heart," in Clinton, Hunterdon County, N.J., June 24, 1853 (age 67 years, 77 days). Interment at Mercer Cemetery.
      Relatives: First cousin of David Stout Manners (1808-1884); first cousin thrice removed of Horace Griggs Prall.
      Political family: Manners-Prall family of Trenton, New Jersey.


    Our Lady of Lourdes Cemetery
    Trenton, Mercer County, New Jersey
    Politicians buried here:
      Allan Bartholomew Walsh (1874-1953) — also known as Allan B. Walsh — of Mercer County, N.J. Born in Trenton, Mercer County, N.J., August 29, 1874. Democrat. Member of New Jersey state house of assembly from Mercer County, 1910-11; U.S. Representative from New Jersey 4th District, 1913-15. Died in 1953 (age about 78 years). Interment at Our Lady of Lourdes Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page


    Riverview Cemetery
    Trenton, Mercer County, New Jersey

    Politicians buried here:
    George B. McClellan George Brinton McClellan (1826-1885) — also known as George B. McClellan; "Little Mac" — of New Jersey. Born in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., December 3, 1826. Democrat. General in the Union Army during the Civil War; candidate for President of the United States, 1864; Governor of New Jersey, 1878-81. Member, Freemasons; Loyal Legion. Died October 29, 1885 (age 58 years, 330 days). Interment at Riverview Cemetery; statue erected 1907 at Connecticut Avenue, Washington, D.C.
      Relatives: Son of George McClellan and Elizabeth Steinmetz (Brinton) McClellan; married to Mary Ellen Marcy (daughter of Gen. Randolph Barnes Marcy (1812-1887); granddaughter of Laban Marcy); father of George Brinton McClellan (1865-1940).
      Political family: Howe family of Massachusetts.
      Other politicians named for him: George HarveyGeorge B. HudnallGeorge B. McClellan
      See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
      Books about George B. McClellan: Stephen W. Sears, George B. McClellan : The Young Napoleon
      Image source: Life and Work of James G. Blaine (1893)
      William Lewis Dayton (1807-1864) — also known as William L. Dayton — of Trenton, Mercer County, N.J. Born in Basking Ridge, Somerset County, N.J., February 17, 1807. Lawyer; member of New Jersey State Council, 1837; associate justice of New Jersey state supreme court, 1838; U.S. Senator from New Jersey, 1842-51; Republican candidate for Vice President of the United States, 1856; New Jersey state attorney general, 1857-61; U.S. Minister to France, 1861-64, died in office 1864. Died in France, December 1, 1864 (age 57 years, 288 days). Interment at Riverview Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Joel Dayton; father of William Lewis Dayton, Jr. (1839-1897); distant relative *** of Jonathan Dayton.
      Political family: Dayton family of Elizabeth, New Jersey.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary
      Mercer Beasley (1815-1897) — of Trenton, Mercer County, N.J. Born in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., 1815. Lawyer; Whig candidate for mayor of Trenton, N.J., 1851; chief justice of New Jersey state supreme court, 1864-97; died in office 1897. Died, from bronchial pneumonia, in Trenton, Mercer County, N.J., February 19, 1897 (age about 81 years). Interment at Riverview Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Rev. Frederick Beasley.
      See also Find-A-Grave memorial
      John Taylor Bird (1829-1911) — of Bloomsbury, Hunterdon County, N.J.; Clinton, Hunterdon County, N.J.; Flemington, Hunterdon County, N.J.; Trenton, Mercer County, N.J. Born in Bloomsbury, Hunterdon County, N.J., August 16, 1829. Democrat. Lawyer; U.S. Representative from New Jersey 3rd District, 1869-73; delegate to New Jersey state constitutional convention, 1876; vice-chancellor of New Jersey court of chancery, 1882-96. Died in Trenton, Mercer County, N.J., May 6, 1911 (age 81 years, 263 days). Interment at Riverview Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      John H. Backes (1864-1935) — of Trenton, Mercer County, N.J. Born in Trenton, Mercer County, N.J., August 18, 1864. Lawyer; vice-chancellor of New Jersey court of chancery, 1913-27. Died in Trenton, Mercer County, N.J., June 15, 1935 (age 70 years, 301 days). Interment at Riverview Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of John Backes (1833-1874) and Mary (Hannes) Backes (1837-1921); married to Elizabeth C. Hattersley (1869-1949).
      See also Find-A-Grave memorial
