PoliticalGraveyard.com
The Political Graveyard: A Database of American History
The Internet's Most Comprehensive Source of U.S. Political Biography
(or, The Web Site that Tells Where the Dead Politicians are Buried)
Created and maintained by Lawrence Kestenbaum

Namesake Politicians: Buildings

in alphabetical order

  Thomas Gerstle Abernethy (1903-1998) — also known as Thomas G. Abernethy; Tom Abernethy — of Eupora, Webster County, Miss.; Okolona, Chickasaw County, Miss. Born in Eupora, Webster County, Miss., May 16, 1903. Democrat. Mayor of Eupora, Miss., 1927-29; U.S. Representative from Mississippi, 1943-73 (4th District 1943-53, 1st District 1953-73); delegate to Democratic National Convention from Mississippi, 1948, 1956 (alternate), 1960. Methodist. Member, Freemasons; Shriners; Lambda Chi Alpha; Exchange Club. Died in Jackson, Hinds County, Miss., June 11, 1998 (age 95 years, 26 days). Interment at Lakewood Memorial Park, Jackson, Miss.
  Relatives: Son of Thomas Franklin Abernethy and Minnie Agnes (Jenkins) Abernethy; married, July 5, 1936, to Alice Margaret Lamb.
  The T. G. Abernethy Federal Building, in Aberdeen, Mississippi, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
John P. Altgeld John Peter Altgeld (1847-1902) — also known as John P. Altgeld — of Andrew County, Mo.; Chicago, Cook County, Ill. Born in Hesse, Germany, December 30, 1847. Served in the Union Army during the Civil War; lawyer; Andrew County State's Attorney, 1875; candidate for U.S. Representative from Illinois, 1884; superior court judge in Illinois, 1886-91; Governor of Illinois, 1893-97; Independent candidate for mayor of Chicago, Ill., 1899. German ancestry. Pardoned the surviving protesters of the Haymarket incident in Chicago, and refused to send troops against the Pullman railway strikers. These actions were not popular at the time, and he never won another election. As he finished a speech at the Joliet Opera House, he suffered a stroke, was carried across the street to the Hotel Monroe, and died the next morning, in Joliet, Will County, Ill., March 12, 1902 (age 54 years, 72 days). Interment at Graceland Cemetery, Chicago, Ill.; statue at Lincoln Park, Chicago, Ill.
  Altgeld Gardens Homes (built 1944-45), a public housing complex in Chicago, Illinois, is named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS John P. Altgeld (built 1943 at Terminal Island, California; sold 1947, scrapped 1969) was named for him.
  See also National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Image source: American Monthly Review of Reviews, April 1902
  George Ross Anderson Jr. (1929-2020) — also known as G. Ross Anderson, Jr. — of Anderson, Anderson County, S.C. Born in Anderson, Anderson County, S.C., January 29, 1929. Served in the U.S. Air Force during the Korean conflict; lawyer; member of South Carolina state house of representatives, 1955-56; U.S. District Judge for South Carolina, 1980-2009; took senior status 2009. Member, American Bar Association; Association of Trial Lawyers of America; Phi Delta Phi. Died in South Carolina, December 1, 2020 (age 91 years, 307 days). Interment at Forest Lawn Memorial Park, Anderson, S.C.
  Relatives: Son of George Ross Anderson (1906-1998) and Eva Mae (Pooler) Anderson (1908-1997); married to Dorothy Downie (1929-2014).
  The G. Ross Anderson Jr. Federal Building and U.S. Courthouse (built 1938, given present name 2002), in Anderson, South Carolina, is named for him.
  See also federal judicial profile — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  George William Andrews (1906-1971) — also known as George W. Andrews — of Union Springs, Bullock County, Ala. Born in Clayton, Barbour County, Ala., December 12, 1906. Democrat. Lawyer; served in the U.S. Navy during World War II; U.S. Representative from Alabama, 1944-71 (3rd District 1944-63, at-large 1963-65, 3rd District 1965-71); died in office 1971. Baptist. Member, Sigma Nu; Phi Delta Phi; Omicron Delta Kappa. Died in Birmingham, Jefferson County, Ala., December 25, 1971 (age 65 years, 13 days). Interment at Oak Hill Cemetery, Union Springs, Ala.
  Relatives: Son of George William Andrews, Sr. and Addie Bell (King) Andrews; married, November 25, 1936, to Leslie Elizabeth Bullock (1911-2002).
  The G. W. Andrews Federal Building and U.S. Courthouse, in Opelika, Alabama, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Winston Eugene Arnow (1911-1994) — also known as Winston E. Arnow — of Gainesville, Alachua County, Fla.; Pensacola, Escambia County, Fla. Born in Micanopy, Alachua County, Fla., March 13, 1911. Lawyer; municipal judge in Florida, 1940-42, 1946-49; major in the U.S. Army during World War II; U.S. District Judge for the Northern District of Florida, 1967-81; took senior status 1981. Member, American Bar Association; American Judicature Society; Sigma Phi Epsilon; Phi Delta Phi; Tau Kappa Alpha; Blue Key; Elks; Rotary. Died in Pensacola, Escambia County, Fla., November 28, 1994 (age 83 years, 260 days). Interment at Roberts Cemetery, Pensacola, Fla.
  Relatives: Son of Joseph Leslie Arnow and Mabel (Thrasher) Arnow; married, January 11, 1941, to Frances Day Cease.
  The Winston E. Arnow Federal Building, in Pensacola, Florida, is named for him.
  See also federal judicial profile — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Carl Clyde Atkins (1914-1999) — also known as C. Clyde Atkins — of Stuart, Martin County, Fla.; Miami, Miami-Dade County, Fla.; Coral Gables, Miami-Dade County, Fla. Born in Washington, D.C., November 23, 1914. Lawyer; founder-trustee, Lawyers Title Guaranty Fund, 1948-66; U.S. District Judge for the Southern District of Florida, 1966-99; died in office 1999. Catholic. Member, American Bar Association; Kappa Alpha Order; Phi Kappa Tau; Phi Alpha Delta; Tau Kappa Alpha; Kiwanis. Died in Miami, Miami-Dade County, Fla., March 11, 1999 (age 84 years, 108 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of C. C. Atkins and Marguerite (Criste) Atkins; married, January 18, 1937, to Esther Castillo.
  The C. Clyde Atkins U.S. Courthouse, in Miami, Florida, is named for him.
  John Bascom (1827-1911) — of Madison, Dane County, Wis.; Williamstown, Berkshire County, Mass. Born in Genoa, Cayuga County, N.Y., April 30, 1827. College professor; president, University of Wisconsin, 1874-87; Prohibition candidate for U.S. Representative from Massachusetts, 1890 (12th District), 1896 (1st District), 1902 (1st District); Prohibition candidate for Governor of Massachusetts, 1897. Died in Williamstown, Berkshire County, Mass., October 2, 1911 (age 84 years, 155 days). Interment at Williams College Cemetery, Williamstown, Mass.
  Relatives: Son of Rev. John Bascom (1784-1828) and Laura (Woodbridge) Bascom (1789-1870); married 1853 to Abbie Burt (1828-1854); married, January 8, 1856, to Emma Curtiss (1828-1916).
  Bascom Hall, on the campus of the University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin, is named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS John Bascom (built 1942-43 at Panama City, Florida; bombed and sank in the harbor at Bari, Italy, 1943) was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Kemp Plummer Battle (1831-1919) — also known as Kemp P. Battle — of Wake County, N.C. Born in Louisburg, Franklin County, N.C., December 19, 1831. Lawyer; delegate to North Carolina secession convention, 1861; president, Chatham Railroad during the Civil War; North Carolina state treasurer, 1866-68; president, University of North Carolina, 1876-91; historian. Died in Raleigh, Wake County, N.C., February 4, 1919 (age 87 years, 47 days). Interment at Oakwood Cemetery, Raleigh, N.C.
  Relatives: Son of William Horn Battle (1802-1879).
  Battle Hall (built 1912), a building at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article
  Charles Edward Bennett (1910-2003) — also known as Charles E. Bennett — of Jacksonville, Duval County, Fla. Born in Canton, St. Lawrence County, N.Y., December 2, 1910. Democrat. Lawyer; member of Florida state house of representatives, 1941-42; served in the U.S. Army during World War II; U.S. Representative from Florida, 1949-93 (2nd District 1949-67, 3rd District 1967-93). Christian. Member, Disabled American Veterans; American Legion; Veterans of Foreign Wars; Sons of the American Revolution; Freemasons; Lions; Jaycees. Died in Jacksonville, Duval County, Fla., September 6, 2003 (age 92 years, 278 days). Interment at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Va.
  The Charles E. Bennett Federal Building (built 1966), in Jacksonville, Florida, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  William Howard Berkey (1874-1952) — also known as William H. Berkey — of Cassopolis, Cass County, Mich. Born in Cambria County, Pa., February 24, 1874. Republican. Newspaper editor and publisher; farmer; delegate to Republican National Convention from Michigan, 1920 (alternate), 1940; member of Michigan state board of agriculture, 1930-47; Dry candidate for delegate to Michigan convention to ratify 21st amendment from Cass County, 1933. Member, Freemasons. Died in Chicago, Cook County, Ill., March 22, 1952 (age 78 years, 27 days). Interment at Prospect Hill Cemetery, Cassopolis, Mich.
  Relatives: Son of Joshua Berkey (1843-1919) and Barbara (Mahan) Berkey (1851-1923); married, June 8, 1911, to Olive K. Gard.
  Berkey Hall, a classroom and office building at Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan, is named for him.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Joseph Robinette Biden Jr. (b. 1942) — also known as Joseph R. Biden, Jr.; Joe Biden; "Sleepy Joe" — of Wilmington, New Castle County, Del. Born in Scranton, Lackawanna County, Pa., November 20, 1942. Democrat. Lawyer; U.S. Senator from Delaware, 1973-2009; resigned 2009; candidate for Democratic nomination for President, 1988, 2008; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Delaware, 1996, 2000, 2004, 2008; Vice President of the United States, 2009-17; President of the United States, 2021-. Catholic. Irish ancestry. Still living as of 2022.
  Relatives: Son of Joseph Robinette Biden, Sr. (1915-2002) and Catherine Eugenia 'Jean' (Finnegan) Biden (1917-2010); married 1966 to Neilia Hunter (1942-1972); married, June 17, 1977, to Jill Biden (born1951); father of Joseph Robinette Biden III.
  Political family: Biden family of Wilmington, Delaware.
  The Joseph R. Biden Jr. Railroad Station, in Wilmington, Delaware, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Ballotpedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Books about Joe Biden: Jules Witcover, Joe Biden: A Life of Trial and Redemption
Hugo L. Black Hugo Lafayette Black (1886-1971) — also known as Hugo L. Black — of Birmingham, Jefferson County, Ala.; Alexandria, Va. Born in Harlan, Clay County, Ala., February 27, 1886. Democrat. Lawyer; police court judge in Alabama, 1910-11; Jefferson County Prosecuting Attorney, 1915-17; served in the U.S. Army during World War I; U.S. Senator from Alabama, 1927-37; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Alabama, 1936; Associate Justice of U.S. Supreme Court, 1937-71; took senior status 1971. Baptist. Member, Freemasons; Knights of Pythias; Odd Fellows; Ku Klux Klan. Died, in Bethesda Naval Hospital, Bethesda, Montgomery County, Md., September 25, 1971 (age 85 years, 210 days). Interment at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Va.
  Relatives: Son of William La Fayette Black and Martha Ardella (Toland) Black; married, February 23, 1921, to Josephine Patterson Foster (died 1951); married, September 11, 1957, to Elizabeth Seay DeMeritte.
  The Hugo L. Black U.S. Courthouse, in Birmingham, Alabama, is named for him.
  Epitaph: "Here lies a good man."
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — federal judicial profile — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial — Arlington National Cemetery unofficial website
  Books about Hugo L. Black: Roger K. Newman, Hugo Black : A Biography — Howard Ball, Hugo L. Black : Cold Steel Warrior — James F Simon, The antagonists: Hugo Black, Felix Frankfurter and civil liberties in modern America — Howard Ball & Phillip J. Cooper, Of Power and Right: Hugo Black, William O. Douglas, and America's Constitutional Revolution
  Image source: Library of Congress
  Luke Pryor Blackburn (1816-1887) — also known as Luke P. Blackburn — of Kentucky. Born in Woodford County, Ky., June 16, 1816. Physician; member of Kentucky state house of representatives, 1843; Governor of Kentucky, 1879-83. Baptist. In 1865, he was tried and acquitted in a Toronto court for violating Canadian neutrality, in connection with a Confederate scheme to spread yellow fever in Northern cities. Died in Frankfort, Franklin County, Ky., September 14, 1887 (age 71 years, 90 days). Interment at Frankfort Cemetery, Frankfort, Ky.
  Relatives: Son of Edward Mitchell Blackburn (1787-1867) and Lavinia St. Clair (Bell) Blackburn (1794-1863); brother of Joseph Clay Stiles Blackburn; married, November 24, 1835, to Ella Boswell; married, November 17, 1857, to Julia Churchill; uncle of Corinne Blackburn (1869-1958; who married William Holt Gale); granduncle of Smith Alford Blackburn; great-granduncle of Charles Milton Blackburn; first cousin twice removed of Gabriel Slaughter; third cousin of Charles Rice Slaughter (1819-1862); third cousin once removed of Robert Pryor Henry, John Flournoy Henry and Gustavus Adolphus Henry.
  Political families: Blackburn-Slaughter-Buckner-Madison family of Kentucky; Pendleton-Lee family of Maryland (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  The Blackburn Correctional Complex (opened 1972), in Lexington, Kentucky, is named for him.
  See also National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about Luke Pryor Blackburn: Nancy Disher Baird, Luke Pryor Blackburn : Physician, Governor, Reformer
  Neal Shaw Blaisdell (1902-1975) — also known as Neal S. Blaisdell — of Honolulu, Island of Oahu, Honolulu County, Hawaii. Born in Honolulu, Island of Oahu, Honolulu County, Hawaii, November 6, 1902. Republican. School teacher; member of Hawaii territorial House of Representatives, 1944-46; member of Hawaii territorial senate, 1946-50; mayor of Honolulu, Hawaii, 1955-69. Died, from a probable brain hemorrhage, in Honolulu, Island of Oahu, Honolulu County, Hawaii, November 5, 1975 (age 72 years, 364 days). Interment at Oahu Cemetery, Honolulu, Island of Oahu, Hawaii.
  Relatives: Son of William Wallace Blaisdell and Malia K. (Merseberg) Blaisdell; married, October 23, 1926, to Lucy Thurston.
  The Neal S. Blaisdell Convention Center, Honolulu, Hawaii, is named for him.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Henry Goode Blasdel (1825-1900) — also known as Henry G. Blasdel — of Virginia City, Storey County, Nev.; Oakland, Alameda County, Calif. Born near Lawrenceburg, Dearborn County, Ind., January 29, 1825. Republican. Farmer; merchant; riverboat captain; miller; mining business; Governor of Nevada, 1864-71. Died in Oakland, Alameda County, Calif., July 22, 1900 (age 75 years, 174 days). Interment at Mountain View Cemetery, Oakland, Calif.
  Relatives: Son of Jacob Blasdel (1782-1841) and Elizabeth (Weaver) Blasdel (1791-1878); married 1845 to Sarah Jane Cox (1827-1904).
  The Blasdel state office building, in Carson City, Nevada, is named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS H. G. Blasdel (built 1943 at Richmond, California; scrapped 1947) was named for him.
  See also National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  William Augustus Bootle (1902-2005) — also known as William A. Bootle — of Macon, Bibb County, Ga. Born in Walterboro, Colleton County, S.C., August 19, 1902. Republican. Lawyer; U.S. Attorney for the Middle District of Georgia, 1929-33; U.S. District Judge for the Middle District of Georgia, 1954-72; took senior status 1972. Baptist. Member, Phi Delta Theta; Freemasons; Civitan. Died January 25, 2005 (age 102 years, 159 days). Interment at Riverside Cemetery, Macon, Ga.
  Relatives: Son of Philip Loraine Bootle and Laura Lilla (Benton) Bootle; married, November 24, 1928, to Virginia Childs.
  The William Augustus Bootle Federal Building and Courthouse, in Macon, Georgia, is named for him.
  See also federal judicial profile — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Earl Murphy Bourdon (1917-1993) — also known as Earl M. Bourdon — of Claremont, Sullivan County, N.H. Born in Claremont, Sullivan County, N.H., December 16, 1917. Democrat. Delegate to Democratic National Convention from New Hampshire, 1980. Died June 19, 1993 (age 75 years, 185 days). Interment at River Cemetery, Plainfield, N.H.
  Relatives: Married to Honorine Hadley (1920-2003).
  The Earl M. Bourdon Centre (senior housing) in Claremont, New Hampshire, is named for him.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Lewis Rice Bradley (1805-1879) — also known as Lewis R. Bradley; "Broadhorns" — of Stockton, San Joaquin County, Calif.; Nevada. Born in Orange County, Va., February 18, 1805. Democrat. Delegate to Democratic National Convention from California, 1860; member of California state assembly 8th District, 1861-62; Governor of Nevada, 1871-79; defeated, 1878. Died in Elko, Elko County, Nev., March 21, 1879 (age 74 years, 31 days). Interment at Elko Cemetery, Elko, Nev.
  Relatives: Married 1835 to Virginia Hode Willis (1817-1852); grandfather of Charles Belknap Henderson (1873-1954).
  The Bradley state office building, in Las Vegas, Nevada, is named for him.
  See also National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Andrew Broaddus (1900-1972) — of Louisville, Jefferson County, Ky. Born in Louisville, Jefferson County, Ky., May 15, 1900. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Navy during World War I; laundry business; mayor of Louisville, Ky., 1953-57. Died, from a heart attack, in Louisville, Jefferson County, Ky., September 7, 1972 (age 72 years, 115 days). Interment at Cave Hill Cemetery, Louisville, Ky.
  Relatives: Son of Russell Broaddus (1873-1946) and Julia Ducan (Ely) Broaddus (1876-1961); married, September 24, 1924, to Elizabeth Robertson (1900-1993); third cousin twice removed of Elbridge Jackson Broaddus; fourth cousin once removed of Joseph Broaddus and Bower Slack Broaddus (1888-1949).
  Political family: Broaddus family of Madison County, Kentucky.
  The Mayor Andrew Broaddus, a floating life-saving station in Louisville, Kentucky, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  James Thomas Broyhill (b. 1927) — also known as James T. Broyhill; Jim Broyhill — of Lenoir, Caldwell County, N.C. Born in Lenoir, Caldwell County, N.C., August 19, 1927. Republican. U.S. Representative from North Carolina, 1963-86 (9th District 1963-69, 10th District 1969-86); U.S. Senator from North Carolina, 1986; defeated, 1986. Baptist. Member, Freemasons; Shriners. Still living as of 2014.
  The James T. Broyhill Post Office Building, in Lenoir, North Carolina, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — NNDB dossier
  George Washington Buckner (1855-1943) — also known as George W. Buckner — Born in slavery near Greensburg, Green County, Ky., December 1, 1855. U.S. Minister to Liberia, 1913-15; U.S. Consul General in Monrovia, as of 1914. African ancestry. Died in Evansville, Vanderburgh County, Ind., February 17, 1943 (age 87 years, 78 days). Interment at Oak Hill Cemetery, Evansville, Ind.
  Presumably named for: George Washington
  The Buckner Towers public housing development, in Evansville, Indiana, is named for him.
  See also U.S. State Dept career summary
  Edward Norman Cahn (b. 1933) — also known as Edward N. Cahn — Born in Allentown, Lehigh County, Pa., 1933. Lawyer; U.S. District Judge for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania, 1974-98; retired 1998. Still living as of 2010.
  The Edward N. Cahn Federal Building and U.S. Courthouse, Allentown, Pennsylvania, is named for him.
  See also federal judicial profile — Wikipedia article — Ballotpedia article
  Millard Fillmore Caldwell Jr. (1897-1984) — also known as Millard F. Caldwell, Jr. — of Milton, Santa Rosa County, Fla.; Tallahassee, Leon County, Fla. Born in Knoxville, Knox County, Tenn., February 6, 1897. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army during World War I; lawyer; member of Florida state house of representatives, 1929-32; U.S. Representative from Florida 3rd District, 1933-41; Governor of Florida, 1945-49; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Florida, 1948, 1956; justice of Florida state supreme court, 1962-69. Protestant. Member, Sons of the American Revolution; Kappa Sigma; Phi Alpha Delta; Freemasons; Shriners; Knights of Pythias; Elks; Newcomen Society; American Legion; American Judicature Society; Alpha Kappa Psi; Blue Key. Died in Tallahassee, Leon County, Fla., October 23, 1984 (age 87 years, 260 days). Interment at Harwood Plantation Cemetery, Leon County, Fla.
  Presumably named for: Millard Fillmore
  Relatives: Son of Millard Fillmore Caldwell and Martha Jane (Clapp) Caldwell; married, February 14, 1925, to Mary Rebecca Harwood.
  The Millard Caldwell state office building (opened 1949), in Tallahassee, Florida, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — National Governors Association biography — NNDB dossier
John C. Calhoun John Caldwell Calhoun (1782-1850) — also known as John C. Calhoun — of Pickens District (now Pickens County), S.C. Born in Abbeville District (part now in McCormick County), S.C., March 18, 1782. Member of South Carolina state house of representatives, 1808; U.S. Representative from South Carolina 6th District, 1811-17; U.S. Secretary of War, 1817-25; Vice President of the United States, 1825-32; resigned 1832; U.S. Senator from South Carolina, 1832-43, 1845-50; died in office 1850; U.S. Secretary of State, 1844-45. Scotch-Irish ancestry. Slaveowner. Died in Washington, D.C., March 31, 1850 (age 68 years, 13 days). Interment at St. Philip's Churchyard, Charleston, S.C.; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery, Washington, D.C.; memorial monument at Marion Park, Charleston, S.C.
