PoliticalGraveyard.com
The Political Graveyard: A Database of American History
Politicians: Death While Campaigning

Very incomplete list!

in chronological order

  Amos Davis (1794-1835) — of Mt. Sterling, Montgomery County, Ky. Born in Mt. Sterling, Montgomery County, Ky., August 15, 1794. Lawyer; member of Kentucky state house of representatives, 1819, 1825, 1827-28; U.S. Representative from Kentucky 11th District, 1833-35. Died while campaigning, in Owingsville, Bath County, Ky., June 11, 1835 (age 40 years, 300 days). Interment at City Cemetery, Mt. Sterling, Ky.
  Relatives: Brother of Garrett Davis (1801-1872).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  James Collinsworth (1806-1838) — Born in Tennessee, 1806. U.S. Attorney for the Western District of Tennessee, 1829-35; served in the Texas Army during the Texas War of Independence; delegate to Texas Republic Republic constitutional convention from District of Brazoria, 1836; signer, Texas Declaration of Independence, 1836; Texas Republic Secretary of State, 1836; Attorney General of the Texas Republic, 1836; member of Texas Republic Senate from District of Brazoria, 1836; justice of Texas Republic supreme court, 1837. Member, Freemasons. While a candidate for the presidency of the Texas Republic, jumped off a boat and drowned in Galveston Bay, 1838 (age about 32 years). Interment at Founders Memorial Park, Houston, Tex.
  Collingsworth County, Tex. is named for him.
  Isaac Van Zandt (1813-1847) — of Texas. Born in Franklin County, Tenn., July 10, 1813. Member of Texas Republic House of Representatives, 1840-42; Texas Republic Charge d'Affaires to the United States, 1842; delegate to Texas state constitutional convention, 1845. Instrumental in negotiating the treaty to annex the Texas Republic to the United States. Died of yellow fever while campaigning for Governor, in Houston, Harris County, Tex., October 11, 1847 (age 34 years, 93 days). Interment at Greenwood Cemetery, Marshall, Tex.
  Relatives: Father of Khleber Miller Van Zandt (1836-1930).
  Van Zandt County, Tex. is named for him.
  John Alexander Greer (1802-1855) — of Texas. Born in Shelbyville, Bedford County, Tenn., July 18, 1802. Member of Texas Republic Senate from District of San Augustine, 1838-45; Texas Republic Secretary of the Treasury, 1845-46; Lieutenant Governor of Texas, 1847-51. Member, Freemasons. Died while campaigning for the governorship, July 4, 1855 (age 52 years, 351 days). Original interment in private or family graveyard; reinterment in 1929 at Texas State Cemetery, Austin, Tex.
  Greer County, Okla. is named for him.
  Thomas Haughey (1826-1869) — of Elyton (now part of Birmingham), Jefferson County, Ala.; Decatur, Morgan County, Ala. Born in Glasgow, Scotland, 1826. Republican. Physician; surgeon; delegate to Alabama state constitutional convention, 1867; U.S. Representative from Alabama 6th District, 1868-69. While making a political speech, he was assaulted by A. B. Collins, who shot and mortally wounded him; he died six days later, in Courtland, Lawrence County, Ala., August 5, 1869 (age about 43 years). Interment at Green Cemetery, Pinson, Ala.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  J. Goldsteen Dupree (d. 1873) — of Montgomery County, Tex. Member of Texas state house of representatives, 1870. African ancestry. Allegedly killed by white vigilantes who opposed his campaigning for Gov. Edmund J. Davis, 1873. Burial location unknown.
  William Wirt Vaughan (1831-1878) — of Brownsville, Haywood County, Tenn. Born in LaGuardo (now Martha), Wilson County, Tenn., July 2, 1831. Democrat. Lawyer; U.S. Representative from Tennessee 8th District, 1871-73. Died while campaigning for election to Congress, in Crockett Mills, Crockett County, Tenn., August 19, 1878 (age 47 years, 48 days). Interment at Oakwood Cemetery, Brownsville, Tenn.
  Presumably named for: William Wirt
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  James Campbell Cantrill (1870-1923) — also known as J. Campbell Cantrill — of Georgetown, Scott County, Ky. Born in Georgetown, Scott County, Ky., July 9, 1870. Democrat. Farmer; chair of Scott County Democratic Party, 1895-97; member of Kentucky state house of representatives 58th District, 1897-1901; member of Kentucky state senate 22nd District, 1901-05; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Kentucky, 1904; U.S. Representative from Kentucky 7th District, 1909-23; died in office 1923; nominated in primary for Governor of Kentucky 1923, but died before election. Member, Elks; Odd Fellows; Freemasons. Died, due to appendicitis and peritonitis, during his campaign for governor, in St. Joseph's Infirmary, Louisville, Jefferson County, Ky., September 2, 1923 (age 53 years, 55 days). Interment at Georgetown Cemetery, Georgetown, Ky.