      Frank Obadiah Briggs (1851-1913) — also known as Frank O. Briggs — of Trenton, Mercer County, N.J. Born in Concord, Merrimack County, N.H., August 12, 1851. Republican. Mayor of Trenton, N.J., 1899-1902; New Jersey state treasurer, 1902-05; U.S. Senator from New Jersey, 1907-13. Died in Trenton, Mercer County, N.J., May 8, 1913 (age 61 years, 269 days). Interment at Riverview Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of James Frankland Briggs (1827-1905).
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      A. Dayton Oliphant (1887-1963) — of Trenton, Mercer County, N.J.; Princeton, Mercer County, N.J. Born in Trenton, Mercer County, N.J., October 28, 1887. Republican. Lawyer; member of New Jersey state house of assembly from Mercer County, 1915-17; Mercer County Prosecutor of the Pleas, 1918-23; chair of Mercer County Republican Party, 1921; circuit judge in New Jersey, 1927-45; associate justice of New Jersey state supreme court, 1945-46, 1948-57; chancellor of New Jersey court of chancery, 1946-48. Presbyterian. Member, American Bar Association; American Judicature Society; Society of the Cincinnati; Phi Delta Theta; Society of Colonial Wars. Died June 25, 1963 (age 75 years, 240 days). Interment at Riverview Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Henry Duncan Oliphant and Elizabeth Van Dever (Dayton) Oliphant; married, June 21, 1924, to Marguerite A. Broughton.
      William Halstead (1794-1878) — of New Jersey. Born in Elizabeth, Union County, N.J., June 4, 1794. U.S. Representative from New Jersey at-large, 1837-39, 1841-43; U.S. Attorney for New Jersey, 1850-53. Died in Trenton, Mercer County, N.J., March 4, 1878 (age 83 years, 273 days). Interment at Riverview Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      David Lane Powers (1896-1968) — also known as D. Lane Powers — of Trenton, Mercer County, N.J. Born in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., July 29, 1896. Republican. Served in the U.S. Army during World War I; member of New Jersey state house of assembly from Mercer County, 1928-30; U.S. Representative from New Jersey 4th District, 1933-45. Died in Feasterville, Bucks County, Pa., March 28, 1968 (age 71 years, 243 days). Interment at Riverview Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      James Ewing (1744-1823) — of Cumberland County, N.J.; Trenton, Mercer County, N.J. Born in Greenwich, Cumberland County, N.J., July 12, 1744. Merchant; member of New Jersey state house of assembly from Cumberland County, 1778-79; mayor of Trenton, N.J., 1797-1803. Died in Trenton, Mercer County, N.J., October 23, 1823 (age 79 years, 103 days). Interment at Riverview Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Thomas Ewing (1690-1747) and Mary (Maskell) Ewing (1700-1784); married, October 15, 1778, to Martha Boyd (1745-1782); father of Charles Ewing (1780-1832).
      See also Find-A-Grave memorial
      John Hart Brewer (1844-1900) — also known as J. Hart Brewer — of Trenton, Mercer County, N.J. Born in Woodsville, Mercer County, N.J., March 29, 1844. Republican. Manufacturer; member of New Jersey state house of assembly from Mercer County, 1876; U.S. Representative from New Jersey 2nd District, 1881-85; delegate to Republican National Convention from New Jersey, 1888. Died in Trenton, Mercer County, N.J., December 21, 1900 (age 56 years, 267 days). Interment at Riverview Cemetery.
      Relatives: Second great-grandson of John Hart (1713-1779).
      Political families: Conger family of New York; Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York; Lockwood-Lanning family of New Jersey; Coberly-Hovermale family of West Virginia; Hendricks family (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
    Other politicians who have monuments here:
      Charles Ewing (1780-1832) — of Trenton, Mercer County, N.J. Born in Bridgeton, Cumberland County, N.J., June 8, 1780. Lawyer; Federalist candidate for New Jersey state house of assembly, 1815; chief justice of New Jersey state supreme court, 1824-32. Died, from cholera, in Trenton, Mercer County, N.J., August 5, 1832 (age 52 years, 58 days). Interment at First Presbyterian Churchyard; cenotaph at Riverview Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of James Ewing (1744-1823) and Martha (Boyd) Ewing (1745-1782); married to Eleanor Graeme Armstrong (1783-1816).
      The township of Ewing, New Jersey, is named for him.
      See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial


    St. Mary's Cemetery
    Trenton, Mercer County, New Jersey
    Politicians buried here:
      Richard Joseph Hughes (1909-1992) — also known as Richard J. Hughes — of Trenton, Mercer County, N.J.; Princeton, Mercer County, N.J. Born in Florence, Burlington County, N.J., August 10, 1909. Democrat. Lawyer; candidate for U.S. Representative from New Jersey 4th District, 1938; chair of Mercer County Democratic Party, 1944-45; delegate to Democratic National Convention from New Jersey, 1948 (alternate), 1964, 1968 (chair, Credentials Committee; speaker), 1972; county judge in New Jersey, 1948-52; superior court judge in New Jersey, 1952-61; Governor of New Jersey, 1962-70; member of Democratic National Committee from New Jersey, 1970-73; chief justice of New Jersey state supreme court, 1973-79. Catholic. Member, Elks; Knights of Columbus; Phi Kappa Theta. Died, of congestive heart failure, in Boca Raton, Palm Beach County, Fla., December 7, 1992 (age 83 years, 119 days). Interment at St. Mary's Cemetery.
      Relatives: Step-father of William Michael Murphy, Jr. and Michael Murphy (1949-); father of Brian M. Hughes.
      Political family: Murphy-Hughes family of New Jersey.
      Cross-reference: William T. Hiering
      The Richard J. Hughes Justice Complex, in Trenton, New Jersey, is named for him.
      See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
      Books about Richard J. Hughes: John B. Wefing, The Life and Times of Richard J. Hughes: The Politics of Civility
      Harry Heher (1889-1972) — of Trenton, Mercer County, N.J. Born in Trenton, Mercer County, N.J., March 20, 1889. Democrat. Lawyer; chair of Mercer County Democratic Party, 1921; New Jersey Democratic state chair, 1922-32; delegate to Democratic National Convention from New Jersey, 1924 (member, Platform and Resolutions Committee), 1928, 1932; associate justice of New Jersey state supreme court, 1933-59. Catholic. Member, American Bar Association; American Judicature Society; American Law Institute; Knights of Columbus. Died at Morris Hall Health and Rehabilitation Center, Trenton, Mercer County, N.J., October 17, 1972 (age 83 years, 211 days). Interment at St. Mary's Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of John Heher and Anna (Spelman) Heher; married, August 5, 1925, to Anne Egan.


    St. Michael's Episcopal Churchyard
    Trenton, Mercer County, New Jersey
    Politicians buried here:
      David Brearley (1741-1790) — also known as David Brearly — of Hunterdon County, N.J. Born in Trenton, Mercer County, N.J., June 11, 1741. Lawyer; colonel in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; delegate to New Jersey state constitutional convention, 1776; chief justice of New Jersey state supreme court, 1779-89; member, U.S. Constitutional Convention, 1787; delegate to New Jersey convention to ratify U.S. constitution from Hunterdon County, 1787; Presidential Elector for New Jersey, 1789; U.S. District Judge for New Jersey, 1789-90; died in office 1790. Episcopalian. Member, Society of the Cincinnati; Freemasons. Died in Trenton, Mercer County, N.J., August 16, 1790 (age 49 years, 66 days). Interment at St. Michael's Episcopal Churchyard.
      See also federal judicial profile — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial


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    The Political Graveyard

    The Political Graveyard is a web site about U.S. political history and cemeteries. Founded in 1996, it is the Internet's most comprehensive free source for American political biography, listing 312,576 politicians, living and dead.
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