  Relatives: Son of James Patrick Calhoun (1727-1795) and Martha (Caldwell) Calhoun (1750-1802); married, December 27, 1809, to Floride Bonneau (1792-1866) and Floride Calhoun (daughter of John Ewing Colhoun (c.1749-1802)); father of Anna Maria Calhoun (1817-1875; who married Thomas Green Clemson (1807-1888)); uncle of John Alfred Calhoun and Martha Catherine Calhoun (1809-1869; who married Armistead Burt); great-granduncle of John Temple Graves; first cousin of John Ewing Colhoun (c.1749-1802) and Joseph Calhoun; first cousin once removed of Andrew Pickens; first cousin twice removed of Francis Wilkinson Pickens; second cousin once removed of Sarah Ann Calhoun (1811-1892; who married Alexander Henry Brown); second cousin twice removed of William Francis Calhoun.
  Political family: Calhoun-Pickens family of South Carolina (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Calhoun counties in Ala., Ark., Fla., Ga., Ill., Iowa, Mich., Miss., S.C., Tex. and W.Va. are named for him.
  The John C. Calhoun State Office Building (opened 1926), in Columbia, South Carolina, is named for him.  — Lake Calhoun (now known by its Dakota name, Bde Maka Ska), in Minneapolis, Minnesota, was named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS John C. Calhoun (built 1941-42 at Wilmington, North Carolina; destroyed in cargo explosion at Finchhafen, Papua New Guinea, 1944) was named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: John C. JohnsonJohn Calhoun NichollsJohn Calhoun CookJohn C. SheppardJohn C. BellJohn C. C. MayoJohn C. Phillips
  Coins and currency: His portrait appeared on Confederate States $1,000 notes (1861) and $100 notes (1862).
  Campaign slogan: "Liberty dearer than union."
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about John C. Calhoun: Margaret L. Coit, John C. Calhoun : American Portrait — Clyde N. Wilson, John C. Calhoun — Merrill D. Peterson, The Great Triumvirate: Webster, Clay, and Calhoun — Warren Brown, John C. Calhoun (for young readers)
  Image source: James Smith Noel Collection, Louisiana State University in Shreveport
  John Archibald Campbell (1811-1889) — also known as John A. Campbell — of Montgomery, Montgomery County, Ala.; Baltimore, Md. Born in Washington, Wilkes County, Ga., June 24, 1811. Lawyer; member of Alabama state house of representatives, 1837; Associate Justice of U.S. Supreme Court, 1853-61; Confederate States Assistant Secretary of War, 1861-65; at the end of the Civil War, he was suspected of involvement in the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln; arrested in May 1865; held in detention for five months, but never charged; released in October 1865. Episcopalian. Died in Baltimore, Md., March 12, 1889 (age 77 years, 261 days). Interment at Green Mount Cemetery, Baltimore, Md.
  Relatives: Married to Anna E. Goldthwaite; grandfather of Duncan Lawrence Groner (1873-1957).
  The John A. Campbell U.S. Courthouse, in Mobile, Alabama, is named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS John A. Campbell (built 1943 at Brunswick, Georgia; scrapped 1968) was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
Joseph G. Cannon Joseph Gurney Cannon (1836-1926) — also known as Joseph G. Cannon; "Uncle Joe" — of Danville, Vermilion County, Ill. Born in Guilford, Guilford County, N.C., May 7, 1836. Republican. Lawyer; Vermilion County State's Attorney, 1861-68; U.S. Representative from Illinois, 1873-91, 1893-1913, 1915-23 (14th District 1873-83, 15th District 1883-91, 1893-95, 12th District 1895-1903, 18th District 1903-13, 1915-23); Speaker of the U.S. House, 1903-11; delegate to Republican National Convention from Illinois, 1892, 1904 (Permanent Chair); candidate for Republican nomination for President, 1908. Died in Danville, Vermilion County, Ill., November 12, 1926 (age 90 years, 189 days). Interment at Spring Hill Cemetery, Danville, Ill.
  Relatives: Son of Dr. Horace H. Cannon and Gulielma (Hollingsworth) Cannon; married 1862 to Mary P. Reed.
  The Cannon House Office Building, in Washington, D.C., is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about Joe Cannon: Richard B. Cheney & Lynne V. Cheney, Kings Of The Hill : How Nine Powerful Men Changed The Course of American History
  Image source: American Monthly Review of Reviews, October 1902
  Doyle Elam Carlton (1885-1972) — also known as Doyle E. Carlton — of Tampa, Hillsborough County, Fla. Born in Wauchula, Hardee County, Fla., July 6, 1885. Democrat. Lawyer; member of Florida state senate, 1917-19; Governor of Florida, 1929-33; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Florida, 1948, 1952, 1956. Baptist. Member, Freemasons; Shriners; Knights of Pythias; Moose; Elks; Kiwanis. Died in a nursing home at Tampa, Hillsborough County, Fla., October 25, 1972 (age 87 years, 111 days). Interment at Myrtle Hill Memorial Park, Tampa, Fla.
  Relatives: Son of Albert Carlton and Martha (McEwan) Carlton; married, July 30, 1912, to Nell Ray; distant relative *** of Vassar B. Carlton (born c.1929).
  The Doyle E. Carlton Building (built 1955 for state government offices), in Tallahassee, Florida, is named for him.
  See also National Governors Association biography — NNDB dossier
Lewis Cass Lewis Cass (1782-1866) — of Detroit, Wayne County, Mich. Born in Exeter, Rockingham County, N.H., October 9, 1782. Democrat. Member of Ohio state house of representatives, 1806; general in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812; Governor of Michigan Territory, 1813-31; U.S. Secretary of War, 1831-36; U.S. Minister to France, 1836-42; member of University of Michigan board of regents, 1843-44; appointed 1843; candidate for Democratic nomination for President, 1844, 1852; U.S. Senator from Michigan, 1845-48, 1849-57; resigned 1848; candidate for President of the United States, 1848; U.S. Secretary of State, 1857-60. Member, Freemasons. Died in Detroit, Wayne County, Mich., June 17, 1866 (age 83 years, 251 days). Interment at Elmwood Cemetery, Detroit, Mich.
  Relatives: Second great-grandfather of Thomas Cass Ballenger (1926-2015).
  Cass counties in Ill., Ind., Iowa, Mich., Minn., Mo., Neb. and Tex. are named for him.
  The town and village of Cassville, Wisconsin, is named for him.  — The village of Cass City, Michigan, is named for him.  — The village of Cassopolis, Michigan, is named for him.  — The city of Cassville, Missouri, is named for him.  — Cass Lake, and the adjoining city of Cass Lake, Minnesota, are named for him.  — Cass Lake, in Oakland County, Michigan, is named for him.  — The Cass River, in Tuscola and Saginaw counties, Michigan, is named for him.  — The Lewis Cass Building (opened 1921 as the State Office Building; damaged in a fire in 1951; rebuilt and named for Lewis Cass; changed to Elliott-Larsen Building in 2020), in Lansing, Michigan, was named for him.  — Cass Avenue, Cass Park, and Cass Technical High School, in Detroit, Michigan, are named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: Lewis Cass WilmarthLewis C. CarpenterLewis C. VandergriftLewis C. TidballLewis Cass WickLewis Cass Tidball IILewis C. Gabbert
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Books about Lewis Cass: Willard Carl Klunder, Lewis Cass and the Politics of Moderation — Frank Bury Woodford, Lewis Cass, the Last Jeffersonian
  Image source: Library of Congress
Charles E. Chamberlain Charles Ernest Chamberlain (1917-2002) — also known as Charles E. Chamberlain; "The Automobile Horn of Congress" — of East Lansing, Ingham County, Mich. Born in Locke Township, Ingham County, Mich., July 22, 1917. Republican. Served in the U.S. Navy during World War II; lawyer; U.S. Representative from Michigan 6th District, 1957-75. Member, American Legion; Veterans of Foreign Wars; Sons of the American Revolution; Kiwanis; Society of the Cincinnati. Died, of renal failure and congestive heart failure, in Leesburg, Loudoun County, Va., November 25, 2002 (age 85 years, 126 days). Interment at Evergreen Cemetery, Lansing, Mich.
  The Charles E. Chamberlain Federal Building and U.S. Post Office, in Lansing, Michigan, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Image source: Michigan Manual 1957-58
  Frances Cleveland (1864-1947) — also known as Frances Clara Folsom — Born in Buffalo, Erie County, N.Y., July 21, 1864. First Lady of the United States, 1886-89, 1893-97. Female. Died in Baltimore, Md., October 29, 1947 (age 83 years, 100 days). Interment at Princeton Cemetery, Princeton, N.J.
  Relatives: Daughter of Oscar Folsom (1837-1875) and Emma (Harmon) Folsom (1840-1915); married, June 2, 1886, to Grover Cleveland; married, February 10, 1913, to Thomas Jecks Preston (1862-1955); mother of Richard Folsom Cleveland (1897-1974).
  Political family: Kellogg-Adams-Seymour-Chapin family of Connecticut and New York (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Cleveland Hall of Languages (built 1911), at Wells College, Aurora, New York, is named for her.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  William Jefferson Clinton (b. 1946) — also known as Bill Clinton; William Jefferson Blythe IV; "Slick Willie"; "Bubba"; "Elvis"; "Eagle"; "The Big Dog" — of Arkansas; Chappaqua, Westchester County, N.Y. Born in Hope, Hempstead County, Ark., August 19, 1946. Democrat. Rhodes scholar; candidate for U.S. Representative from Arkansas 3rd District, 1974; Arkansas state attorney general, 1977-79; Governor of Arkansas, 1979-81, 1983-92; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Arkansas, 1996, 2000; speaker, 1984, 1988; President of the United States, 1993-2001; delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 2004, 2008. Baptist. Member, Trilateral Commission; Council on Foreign Relations; Phi Beta Kappa; Pi Sigma Alpha; Phi Alpha Delta; American Bar Association. On October 29, 1994, Francisco Duran fired 27 shots from the sidewalk at the White House in an apparent assassination attempt against President Clinton. Impeached by the House of Representatives in December 1998 over allegations of perjury and obstruction of justice in connection with his sexual contact with a White House intern, Monica Lewinsky, but acquitted by the Senate. Still living as of 2020.
  Relatives: Step-son of Roger Clinton; son of William Jefferson Blythe II and Virginia (Cassidy) Clinton (1923-1994); married, October 11, 1975, to Hillary Diane Rodham (sister of Hugh Edwin Rodham); father of Chelsea Clinton (daughter-in-law of Edward Maurice Mezvinsky and Marjorie Margolies-Mezvinsky); third cousin twice removed of James Alexander Lockhart (1850-1905).
  Political families: Clinton family of Wadesboro, North Carolina; Ashe-Polk family of North Carolina (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Cross-reference: Abraham J. Hirschfeld — Kenneth W. Starr — Rahm Emanuel — Henry G. Cisneros — Maria Echaveste — Thurgood Marshall, Jr. — Walter S. Orlinsky — Charles F. C. Ruff — Sean Patrick Maloney — Lanny J. Davis
  The William Jefferson Clinton Federal Building (built 1934; renamed 2012) in Washington, D.C., is named for him.
  See also National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Books by Bill Clinton: Between Hope and History : Meeting America's Challenges for the 21st Century (1996) — My Life (2004)
  Books about Bill Clinton: David Maraniss, First in His Class : The Biography of Bill Clinton — Joe Conason, The Hunting of the President : The Ten-Year Campaign to Destroy Bill and Hillary Clinton — Gene Lyons, Fools for Scandal : How the Media Invented Whitewater — Sidney Blumenthal, The Clinton Wars — Dewayne Wickham, Bill Clinton and Black America — Joe Klein, The Natural : The Misunderstood Presidency of Bill Clinton — Nigel Hamilton, Bill Clinton: An American Journey — Bob Woodward, The Agenda: Inside the Clinton White House — George Stephanopolous, All Too Human — John F. Harris, The Survivor : Bill Clinton in the White House — Mark Katz, Clinton & Me: A Real Life Political Comedy — Michael Takiff, A Complicated Man: The Life of Bill Clinton as Told by Those Who Know Him — Tim O'Shei, Bill Clinton (for young readers)
  Critical books about Bill Clinton: Barbara Olson, The Final Days : The Last, Desperate Abuses of Power by the Clinton White House — Meredith L. Oakley, On the Make : The Rise of Bill Clinton — Robert Patterson, Dereliction of Duty: The Eyewitness Account of How Bill Clinton Endangered America's Long-Term National Security — Ambrose Evans-Pritchard, The Secret Life of Bill Clinton: The Unreported Stories — Ann Coulter, High Crimes and Misdemeanors: The Case Against Bill Clinton — Dick Morris & Eileen McGann, Because He Could — Jack Cashill, Ron Brown's Body : How One Man's Death Saved the Clinton Presidency and Hillary's Future — Christopher Hitchens, No One Left To Lie To: The Values of the Worst Family — Rich Lowry, Legacy: Paying the Price for the Clinton Years — Richard Miniter, Losing Bin Laden : How Bill Clinton's Failures Unleashed Global Terror
  William Thad Cochran (1937-2019) — also known as Thad Cochran — of Jackson, Hinds County, Miss.; Oxford, Lafayette County, Miss. Born in Pontotoc, Pontotoc County, Miss., December 7, 1937. Republican. Lawyer; U.S. Representative from Mississippi 4th District, 1973-79; U.S. Senator from Mississippi, 1979-2018; resigned 2018; delegate to Republican National Convention from Mississippi, 2004, 2008, 2012. Baptist. Member, Pi Kappa Alpha. Died, from renal failure, in Oxford, Lafayette County, Miss., May 30, 2019 (age 81 years, 174 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of William Holmes Cochran and Emma Grace (Berry) Cochran; married 1964 to Rose Clayton; married, May 23, 2015, to Kay Webber.
  The Thad Cochran U.S. Courthouse, in Jackson, Mississippi, is named for him.  — The Thad Cochran Center building, at the University of Southern Mississippi, Hattiesburg, Mississippi, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile
  Lila Cockrell (1922-2019) — also known as Lila May Banks — of San Antonio, Bexar County, Tex. Born in Fort Worth, Tarrant County, Tex., January 19, 1922. Mayor of San Antonio, Tex., 1975-81, 1989-91. Female. Member, Delta Delta Delta; League of Women Voters. Died in San Antonio, Bexar County, Tex., August 29, 2019 (age 97 years, 222 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Daughter of Robert Bruce Banks and Velma (Jones) Banks; married to Sidney Earl Cockrell, Jr. (1916-1986; second cousin once removed of Robert Spratt Cockrell (1866-1957)).
  Political family: Walker-Meriwether-Kellogg family of Virginia (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  The Lila Cockrell Theatre, a 2,319-seat convention center auditorium, in San Antonio, Texas, is named for her.
  See also Wikipedia article
  Thomas LeRoy Collins (1909-1991) — also known as LeRoy Collins — of Florida. Born in Tallahassee, Leon County, Fla., March 10, 1909. Democrat. Lawyer; member of Florida state house of representatives, 1934-40; member of Florida state senate 8th District, 1940-54; served in the U.S. Navy during World War II; Governor of Florida, 1955-61; alternate delegate to Democratic National Convention from Florida, 1956; candidate for U.S. Senator from Florida, 1968. Episcopalian. Member, American Bar Association. Died of cancer, in Tallahassee, Leon County, Fla., March 12, 1991 (age 82 years, 2 days). Interment a private or family graveyard, Leon County, Fla.
  Relatives: Son of Marvin H. Collins and Mattie (Brandon) Collins; married, June 29, 1932, to Mary Call Darby (great-granddaughter of Richard Keith Call (1792-1862)).
  Political family: Call family of Tallahassee, Florida (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  The LeRoy Collins state office building (built 1962), in Tallahassee, Florida, is named for him.
  See also National Governors Association biography — NNDB dossier
  Books about Leroy Collins: Tom Wagy, Governor Leroy Collins of Florida : Spokesman of the New South — Martin A. Dyckman, Floridian of His Century: The Courage of Governor LeRoy Collins
  William Meyers Colmer (1890-1980) — also known as William M. Colmer — of Pascagoula, Jackson County, Miss. Born in Moss Point, Jackson County, Miss., February 11, 1890. Democrat. Lawyer; served in the U.S. Army during World War I; Jackson County Attorney, 1921-27; U.S. Representative from Mississippi, 1933-73 (6th District 1933-63, 5th District 1963-73); delegate to Democratic National Convention from Mississippi, 1936, 1948, 1952, 1956, 1960; candidate for U.S. Senator from Mississippi, 1947. Methodist. Member, American Legion; Forty and Eight; Freemasons; Woodmen; Rotary; Pi Kappa Alpha; Elks. Died in Pascagoula, Jackson County, Miss., September 9, 1980 (age 90 years, 211 days). Interment at Machpelah Cemetery, Pascagoula, Miss.
  Relatives: Son of Henry Colmer and Anna S. (Meyers) Colmer; married, September 17, 1917, to Ruth Miner.
  Cross-reference: Trent Lott
  The William M. Colmer Federal Building and U.S. Courthouse, in Hattiesburg, Mississippi, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Jesse Sherwood Cooper Jr. (1899-1971) — also known as Jesse S. Cooper, Jr. — of Mt. Vernon, Westchester County, N.Y.; Dover, Kent County, Del. Born in Dover, Kent County, Del., March 13, 1899. Democrat. Alternate delegate to Democratic National Convention from Delaware, 1928; Delaware state treasurer, 1945-46; defeated, 1946. Member, Freemasons; Knights Templar; Sons of the American Revolution. In 1950, he quietly helped Sen. John J. Williams to expose corruption in the U.S. Internal Revenue Service, but his role was not disclosed until after his death. Died in Dover, Kent County, Del., 1971 (age about 72 years). Interment at Woodlawn Cemetery, Bronx, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Jesse Sherwood Cooper (1873-1904) and Juliette Gardner (Minard) Cooper (1873-1966); married, April 19, 1937, to Elizabeth Roberts (1905-1985).
  The Jesse S. Cooper Building (Delaware Health and Social Services division), in Dover, Delaware, is named for him.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  John Sherman Cooper (1901-1991) — of Somerset, Pulaski County, Ky. Born in Somerset, Pulaski County, Ky., August 23, 1901. Republican. Member of Kentucky state house of representatives, 1928-30; county judge in Kentucky, 1930-38; candidate for Governor of Kentucky, 1939; served in the U.S. Army during World War II; U.S. Senator from Kentucky, 1946-49, 1952-55, 1956-73; defeated, 1948, 1954; delegate to Republican National Convention from Kentucky, 1948, 1956 (speaker), 1960 (member, Resolutions Committee), 1972 (delegation chair); U.S. Ambassador to India, 1955-56; Nepal, 1955-56; East Germany, 1974-76; member, President's Commission on the Assassination of President KNDY, 1963-64. Baptist or Episcopalian. Member, American Legion; Veterans of Foreign Wars; Rotary; American Bar Association; Beta Theta Pi. Died of heart failure, in Washington, D.C., February 21, 1991 (age 89 years, 182 days). Interment at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Va.; statue at Fountain Square, Somerset, Ky.
  Relatives: Son of John Sherman Cooper, Sr. (1866-1924); married to Lorraine Rowan (1905-1985).
  Cross-reference: William Butts Macomber, Jr.
  The John Sherman Cooper Power Station, near Burnside, Kentucky, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — Find-A-Grave memorial
  James Charles Corman (1920-2000) — also known as James C. Corman; Jim Corman — of Van Nuys, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, Calif.; Reseda, Los Angeles County, Calif. Born in Galena, Cherokee County, Kan., October 20, 1920. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Marine Corps during World War II; served in the U.S. Marine Corps during the Korean conflict; delegate to Democratic National Convention from California, 1960, 1964; U.S. Representative from California, 1961-81 (22nd District 1961-75, 21st District 1975-81). Methodist. Member, Lions; American Legion; Elks; Veterans of Foreign Wars; American Bar Association. Floor manager in U.S. House for Civil Rights Act and Voting Rights Act in 1960s; member of the Kerner Commission on Civil Disorders. Died, following a cerebral hemorrhage, in a hospital at Arlington, Arlington County, Va., December 30, 2000 (age 80 years, 71 days). Cremated; ashes interred at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Va.
  The James C. Corman Federal Building, in Van Nuys, Los Angeles, California, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  Richard Joseph Daronco (1931-1988) — also known as Richard J. Daronco — Born in New York, New York County, N.Y., August 1, 1931. Lawyer; Justice of New York Supreme Court, 1979-87; U.S. District Judge for the Southern District of New York, 1987-88; died in office 1988. Catholic. Italian ancestry. Shot and killed, by Charles L. Koster, in Pelham Heights, Pelham, Westchester County, N.Y., May 21, 1988 (age 56 years, 294 days). Koster, a retired police officer, was angry over ruling the judge had issued two days earlier; he killed himself at the scene. Burial location unknown.
  The Richard J. Daronco Westchester County Courthouse, in White Plains, New York, is named for him.
  See also federal judicial profile — Wikipedia article — Biographical Directory of Federal Judges
J. Bratton Davis John Bratton Davis (1917-2004) — also known as J. Bratton Davis — of Columbia, Richland County, S.C. Born in Hartsville, Darlington County, S.C., October 27, 1917. Democrat. Lawyer; served in the U.S. Navy during World War II; campaign manager for Donald S. Russell for Governor, 1962; delegate to Democratic National Convention from South Carolina, 1964; U.S. bankruptcy judge, 1978-2000. Died October 29, 2004 (age 87 years, 2 days). Interment at Elmwood Cemetery, Columbia, S.C.
  Relatives: Son of John Bratton Davis (1885-1925) and Sarah Eleanor (Causey) Davis (1892-1975); married to Margaret Smyth McKissick (1923-2018).