  Relatives: Son of James Edwards Cantrill (1839-1909) and Jennie (Moore) Cantrill; married, October 18, 1893, to Carrie Payne (1872-1913); married, June 26, 1918, to Ethel Gist Cantrill (1876-1954); father of James Edwards Cantrill (1897-1944; son-in-law of James Benjamin Aswell; who married Florence McDowell Shelby).
  Political family: Lee-Randolph family of Maryland and Virginia (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Bert F. Baker (1867-1924) — of Glenburn, Renville County, N.Dak. Born in 1867. Member of North Dakota state senate, 1921-23. Died in an automobile accident while campaigning for State Agriculture Commissioner, 1924 (age about 57 years). Interment at Rosehill Cemetery, Minot, N.Dak.
  Relatives: Married to Berta E. Baker (1876-1964).
  Frank Bartlett Willis (1871-1928) — also known as Frank B. Willis — of Delaware, Delaware County, Ohio. Born in Lewis Center, Delaware County, Ohio, December 28, 1871. Republican. U.S. Representative from Ohio 8th District, 1911-15; Governor of Ohio, 1915-17; defeated, 1916, 1918; delegate to Republican National Convention from Ohio, 1916, 1920, 1924; U.S. Senator from Ohio, 1921-28; died in office 1928; candidate for Republican nomination for President, 1928. Died suddenly, from a cerebral hemorrhage, as he was about to give a presidential campaign speech, at Ohio Wesleyan University, Delaware, Delaware County, Ohio, March 30, 1928 (age 56 years, 93 days). Interment at Oak Grove Cemetery, Delaware, Ohio.
  Relatives: Son of Jay B. Willis and Lavinia Willis (1842-1915); married 1895 to Almira Parmelia Dustin (1873-1956).
  Frank B. Willis School (opened 1883 as Delaware High School; renamed 1928; closed 2016), in Delaware, Ohio, was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Frank Tetes Johns (1889-1928) — also known as Frank T. Johns — of Portland, Multnomah County, Ore. Born February 23, 1889. Socialist. Carpenter; Industrial Labor candidate for U.S. Representative from Oregon 3rd District, 1920, 1922; Socialist Labor candidate for President of the United States, 1924. Interrupting an outdoor campaign speech, he dove into the Deschutes River in an attempt to save a 10-year-old boy who had fallen in, but both drowned, in Bend, Deschutes County, Ore., May 20, 1928 (age 39 years, 87 days). Burial location unknown.
  See also Wikipedia article
  Robert McDowell McCracken (1874-1934) — also known as Robert M. McCracken — of Boise, Ada County, Idaho. Born in Vincennes, Knox County, Ind., March 15, 1874. Republican. Member of Idaho state house of representatives, 1907; U.S. Representative from Idaho at-large, 1915-17. While campaigning was in an automobile accident, which resulted in his death, in Emmett, Gem County, Idaho, May 16, 1934 (age 60 years, 62 days). Interment at Blackfoot Cemetery, Blackfoot, Idaho.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Marion Anthony Zioncheck (1901-1936) — also known as Marion A. Zioncheck — of Seattle, King County, Wash. Born in Kety, Galicia, Poland, December 5, 1901. Democrat. U.S. Representative from Washington 1st District, 1933-36; died in office 1936. While running for re-election, he jumped from the window of his campaign office in the Arctic Building, and fell to his death, in Seattle, King County, Wash., August 7, 1936 (age 34 years, 246 days). Interment at Evergreen-Washelli Memorial Park, Seattle, Wash.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Books about Marion A. Zioncheck: Phil Campbell, Zioncheck for President: A True Story of Idealism and Madness in American Politics
  Arthur Edson Blair Moody (1902-1954) — also known as Blair Moody — of Michigan. Born in New Haven, New Haven County, Conn., February 13, 1902. Democrat. Newspaper reporter; U.S. Senator from Michigan, 1951-52; defeated, 1952, 1954; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Michigan, 1952 (chair, Committee on Rules and Order of Business). Member, Phi Beta Kappa. Died, during his campaign for the Democratic nomination for U.S. Senator, of a heart ailment and pneumonia, in University Hospital, Ann Arbor, Washtenaw County, Mich., July 20, 1954 (age 52 years, 157 days). Interment at Woodlawn Cemetery, Detroit, Mich.