  The J. Bratton Davis U.S. Bankruptcy Courthouse (built 1936; given current name about 2005), in Columbia, South Carolina, is named for him.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: U.S. Bankruptcy Court for South Carolina
Everett M. Dirksen Everett McKinley Dirksen (1896-1969) — also known as Everett M. Dirksen; "The Wizard of Ooze" — of Pekin, Tazewell County, Ill. Born in Pekin, Tazewell County, Ill., January 4, 1896. Republican. Served in the U.S. Army during World War I; merchant; U.S. Representative from Illinois 16th District, 1933-49; delegate to Republican National Convention from Illinois, 1940 (alternate), 1948, 1952 (speaker), 1956 (speaker), 1960 (member, Credentials Committee), 1964 (delegation chair), 1968 (delegation chair); U.S. Senator from Illinois, 1951-69; died in office 1969. Christian Reformed. Member, American Legion; Veterans of Foreign Wars; Freemasons; Order of the Eastern Star; Shriners; Eagles; Elks; Moose; American Bar Association; Odd Fellows; Izaak Walton League. Died, of lung cancer, at the Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Washington, D.C., September 7, 1969 (age 73 years, 246 days). Interment at Glendale Memorial Gardens, Pekin, Ill.
  Relatives: Father of Joy Dirksen (who married Howard Henry Baker Jr. (1925-2014)).
  Political family: Baker-Dirksen family of Huntsville and Alcoa, Tennessee.
  Cross-reference: Harold E. Rainville
  The Dirksen Senate Office Building (opened 1958), in Washington, D.C., is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile
  Books about Everett Dirksen: Byron C. Hulsey, Everett Dirksen and His Presidents: How a Senate Giant Shaped American Politics
  Image source: U.S. postage stamp (1981)
  Richard Joseph Donovan (1926-1971) — also known as Richard Donovan; Dick Donovan — of Chula Vista, San Diego County, Calif. Born in New Rochelle Hospital, New Rochelle, Westchester County, N.Y., February 24, 1926. Republican. Served in the U.S. Navy during World War II; police officer; lawyer; member of California state assembly, 1965-69; municipal judge in California, 1969-71; died in office 1971. Catholic; later Congregationalist. Member, Elks; Kiwanis; Sons of the American Revolution. Suffered a self-inflicted gunshot wound, and died soon after, in a hospital at Chula Vista, San Diego County, Calif., November 21, 1971 (age 45 years, 270 days). Cremated; ashes interred at Glen Abbey Memorial Park, Bonita, Calif.
  The Richard J. Donovan Correctional Facility, in San Diego County, California, is named for him.
  John Goodchild Dow (1905-2003) — also known as John G. Dow — of Rockland County, N.Y. Born in Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., May 6, 1905. Democratic candidate for New York state senate 33rd District, 1954; Democratic candidate for New York state assembly from Rockland County, 1956; U.S. Representative from New York 27th District, 1965-69, 1971-73; defeated, 1968 (Democratic), 1972 (Democratic), 1974 (Democratic), 1982 (Democratic primary), 1982 (Liberal), 1990 (Democratic); delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1968. Died in Suffern, Rockland County, N.Y., March 11, 2003 (age 97 years, 309 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Joy Wheeler Dow (born 1859) and Elizabeth (Goodchild) Dow.
  The John G. Dow Post Office Building, in Tappan, New York, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Henry Durant (1802-1875) — of Byfield, Newbury, Essex County, Mass.; Oakland, Alameda County, Calif. Born in Acton, Middlesex County, Mass., June 18, 1802. Pastor; founder, College of California; first president, University of California, 1870-72; mayor of Oakland, Calif., 1873-75; died in office 1875. Congregationalist. Died in Oakland, Alameda County, Calif., January 22, 1875 (age 72 years, 218 days). Interment at Mountain View Cemetery, Oakland, Calif.
  Relatives: Married 1833 to Mary E. Buffett.
  The Hotel Durant (built 1928; renamed 2017 as Graduate Berkeley), in Berkeley, California, was named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS Henry Durant (built 1943 at Sausalito, California; scrapped 1963) was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article
  Perry B. Duryea Jr. (1921-2004) — of Montauk, Suffolk County, Long Island, N.Y. Born in Montauk, Suffolk County, Long Island, N.Y., October 18, 1921. Republican. Served in the U.S. Navy during World War II; member of New York state assembly, 1961-77 (Suffolk County 1st District 1961-65, 1st District 1966-77); Speaker of the New York State Assembly, 1969-73; delegate to New York state constitutional convention 1st District, 1967; member of New York Republican State Central Committee, 1968; delegate to Republican National Convention from New York, 1972; candidate for Governor of New York, 1978. Member, American Legion; Veterans of Foreign Wars; Lions; Freemasons. Died, from injuries suffered in a car accident, January 11, 2004 (age 82 years, 85 days). Interment at Fort Hill Cemetery, Montauk, Long Island, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Perry B. Duryea (born c.1897); married to Elizabeth Ann Weed.
  The Perry B. Duryea, Jr. State Office Building, in Islip, New York, is named for him.
  David William Dyer (1910-1998) — Born in Columbus, Franklin County, Ohio, June 28, 1910. U.S. District Judge for the Southern District of Florida, 1961-66; Judge of U.S. Court of Appeals for the 5th Circuit, 1966-76; took senior status 1976; Judge of U.S. Court of Appeals for the 11th Circuit, 1981-98; died in office 1998. Died in Miami, Miami-Dade County, Fla., June 7, 1998 (age 87 years, 344 days). Burial location unknown.
  The David W. Dyer Federal Building and Courthouse, in Miami, Florida, is named for him.
  See also federal judicial profile — Biographical Directory of Federal Judges
  John Morton Eshleman (1876-1916) — also known as John M. Eshleman; Jack Eshleman — of California. Born in Villa Ridge, Pulaski County, Ill., June 14, 1876. Republican. Member of California state assembly 52nd District; elected 1906; delegate to Republican National Convention from California, 1912; Lieutenant Governor of California, 1915-16; died in office 1916. Member, Freemasons. Died, of tuberculosis, in a train station at at Indio, Riverside County, Calif., February 28, 1916 (age 39 years, 259 days). Original interment in unknown location; reinterment at Sunset View Cemetery, El Cerrito, Calif.
  Relatives: Married to Elizabeth Ledgett Eshleman (c.1884-1961).
  Eshleman Hall, at the University of California Berkeley, is named for him.
  March Fong Eu (1922-2017) — also known as March Kong; March K. Fong — of Oakland, Alameda County, Calif.; Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, Calif. Born in Oakdale, Stanislaus County, Calif., March 29, 1922. Democrat. Dental hygenist; supervisor of dental health education, Alameda County; member of California state assembly 15th District, 1967-74; delegate to Democratic National Convention from California, 1968, 1988; secretary of state of California, 1975-94; resigned 1994; defeated, 2002; U.S. Ambassador to Micronesia, 1994-96. Female. Chinese ancestry. Member, Delta Kappa Gamma. Died, following a fall, in Irvine, Orange County, Calif., December 21, 2017 (age 95 years, 267 days). The California Secretary of State building in Sacramento is named for her. Cremated; ashes interred at Mountain View Cemetery, Oakland, Calif.
  Relatives: Daughter of Yuen Kong and Shin (Shee) Kong; married to Chester Fong and Henry Eu; adoptive mother of Matthew Kipling Fong (1953-2011).
  The March Fong Eu Secretary of State Building, Sacramento, California, is named for her.
  See also Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Jacob Sloat Fassett (1853-1924) — also known as J. Sloat Fassett — of Elmira, Chemung County, N.Y. Born in Elmira, Chemung County, N.Y., November 13, 1853. Republican. Lawyer; newspaper editor; Chemung County District Attorney, 1879-80; delegate to Republican National Convention from New York, 1880, 1892, 1904, 1908, 1916; member of New York state senate 27th District, 1884-91; Secretary of Republican National Committee, 1888-92; U.S. Collector of Customs, 1891; candidate for Governor of New York, 1891; U.S. Representative from New York 33rd District, 1905-11; defeated, 1910; banker; lumber business. Died in Vancouver, British Columbia, April 21, 1924 (age 70 years, 160 days). Interment at Woodlawn Cemetery, Elmira, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Newton Pomeroy Fassett (1822-1894) and Martha Ellen (Sloat) Fassett (1829-1907); married, February 13, 1879, to Jennie L. Crocker (1860-1939; daughter of Edwin Bryant Crocker; niece of Charles Crocker); fourth cousin once removed of Zenas Ferry Moody (1832-1917) and Alfred Clark Chapin.
  Political families: Kellogg-Adams-Seymour-Chapin family of Connecticut and New York; Crocker-Whitehouse family of Sacramento, California (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  The village of Fassett, Quebec, Canada, is named for him.  — Fassett Elementary School, in Elmira, New York, is named for him.  — Fassett Commons, a building at Elmira College, Elmira, New York, is named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS Jacob Sloat Fassett (built 1944 at Savannah, Georgia; scrapped 1965) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Wilkie D. Ferguson Jr. (1938-2003) — Born in Miami, Miami-Dade County, Fla., May 11, 1938. U.S. District Judge for the Southern District of Florida, 1993-2003; died in office 2003. African ancestry. Died in Miami, Miami-Dade County, Fla., June 9, 2003 (age 65 years, 29 days). Burial location unknown.
  The Wilkie D. Ferguson, Jr. U.S. Courthouse, in Miami, Florida, is named for him.
  See also federal judicial profile — Biographical Directory of Federal Judges
Gerald R. Ford Gerald Rudolph Ford Jr. (1913-2006) — also known as Gerald R. Ford; Jerry Ford; Leslie Lynch King Jr.; "Passkey" — of Grand Rapids, Kent County, Mich.; Rancho Mirage, Riverside County, Calif. Born in Omaha, Douglas County, Neb., July 14, 1913. Republican. Lawyer; served in the U.S. Navy during World War II; delegate to Republican National Convention from Michigan, 1948, 1960, 1964; U.S. Representative from Michigan 5th District, 1949-73; resigned 1973; member, President's Commission on the Assassination of President KNDY, 1963-64; Vice President of the United States, 1973-74; President of the United States, 1974-77; defeated, 1976. Episcopalian. English and Scottish ancestry. Member, Freemasons; Scottish Rite Masons; Shriners; American Legion; Veterans of Foreign Wars; Amvets; Sons of the American Revolution; Forty and Eight; Jaycees; Delta Kappa Epsilon; Phi Delta Phi; Humane Society; Elks; American Bar Association. Shot at in two separate incidents in San Francisco in September 1975. On September 5, Lynette 'Squeaky' Fromme, follower of murderous cult leader Charles Manson, got close to the President with a loaded pistol, and squeezed the trigger at close range; the gun misfired. On September 22, Sara Jane Moore fired a shot at him, but a bystander deflected her aim. Both women were convicted and sentenced to life in prison. Received the Medal of Freedom in 1999. Died in Rancho Mirage, Riverside County, Calif., December 26, 2006 (age 93 years, 165 days). Interment at Gerald R. Ford Museum, Grand Rapids, Mich.
  Relatives: Step-son of Gerald Rudolph Ford, Sr. (1890-1962); son of Leslie Lynch King, Sr. (1884-1941) and Dorothy Ayer (Gardner) King Ford (1892-1967); half-brother of Thomas G. Ford Sr. (1918-1995); married, October 15, 1948, to Betty Warren.
  Political family: Ford family of Grand Rapids, Michigan.
  Cross-reference: Richard M. Nixon — L. William Seidman
  The Gerald R. Ford Freeway (I-196), in Kent, Ottawa, and Allegan counties, Michigan, is named for him.  — The Gerald R. Ford International Airport (opened 1963, given present name 1999), near Grand Rapids, Michigan, is named for him.  — The Gerald R. Ford Federal Building and U.S. Courthouse, in Grand Rapids, Michigan, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Books by Gerald R. Ford: A Time to Heal: The Autobiography of Gerald R. Ford (1983)
  Books about Gerald R. Ford: John Robert Greene, The Presidency of Gerald R. Ford — Edward L. Schapsmeier, Gerald R. Ford's Date With Destiny: A Political Biography — James Cannon, Time and Chance : Gerald Ford's Appointment With History — Douglas Brinkley, Gerald R. Ford
  Image source: Michigan Manual 1957-58
  Ettie Garner (1869-1948) — also known as Mariette Elizabeth Rheiner — Born in Sabinal, Uvalde County, Tex., July 17, 1869. Democrat. Second Lady of the United States, 1933-41. Female. Swiss ancestry. Died, from Parkinson's disease, in Uvalde, Uvalde County, Tex., September 17, 1948 (age 79 years, 62 days). Interment at Uvalde Cemetery, Uvalde, Tex.
  Relatives: Daughter of Johann Peter Rheiner (1832-1879) and Mary Elizabeth (Watson) Rheiner (1849-1870); married, November 25, 1895, to John Nance Garner (1868-1967).
  Ettie R. Garner Hall, at Southwest Texas Junior College, Uvalde, Texas, is named for her.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Edwin Peabody Gerry (1846-1911) — also known as E. Peabody Gerry — of Jamaica Plain, Boston, Suffolk County, Mass. Born in Standish, Cumberland County, Maine, November 2, 1846. Republican. Physician; candidate in primary for mayor of Boston, Mass., 1903. Died in Phillipston, Worcester County, Mass., June 22, 1911 (age 64 years, 232 days). Interment at Mt. Auburn Cemetery, Cambridge, Mass.
  Relatives: Son of Edwin Jerome Gerry (1820-1885) and Sophia J. (Goodwin) Gerry (1827-1898).
  Gerry Hall (opened 1962, demolished 2007), at Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire, was named for him.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Sam Melville Gibbons (1920-2012) — also known as Sam M. Gibbons — of Tampa, Hillsborough County, Fla. Born in Tampa, Hillsborough County, Fla., January 20, 1920. Democrat. Major in the U.S. Army during World War II; lawyer; member of Florida state house of representatives, 1953-58; member of Florida state senate, 1959-62; U.S. Representative from Florida, 1963-97 (10th District 1963-67, 6th District 1967-73, 7th District 1973-93, 11th District 1993-97); delegate to Democratic National Convention from Florida, 1964, 1968, 1984, 1996. Presbyterian. Died in Tampa, Hillsborough County, Fla., October 9, 2012 (age 92 years, 263 days). Interment at Myrtle Hill Memorial Park, Tampa, Fla.
  Relatives: Married to Martha Hanley (1923-2003).
  The Sam M. Gibbons U.S. Courthouse, in Tampa, Florida, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  John Cooper Godbold (1920-2009) — also known as John C. Godbold — Born in Coy, Wilcox County, Ala., March 24, 1920. Served in the U.S. Army during World War II; lawyer; law professor; author; Judge of U.S. Court of Appeals for the 5th Circuit, 1966-81; Judge of U.S. Court of Appeals for the 11th Circuit, 1981-87; took senior status 1987. Died in Montgomery, Montgomery County, Ala., December 22, 2009 (age 89 years, 273 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Married to Betty Showalter.
  The John C. Godbold Federal Building, in Atlanta, Georgia, is named for him.
  See also federal judicial profile — Biographical Directory of Federal Judges
  Frances Goldin (1924-2020) — also known as Frances Axler — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born in Queens, Queens County, N.Y., June 22, 1924. Housing rights and neighborhood activist; American Labor candidate for New York state senate 18th District, 1950; literary agent. Female. Jewish ancestry. Died in Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., May 16, 2020 (age 95 years, 329 days). Cremated.
  Relatives: Daughter of Michael Axler and Sophie (Saslowsky) Axler; married 1944 to Morris Goldin.
  The Francis Goldin Houses apartment building (opened 2018), in Manhattan, New York, is named for her.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
John Gorrie John Gorrie (1803-1855) — of Apalachicola, Franklin County, Fla. Born in Nevis, October 3, 1803. Physician; postmaster at Apalachicola, Fla., 1834-38; mayor of Apalachicola, Fla., 1837-38; banker; inventor of the first ice-making machine, patented in 1851. Episcopalian. Scottish ancestry. Member, Freemasons. Died in Apalachicola, Franklin County, Fla., June 29, 1855 (age 51 years, 269 days). Original interment at Magnolia Cemetery, Apalachicola, Fla.; reinterment at Gorrie Square, Apalachicola, Fla.
  Relatives: Married 1838 to Caroline Frances Myrick (1805-1864).
  The John Gorrie Memorial Bridge (built 1935; rebuilt 1988), which carries U.S. highways 98 and 319 across Apalachicola Bay, from Apalachicola to Eastpoint, in Franklin County, Florida, is named for him.  — John Gorrie Junior High School (built 1923; closed 1997; now an apartment building called The John Gorrie), in Jacksonville, Florida, was named for him.  — Gorrie Elementary School (built 1889 as Hyde Park School; renamed 1915), in Tampa, Florida, is named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS John Gorrie (built 1942-43 at Jacksonville, Florida; scrapped 1967) was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: Palm Beach (Fla.) Post, October 17, 1993
  Edward F. Gorton (1854-1929) — of Lake Forest, Lake County, Ill. Born in Ashtabula, Ashtabula County, Ohio, May 6, 1854. Lawyer; mayor of Lake Forest, Ill., 1895-1902. Died in Italy, March 10, 1929 (age 74 years, 308 days). Interment at Lake Forest Cemetery, Lake Forest, Ill.
  The Edward F. Gorton School (built 1901 as Central School; renamed 1905; closed 1971; became Gorton Community Center 1978), in Lake Forest, Illinois, is named for him.
  Frank Porter Graham (1886-1972) — also known as Frank P. Graham — of Chapel Hill, Orange County, N.C. Born in Fayetteville, Cumberland County, N.C., October 14, 1886. Democrat. School teacher; college instructor; lawyer; served in the U.S. Army during World War I; university professor; president of the University of North Carolina, 1931-49; U.S. Senator from North Carolina, 1949-50; appointed 1949; defeated, 1950. Presbyterian. Member, Americans for Democratic Action; Phi Beta Kappa. Died in Chapel Hill, Orange County, N.C., February 16, 1972 (age 85 years, 125 days). Interment at Old Chapel Hill Cemetery, Chapel Hill, N.C.
  Relatives: Son of Alexander Graham and Katherine Bryan (Sloan) Graham; married 1932 to Marian Drane (1899-1967).
  The Frank Porter Graham Student Union building, at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial — NCpedia
  William Walton Griest (1858-1929) — also known as William W. Griest — of Lancaster, Lancaster County, Pa. Born in Christiana, Lancaster County, Pa., September 22, 1858. Republican. Newspaper editor; president of electric railways and lighting companies; delegate to Republican National Convention from Pennsylvania, 1896, 1900, 1904, 1908, 1912, 1916, 1920, 1924 (member, Committee on Rules and Order of Business), 1928 (member, Committee on Rules and Order of Business); secretary of the commonwealth of Pennsylvania, 1899-1903; U.S. Representative from Pennsylvania, 1909-29 (9th District 1909-23, 10th District 1923-29); died in office 1929. Died in Mt. Clemens, Macomb County, Mich., December 5, 1929 (age 71 years, 74 days). Interment at Woodward Hill Cemetery, Lancaster, Pa.
  Relatives: Son of Ellwood Griest and Rebecca (Walton) Griest; married, October 17, 1888, to Elizabeth P. Smith.
  The W. W. Griest Building (built 1924-25), a 14-story office building in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  Kenneth Frederick Hahn (1920-1997) — also known as Kenneth Hahn; Kenny Hahn — of Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, Calif. Born in Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, Calif., August 19, 1920. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Navy during World War II; member, Los Angeles City Council, 1947-52; Los Angeles County Supervisor, 1952-92; alternate delegate to Democratic National Convention from California, 1952; candidate in primary for U.S. Senator from California, 1970. Church of Christ. Died, from heart failure, in a hospital at Inglewood, Los Angeles County, Calif., October 12, 1997 (age 77 years, 54 days). Interment at Inglewood Park Cemetery, Inglewood, Calif.
  Relatives: Son of John Heinrich Hahn and Hattie Louise (Wiggins) Hahn; brother of Gordon R. Hahn; father of James Kenneth Hahn and Janice Kay Hahn (born1952).
  Political family: Hahn family of Los Angeles, California.
  The Kenneth Hahn State Recreation Area, in Los Angeles, California, is named for him.  — The Kenneth Hahn Hall of Administration, in Los Angeles, California, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article
Hannibal Hamlin Hannibal Hamlin (1809-1891) — of Hampden, Penobscot County, Maine; Bangor, Penobscot County, Maine. Born in Paris, Oxford County, Maine, August 27, 1809. Farmer; surveyor; compositor; lawyer; member of Maine state house of representatives, 1836-41, 1847; Speaker of the Maine State House of Representatives, 1837, 1839-40; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Maine, 1840; U.S. Representative from Maine 6th District, 1843-47; U.S. Senator from Maine, 1848-57, 1857-61, 1869-81; Governor of Maine, 1857; Vice President of the United States, 1861-65; candidate for Republican nomination for Vice President, 1864, 1868; U.S. Collector of Customs, 1865-66; U.S. Minister to Spain, 1881-82. Died in Bangor, Penobscot County, Maine, July 4, 1891 (age 81 years, 311 days). Interment at Mt. Hope Cemetery, Bangor, Maine; statue at Kenduskeag Parkway, Bangor, Maine.
  Relatives: Son of Cyrus Hamlin (1769-1829) and Anna (Livermore) Hamlin (1775-1852); brother of Elijah Livermore Hamlin; married, December 10, 1833, to Sarah Jane Emery (1815-1855; daughter of Stephen Emery (1790-1863)); married, September 25, 1856, to Ellen Vesta Emery (daughter of Stephen Emery (1790-1863)); father of Charles Hamlin and Hannibal Emery Hamlin (1858-1938); granduncle of Isaiah Kidder Stetson; great-granduncle of Clarence Cutting Stetson; first cousin once removed of John Appleton; first cousin twice removed of Charles Sumner Hamlin; third cousin once removed of David Sears; fourth cousin of George Pickering Bemis; fourth cousin once removed of Henry Fisk Janes, John Mason Jr., William Henry Harrison Stowell, Walter S. Bemis and Eldred C. Pitkin.
  Political families: Hamlin-Bemis family of Bangor, Maine; Kellogg-Adams-Seymour-Chapin family of Connecticut and New York (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Hamlin County, S.Dak. is named for him.
  The town of Hamlin, Maine, is named for him.  — The town of Hamlin, New York, is named for him.  — The city of Hamlin, Kansas, is named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS Hannibal Hamlin (built 1942-43 at South Portland, Maine; scrapped 1971) was named for him.  — Hannibal Hamlin Hall, at the University of Maine, Orono, Maine, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Books about Hannibal Hamlin: Charles Eugene Hamlin, The Life and Times of Hannibal Hamlin — Mark Scroggins, Hannibal
  Image source: James G. Blaine, Twenty Years of Congress, vol. 2 (1886)
Wade Hampton Wade Hampton III (1818-1902) — also known as "Savior of South Carolina" — of Columbia, Richland County, S.C.; Charleston, Charleston County, S.C. Born in Charleston, Charleston County, S.C., March 28, 1818. Democrat. Member of South Carolina state senate, 1858; general in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; Governor of South Carolina, 1876-79; defeated, 1865; U.S. Senator from South Carolina, 1879-91; delegate to Democratic National Convention from South Carolina, 1880; U.S. Railroad Commissioner, 1893-97. Episcopalian. Awarded the Confederate Medal of Honor by the Sons of Confederate Veterans. Lost a leg in an accident in 1878. Slaveowner. Died in Columbia, Richland County, S.C., April 11, 1902 (age 84 years, 14 days). Interment at Trinity Episcopal Cathedral Cemetery, Columbia, S.C.; statue at State House Grounds, Columbia, S.C.
  Relatives: Son of Wade Hampton (1791-1858) and Ann (FitzSimons) Hampton; married, October 10, 1838, to Margaret Buchanan Frances Preston (1818-1852; daughter of Francis Smith Preston; sister of William Campbell Preston (1794-1860)); married 1858 to Mary Singleton McDuffie (1830-1874; daughter of George McDuffie); nephew of Caroline Martha Hampton (1807-1883; who married John Smith Preston) and Susan Frances Hampton (1816-1845; who married John Laurence Manning); grandson of Wade Hampton (1752-1835).
  Political families: Breckinridge-Preston-Cabell family of Virginia; Kellogg-Adams-Seymour-Chapin family of Connecticut and New York (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Hampton County, S.C. is named for him.
  The town of Hampton, South Carolina, is named for him.  — Wade Hampton High School (built 1960, rebuilt 2006), in Greenville, South Carolina, is named for him.  — The Wade Hampton State Office Building (opened 1940), in Columbia, South Carolina, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Books about Wade Hampton: Walter Brian Cisco, Wade Hampton: Confederate Warrior, Conservative Statesman
  Image source: William C. Roberts, Leading Orators (1884)
  Freeman P. Hankins (1917-1988) — also known as Freeman Hankins — of Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa. Born in Brunswick, Glynn County, Ga., September 30, 1917. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army during World War II; funeral director; member of Pennsylvania state house of representatives, 1961-67; member of Pennsylvania state senate 7th District, 1967-88; died in office 1988. Baptist. African ancestry. Member, American Legion; Amvets; NAACP; Freemasons; American Woodmen; Elks. Died, from heart disease, in the University of Pennsylvania Hospital, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., December 31, 1988 (age 71 years, 92 days). Interment at Fernwood Cemetery, Upper Darby Township, Delaware County, Pa.
  Relatives: Son of Oliver Hankins and Anna (Pyles) Hankins; married, April 20, 1939, to Dorothy Days.
  The Freeman Hankins branch post office, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article
Philip A. Hart Philip Aloysius Hart (1912-1976) — also known as Philip A. Hart — of Birmingham, Oakland County, Mich.; Mackinac Island, Mackinac County, Mich. Born in Bryn Mawr, Montgomery County, Pa., December 10, 1912. Democrat. Lawyer; colonel in the U.S. Army during World War II; candidate for secretary of state of Michigan, 1950; U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of Michigan, 1952-53; Lieutenant Governor of Michigan, 1955-58; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Michigan, 1956, 1960, 1964, 1968 (speaker), 1976; U.S. Senator from Michigan, 1959-76; died in office 1976. Member, Urban League. Died in Washington, D.C., December 26, 1976 (age 64 years, 16 days). Interment at St. Anne's Catholic Cemetery, Mackinac Island, Mich.
  The Hart Senate Office Building (opened 1982), in Washington, D.C., is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Image source: Michigan Manual 1957-58
  Mark Odom Hatfield (1922-2011) — also known as Mark O. Hatfield — of Salem, Marion County, Ore. Born in Dallas, Polk County, Ore., July 12, 1922. Republican. Served in the U.S. Navy during World War II; member of Oregon state house of representatives, 1951-54; delegate to Republican National Convention from Oregon, 1952 (member, Resolutions Committee), 1956, 1960 (delegation chair); member of Oregon state senate, 1955-56; secretary of state of Oregon, 1957-59; Governor of Oregon, 1959-67; U.S. Senator from Oregon, 1967-97. Baptist. Member, Freemasons. Died in Portland, Multnomah County, Ore., August 7, 2011 (age 89 years, 26 days). Interment at Willamette National Cemetery, Portland, Ore.
  Relatives: Son of Charles Dolen Hatfield (1887-1972) and Dovie (Odom) Hatfield (1893-1979); married, July 8, 1958, to Antoinette Kuzmanich.
  The Mark O. Hatfield U.S. Courthouse (opened 1997), in Portland, Oregon, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — National Governors Association biography — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Books by Mark O. Hatfield: Against the Grain: Reflections of a Rebel Republican, with Diane N. Solomon (2000)
Rutherford B. Hayes Rutherford Birchard Hayes (1822-1893) — also known as Rutherford B. Hayes; "Rutherfraud B. Hayes"; "His Fraudulency" — of Ohio. Born in Delaware, Delaware County, Ohio, October 4, 1822. Republican. Lawyer; general in the Union Army during the Civil War; U.S. Representative from Ohio 2nd District, 1865-67; Governor of Ohio, 1868-72, 1876-77; President of the United States, 1877-81. Methodist. Scottish ancestry. Member, Loyal Legion; Grand Army of the Republic; Odd Fellows; Delta Kappa Epsilon. Stricken by a heart attack at the railroad station in Cleveland, Ohio, and died that night in Fremont, Sandusky County, Ohio, January 17, 1893 (age 70 years, 105 days). Original interment and cenotaph at Oakwood Cemetery, Fremont, Ohio; reinterment in 1915 at Rutherford B. Hayes State Memorial Grounds, Fremont, Ohio.
  Relatives: Son of Rutherford Hayes, Jr. and Sophia (Birchard) Hayes; married, December 30, 1852, to Lucy Webb Hayes; father of James Webb Cook Hayes (1856-1934).
  Political family: Hayes family of Fremont, Ohio.
  Cross-reference: Leopold Markbreit — James M. Comly — Joseph P. Bradley
  Hayes County, Neb. is named for him.
  Rutherford B. Hayes High School, in Delaware, Ohio, is named for him.  — The Presidente Hayes Department (province), and its capital city, Villa Hayes, in Paraguay, are named for him.  — Hayes Hall (built 1893), at Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio, is named for him.
  Personal motto: "He serves his party best who serves his country best."
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Books about Rutherford B. Hayes: Ari Hoogenboom, Rutherford B. Hayes: Warrior and President — Hans Trefousse, Rutherford B. Hayes: 1877 - 1881 — William H. Rehnquist, Centennial Crisis : The Disputed Election of 1876
  Image source: James G. Blaine, Twenty Years of Congress, vol. 2 (1886)
  Clement Furman Haynsworth Jr. (1912-1989) — also known as Clement F. Haynsworth, Jr. — Born in Greenville, Greenville County, S.C., October 30, 1912. Lawyer; served in the U.S. Navy during World War II; Judge of U.S. Court of Appeals for the 4th Circuit, 1957-81; took senior status 1981. Died in Greenville, Greenville County, S.C., November 22, 1989 (age 77 years, 23 days). Interment at Springwood Cemetery, Greenville, S.C.
  The C. F. Haynsworth Federal Building and U.S. Courthouse, in Greenville, South Carolina, is named for him.
  John Williamson Herron (1827-1912) — also known as John W. Herron — of Hamilton County, Ohio. Born in Shippensburg, Cumberland County, Pa., May 10, 1827. Lawyer; delegate to Ohio state constitutional convention from Hamilton County, 1873; U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of Ohio, 1889-94. Died in Cincinnati, Hamilton County, Ohio, August 5, 1912 (age 85 years, 87 days). Interment at Spring Grove Cemetery, Cincinnati, Ohio.
  Relatives: Son of Francis Herron (1794-1841) and Jane (Willis) Herron (1800-1877); married, March 7, 1854, to Harriet Anne Collins (1833-1902); father of Helen Louise Herron (who married William Howard Taft); grandfather of Robert Alphonso Taft, Charles Phelps Taft II and Frederick Lippitt (1916-2005); great-grandfather of William Howard Taft III, Robert Taft Jr. and Seth Chase Taft; second great-grandfather of Robert Alphonso Taft III.
  Political families: Kellogg-Adams-Seymour-Chapin family of Connecticut and New York; Greene-Lippitt family of Providence, Rhode Island (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Herron Gymnasium (built 1896; later named Van Voorhis Hall; demolished 1986) at Miami University, Oxford, Ohio, was named for him.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Spessard Lindsey Holland (1892-1971) — also known as Spessard L. Holland — of Bartow, Polk County, Fla. Born in Bartow, Polk County, Fla., July 10, 1892. Democrat. Lawyer; served in the U.S. Army during World War I; county judge in Florida, 1921-29; member of Florida state senate, 1932-40; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Florida, 1940 (alternate), 1948 (alternate), 1952 (alternate; member, Platform and Resolutions Committee), 1956 (alternate), 1968; Governor of Florida, 1941-45; U.S. Senator from Florida, 1946-71. Methodist. Member, American Legion; Veterans of Foreign Wars; Freemasons; Shriners; Kiwanis; Elks; Alpha Tau Omega; Phi Beta Kappa; Phi Kappa Phi; Phi Delta Phi; American Bar Association. Sponsor of 24th Amendment outlawing the poll tax. Died in Bartow, Polk County, Fla., November 6, 1971 (age 79 years, 119 days). Interment at Wildwood Cemetery, Bartow, Fla.
  Relatives: Son of Benjamin Franklin Holland and Fannie V. (Spessard) Holland; married, February 8, 1919, to Mary Agnes Groover.
  The Spessard Holland state office building (opened 1949), in Tallahassee, Florida, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Ernest Frederick Hollings (1922-2019) — also known as Ernest F. Hollings; Fritz Hollings; "Foghorn Leghorn" — of Charleston, Charleston County, S.C. Born in Charleston, Charleston County, S.C., January 1, 1922. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army during World War II; member of South Carolina state house of representatives, 1949-55; Lieutenant Governor of South Carolina, 1955-59; delegate to Democratic National Convention from South Carolina, 1956, 1996, 2000, 2004; Governor of South Carolina, 1959-63; U.S. Senator from South Carolina, 1966-2005; candidate for Democratic nomination for President, 1984. Lutheran. Member, American Bar Association; Freemasons; Shriners; Elks; American Legion; Veterans of Foreign Wars; Ancient Order of Hibernians; Sertoma. Died in Isle of Palms, Charleston County, S.C., April 6, 2019 (age 97 years, 95 days). Interment at Bethany Cemetery, Charleston, S.C.
  Cross-reference: Richard M. Miles
  The Hollings Judicial Center (renamed in 2015 as the J. Watie Waring Judicial Center), in Charleston, South Carolina, was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books by Ernest Hollings: Making Government Work (2008)
  Richard Joseph Hughes (1909-1992) — also known as Richard J. Hughes — of Trenton, Mercer County, N.J.; Princeton, Mercer County, N.J. Born in Florence, Burlington County, N.J., August 10, 1909. Democrat. Lawyer; candidate for U.S. Representative from New Jersey 4th District, 1938; chair of Mercer County Democratic Party, 1944-45; delegate to Democratic National Convention from New Jersey, 1948 (alternate), 1964, 1968 (chair, Credentials Committee; speaker), 1972; county judge in New Jersey, 1948-52; superior court judge in New Jersey, 1952-61; Governor of New Jersey, 1962-70; member of Democratic National Committee from New Jersey, 1970-73; chief justice of New Jersey state supreme court, 1973-79. Catholic. Member, Elks; Knights of Columbus; Phi Kappa Theta. Died, of congestive heart failure, in Boca Raton, Palm Beach County, Fla., December 7, 1992 (age 83 years, 119 days). Interment at St. Mary's Cemetery, Trenton, N.J.
  Relatives: Step-father of William Michael Murphy Jr. and Michael Murphy (born1949); father of Brian M. Hughes.
  Political family: Murphy-Hughes family of New Jersey.
  Cross-reference: William T. Hiering
  The Richard J. Hughes Justice Complex, in Trenton, New Jersey, is named for him.
  See also National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Books about Richard J. Hughes: John B. Wefing, The Life and Times of Richard J. Hughes: The Politics of Civility
George Magoffin Humphrey George Magoffin Humphrey (1890-1970) — also known as George M. Humphrey — of Mentor, Lake County, Ohio. Born in Cheboygan, Cheboygan County, Mich., March 8, 1890. Lawyer; president, M.A. Hanna Company (mining and processing iron and nickel ores), 1929-52; chairman of Pittsburgh Consolidated Coal Company; chairman, Executive Committee, National Steel Corporation; U.S. Secretary of the Treasury, 1953-57. Episcopalian. Died, from heart disease, in University Hospital, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, Ohio, January 20, 1970 (age 79 years, 318 days). Interment at Lake View Cemetery, Cleveland, Ohio.
  Relatives: Son of Watts Sherman Humphrey (1844-1916) and Caroline (Magoffin) Humphrey (1861-1946); married, January 15, 1913, to Pamela Stark.
  Humphrey House (offices, built 1965 and named for Humphrey, renovated and renamed Greenhill House 2004), at Harvard University Business School, Boston, Massachusetts, was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Image source: Eminent Americans (1954)
  James Baxter Hunt Jr. (b. 1937) — also known as James B. Hunt, Jr.; Jim Hunt — of North Carolina. Born in Greensboro, Guilford County, N.C., May 16, 1937. Democrat. Lieutenant Governor of North Carolina, 1973-77; Governor of North Carolina, 1977-85, 1993-2001; candidate for U.S. Senator from North Carolina, 1984; delegate to Democratic National Convention from North Carolina, 1996, 2000. Presbyterian. Still living as of 2014.
  The James B. Hunt, Jr. Library, at the North Carolina State University Centennial Campus, Raleigh, North Carolina, is named for him.  — Hunt Hall, a dormitory at the University of North Carolina Charlotte, in Charlotte, North Carolina, is named for him.  — The James B. Hunt Jr. Residence Hall, at the North Carolina School of Science and Mathematics, in Durham, North Carolina, is named for him.
  See also National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile
  Books about James B. Hunt: Wayne Grimsley, James B. Hunt: A North Carolina Progressive — Gary Pearce, Jim Hunt: A Biography
  Henry Edwards Huntington (1850-1927) — also known as Henry E. Huntington — of Oneonta, Otsego County, N.Y.; San Francisco, Calif.; San Marino, Los Angeles County, Calif. Born in Oneonta, Otsego County, N.Y., February 27, 1850. Republican. Owned and expanded the streetcar and trolley system in Southern California; real estate developer; Presidential Elector for New York, 1908. Member, Sons of the Revolution. Died, from kidney disease and pneumonia, in Lankenau Hospital, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., May 23, 1927 (age 77 years, 85 days). Entombed in mausoleum at Huntington Library and Botanical Gardens, San Marino, Calif.
  Relatives: Son of Solon Huntington (1812-1890) and Harriet (Saunders) Huntington (1821-1906); married 1873 to Mary Alice Prentice (1852-1916); married 1913 to Arabella Duval 'Belle' (Yarrington) Huntington (1850-1924; his uncle's widow).
  The city of Huntington Beach, California, is named for him.  — The city of Huntington Park, California, is named for him.  — Huntington Lake, in Fresno County, California, is named for him.  — The Huntington Hotel (built 1907 as Hotel Wentworth; expanded and reopened 1914 as the Huntington Hotel; demolished 1989 and rebuilt; now Langham Huntington hotel) in Pasadena, California, is named for him.  — The Huntington Library, Art Museum, and Botanical Gardens, on his former estate, in San Marino, California, is named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS Henry E. Huntington (built 1943-44 at Terminal Island, California; scrapped 1961) was named for him.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  George Lewis Ingalls (1914-2001) — also known as George L. Ingalls — of Binghamton, Broome County, N.Y. Born in Danielson, Killingly, Windham County, Conn., June 7, 1914. Republican. Lawyer; member of New York state assembly, 1953-66 (Broome County 2nd District 1953-65, 125th District 1966). Congregationalist. Member, Phi Beta Kappa; Phi Kappa Phi; Phi Delta Phi; Rotary; Jaycees; American Bar Association. Trustee of the New York Power Authority in 1967-90. Died in Binghamton, Broome County, N.Y., April 10, 2001 (age 86 years, 307 days). Interment at Calvary Cemetery, Johnson City, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Louis Sessions Ingalls and Mary Ethel (Gallup) Ingalls; married, December 12, 1942, to Dorothy M. Joggerst (1912-2001).
  The George L. Ingalls Pump-Generating Plant, at the NYPA's Blenheim-Gilboa Pumped Storage Power Project, in North Blenheim, New York, is named for him.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Frank Minis Johnson Jr. (1918-1999) — also known as Frank M. Johnson, Jr. — of Jasper, Walker County, Ala.; Montgomery, Montgomery County, Ala. Born in Haleyville, Winston County, Ala., October 30, 1918. Republican. Served in the U.S. Army during World War II; delegate to Republican National Convention from Alabama, 1948; U.S. Attorney for the Northern District of Alabama, 1953-55; U.S. District Judge for the Middle District of Alabama, 1955-; Judge of U.S. Court of Appeals for the 5th Circuit, 1979-81; Judge of U.S. Court of Appeals for the 11th Circuit, 1981-92. Legendary for civil rights decisions; recipient of the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1995. Died of pneumonia, in Montgomery, Montgomery County, Ala., July 23, 1999 (age 80 years, 266 days). Interment at Hill Crest City Cemetery, Haleyville, Ala.
  Relatives: Son of Frank Minis Johnson (born c.1888).
  The Frank M. Johnson, Jr. Federal Building and U.S. Courthouse, in Montgomery, Alabama, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about Frank M. Johnson, Jr.: Frank Sikora, The Judge : The Life and Opinions of Alabama's Frank M. Johnson, Jr.
  Carey Estes Kefauver (1903-1963) — also known as Estes Kefauver — of Chattanooga, Hamilton County, Tenn. Born near Madisonville, Monroe County, Tenn., July 26, 1903. Democrat. Lawyer; U.S. Representative from Tennessee 3rd District, 1939-49; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Tennessee, 1944 (alternate; speaker), 1952; U.S. Senator from Tennessee, 1949-63; died in office 1963; candidate for Democratic nomination for President, 1952, 1956; candidate for Vice President of the United States, 1956. Baptist. Member, Freemasons; Lions; American Bar Association; Rotary; Americans for Democratic Action; American Political Science Association; Kappa Sigma; Phi Delta Phi. Died, from a ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm, at Bethesda Naval Hospital, Bethesda, Montgomery County, Md., August 10, 1963 (age 60 years, 15 days). Interment a private or family graveyard, Monroe County, Tenn.
  Relatives: Son of Robert Cooke Kefauver (1870-1958) and Phredonia Bradford (Estes) Kefauver (1873-1948); married, August 8, 1935, to Nancy Patterson Pigott (1911-1967); first cousin once removed of Joseph Wingate Folk (1869-1923); second cousin thrice removed of Montgomery Blair and Francis Preston Blair Jr.; third cousin twice removed of James Lawrence Blair, Francis Preston Blair Lee and Gist Blair; fourth cousin once removed of Edward Brooke Lee.
  Political family: Lee-Randolph family (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  The Estes Kefauver Federal Building, in Nashville, Tennessee, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about Estes Kefauver: Hugh Brogan, All Honorable Men : Huey Long, Robert Moses, Estes Kefauver, Richard J. Daley — Joseph Bruce Gorman, Kefauver: A Political Biography
  Robert Francis Kennedy (1925-1968) — also known as Robert F. Kennedy; Bobby Kennedy; "R.F.K." — of Boston, Suffolk County, Mass.; Barnstable, Barnstable County, Mass.; Glen Cove, Nassau County, Long Island, N.Y. Born in Boston, Suffolk County, Mass., November 20, 1925. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Navy during World War II; lawyer; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Massachusetts, 1956, 1960; U.S. Attorney General, 1961-64; U.S. Senator from New York, 1965-68; died in office 1968; candidate for Democratic nomination for President, 1968. Catholic. Member, American Bar Association; Veterans of Foreign Wars; American Legion. On June 5, 1968, while running for president, having just won the California presidential primary, was shot and mortally wounded by Sirhan Sirhan, in the Ambassador Hotel, and died the next day in in Good Samaritan Hospital, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, Calif., June 6, 1968 (age 42 years, 199 days). Interment at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Va.
  Relatives: Son of Joseph Patrick Kennedy, Sr. and Rose (Fitzgerald) Kennedy (1890-1995); brother of Joseph Patrick Kennedy Jr., John Fitzgerald Kennedy, Eunice Mary Kennedy (1921-2009; who married Robert Sargent Shriver Jr.), Patricia Kennedy Lawford (who married Peter Lawford), Jean Kennedy Smith and Edward Moore Kennedy; married, June 17, 1950, to Ethel Skakel; father of Kathleen Kennedy Townsend, Joseph Patrick Kennedy II and Kerry Kennedy (who married Andrew Mark Cuomo); uncle of John Fitzgerald Kennedy Jr., Mark Kennedy Shriver (born1964) and Patrick Joseph Kennedy (born1967); grandson of Patrick Joseph Kennedy (1858-1929) and John Francis Fitzgerald.
  Political family: Kennedy family.
  Cross-reference: Benjamin Altman — John Bartlow Martin — Frank Mankiewicz — Paul Schrade
  The Robert F. Kennedy Department of Justice Building (opened 1935, renamed 2001), in Washington, D.C., is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about Robert F. Kennedy: Arthur M. Schlesinger Jr., Robert Kennedy and His Times — Evan Thomas, Robert Kennedy : His Life — Joseph A. Palermo, In His Own Right — Thurston Clarke, The Last Campaign: Robert F. Kennedy and 82 Days That Inspired America — Nicholas deB. Katzenbach, Some of It Was Fun: Working with RFK and LBJ — Bill Eppridge, A Time it Was: Bobby Kennedy in the Sixties
  Critical books about Robert F. Kennedy: Allen Roberts, Robert Francis Kennedy: Biography of a Compulsive Politician — Victor Lasky, RFK: Myth and Man — Darwin Porter & Danforth Prince, The Kennedys: All the Gossip Unfit for Print
  John Henry Kinkead (1826-1904) — also known as John H. Kinkead — of Carson City, Nev.; Sitka, Alaska; Unionville, Pershing County, Nev. Born in Smithfield, Somerset County, Pa., December 10, 1826. Republican. Dry goods merchant; treasurer of Nevada Territory, 1862-64; delegate to Nevada state constitutional convention, 1863; postmaster at Sitka, Alaska, 1867-69; Governor of Nevada, 1879-83; Governor of Alaska District, 1884-85. Died in Carson City, Nev., August 15, 1904 (age 77 years, 249 days). Interment at Lone Mountain Cemetery, Carson City, Nev.
  Relatives: Married 1856 to Elizabeth Fall (1837-1907).
  The Kinkead state office building, in Carson City, Nevada, is named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS J. H. Kinkaid (built 1943 at Richmond, California; scrapped 1966) was named for him.
  See also National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Robert Carter Kirkwood (1909-1964) — also known as Robert C. Kirkwood — of Saratoga, Santa Clara County, Calif. Born in Mountain View, Santa Clara County, Calif., August 30, 1909. Republican. Lawyer; member of California state assembly, 1947-53; resigned 1953; alternate delegate to Republican National Convention from California, 1952; California state auditor, 1953-58; appointed 1953; defeated, 1958; General Manager, San Francisco Public Utilities Commission, 1959-64. Died in San Francisco, Calif., May 5, 1964 (age 54 years, 249 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Married, August 30, 1933, to Jean Hazard Gerlinder.
  The Robert C. Kirkwood Powerhouse, downstream from O'Shaughnessy Dam, in Tuolumne County, California, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article
  Frederick Ernest Lackey — also known as Dutch Lackey — of Hopkinsville, Christian County, Ky. Democrat. Mayor of Hopkinsville, Ky., 1958-65. Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Ernest Lackey; brother of Pierce Eubanks Lackey and Hecht S. Lackey; married to Bonnie Bessire; father of Sherrill Lackey Jeffers (1938-1997); uncle of Henry G. Lackey.
  Political family: Lackey family of Kentucky.
  The Lackey Municipal Building (opened 1965, superseded 2014), in Hopkinsville, Kentucky, was named for him.
  Fritz Garland Lanham (1880-1965) — also known as Fritz G. Lanham — of Fort Worth, Tarrant County, Tex. Born in Weatherford, Parker County, Tex., January 3, 1880. Democrat. Lawyer; U.S. Representative from Texas 12th District, 1919-47. Methodist. Died July 31, 1965 (age 85 years, 209 days). Interment at East Greenwood Cemetery, Weatherford, Tex.
  Relatives: Son of Samuel Willis Tucker Lanham (1846-1908) and Sarah (Meng) Lanham; married, October 27, 1908, to Beulah Rowe.
  The Fritz G. Lanham Federal Building in Fort Worth, Texas, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Theodore Levin (1897-1970) — of Detroit, Wayne County, Mich. Born in Chicago, Cook County, Ill., February 18, 1897. Lawyer; U.S. District Judge for the Eastern District of Michigan, 1946-70; died in office 1970. Jewish. Member, Freemasons; Shriners. Died December 31, 1970 (age 73 years, 316 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Father of Charles Leonard Levin and Joseph Levin (born c.1934); uncle of Sander Martin Levin and Carl Milton Levin.
  Political family: Levin family of Detroit, Michigan.
  The Theodore Levin U.S. Courthouse, in Detroit, Michigan, is named for him.
  Clarence Everett Lightner (1921-2002) — also known as Clarence E. Lightner — of Raleigh, Wake County, N.C. Born in Raleigh, Wake County, N.C., August 15, 1921. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army during World War II; funeral director; mayor of Raleigh, N.C., 1973-75; member of North Carolina state senate, 1977-78; delegate to Democratic National Convention from North Carolina, 1996, 2000. Presbyterian. African ancestry. Member, Omega Psi Phi. Died in Raleigh, Wake County, N.C., July 8, 2002 (age 80 years, 327 days). Interment at Mt. Hope Cemetery, Raleigh, N.C.
  Relatives: Son of Calvin E. Lightner and Mammie (Blackmon) Lightner; married 1946 to Marguerite Massey.
  The Clarence E. Lightner Public Safety Center (proposed in 2003, ultimately not built), in Raleigh, North Carolina, was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  James Helme Lincoln (1916-2011) — also known as James H. Lincoln — of Detroit, Wayne County, Mich.; Harbor Beach, Huron County, Mich. Born in Harbor Beach, Huron County, Mich., August 26, 1916. Democrat. Lawyer; served in the U.S. Merchant Marine during World War II; candidate for mayor of Detroit, Mich., 1953; candidate for circuit judge in Michigan 3rd Circuit, 1957, 1959; Wayne County Probate Judge, 1960-77; candidate for Michigan state board of education, 1980. Died in Harbor Beach, Huron County, Mich., July 23, 2011 (age 94 years, 331 days). Interment at Rock Falls Cemetery, Harbor Beach, Mich.
  Relatives: Son of Esther Elizabeth (Hoare) Lincoln (1879-1961) and Burr Buchanan Lincoln; married, June 21, 1941, to Mary F. Kimmerling; grandson of Lansing Edgar Lincoln; second cousin four times removed of Levi Lincoln; third cousin thrice removed of Levi Lincoln Jr. (1782-1868) and Enoch Lincoln.
  Political families: Lincoln-Lee family; Livingston-Schuyler family of New York; Whitney-Nye-Lincoln-Hay family (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  The James H. Lincoln Hall of Juvenile Justice, in Detroit, Michigan, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Jack Griffith London (1876-1916) — also known as Jack London; John Griffith Chaney — of Oakland, Alameda County, Calif.; Glen Ellen, Sonoma County, Calif. Born in San Francisco, Calif., January 12, 1876. Socialist. Novelist; candidate for mayor of Oakland, Calif., 1901 (Social Democratic), 1905 (Socialist). Died in Glen Ellen, Sonoma County, Calif., November 22, 1916 (age 40 years, 315 days). Interment at Jack London State Historic Park Cemetery, Glen Ellen, Calif.
  Relatives: Son of William Henry Chaney (1821-1903) and Flora (Wellman) London (1843-1922); married 1900 to Elizabeth May Maddern (1876-1947); married 1905 to Charmian 'Clara' Kittredge (1871-1955).
  Mount London, on the border between British Columbia, Canada, and Haines Borough, Alaska, is named for him.  — Jack London Square (entertainment and business development), and the surrounding Jack London District neighborhood, in Oakland, California, are named for him.  — Jack London Lake (Ozero Dzheja Londona), and the surrounding Jack London Nature Park, in Magadan Oblast, Russia, are named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS Jack London (built 1943 at Sausalito, California; scrapped 1968) was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Seybourn Harris Lynne (1907-2000) — also known as Seybourn H. Lynne — of Birmingham, Jefferson County, Ala. Born in Decatur, Morgan County, Ala., July 25, 1907. Democrat. Lawyer; county judge in Alabama, 1934-40; circuit judge in Alabama, 1940-42; served in the U.S. Army during World War II; U.S. District Judge for the Northern District of Alabama, 1946-73; took senior status 1973. Baptist. Member, American Bar Association; Blue Key; Pi Kappa Alpha; Phi Kappa Phi; Phi Delta Phi; Omicron Delta Kappa; Kiwanis. In 1963, he prohibited Gov. George C. Wallace from barring two Black students from attending the University of Alabama. In 1969, he ordered that Elmwood Cemetery in Birmingham, Ala., be desegregated. Died in Birmingham, Jefferson County, Ala., September 10, 2000 (age 93 years, 47 days). Interment at Decatur Cemetery, Decatur, Ala.
  Relatives: Son of Seybourn Arthur Lynne and Annie Leigh (Harris) Lynne; married, June 16, 1937, to Katherine Donaldson Brandau.
  The Seybourn H. Lynne U.S. Courthouse and Post Office, in Decatur, Alabama, is named for him.
  John Wellborn Martin (1884-1958) — also known as John W. Martin — of Jacksonville, Duval County, Fla. Born in Plainfield, Marion County, Fla., June 21, 1884. Democrat. Lawyer; mayor of Jacksonville, Fla., 1917-23; Governor of Florida, 1925-29; defeated in primary, 1932; candidate in primary for U.S. Senator from Florida, 1928; alternate delegate to Democratic National Convention from Florida, 1948, 1952, 1956. Baptist. Member, Freemasons; Shriners; Odd Fellows; Moose. Died in Jacksonville, Duval County, Fla., February 22, 1958 (age 73 years, 246 days). Interment at Evergreen Cemetery, Jacksonville, Fla.
  Relatives: Son of John Marshall Martin and Willie Martin (Owens) Martin; married, January 30, 1907, to Lottie Wilt Pepper; grandson of James Byeram Owens (c.1816-1889).
  Political family: Barksdale family of Virginia.
  Martin County, Fla. is named for him.
  The John W. Martin Building (built 1925 for state government offices; sold and became City Hall 1964; later demolished), in Tallahassee, Florida, was named for him.
  See also National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Robert Martinez (b. 1934) — also known as Bob Martinez — of Tampa, Hillsborough County, Fla. Born in Tampa, Hillsborough County, Fla., December 25, 1934. Republican. School teacher; mayor of Tampa, Fla., 1979-86; defeated, 1974; resigned 1986; Governor of Florida, 1987-91; defeated, 1990. Catholic. Hispanic ancestry. Still living as of 2014.
  Relatives: Married to Mary Jane Marino.
  The Bob Martinez Center (state offices and laboratories), in Tallahassee, Florida, is named for him.
  See also National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Romano Louis Mazzoli (b. 1932) — also known as Romano L. Mazzoli — of Louisville, Jefferson County, Ky. Born in Louisville, Jefferson County, Ky., November 2, 1932. Democrat. Lawyer; member of Kentucky state senate, 1968-70; candidate in primary for mayor of Louisville, Ky., 1969; U.S. Representative from Kentucky 3rd District, 1971-95. Catholic. Still living as of 2014.
  The Romano Mazzoli Federal Building, in Louisville, Kentucky, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Stewart Brett McKinney (1931-1987) — also known as Stewart B. McKinney — of Fairfield, Fairfield County, Conn.; Westport, Fairfield County, Conn. Born in Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, Pa., January 30, 1931. Republican. Member of Connecticut state house of representatives, 1967-71; U.S. Representative from Connecticut 4th District, 1971-87; died in office 1987; delegate to Republican National Convention from Connecticut, 1972. Bisexual. Member, Rotary; American Legion. Died, from acquired immune deficiency syndrome, Washington, D.C., May 7, 1987 (age 56 years, 97 days). Interment at Oak Lawn Cemetery, Fairfield, Conn.
  Relatives: Son of James Polk McKinney (1889-1941) and Clare Louise (Brett) McKinney (1893-1957); married, October 2, 1954, to Lucy Cunningham (1934-2014); father of John P. McKinney (born1964).
  The Stewart B. McKinney Transportation Center (built 1987), in Stamford, Connecticut, is named for him.  — The Stewart B. McKinney National Wildlife Refuge (etablished 1972 as the Salt Meadow Wildlife Refuge; renamed 1987), in Fairfield, New Haven, and Middlesex counties, Connecticut, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  John Lanneau McMillan (1898-1979) — also known as John L. McMillan — of Florence, Florence County, S.C. Born near Mullins, Marion County, S.C., April 12, 1898. Democrat. U.S. Representative from South Carolina 6th District, 1939-73. Baptist. Member, Freemasons; Forty and Eight; American Legion. Died in Florence, Florence County, S.C., September 3, 1979 (age 81 years, 144 days). Interment at Mt. Hope Cemetery, Florence, S.C.
  Relatives: Son of Malcolm Leonard McMillan and Mary Alice (Keith) McMillan; married, October 31, 1936, to Margaret Alexander English (1910-1997).
  The J. L. McMillan Federal Building (opened 1975), in Florence, South Carolina, is named for him.
  Epitaph: "No one has been more worthy of real honor than one who serves and loves his fellow man."
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
Patrick V. McNamara Patrick Vincent McNamara (1894-1966) — also known as Patrick V. McNamara — of Detroit, Wayne County, Mich. Born in North Weymouth, Weymouth, Norfolk County, Mass., October 4, 1894. Democrat. U.S. Senator from Michigan, 1955-66; died in office 1966; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Michigan, 1956, 1960, 1964. Member, Americans for Democratic Action. Died in Bethesda, Montgomery County, Md., April 30, 1966 (age 71 years, 208 days). Interment at Mt. Olivet Cemetery, Detroit, Mich.
  Cross-reference: John Brademas
  The Patrick V. McNamara Federal Building, in Detroit, Michigan, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — NNDB dossier
  Image source: Michigan Manual 1957-58
  Thomas Elliott Millsop (1898-1967) — also known as Thomas E. Millsop — of Weirton, Hancock County, W.Va. Born in Sharon, Mercer County, Pa., December 4, 1898. Republican. Served in the U.S. Marine Corps during World War I; steel executive; mayor of Weirton, W.Va., 1947-55; candidate for Presidential Elector for West Virginia, 1948; delegate to Republican National Convention from West Virginia, 1952. Scottish ancestry. Member, American Legion; Veterans of Foreign Wars; Elks; Freemasons; Scottish Rite Masons; Shriners; Jesters; Lions; Moose; Eagles; Rotary; Sigma Phi Epsilon. Died, following a heart attack, in Weirton, Hancock County, W.Va., September 12, 1967 (age 68 years, 282 days). Interment at Chestnut Ridge Cemetery, Florence, Pa.
  Relatives: Son of George Roy Millsop (1861-1928) and Mary Margaret (McCormick) Millsop (1868-1947); married, December 1, 1918, to Lauretta Brunswick (1898-1947); married 1949 to Eleanor (Marwitz) Ent (1900-1984); married, January 17, 1955, to Frances (Lowe) Weir (1889-1975).
  The Weirton Millsop Community Center (opened 1952 as Weirton Community Center; renamed 1965), in Weirton, West Virginia, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Sam Winn Mitchell (1872-1955) — also known as Sam W. Mitchell — of Montana. Born in Yorkshire, England, February 9, 1872. Democrat. Secretary of state of Montana, 1933-55; died in office 1955. Died in Helena, Lewis and Clark County, Mont., June 25, 1955 (age 83 years, 136 days). Interment at Forestvale Cemetery, Helena, Mont.
  The Sam W. Mitchell State Office Building, in Helena, Montana, is named for him.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Lewis Render Morgan (1913-2001) — also known as Lewis R. Morgan — of Troup County, Ga. Born in LaGrange, Troup County, Ga., July 14, 1913. Member of Georgia state house of representatives from Troup County, 1937-40; U.S. District Judge for the Northern District of Georgia, 1961-68; Judge of U.S. Court of Appeals for the 5th Circuit, 1968-78; took senior status 1978; Judge of U.S. Court of Appeals for the 11th Circuit, 1981-2001; died in office 2001. Died in LaGrange, Troup County, Ga., November 15, 2001 (age 88 years, 124 days). Burial location unknown.
  The Lewis R. Morgan Federal Building, Post Office and Courthouse, in Newnan, Georgia, is named for him.
  See also federal judicial profile — Biographical Directory of Federal Judges
  Wayne Lyman Morse (1900-1974) — also known as Wayne L. Morse — of Eugene, Lane County, Ore. Born in Verona, Dane County, Wis., October 20, 1900. Lawyer; U.S. Senator from Oregon, 1945-69; defeated (Democratic), 1968, 1972; delegate to Republican National Convention from Oregon, 1952; member, Commission on Intergovernmental Relations, 1955; candidate for Democratic nomination for President, 1960; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Oregon, 1964. Congregationalist. Member, Freemasons; Americans for Democratic Action. Was actively engaged in campaigning for U.S. Senate when he died, in Portland, Multnomah County, Ore., July 22, 1974 (age 73 years, 275 days). Interment at Rest Haven Memorial Park, Eugene, Ore.
  Relatives: Son of Wilbur Frank Morse (1859-1936) and Jessie F. (White) Morse; married, June 18, 1924, to Mildred Martha Downie (1901-1994); second cousin four times removed of James Doolittle Wooster; second cousin five times removed of Oliver Ellsworth (1745-1807); third cousin thrice removed of Martin Olds.
  Political families: Kellogg-Adams-Seymour-Chapin family of Connecticut and New York; Morris-Ingersoll family of New York and Connecticut (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  The Wayne L. Morse U.S. Courthouse, in Eugene, Oregon, is named for him.
  Campaign slogan (1960): "The candidate who votes the way he talks."
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Books about Wayne Morse: Mason Drukman, Wayne Morse : A Political Biography
  George Richard Moscone (1929-1978) — also known as George Moscone — of San Francisco, Calif. Born in San Francisco, Calif., November 24, 1929. Democrat. Candidate for California state assembly, 1960; member of California state senate, 1966-75; delegate to Democratic National Convention from California, 1968, 1972; mayor of San Francisco, Calif., 1976-78; died in office 1978. Shot and killed, along with Supervisor Harvey Milk, by Supervisor Dan White, in his office in San Francisco City Hall, San Francisco, Calif., November 27, 1978 (age 49 years, 3 days). Interment at Holy Cross Catholic Cemetery, Colma, Calif.
  Relatives: Son of George Joseph Moscone and Lena Moscone; married 1954 to Gina Bondanza.
  The George R. Moscone Convention Center, in San Francisco, California, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Frank Edward Moss (1911-2003) — also known as Frank E. Moss; Ted Moss; "The Conscience of the Senate" — of Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Utah. Born in Holladay, Salt Lake County, Utah, September 23, 1911. Democrat. Lawyer; served in the U.S. Army Air Force in World War II; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Utah, 1952 (alternate), 1972; candidate for Governor of Utah, 1956; U.S. Senator from Utah, 1959-77; defeated, 1976. Mormon. Member, American Legion; Veterans of Foreign Wars; Lions. Died, from pneumonia, in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Utah, January 29, 2003 (age 91 years, 128 days). Interment at Salt Lake City Cemetery, Salt Lake City, Utah.
  Relatives: Son of Harriet Maud Martin (Nixon) Moss (1874-1954) and James Edward Moss (1875-1962); married to Phyllis Hart (1910-2007).
  Cross-reference: Allan Turner Howe
  The Frank E. Moss U.S. Courthouse (built 1905, expanded in 1912 and 1932, renamed for Moss 1990), in Salt Lake City, Utah, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Alfred Paul Murrah (1904-1975) — also known as Alfred P. Murrah — of Oklahoma. Born in Tishomingo, Johnston County, Okla., October 27, 1904. Lawyer; U.S. District Judge for the Eastern District of Oklahoma, 1937-40; U.S. District Judge for the Northern District of Oklahoma, 1937-40; U.S. District Judge for the Western District of Oklahoma, 1937-40; Judge of U.S. Court of Appeals for the 10th Circuit, 1940-70. Methodist. Member, American Bar Association; Lambda Chi Alpha; Phi Alpha Delta; Freemasons. Died, in University Hospital, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma County, Okla., October 30, 1975 (age 71 years, 3 days). Interment at Fairlawn Cemetery, Oklahoma City, Okla.
  The Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building (opened 1977, destroyed by truck bomb 1995), in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, was named for him.
  See also federal judicial profile — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial — Biographical Directory of Federal Judges
  William Huston Natcher (1909-1994) — also known as William H. Natcher — of Bowling Green, Warren County, Ky. Born in Bowling Green, Warren County, Ky., September 11, 1909. Democrat. Lawyer; Warren County Attorney, 1938-50; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Kentucky, 1940; served in the U.S. Navy during World War II; commonwealth attorney, 8th District, 1951-53; U.S. Representative from Kentucky 2nd District, 1953-94; died in office 1994. Baptist. Member, American Legion; Forty and Eight; Kiwanis; Odd Fellows. Died, in the Bethesda Naval Hospital, Bethesda, Montgomery County, Md., March 29, 1994 (age 84 years, 199 days). Interment at Fairview Cemetery, Bowling Green, Ky.
  Relatives: Son of J. M. Natcher and Blanche (Hays) Natcher; married, June 17, 1937, to Virginia Reardon.
  The William H. Natcher Federal Building and U.S. Courthouse, in Bowling Green, Kentucky, is named for him.  — The William H. Natcher Parkway (opened 1972 as the Green River Parkway; renamed 1994; redesignated 2018 as Interstate 165, without the Natcher name), which ran through Warren, Butler, Ohio, and Daviess counties, Kentucky, was named for him.  — The William H. Natcher Bridge (opened 2002), which takes U.S. Highway 231 over the Ohio River, between Daviess County, Kentucky and Spencer County, Indiana, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Samuel Augustus Nunn Jr. (b. 1938) — also known as Sam Nunn — of Perry, Houston County, Ga. Born in Macon, Bibb County, Ga., September 8, 1938. Democrat. Lawyer; member of Georgia state house of representatives, 1969-72; U.S. Senator from Georgia, 1972-97; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Georgia, 1996. Methodist. Member, Freemasons; Phi Delta Theta. Still living as of 2014.
  Relatives: Grandnephew of Carl Vinson (1883-1981).
  Cross-reference: Richard Ray
  The Sam Nunn Atlanta Federal Center, in Atlanta, Georgia, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Ransom Eli Olds (1864-1950) — also known as Ransom E. Olds — of Lansing, Ingham County, Mich. Born in Geneva, Ashtabula County, Ohio, June 3, 1864. Republican. Founder in 1897 of Olds Motor Vehicle Company, maker of the first commercially successful American-made automobile; founder in 1905 of the REO Motor Car Company (later, the Olds company became the Oldsmobile division of General Motors, and Reo became part of truck manufacturer Diamond Reo); owner of several hotels; banker; delegate to Republican National Convention from Michigan, 1908. Baptist. Member, Freemasons; Knights Templar; Shriners. Died in Lansing, Ingham County, Mich., August 26, 1950 (age 86 years, 84 days). Entombed at Mt. Hope Cemetery, Lansing, Mich.
  Relatives: Son of Pliny Fisk Olds (1828-1908) and Sarah (Whipple) Olds (1834-1910); married, June 5, 1889, to Metta Ursula Woodward (1864-1950); second cousin thrice removed of Martin Olds (1798-1872).
  Political families: Greene-Lippitt family of Providence, Rhode Island; Baldwin-Greene-Upson-Hoar family of Connecticut; Kellogg-Adams-Seymour-Chapin family of Connecticut and New York (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Olds Hall (built 1917 for the College of Engineering, now used as offices), Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan, is named for him.  — The city of Oldsmar, Florida, is named for him.  — R. E. Olds Park, on the waterfront in Oldsmar, FLorida, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis (1929-1994) — also known as Jackie Onassis; Jaqueline Lee Bouvier; Jacqueline Kennedy — Born in Southampton, Suffolk County, Long Island, N.Y., July 28, 1929. First Lady of the United States, 1961-63. Female. Catholic. Died, from non-Hodgkin lymphoma, in Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., May 19, 1994 (age 64 years, 295 days). Interment at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Va.
  Relatives: Step-daughter of Hugh Dudley Auchincloss; daughter of John Vernou Bouvier (1891-1957) and Janet Norton (Lee) Bouvier (1907-1989); step-sister of Eugene Luther Gore Vidal Jr. and Hugh Dudley Auchincloss III; married, September 12, 1953, to John Fitzgerald Kennedy (son of Joseph Patrick Kennedy, Sr. (1888-1969); brother of Jean Kennedy Smith; grandson of John Francis Fitzgerald); married 1968 to Aristotle Socrates Onassis (1906-1975); mother of John Fitzgerald Kennedy Jr..
  Political family: Kennedy family.
  The Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis High School for International Careers, in Manhattan, New York, is named for her.  — Jacqueline Bouvier Kennedy Onassis Hall, at George Washington University, Washington, D.C., is named for her.  — Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis Reservoir, in Central Park, Manhattan, New York, is named for her.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  John Rockey Park (1833-1900) — also known as John R. Park — of Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Utah. Born in Tiffin, Seneca County, Ohio, May 7, 1833. Republican. School teacher; president, University of Deseret (now University of Utah), 1869-92; Utah superintendent of public instruction, 1895-1900; died in office 1900. Mormon. Died in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Utah, September 29, 1900 (age 67 years, 145 days). Interment at Salt Lake City Cemetery, Salt Lake City, Utah.
  Relatives: Son of John Park (1788-1868) and Anna Elizabeth (Waggoner) Park (1797-1881).
  The Park Building at the University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah, is named for him.  — Draper Park School (built 1912; converted to city hall 1972; sold 2017), in Draper, Utah, was named for him.  — Draper Park Middle School (built 2013), in Draper, Utah, is named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS John R. Park (built 1943 at Richmond, California; torpedoed and lost in the English Channel, 1945) was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
Jessie M. Parker Jessie M. Parker (1879-1959) — of Lake Mills, Winnebago County, Iowa. Born in Black Hawk County, Iowa, February 25, 1879. Republican. School teacher and principal; Winnebago County Superintendent of Schools, 1915-27; Iowa superintendent of public instruction, 1939-54. Female. Member, Delta Kappa Gamma; Phi Theta Kappa; Order of the Eastern Star. Inducted into the Iowa Women's Hall of Fame, 1986. Died May 1, 1959 (age 80 years, 65 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Daughter of Frederick H. Parker and Martha J. (Knapp) Parker.
  The Jessie Parker State Office Building, in Des Moines, Iowa, is named for her.
  Image source: Iowa Official Register 1951-52
Claude Pepper Claude Denson Pepper (1900-1989) — also known as Claude Pepper — of Tallahassee, Leon County, Fla.; Miami, Miami-Dade County, Fla. Born near Dudleyville, Chambers County, Ala., September 8, 1900. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army during World War I; lawyer; member of Florida state house of representatives, 1929-30; U.S. Senator from Florida, 1936-51; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Florida, 1940 (alternate), 1944 (alternate), 1948 (alternate), 1960, 1964, 1968 (alternate); member, Platform and Resolutions Committee, 1944; speaker, 1944, 1988; U.S. Representative from Florida, 1963-89 (3rd District 1963-67, 11th District 1967-73, 14th District 1973-83, 18th District 1983-89); died in office 1989. Baptist. Member, Moose; Woodmen; American Legion; Forty and Eight; Freemasons; Shriners; Elks; Kiwanis; American Bar Association; Phi Beta Kappa; Omicron Delta Kappa; Phi Alpha Delta; Sigma Upsilon; Kappa Alpha Order; United World Federalists. Received the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1989. Died in Washington, D.C., May 30, 1989 (age 88 years, 264 days). Interment at Oakland Cemetery, Tallahassee, Fla.
  Cross-reference: Clarence W. Meadows
  The Claude Pepper Federal Building, in Miami, Florida, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about Claude Pepper: Tracy E. Danese, Claude Pepper and Ed Ball : Politics, Purpose, and Power — James C. Clark, Red Pepper and Gorgeous George: Claude Pepper's Epic Defeat in the 1950 Democratic Primary
  Image source: State Archives of Florida, Florida Memory
  Carl Dewey Perkins (1912-1984) — also known as Carl D. Perkins — of Hindman, Knott County, Ky. Born in Hindman, Knott County, Ky., October 15, 1912. Democrat. Lawyer; member of Kentucky state house of representatives, 1940; served in the U.S. Army during World War II; U.S. Representative from Kentucky 7th District, 1949-84; died in office 1984. Member, American Legion; Freemasons. Died in Lexington, Fayette County, Ky., August 3, 1984 (age 71 years, 293 days). Interment at Perkins Cemetery, Leburn, Ky.
  Relatives: Father of Carl Christopher Perkins (born1954).
  The Carl D. Perkins Federal Building and U.S. Courthouse, in Ashland, Kentucky, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Matthew James Perry Jr. (1921-2011) — also known as Matthew J. Perry, Jr. — Born in Columbia, Richland County, S.C., August 3, 1921. Lawyer; U.S. District Judge for South Carolina, 1979-95; took senior status 1995. African ancestry. Died in Columbia, Richland County, S.C., July 29, 2011 (age 89 years, 360 days). Burial location unknown.
  The Matthew J. Perry U.S. Courthouse, in Columbia, South Carolina, is named for him.
  See also federal judicial profile — Wikipedia article — Biographical Directory of Federal Judges
  James Johnston Pettigrew (1828-1863) — also known as J. Johnston Pettigrew — of Charleston, Charleston County, S.C. Born in Tyrrell County, N.C., July 4, 1828. Lawyer; member of South Carolina state house of representatives, 1856; general in the Confederate Army during the Civil War. French Huguenot ancestry. Mortally wounded at the Battle of Gettysburg, and died soon after at Bunker Hill, Berkeley County, W.Va., July 17, 1863 (age 35 years, 13 days). Original interment somewhere in Raleigh, N.C.; reinterment in 1865 at Pettigrew Family Cemetery, Tyrrell County, N.C.
  Pettigrew Hall (built 1912), a building at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, is named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS James J. Pettigrew (built 1942 at Wilmington, North Carolina; scrapped 1960) was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Owen Bradford Pickett (1930-2010) — also known as Owen B. Pickett — of Virginia Beach, Va. Born in Richmond, Va., August 31, 1930. Democrat. Lawyer; accountant; member of Virginia state house of delegates, 1972-86; Virginia Democratic state chair, 1980-82; U.S. Representative from Virginia 2nd District, 1987-2001; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Virginia, 1996, 2000. Member, American Bar Association; Association of Trial Lawyers of America; Rotary; Lions; Freemasons; Shriners. Died in Virginia Beach, Va., October 27, 2010 (age 80 years, 57 days). Interment at Taylorsville Baptist Church Cemetery, Taylorsville, Va.
  The Owen B. Pickett U.S. Customs House (built 1852; given current name 2001), in Norfolk, Virginia, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Charles Poletti (1903-2002) — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born in Barre, Washington County, Vt., July 2, 1903. Democrat. Lawyer; delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1936 (alternate), 1940; Justice of New York Supreme Court 1st District, 1937-38; appointed 1937; delegate to New York state constitutional convention at-large, 1938; Lieutenant Governor of New York, 1939-42; defeated, 1942; Governor of New York, 1942-43; colonel in the U.S. Army during World War II. Baptist. Italian ancestry. Member, Urban League; American Bar Association; Knights of Pythias; Elks; Phi Beta Kappa. First American of Italian ancestry to serve as a Governor. During World War II, he was a senior officer in the Allied Military Government of occupied Italy. Died in Marco Island, Collier County, Fla., August 7, 2002 (age 99 years, 36 days). Interment at Calkins Cemetery, Elizabethtown, N.Y.
  Relatives: Married to Jean Knox Ellis (1904-1974).
  The Charles Poletti Power Plant (opened 1977, renamed for Poletti 1982, shut down 2010), in Astoria, Queens, New York, was named for him.
  See also National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
Adam Clayton Powell, Jr. Adam Clayton Powell Jr. (1908-1972) — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born in New Haven, New Haven County, Conn., November 29, 1908. Democrat. Baptist minister; U.S. Representative from New York, 1945-71 (22nd District 1945-53, 16th District 1953-63, 18th District 1963-71); delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1952, 1960, 1964; cited for contempt of court in 1966 for refusing to pay damages in a lawsuit against him; on February 28, 1967, he was expelled from the House of Representatives on charges of unbecoming conduct and misusing public funds; the Supreme Court overturned the expulsion in 1969. Baptist. African ancestry. Member, Alpha Phi Alpha; Elks. Died, of prostate cancer, in Jackson Memorial Hospital, Miami, Dade County (now Miami-Dade County), Fla., April 4, 1972 (age 63 years, 127 days). Cremated; ashes scattered in a private or family graveyard, Bahamas.
  Relatives: Son of Adam Clayton Powell, Sr. (1865-1953; minister) and Mattie (Fletcher) Powell; married, March 8, 1933, to Isabel Washington (divorced 1945); married, August 1, 1945, to Hazel Scott (divorced 1960); married, December 15, 1960, to Yvette Marjorie Diago (Flores) Powell; father of Adam Clayton Powell IV (born1962).
  Adam Clayton Powell Jr. Boulevard (formerly part of Seventh Avenue), in Manhattan, New York, is named for him.  — The Adam Clayton Powell State Office Building (opened 1974 as the Harlem State Office Building; renamed 1983), in Manhattan, New York, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Books by Powell,Adam Clayton,Jr.: Adam by Adam: The Autobiography of Adam Clayton Powell, Jr.
  Books about Powell,Adam Clayton,Jr.: Tisha Hamilton, Adam Clayton Powell, Jr.: The Political Biography of an American Dilemma — Wil Haygood, King of the Cats: The Life and Times of Adam Clayton Powell, Jr.
  Image source: Library of Congress
  Prince Hulon Preston Jr. (1908-1961) — also known as Prince H. Preston, Jr. — of Statesboro, Bulloch County, Ga. Born in Monroe, Walton County, Ga., July 5, 1908. Democrat. Member of Georgia state house of representatives from Bulloch County, 1935-38; served in the U.S. Army during World War II; U.S. Representative from Georgia 1st District, 1947-61; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Georgia, 1952. Baptist. Member, Freemasons; Eagles; American Legion; Veterans of Foreign Wars. Died in 1961 (age about 52 years). Interment at Eastside Cemetery, Statesboro, Ga.
  The Prince H. Preston Federal Building, in Statesboro, Georgia, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Lunsford Richardson Preyer (1919-2001) — also known as L. Richardson Preyer — of Greensboro, Guilford County, N.C. Born in Greensboro, Guilford County, N.C., January 11, 1919. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Navy during World War II; lawyer; superior court judge in North Carolina, 1956; U.S. District Judge for the Middle District of North Carolina, 1961-63; candidate for Governor of North Carolina, 1964; delegate to Democratic National Convention from North Carolina, 1964; U.S. Representative from North Carolina 6th District, 1969-81. Presbyterian. Member, Common Cause. Died, of cancer, in Moses Cone Memorial Hospital, Greensboro, Guilford County, N.C., April 3, 2001 (age 82 years, 82 days). Interment at Green Hill Cemetery, Greensboro, N.C.
  Relatives: Grandson of Lunsford Richardson (inventor of Vick's VapoRub and Vick's Cough Drops).
  The L. Richardson Preyer Federal Building (built 1933, renamed for Preyer 1988), in Greensboro, North Carolina, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Nick James Rajkovich (1910-1969) — also known as Nick J. Rajkovich — of Ironwood, Gogebic County, Mich.; Traverse City, Grand Traverse County, Mich. Born in Krispolje, Austria (now Krizpolje, Croatia), February 8, 1910. Republican. School teacher; college professor; delegate to Michigan state constitutional convention from Grand Traverse District, 1961-62; mayor of Traverse City, Mich., 1969; died in office 1969. Catholic. Member, Kiwanis. Died, from a heart attack, in Munson Hospital, in Traverse City, Grand Traverse County, Mich., November 11, 1969 (age 59 years, 276 days). Interment at Oakwood Catholic Cemetery, Traverse City, Mich.
  Relatives: Son of Andrew Rajkovich and Mary (Ticak) Rajkovich; married to Frances C. Derbyshire.
  The Rajkovich Physical Education Center (opened 1969), at Northwestern Michigan College, Traverse City, Michigan, is named for him.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Calvin Lewellyn Rampton (1913-2007) — also known as Calvin L. Rampton; Cal Rampton — of Davis County, Utah; Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Utah. Born in Bountiful, Davis County, Utah, November 6, 1913. Democrat. Lawyer; administrative assistant to U.S. Rep. J. W. Robinson, 1936-38; Davis County Attorney, 1939-41; major in the U.S. Army during World War II; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Utah, 1952, 1972; Governor of Utah, 1965-77. Mormon. Died, of cancer, in CareSource Hospice, Holladay, Salt Lake County, Utah, September 16, 2007 (age 93 years, 314 days). Interment at Salt Lake City Cemetery, Salt Lake City, Utah.
  Relatives: Son of Lewellyn Smith Rampton and Janet (Campbell) Rampton; married, March 10, 1941, to Lucybeth Cardon (died 2004).
  Cross-reference: Allan Turner Howe
  The Calvin L. Rampton Complex of state office buildings, in West Valley City, Utah, is named for him.  — The Calvin Rampton Salt Palace Convention Center, in Salt Lake City, Utah, is named for him.
  See also National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Ronald Wilson Reagan (1911-2004) — also known as Ronald Reagan; "Dutch"; "The Gipper"; "The Great Communicator"; "The Teflon President"; "Rawhide" — of Pacific Palisades, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, Calif.; Bel Air, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, Calif. Born in Tampico, Whiteside County, Ill., February 6, 1911. Republican. Worked as a sports broadcaster in Iowa in the 1930s, doing local radio broadcast of Chicago Cubs baseball games; served in the U.S. Army during World War II; professional actor in 1937-64; appeared in dozens of films including Kings Row, Dark Victory, Santa Fe Trail, Knute Rockne, All American, and The Winning Team; president of the Screen Actors Guild, 1947-52, 1959-60; member of California Republican State Central Committee, 1964-66; delegate to Republican National Convention from California, 1964 (alternate), 1972 (delegation chair); Governor of California, 1967-75; candidate for Republican nomination for President, 1968, 1976; Presidential Elector for California, 1968; President of the United States, 1981-89; on March 30, 1981, outside the Washington Hilton hotel, he and three others were shot and wounded by John Hinkley, Jr.; received the Presidential Medal of Freedom, 1993. Disciples of Christ. Member, Screen Actors Guild; Lions; American Legion; Tau Kappa Epsilon. Died, from pneumonia and Alzheimer's disease, in Bel Air, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, Calif., June 5, 2004 (age 93 years, 120 days). Interment at Ronald Reagan Presidential Library, Simi Valley, Calif.
  Relatives: Son of John Reagan and Nellie (Wilson) Reagan; married, January 25, 1940, to Jane Wyman (actress; divorced 1948); married, March 4, 1952, to Nancy Davis (born 1923; actress) and Nancy Davis (1921-2016); father of Maureen Elizabeth Reagan.
  Political family: Reagan family of Bel Air and Simi Valley, California.
  Cross-reference: Katherine Hoffman Haley — Dana Rohrabacher — Donald T. Regan — Henry Salvatori — L. William Seidman — Christopher Cox — Patrick J. Buchanan — Bay Buchanan — Edwin Meese III
  Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport (opened 1941; renamed 1998), in Arlington, Virginia, is named for him.  — Mount Reagan (officially known as Mount Clay), in the White Mountains, Coos County, New Hampshire, is named for him.  — The Ronald Reagan Building and International Trade Center, in the Federal Triangle, Washington, D.C., is named for him.
  See also National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Books by Ronald Reagan: Ronald Reagan : An American Life
  Books about Ronald Reagan: Lou Cannon, President Reagan : The Role of a Lifetime — Lou Cannon, Governor Reagan : His Rise to Power — Peter Schweizer, Reagan's War : The Epic Story of His Forty-Year Struggle and Final Triumph Over Communism — Lee Edwards, Ronald Reagan: A Political Biography — Paul Kengor, God and Ronald Reagan : A Spiritual Life — Mary Beth Brown, Hand of Providence: The Strong and Quiet Faith of Ronald Reagan — Edmund Morris, Dutch: A Memoir of Ronald Reagan — Peggy Noonan, When Character Was King: A Story of Ronald Reagan — Peter J. Wallison, Ronald Reagan: The Power of Conviction and the Success of His Presidency — Dinesh D'Souza, Ronald Reagan : How an Ordinary Man Became an Extraordinary Leader — William F. Buckley, Jr., Ronald Reagan: An American Hero — Craig Shirley, Reagan's Revolution : The Untold Story of the Campaign That Started It All — Richard Reeves, President Reagan : The Triumph of Imagination — Ron Reagan, My Father at 100 — Newt & Callista Gingrich & David N. Bossie, Ronald Reagan: Rendezvous with Destiny — William F. Buckley, The Reagan I Knew — Chris Matthews, Tip and the Gipper: When Politics Worked
  Critical books about Ronald Reagan: Haynes Johnson, Sleepwalking Through History: America in the Reagan Years — William Kleinknecht, The Man Who Sold the World: Ronald Reagan and the Betrayal of Main Street America
  John E. Reardon (1943-1988) — also known as Jack Reardon — of Kansas City, Wyandotte County, Kan. Born in Kansas City, Wyandotte County, Kan., August 23, 1943. School teacher; mayor of Kansas City, Kan., 1975-87; defeated, 1987. Died, of heart failure, November 25, 1988 (age 45 years, 94 days). Interment at Mt. Calvary Cemetery, Kansas City, Kan.
  Relatives: Father of Joe Reardon (born1968).
  The Jack Reardon Convention Center in Kansas City, Kansas, is named for him.
  Henry Schoellkopf Reuss (1912-2002) — also known as Henry S. Reuss — of Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, Wis. Born in Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, Wis., February 22, 1912. Democrat. Lawyer; major in the U.S. Army during World War II; candidate for mayor of Milwaukee, Wis., 1948, 1960; alternate delegate to Democratic National Convention from Wisconsin, 1952; U.S. Representative from Wisconsin 5th District, 1955-83. Died, of congestive heart failure, in a hospital at San Rafael, Marin County, Calif., January 12, 2002 (age 89 years, 324 days). Cremated; ashes interred at Forest Home Cemetery, Milwaukee, Wis.
  Relatives: Son of Gustav A. Reuss and Paula Schoellkopf Reuss; married 1942 to Margaret Magrath.
  The Reuss Federal Plaza office building (built 1982, sold and renamed 2017), in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, was named for him.
  Campaign slogan (1948): "Our Choice is Reuss."
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — NNDB dossier
  Books by Henry S. Reuss: When Government Was Good: Memories of a Life in Politics
  James Allen Rhodes (1909-2001) — also known as James A. Rhodes; Jim Rhodes — of Columbus, Franklin County, Ohio; Bexley, Franklin County, Ohio; Upper Arlington, Franklin County, Ohio. Born in Coalton, Jackson County, Ohio, September 13, 1909. Republican. Mayor of Columbus, Ohio, 1944-52; Ohio auditor of state, 1953-63; Governor of Ohio, 1963-71, 1975-83; defeated, 1950, 1954, 1986; candidate for Republican nomination for President, 1964, 1968; delegate to Republican National Convention from Ohio, 1964, 1972; candidate in primary for U.S. Senator from Ohio, 1970. Presbyterian. His decision, in 1970, to send the National Guard to the Kent State University campus to quell a disturbance was blamed for the deaths of four students there. Along with Alabama Gov. George C. Wallace, he was the longest-serving state governor in U.S. history. Died, from infection complications and heart failure, in Ohio State University Medical Center, Columbus, Franklin County, Ohio, March 4, 2001 (age 91 years, 172 days). Entombed in mausoleum at Green Lawn Cemetery, Columbus, Ohio; statue at Broad Street, Columbus, Ohio.
  Relatives: Son of James Allen Rhodes (1880-1918) and Susan Ann (Howe) Rhodes (1884-1950); married 1941 to Helen Bertha Rawlins (1915-1987); third cousin of Virginia A. Kittell; third cousin once removed of Arthur Callen Kittell Jr. (1929-1999).
  Political families: Kellogg-Adams-Seymour-Chapin family of Connecticut and New York; Edwards-Davenport-Thompson-Kittell family of Connecticut (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  The Rhodes Tower state office building, in Columbus, Ohio, is named for him.
  See also National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Paul Grant Rogers (1921-2008) — also known as Paul G. Rogers — of West Palm Beach, Palm Beach County, Fla. Born in Ocilla, Irwin County, Ga., June 4, 1921. Democrat. Major in the U.S. Army during World War II; U.S. Representative from Florida, 1955-79 (6th District 1955-67, 9th District 1967-73, 11th District 1973-79); alternate delegate to Democratic National Convention from Florida, 1968. Methodist. Member, Kiwanis. Died October 13, 2008 (age 87 years, 131 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Dwight Laing Rogers (1886-1954).
  The Paul G. Rogers Federal Building and U.S. Courthouse, in West Palm Beach, Florida, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — NNDB dossier
  Edwynne Cutler Rosenbaum (1899-2003) — also known as E. C. 'Polly' Rosenbaum — of Hayden, Gila County, Ariz.; Globe, Gila County, Ariz. Born in Ollie, Keokuk County, Iowa, September 4, 1899. Democrat. School teacher; member of Arizona state house of representatives, 1949-94; defeated, 1994; Presidential Elector for Arizona, 1996. Female. Member, Zonta; Order of the Eastern Star. Died, of congestive heart failure, in Phoenix, Maricopa County, Ariz., December 28, 2003 (age 104 years, 115 days). Interment at Greenwood Memory Lawn Cemetery, Phoenix, Ariz.
  Relatives: Married 1939 to William George Rosenbaum (1889-1949).
  The Polly Rosenbaum Archives and History Building (opened 2008), in Phoenix, Arizona, is named for her.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  James Roy Rowland Jr. (b. 1926) — also known as J. Roy Rowland — of Dublin, Laurens County, Ga. Born in Wrightsville, Johnson County, Ga., February 3, 1926. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army during World War II; physician; member of Georgia state house of representatives, 1977-82; U.S. Representative from Georgia 8th District, 1983-95. Methodist. Still living as of 2014.
  The J. Roy Rowland Federal Courthouse, in Dubin, Georgia, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — NNDB dossier
  Edward Ross Roybal (1916-2005) — also known as Edward R. Roybal — of Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, Calif. Born in Albuquerque, Bernalillo County, N.M., February 10, 1916. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army during World War II; candidate for Lieutenant Governor of California, 1954; delegate to Democratic National Convention from California, 1956, 1960, 1964, 1988 (speaker); U.S. Representative from California, 1963-93 (30th District 1963-75, 25th District 1975-93). Catholic. Hispanic ancestry. Member, American Legion; Knights of Columbus; Optimist Club. Died, from respiratory failure and pneumonia, in Huntington Hospital, Pasadena, Los Angeles County, Calif., October 24, 2005 (age 89 years, 256 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Father of Lucille Roybal-Allard (born1941).
  The Edward R. Roybal Infectious Disease Lab, in Atlanta, Georgia, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Dan Monroe Russell Jr. (1913-2011) — also known as Dan M. Russell, Jr. — of Bay St. Louis, Hancock County, Miss. Born in Magee, Simpson County, Miss., March 15, 1913. Democrat. Lawyer; served in the U.S. Navy during World War II; alternate delegate to Democratic National Convention from Mississippi, 1960; U.S. District Judge for the Southern District of Mississippi, 1965-83; took senior status 1983. Died in Gulfport, Harrison County, Miss., April 16, 2011 (age 98 years, 32 days). Burial location unknown.
  The Dan M. Russell Jr. U.S. Courthouse, in Gulfport, Mississippi, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article
  Donald Stuart Russell (1906-1998) — also known as Donald S. Russell — of Spartanburg, Spartanburg County, S.C. Born in Lafayette Springs, Lafayette County, Miss., February 22, 1906. Democrat. Lawyer; major in the U.S. Army during World War II; president, University of South Carolina, 1952-57; Governor of South Carolina, 1963-65; U.S. Senator from South Carolina, 1965-66; U.S. District Judge for South Carolina, 1966-71; Judge of U.S. Court of Appeals for the 4th Circuit, 1971-98; died in office 1998. Methodist. Member, American Bar Association. Died in Spartanburg, Spartanburg County, S.C., February 22, 1998 (age 92 years, 0 days). Interment at Greenlawn Memorial Gardens, Spartanburg, S.C.
  Relatives: Son of Jesse Lafayette Russell (1871-1911) and Lula (Russell) Russell.
  Cross-reference: J. Bratton Davis
  The Donald Stuart Russell U.S. Courthouse, in Spartanburg, South Carolina, is named for him.
  Campaign slogan (1962): "Russell's Right."
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial — Biographical Directory of Federal Judges
  Richard Brevard Russell Jr. (1897-1971) — also known as Richard B. Russell, Jr. — of Winder, Barrow County, Ga. Born in Winder, Barrow County, Ga., November 2, 1897. Democrat. Lawyer; member of Georgia state house of representatives from Barrow County, 1921-31; Speaker of the Georgia State House of Representatives, 1927-31; Governor of Georgia, 1931-33; U.S. Senator from Georgia, 1933-71; died in office 1971; candidate for Democratic nomination for President, 1952; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Georgia, 1952; member, President's Commission on the Assassination of President KNDY, 1963-64. Methodist. Member, Freemasons; Odd Fellows; Kiwanis; Sigma Alpha Epsilon; American Legion; Forty and Eight; American Bar Association. Died in Washington, D.C., January 21, 1971 (age 73 years, 80 days). Interment at Russell Memorial Park, Winder, Ga.; statue at State Capitol Grounds, Atlanta, Ga.
  Relatives: Son of Richard Brevard Russell (1861-1938) and Ina (Dillard) Russell (1868-1953); brother of Robert Lee Russell; uncle of Robert Lee Russell Jr..
  Political family: Russell family of Winder, Georgia.
  The Russell Senate Office Building (built 1903-08; named 1972), in Washington, D.C., is named for him.  — The Richard B. Russell Federal Building and Courthouse (built 1978-79), in Atlanta, Georgia, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Books about Richard B. Russell, Jr.: Gilbert C. Fite, Richard B. Russell, Jr., Senator from Georgia — Sally Russell, Richard Brevard Russell, Jr.: A Life of Consequence
  Frank Grant Sawyer (1918-1996) — also known as F. Grant Sawyer — of Elko, Elko County, Nev. Born in Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, Idaho, December 14, 1918. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army during World War II; lawyer; Elko County District Attorney, 1950-58; Nevada Democratic state chair, 1955; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Nevada, 1956; Governor of Nevada, 1959-67; defeated, 1966. Baptist. Member, American Bar Association; American Judicature Society; Freemasons; Shriners; Veterans of Foreign Wars; Amvets; American Legion; Lions; Eagles. Died, of complications from a stroke, in Las Vegas, Clark County, Nev., February 19, 1996 (age 77 years, 67 days). Entombed in mausoleum at Palm Memorial Park - Green Valley, Las Vegas, Nev.
  Relatives: Son of Harry W. Sawyer and Bula (Cameron) Sawyer; married, August 1, 1946, to Bette Hoge.
  The Sawyer state office building, in Las Vegas, Nevada, is named for him.
  See also National Governors Association biography — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Francis Muir Scarlett (1891-1971) — also known as Frank M. Scarlett — of Brunswick, Glynn County, Ga. Born in Brunswick, Glynn County, Ga., June 9, 1891. Democrat. Lawyer; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Georgia, 1924, 1928 (alternate), 1936; U.S. District Judge for the Southern District of Georgia, 1946-68; took senior status 1968; senior judge, 1968-71. Presbyterian. Member, Alpha Tau Omega; Freemasons; Shriners; Elks. Died November 18, 1971 (age 80 years, 162 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Frank M. Scarlett and Bessie Brailsford (Bailey) Scarlett; married, June 15, 1923, to Mary Louisa Morgan (died 1962); married, May 29, 1965, to Mary Roberta Walker.
  The Frank M. Scarlett Federal Building, in Brunswick, Georgia, is named for him.
  See also federal judicial profile — Biographical Directory of Federal Judges
  Edward Joseph Schwartz (1912-2000) — of California. Born in Seattle, King County, Wash., March 26, 1912. Lawyer; served in the U.S. Navy during World War II; municipal judge in California, 1959-63; superior court judge in California, 1964-68; U.S. District Judge for the Southern District of California, 1968-82; took senior status 1982. Died, at Scripps Mercy Hospital, San Diego, San Diego County, Calif., March 22, 2000 (age 87 years, 362 days). Burial location unknown.
  The Edward J. Schwartz Federal Office Building (built 1975, given current name 1994), in San Diego, California, is named for him.
  See also federal judicial profile — Biographical Directory of Federal Judges
  Robert Thompson Secrest (1904-1994) — also known as Robert T. Secrest — of Caldwell, Noble County, Ohio; Senecaville, Guernsey County, Ohio. Born in Senecaville, Guernsey County, Ohio, January 22, 1904. Democrat. School principal; superintendent of schools; member of Ohio state legislature, 1931-32; U.S. Representative from Ohio 15th District, 1933-42, 1949-54, 1963-67; defeated, 1946; served in the U.S. Navy during World War II; member, Federal Trade Commission, 1954-61. Member, American Legion; Amvets; Forty and Eight; Veterans of Foreign Wars. Died May 15, 1994 (age 90 years, 113 days). Interment at Senecaville Cemetery, Senacaville, Ohio.
  Relatives: Married to Virginia Bowden (1911-1980).
  Secrest Elementary School, in Senecaville, Ohio, is named for him.  — The Robert T. Secrest Senior Citizen Center, in Senecaville, Ohio, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Charles Earl Simons Jr. (1916-1999) — also known as Charles E. Simons, Jr. — of South Carolina. Born in Johnston, Edgefield County, S.C., August 17, 1916. Lawyer; law partner of Strom Thurmond; member of South Carolina state house of representatives, 1942, 1947-48, 1960-64; served in the U.S. Navy during World War II; U.S. District Judge for the Eastern District of South Carolina, 1964-65; U.S. District Judge for South Carolina, 1965-86; took senior status 1986. Baptist. Died, from the effects of head injuries sustained in a fall, at Aiken Regional Medical Center, Aiken, Aiken County, S.C., October 26, 1999 (age 83 years, 70 days). Interment at Aiken Memorial Gardens, Aiken, S.C.
  The Charles E. Simons, Jr. Federal Courthouse (built 1935; received its current name 1986), in Aiken, South Carolina, is named for him.
  See also federal judicial profile — Wikipedia article — Biographical Directory of Federal Judges
Alfred E. Smith Alfred Emanuel Smith (1873-1944) — also known as Alfred E. Smith; Al Smith; "The Happy Warrior"; "The Brown Derby"; "The King of Oliver Street"; "The First Citizen" — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born in New York, New York County, N.Y., December 30, 1873. Democrat. Real estate business; member of New York state assembly from New York County 2nd District, 1904-15; Speaker of the New York State Assembly, 1913; delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1912 (alternate), 1916, 1920, 1932, 1936; delegate to New York state constitutional convention 11th District, 1915; Governor of New York, 1919-21, 1923-29; defeated, 1920; candidate for Democratic nomination for President, 1920, 1932; candidate for President of the United States, 1928; delegate to New York convention to ratify 21st amendment, 1933; delegate to New York state constitutional convention 12th District, 1938. Catholic. Irish, German, and Italian ancestry. Died October 4, 1944 (age 70 years, 279 days). Interment at Calvary Cemetery, Woodside, Queens, N.Y.; statue at Alfred E. Smith Park, Manhattan, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Alfred Emanuel Smith and Catherine (Mulvihill) Smith; married, May 6, 1900, to Catherine A. Dunn.
  Cross-reference: Raymond V. Ingersoll — Joseph M. Proskauer — George R. Van Namee — John Roach Straton — Clarence J. Shearn — Wythe Leigh Kinsolving
  The Alfred E. Smith State Office Building (built 1928) in Albany, New York, is named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS Alfred E. Smith (built 1944 at South Portland, Maine; scrapped 1970) was named for him.
  See also National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about Alfred E. Smith: Robert A. Slayton, Empire Statesman: The Rise and Redemption of Al Smith — Christopher M. Finan, Alfred E. Smith : The Happy Warrior — Scott Farris, Almost President: The Men Who Lost the Race but Changed the Nation
  Image source: New York Red Book 1924
  Dallas Burton Smith (1883-1936) — also known as Dallas B. Smith — of Opelika, Lee County, Ala. Born in Opelika, Lee County, Ala., March 9, 1883. Republican. Served in the U.S. Army during the Spanish-American War; served in the U.S. Army on the Mexican border; colonel in the U.S. Army during World War I; candidate for Governor of Alabama, 1918; delegate to Republican National Convention from Alabama, 1920; candidate for U.S. Representative from Alabama 3rd District, 1920. Member, Rotary; Freemasons. Died, in the Veterans Hospital, Gulfport, Harrison County, Miss., August 1, 1936 (age 53 years, 145 days). Interment at Rosemere Cemetery, Opelika, Ala.
  Relatives: Son of Mary Josephine (Bingham) Smith (1844-1905) and Dallas Burton Smith (1844-1913); married to Allie Mitchell (1886-1971); nephew of William Hugh Smith; great-grandson of David Dickson.
  Political family: Smith family of Opelika, Alabama.
  The Dallas B. Smith Armory (now the Dallas B. Smith Building), in Opelika, Alabama, is named for him.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Marion Eugene Snyder (1928-2007) — also known as Gene Snyder — of Brownsboro Farms, Jefferson County, Ky. Born in Louisville, Jefferson County, Ky., January 26, 1928. Republican. Lawyer; U.S. Representative from Kentucky, 1963-65, 1967-87 (3rd District 1963-65, 4th District 1967-87); defeated, 1964. Lutheran. Member, Optimist Club. Died in Naples, Collier County, Fla., February 16, 2007 (age 79 years, 21 days). Interment at Duncan Memorial, Oldham County, Ky.
  Relatives: Son of Marion Hustavus Snyder and Lois E. Snyder; married 1961 to Mary Louise Hodges (divorced 1974).
  The Gene Snyder U.S. Courthouse and Custom House (opened 1932, renamed 1986), in Louisville, Kentucky, is named for him.  — The Gene Snyder Freeway (I-265 and Ky-841), in Louisville, Kentucky, is named for him.  — The Gene Snyder Airport (general aviation), in Pendleton County, Kentucky, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Gus Jerome Solomon (1906-1987) — also known as Gus J. Solomon — of Portland, Multnomah County, Ore. Born in Portland, Multnomah County, Ore., August 29, 1906. Democrat. Lawyer; alternate delegate to Democratic National Convention from Oregon, 1940, 1944; U.S. District Judge for Oregon, 1949-71; took senior status 1971. Jewish. Died February 15, 1987 (age 80 years, 170 days). Burial location unknown.
  The Gus J. Solomon U.S. Courthouse (opened 1933; named 1988; courts moved out 1997), in Portland, Oregon, is named for him.
  See also federal judicial profile — Wikipedia article — Biographical Directory of Federal Judges
  Harry Vaios Spanos (1926-1995) — also known as Harry V. Spanos — of Newport, Sullivan County, N.H. Born in Newport, Sullivan County, N.H., May 8, 1926. Democrat. Lawyer; member of New Hampshire state senate, 1970; defeated, 1956; delegate to Democratic National Convention from New Hampshire, 1960 (alternate), 1964, 1972; member of New Hampshire state house of representatives, 1960; candidate for Governor of New Hampshire, 1976; probate judge in New Hampshire, 1980-95. Eastern Orthodox. Greek ancestry. Member, Moose; Lions. Died in Newport, Sullivan County, N.H., March 18, 1995 (age 68 years, 314 days). Interment at Pine Grove Cemetery, Newport, N.H.
  The Harry V. Spanos District Court Building (formerly Grange Hall), in Newport, New Hampshire, is named for him.
  Robert Grier Stephens Jr. (1913-2003) — also known as Robert G. Stephens, Jr. — of Athens, Clarke County, Ga. Born in Atlanta, Fulton County, Ga., August 14, 1913. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army during World War II; lawyer; member of Georgia state senate, 1951-53; member of Georgia state house of representatives from Clarke County, 1953-59; U.S. Representative from Georgia 10th District, 1961-77. Presbyterian. Member, American Legion; Veterans of Foreign Wars; Elks; Kiwanis; Woodmen. Died, in a hospital at Athens, Clarke County, Ga., February 20, 2003 (age 89 years, 190 days). Interment at Oconee Hill Cemetery, Athens, Ga.
  Relatives: Great-grandnephew of Alexander Hamilton Stephens (1812-1883).
  Political family: Stephens family of Crawfordville and Atlanta, Georgia.
  Cross-reference: Tillie K. Fowler
  The Robert G. Stephens Jr. Federal Building, in Athens, Georgia, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Isaac Ingalls Stevens (1818-1862) — also known as Isaac I. Stevens — of Washington. Born in North Andover, Essex County, Mass., March 25, 1818. Major in the U.S. Army during the Mexican War; Governor of Washington Territory, 1853-57; Delegate to U.S. Congress from Washington Territory, 1857-61; general in the Union Army during the Civil War. Shot and killed at the Civil War battle of Chantilly, Fairfax County, Va., September 1, 1862 (age 44 years, 160 days). Interment at Island Cemetery, Newport, R.I.; memorial monument at Ox Hill Battlefield Park, Fairfax County, Va.
  Relatives: Cousin *** of Charles Abbot Stevens (1816-1892) and Moses Tyler Stevens.
  Political family: Stevens-Woodhull family of New York City, New York.
  Stevens counties in Minn. and Wash. are named for him.
  Fort Stevens (established 1863; decomissioned 1947; now a state park) in Warrenton, Oregon, was named for him.  — Fort Stevens (active during the Civil War, 1861-65; site now a park) in Washington, D.C., was named for him.  — The city (and lake) of Lake Stevens, Washington, is named for him.  — The town of Stevensville, Montana, is named for him.  — Stevens Peak (6,838 feet), in Shoshone County, Idaho, is named for him.  — Stevens Peak (5,372 feet), in Bingham County, Idaho, is named for him.  — Upper Stevens Lake, and Lower Stevens Lake, in Shoshone County, Idaho, are named for him.  — The Stevens Hall dormitory, at Washington State University, Pullman, Washington, is named for him.  — Isaac I. Stevens Elementary School (opened 1906, expanded 1928, renovated and reopened 2001), in Seattle, Washington, is named for him.  — Stevens Middle School, in Port Angeles, Washington, is named for him.  — Stevens Junior High School (now Middle School), in Pasco, Washington, is named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS Isaac I. Stevens (built 1943 at Portland, Oregon; scrapped 1967) was named for him.
  Epitaph: "Who gave to the service of his country a quick and comprehensive mind, a warm and generous heart, a firm will, and a strong arm, and who fell while rallying his command, with the flag of the Republic in his dying grasp, at the battle of Chantilly, Va."
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about Isaac Ingalls Stevens: Joseph Taylor Hazard, Companion of Adventure: A Biography of Isaac Ingalls Stevens, First Governor of Washington
Thaddeus Stevens Thaddeus Stevens (1792-1868) — of Gettysburg, Adams County, Pa.; Lancaster, Lancaster County, Pa. Born in Danville, Caledonia County, Vt., April 4, 1792. Republican. Lawyer; member of Pennsylvania state house of representatives, 1833-35, 1837, 1841; delegate to Pennsylvania state constitutional convention, 1838; U.S. Representative from Pennsylvania, 1849-53, 1859-68 (8th District 1849-53, 9th District 1859-68); died in office 1868; delegate to Republican National Convention from Pennsylvania, 1856 (speaker), 1860. Died in Washington, D.C., August 11, 1868 (age 76 years, 129 days). Interment at Shreiner-Concord Cemetery, Lancaster, Pa.; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery, Washington, D.C.
  Relatives: Son of Joshua Stevens (1774-1814) and Sarah 'Sally' (Morrill) Stevens (1774-1852); married to Lydia Hamilton Smith (1816-1884); fourth cousin once removed of Charles Rowell (1785-1867).
  Political families: Sargent-Davis-Pike-Flanders family of New Hampshire; Eastman-Webster-Rowell family (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  The Thaddeus Stevens Post Office Building, in Danville, Vermont, is named for him.
  Epitaph: "I repose in this quiet and secluded spot / not from any natural preference for solitude / but, finding other cemeteries limited as to race / by charter rules / I have chosen this, that I might illustrate / in my death / the principles which I advocated / through a long life / EQUALITY OF MAN BEFORE HIS CREATOR."
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about Thaddeus Stevens: Charles W. Boyd, Your Legacy from Thaddeus Stevens : Republican of the First Kind — Richard B. Cheney & Lynne V. Cheney, Kings Of The Hill : How Nine Powerful Men Changed The Course of American History
  Image source: Life and Work of James G. Blaine (1893)
Thaddeus C. Sweet Thaddeus Campbell Sweet (1872-1928) — also known as Thaddeus C. Sweet — of Phoenix, Oswego County, N.Y. Born in Phoenix, Oswego County, N.Y., November 16, 1872. Republican. Paper manufacturer; member of New York state assembly from Oswego County, 1910-20; Speaker of the New York State Assembly, 1914-20; delegate to Republican National Convention from New York, 1916, 1924; U.S. Representative from New York 32nd District, 1923-28; died in office 1928. Member, Freemasons; Knights Templar; Shriners; Elks. Died as result of an airplane accident in Whitney Point, Broome County, N.Y., May 1, 1928 (age 55 years, 167 days). Interment at Rural Cemetery, Phoenix, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Anthony Wayne Sweet (1827-1905) and Sarah Elizabeth (Campbell) Sweet (1843-1925).
  The Sweet Memorial Building (village hall, built 1929), in Phoenix, New York, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  Image source: Library of Congress
  Arie Parks Taylor (1927-2003) — also known as Arie P. Taylor; "Denver's Bella Abzug" — of Denver, Colo. Born in Bedford, Cuyahoga County, Ohio, 1927. Democrat. Delegate to Democratic National Convention from Colorado, 1968, 1972 (alternate); member of Colorado state house of representatives 7th District, 1973-84; Denver clerk and recorder, 1991-95. Female. African ancestry. Colorado's first African-American woman legislator. Died, in Presbyterian/St. Luke's Hospital, Denver, Colo., September 27, 2003 (age about 76 years). Interment at Fort Logan National Cemetery, Denver, Colo.
  The Arie P. Taylor Municipal Center, in Denver, Colorado, is named for her.
  Fred Dalton Thompson (b. 1942) — also known as Fred Thompson — of Tennessee. Born in Sheffield, Colbert County, Ala., August 19, 1942. Republican. Lawyer; U.S. Senator from Tennessee, 1994-; candidate for Republican nomination for President, 2008. Member, Screen Actors Guild. Became an actor when he played himself in the 1985 film Marie, and went on to appear in other films in 1985-94, including No Way Out, The Hunt for Red October, Cape Fear, and In the Line of Fire, as well as the television series Law and Order. Still living as of 2014.
  Relatives: Son of Fletcher Thompson (died 1990) and Ruth Thompson; married, September 12, 1959, to Sarah Elizabeth Lindsey (divorced 1985); married, June 29, 2002, to Jeri Kehn.
  The Fred Thompson U.S. Courthouse (under construction 2019), in Nashville, Tennessee, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile
Strom Thurmond James Strom Thurmond (1902-2003) — also known as Strom Thurmond — of Edgefield, Edgefield County, S.C.; Aiken, Aiken County, S.C.; Columbia, Richland County, S.C. Born in Edgefield, Edgefield County, S.C., December 5, 1902. School teacher; superintendent of schools; lawyer; member of South Carolina state senate from Edgefield County, 1933-38; resigned 1938; delegate to Democratic National Convention from South Carolina, 1936, 1948, 1952 (member, Committee on Rules and Order of Business), 1956; circuit judge in South Carolina, 1938-46; served in the U.S. Army during World War II; Governor of South Carolina, 1947-51; States Rights candidate for President of the United States, 1948; U.S. Senator from South Carolina, 1954-56, 1956-2003; received 14 electoral votes for Vice-President, 1960; delegate to Republican National Convention from South Carolina, 1972, 1988. Baptist. Member, American Bar Association; Freemasons; Knights Templar; Shriners; Pi Kappa Alpha. Died in Edgefield, Edgefield County, S.C., June 26, 2003 (age 100 years, 203 days). Interment at Willow Brook Cemetery, Edgefield, S.C.; statue erected 1999 at State House Grounds, Columbia, S.C.
  Relatives: Son of John William Thurmond and Eleanor Gertrude Thurmond; married 1947 to Jean Crouch (1926-1960); married 1968 to Nancy Janice Moore.
  Cross-reference: Charles E. Simons, Jr. — Joe Wilson — John Light Napier — Robert Adams
  Strom Thurmond Federal Building and U.S. Courthouse, in Columbia, South Carolina, is named for him.  — Strom Thurmond High School, in Johnston, South Carolina, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Books about Strom Thurmond: Essie May Washington-Williams, Dear Senator : A Memoir by the Daughter of Strom Thurmond — Jack Bass & Marilyn W. Thompson, Strom: The Complicated Personal and Political Life of Strom Thurmond — R. J. Duke, The Centennial Senator: True Stories of Strom Thurmond from the People Who Knew Him Best — Joseph Crespino, Strom Thurmond's America
  Image source: Library of Congress
  Elbert Parr Tuttle (1897-1996) — also known as Elbert P. Tuttle — of Atlanta, Fulton County, Ga. Born in Pasadena, Los Angeles County, Calif., July 17, 1897. Republican. Served in the U.S. Army during World War I; lawyer; colonel in the U.S. Army during World War II; delegate to Republican National Convention from Georgia, 1948, 1952 (member, Credentials Committee); Judge of U.S. Court of Appeals for the 5th Circuit, 1954-68; took senior status 1968. Received the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1981. Died in Atlanta, Fulton County, Ga., June 23, 1996 (age 98 years, 342 days). Interment at All Saints Episcopal Church, Atlanta, Ga.
  The Elbert P. Tuttle U.S. Court of Appeals Building (built 1910, renamed 1989), in Atlanta, Georgia, is named for him.
  Books about Elbert Tuttle: Jack Bass, Unlikely Heroes — Anne Emanuel, Elbert Parr Tuttle: Chief Jurist of the Civil Rights Revolution
  Robert Smith Vance (1931-1989) — also known as Bob Vance — of Birmingham, Jefferson County, Ala.; Mountain Brook, Jefferson County, Ala. Born in Talladega, Talladega County, Ala., May 10, 1931. Democrat. Lawyer; Alabama Democratic state chair, 1966-77; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Alabama, 1968, 1972 (alternate); Judge of U.S. Court of Appeals for the 5th Circuit, 1977-81; Judge of U.S. Court of Appeals for the 11th Circuit, 1981-89; died in office 1989. Assassinated by way of a mail bomb, in Mountain Brook, Jefferson County, Ala., December 16, 1989 (age 58 years, 220 days). Walter Leroy Moody, Jr., who sent the bomb, was convicted of murder, sentenced to death, and executed in 2018. Cremated; ashes interred at St. Lukes Episcopal Columbarium, Mountain Brook, Ala.
  Relatives: Son of Harrell Taylor Vance (1897-1963) and Mae (Smith) Vance (1897-1951); married to Helen Vance (1934-2010).
  The Robert S. Vance Federal Building and U.S. Courthouse (built 1921, named 1990), in Birmingham, Alabama, is named for him.
  See also federal judicial profile — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial — Biographical Directory of Federal Judges
  Zebulon Baird Vance (1830-1894) — also known as Zebulon B. Vance — of Asheville, Buncombe County, N.C.; Charlotte, Mecklenburg County, N.C. Born in Asheville, Buncombe County, N.C., May 13, 1830. Democrat. Member of North Carolina state legislature, 1854; U.S. Representative from North Carolina 8th District, 1858-61; colonel in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; Governor of North Carolina, 1862-65, 1877-79; U.S. Senator from North Carolina, 1879-94; died in office 1894. Slaveowner. Died in Washington, D.C., April 14, 1894 (age 63 years, 336 days). Interment at Riverside Cemetery, Asheville, N.C.; statue at Union Square, Raleigh, N.C.
  Relatives: Son of David Vance (1792-1844) and Elmira Margaret (Baird) Vance (1802-1878); brother of Robert Brank Vance (1828-1899); married to Harriette Newell Espy (1832-1878) and Florence Steele (1840-1924); father of Thomas Malvern Vance; nephew of Robert Brank Vance (1793-1827).
  Political family: Vance family of Asheville, North Carolina.
  Cross-reference: Lee S. Overman
  Vance County, N.C. is named for him.
  Vance Hall (built 1912), a building at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — National Governors Association biography — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about Zebulon B. Vance: Cordelia Camp, Governor Vance : a life for young people (for young readers)
  James Madison Waddell Jr. (1922-2003) — also known as James M. Waddell, Jr. — of Beaufort, Beaufort County, S.C. Born in Boydell, Ashley County, Ark., November 1, 1922. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army during World War II; insurance business; member of South Carolina state house of representatives from Beaufort County, 1954-58; delegate to Democratic National Convention from South Carolina, 1956 (alternate), 1964; member of South Carolina state senate, 1960-92 (Beaufort County 1960-66, 16th District 1966-68, 13th District 1968-72, 15th District 1972-84, 46th District 1984-92); resigned 1992. Presbyterian. Member, American Legion; Disabled American Veterans; Navy League; Veterans of Foreign Wars; Freemasons; Shriners; Sertoma; Farm Bureau; Nature Conservancy. Died in Columbia, Richland County, S.C., January 15, 2003 (age 80 years, 75 days). Interment at Beaufort National Cemetery, Beaufort, S.C.
  Presumably named for: James Madison
  Relatives: Son of James Madison Waddell (1882-1963) and Mabel Maude (Gibson) Waddell (1899-1991); married, January 2, 1946, to Natalie Phyllis Lavis.
  The Waddell Mariculture Research and Development Center (built 1983-84), an experiment station, located on the Colleton River in Beaufort County, South Carolina, is named for him.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Henry Menasco Wade (1914-2001) — also known as Henry M. Wade; "The Chief" — of Texas. Born in Rockwall County, Tex., November 11, 1914. Democrat. FBI special agent; served in the U.S. Navy during World War II; lawyer; Dallas County District Attorney, 1951-86; candidate for U.S. Representative from Texas 5th District, 1956. Member, Phi Beta Kappa; Order of the Coif. As District Attorney, he prosecuted Jack Ruby in 1964 for the murder of Lee Harvey Oswald, the assassin of President John F. Kennedy. Also in his role as District Attorney, he was the named defendant in the Supreme Court's landmark 1973 abortion decision, Roe v. Wade. Died, from complications of Parkinson's disease, in Dallas, Dallas County, Tex., March 1, 2001 (age 86 years, 110 days). Interment at Sparkman Hillcrest Memorial Park, Dallas, Tex.
  Relatives: Son of Henry Menasco Wade (1864-1938) and Lula Ellen (Michie) Wade (1876-1954); married to Yvonne Hillman (1920-1987).
  The Henry Wade Juvenile Justice Center, in Dallas, Texas, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  William A. Walsh — of Yonkers, Westchester County, N.Y. Democrat. Mayor of Yonkers, N.Y., 1926-27. Burial location unknown.
  Walsh Road, in Yonkers, New York, is named for him.  — The William A. Walsh Homes (opened 1967), a public housing complex in Yonkers, New York, is named for him.
  Julius Waties Waring (1880-1968) — also known as Julius W. Waring — of Charleston, Charleston County, S.C. Born in Charleston, Charleston County, S.C., July 27, 1880. U.S. District Judge for the Eastern District of South Carolina, 1942-52; took senior status 1952. Died in New York City (unknown county), N.Y., January 11, 1968 (age 87 years, 168 days). Interment at Magnolia Cemetery, Charleston, S.C.
  Relatives: Son of Edward Perry Waring (1848-1916) and Anna Thomasine (Waties) Waring (1849-1903); married to Annie Gammell (1879-1954) and Elizabeth Avery (1895-1968).
  The J. Waties Waring Judicial Center, in Charleston, South Carolina, is named for him.
  See also federal judicial profile — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial — Biographical Directory of Federal Judges
  John Clarence Watts (1902-1971) — also known as John C. Watts — of Nicholasville, Jessamine County, Ky. Born in Nicholasville, Jessamine County, Ky., July 9, 1902. Democrat. Lawyer; farmer; chair of Jessamine County Democratic Party, 1928-53; Jessamine County Attorney, 1933-45; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Kentucky, 1940; member of Kentucky state house of representatives, 1947-48; Kentucky motor transportation commissioner, 1948-51; U.S. Representative from Kentucky 6th District, 1951-71; died in office 1971. Member, Phi Delta Phi; Knights of Pythias; Lions. Died in Lexington, Fayette County, Ky., September 24, 1971 (age 69 years, 77 days). Interment at Maple Grove Cemetery, Nicholasville, Ky.
  Relatives: Son of William Montague Watts and Frances Elizabeth (Wilson) Watts; married, March 27, 1945, to Nora Mae Wilburn.
  The John C. Watts Federal Building, in Frankfort, Kentucky, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Robert Clifton Weaver (1907-1997) — also known as Robert C. Weaver — of Washington, D.C.; Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born in Washington, D.C., December 29, 1907. Democrat. Economist; received the Spingarn Medal in 1962; U.S. Secretary of Housing and Urban Development, 1966-68; first African-American cabinet member; speaker, Democratic National Convention, 1968 ; president, Baruch College, 1969; trustee, Mount Sinai Medical Center. Methodist. African ancestry. Member, NAACP; Americans for Democratic Action. Died in Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., July 17, 1997 (age 89 years, 200 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Mortimer G. Weaver and Florence (Freeman) Weaver; married, July 19, 1935, to Ella V. Hiath (c.1911-1991).
  The Robert C. Weaver Federal Building (opened 1968; named 2000; headquarters of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development), in Washington, D.C., is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  James Bryan Whitfield (1860-1948) — also known as James B. Whitfield — of Tallahassee, Leon County, Fla. Born in Wayne County, N.C., November 8, 1860. Leon County Judge, 1889; Florida state treasurer, 1897-1900; Florida state attorney general, 1903-04; justice of Florida state supreme court, 1904-43; appointed 1904; chief justice of Florida state supreme court, 1905, 1909. Died in Pensacola, Escambia County, Fla., August 20, 1948 (age 87 years, 286 days). Interment at St. John's Episcopal Cemetery, Tallahassee, Fla.
  Relatives: Son of Richard Allen Whitfield (1832-1906) and Mary Whitfield (Croom) Whitfield (1836-1867); married, November 25, 1886, to Leila Nash; married, June 12, 1901, to Margaret Hayward Randolph (1873-1966); nephew of Nathan Bryan Whitfield (1835-1914); grandson of James Bryan Whitfield; grandnephew of Nathan Bryan Whitfield (1799-1868); great-grandson of Bryan Whitfield; first cousin thrice removed of Needham Bryan and Hardy Bryan; second cousin twice removed of Lovard Bryan; third cousin thrice removed of Joseph Hunter Bryan (1782-1839) and Henry Hunter Bryan; fourth cousin once removed of Auburn Bascomb Bryan.
  Political family: Bryan-Whitfield family of North Carolina.
  The J. B. Whitfield Building (built 1913 as the Supreme Court and Railroad Commission Building; later renamed and occupied by the Public Service Commission; demolished in the late 1970s), in the Capital Complex of Tallahassee, Florida, was named for him.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Joseph R. Williams (c.1904-1993) — also known as Joe R. Williams — of Boise, Ada County, Idaho. Born in Samaria, Oneida County, Idaho, about 1904. Democrat. Acting postmaster at Boise, Idaho, 1950-52; Idaho state auditor, 1959-89; resigned 1989. Died, from heart failure, May 10, 1993 (age about 89 years). Burial location unknown.
  The Joe R. Williams State Office Building, in Boise, Idaho, is named for him.
  George Wolf (1777-1840) — of Easton, Northampton County, Pa.; Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa. Born in Allen Township, Northampton County, Pa., August 12, 1777. Democrat. Lawyer; postmaster at Easton, Pa., 1802-03; member of Pennsylvania state house of representatives, 1814; U.S. Representative from Pennsylvania 8th District, 1824-29; Governor of Pennsylvania, 1829-35; defeated, 1835; comptroller of the U.S. Treasury, 1836-38; U.S. Collector of Customs, 1838-40; died in office 1840. German ancestry. Died in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., March 11, 1840 (age 62 years, 212 days). Interment at Harrisburg Cemetery, Harrisburg, Pa.
  Relatives: Son of Maria Margaretta Wolf (1736-1811) and George Wolf (1737-1808).
  Wolf Township, in Lycoming County, Pennsylvania, is named for him.  — Wolf Hall, at Penn State University, State College, Pennsylvania, is named for him.  — Governor Wolf Elementary School (built 1956), in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, is named for him.  — George Wolf Elementary School, in Bath, Pennsylvania, is named for him.  — The Governor Wolf Building (built 1893, a former school converted to apartments), in Easton, Pennsylvania, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  John Howland Wood Jr. (1916-1979) — also known as John H. Wood, Jr.; "Maximum John" — of San Antonio, Bexar County, Tex. Born in Rockport, Aransas County, Tex., March 31, 1916. Republican. Lawyer; served in the U.S. Navy during World War II; delegate to Republican National Convention from Texas, 1960; U.S. District Judge for the Western District of Texas, 1970-79; died in office 1979. Shot and killed in San Antonio, Bexar County, Tex., May 29, 1979 (age 63 years, 59 days). The killer was Charles Harrelson, a contract killer who was also the father of actor Woody Harrelson. Burial location unknown.
  The John H. Wood Federal Courthouse, in San Antonio, Texas, is named for him.  — John H. Wood Middle School, in San Antonio, Texas, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article
  George Cressler Young (1916-2015) — Born in Cincinnati, Hamilton County, Ohio, August 4, 1916. U.S. District Judge for the Northern District of Florida, 1961-66; U.S. District Judge for the Southern District of Florida, 1961-66; U.S. District Judge for the Middle District of Florida, 1962-81; took senior status 1981. Died in Orlando, Orange County, Fla., April 24, 2015 (age 98 years, 263 days). Burial location unknown.
  The George C. Young Federal Building and U.S. Courthouse, in Orlando, Florida, is named for him.
  See also federal judicial profile — Biographical Directory of Federal Judges
  Robert Anton Young III (1923-2007) — also known as Robert A. Young III — of St. Ann, St. Louis County, Mo. Born in St. Louis, Mo., November 27, 1923. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army during World War II; pipefitter; member of Missouri state house of representatives from St. Louis County 1st District, 1957-63; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Missouri, 1960, 1964; member of Missouri state senate, 1963-77; U.S. Representative from Missouri 2nd District, 1977-87; defeated, 1986. Catholic. Member, American Legion; Lions; Knights of Columbus; Veterans of Foreign Wars; Amvets. Died, of liver failure, in St. Ann, St. Louis County, Mo., October 17, 2007 (age 83 years, 324 days). Interment at Memorial Park Cemetery, Jennings, Mo.
  Relatives: Married, November 27, 1947, to Irene Slawson.
  The Robert A. Young Federal Building (built 1931 as St. Louis Mart & Terminal Warehouse; acquired by U.S. Army 1941; converted to civilian federal agency offices 1961; given current name 1988), in SAINT Louis, Missouri, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
"Enjoy the hospitable entertainment of a political graveyard."
Henry L. Clinton, Apollo Hall, New York City, February 3, 1872
The Political Graveyard

The Political Graveyard is a web site about U.S. political history and cemeteries. Founded in 1996, it is the Internet's most comprehensive free source for American political biography, listing 315,917 politicians, living and dead.
 
  The coverage of this site includes (1) the President, Vice President, members of Congress, elected state and territorial officeholders in all fifty states, the District of Columbia, and U.S. territories; and the chief elected official, typically the mayor, of qualifying municipalities; (2) candidates at election, including primaries, for any of the above; (3) all federal judges and all state appellate judges; (4) certain federal officials, including the federal cabinet, diplomatic chiefs of mission, consuls, U.S. district attorneys, collectors of customs and internal revenue, members of major federal commissions; and political appointee (pre-1971) postmasters of qualifying communities; (5) state and national political party officials, including delegates, alternate delegates, and other participants in national party nominating conventions. Note: municipalities or communities "qualify", for TPG purposes, if they have at least half a million person-years of history, inclusive of predecessor, successor, and merged entities.  
  The listings are incomplete; development of the database is a continually ongoing project.  
  Information on this page — and on all other pages of this site — is believed to be accurate, but is not guaranteed. Users are advised to check with other sources before relying on any information here.  
  The official URL for this page is: https://politicalgraveyard.com/special/namesake-buildings.html.  
  Links to this or any other Political Graveyard page are welcome, but specific page addresses may sometimes change as the site develops.  
  If you are searching for a specific named individual, try the alphabetical index of politicians.  
  More information: FAQ; privacy policy; cemetery links.  
  If you find any error or omission in The Political Graveyard, or if you have information to share, please see the biographical checklist and submission guidelines.  
Copyright notices: (1) Facts are not subject to copyright; see Feist v. Rural Telephone. (2) Politician portraits displayed on this site are 70-pixel-wide monochrome thumbnail images, which I believe to constitute fair use under applicable copyright law. Where possible, each image is linked to its online source. However, requests from owners of copyrighted images to delete them from this site are honored. (3) Original material, programming, selection and arrangement are © 1996-2019 Lawrence Kestenbaum. (4) This work is also licensed for free non-commercial re-use, with attribution, under a Creative Commons License.
Site information: The Political Graveyard is created and maintained by Lawrence Kestenbaum, who is solely responsible for its structure and content. — The mailing address is The Political Graveyard, P.O. Box 2563, Ann Arbor MI 48106. — This site is hosted by HDL. — The Political Graveyard opened on July 1, 1996; the last full revision was done on May 10, 2022.

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