  Relatives: Father of Blair Moody, Jr. (1928-1982).
  Cross-reference: Billie S. Farnum
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Earl Kemp Long (1895-1960) — also known as Earl Long — of Winnfield, Winn Parish, La. Born in Winnfield, Winn Parish, La., August 26, 1895. Democrat. Lieutenant Governor of Louisiana, 1936-39; defeated, 1932, 1944; Governor of Louisiana, 1939-40, 1948-52, 1956-60; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Louisiana, 1956; candidate for U.S. Representative from Louisiana 8th District 1960, but died before election. In 1959, after making a speech defending the rights of Blacks to vote, was committed to a state mental hospital by his wife Blanche R. Long; he used his gubernatorial powers to obtain his release. Suffered a heart attack while campaigning, but refused medical attention until the polls had closed; died a few days later, in Baptist Hospital, Alexandria, Rapides Parish, La., September 5, 1960 (age 65 years, 10 days). Interment at Earl K. Long Memorial Park, Winnfield, La.
  Relatives: Son of Hugh Pierce Long (1852-1937) and Caledonia Palestine (Tison) Long (1860-1913); brother of George Shannon Long and Huey Pierce Long (who married Rose McConnell); married, August 17, 1932, to Blanche B. Revere; uncle of Russell Billiu Long; second cousin once removed of Gillis William Long and Speedy Oteria Long (1928-2006).
  Political family: Long family of Louisiana.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile
  Books about Earl K. Long: A. J. Liebling, The Earl of Louisiana
  Rex Bell (1903-1962) — also known as George Anthony Beldam; George Francis Beldam — of Las Vegas, Clark County, Nev. Born in Chicago, Cook County, Ill., October 16, 1903. Republican. Candidate for U.S. Representative from Nevada at-large, 1944; delegate to Republican National Convention from Nevada, 1948 (alternate), 1952 (Honorary Vice-President), 1960 (delegation chair); Lieutenant Governor of Nevada, 1954-62; died in office 1962. Cowboy film star who appeared in numerous movies from 1928 to 1952. While running for governor, died of a heart attack, in Las Vegas, Clark County, Nev., July 4, 1962 (age 58 years, 261 days). Entombed in mausoleum at Forest Lawn Memorial Park, Glendale, Calif.
  Relatives: Married, December 3, 1931, to Clara Gordon Bow (1905-1965; actress); father of Rex Bell, Jr. (actor).
  See also Wikipedia article — Internet Movie Database profile — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Charles Francis Carpentier (1896-1964) — also known as Charles F. Carpentier — of East Moline, Rock Island County, Ill. Born in Moline, Rock Island County, Ill., September 19, 1896. Republican. Served in the U.S. Army during World War I; movie theater operator; mayor of East Moline, Ill., 1929-39; defeated (Citizens), 1927; member of Illinois state senate 33rd District, 1939-53; delegate to Republican National Convention from Illinois, 1940 (alternate), 1956, 1960; secretary of state of Illinois, 1953-64; died in office 1964. Catholic. Member, American Legion; Knights of Columbus; Forty and Eight; Eagles; Moose; Elks; Rotary; Catholic Order of Foresters. Died, while seeking the Republican nomination for Governor, April 3, 1964 (age 67 years, 197 days). Interment at St. Mary's Cemetery, East Moline, Ill.
  Relatives: Son of Gregoir Carpentier and Louise (De Connick) Carpentier; married, June 22, 1920, to Alta Sarginson.
  Walter Edwin Alessandroni (1914-1966) — also known as Walter E. Alessandroni — of Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa.; Harrisburg, Dauphin County, Pa. Born in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., December 27, 1914. Republican. Lawyer; served in the U.S. Marine Corps during World War II; U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania, 1959-61; Pennsylvania state attorney general, 1963-66; delegate to Republican National Convention from Pennsylvania, 1964. Italian ancestry. Member, American Bar Association; American Judicature Society; American Legion. As a candidate for Lieutenant Governor, was flying to a planned campaign speech in a twin-engine Aztec plane, in rainy and snowy weather, when the plane crashed near Connellsville, Fayette County, Pa., May 8, 1966 (age 51 years, 132 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Joseph Alessandroni and Sally Alessandroni; married 1935 to Ethel Decius.
  Robert Francis Kennedy (1925-1968) — also known as Robert F. Kennedy; Bobby Kennedy; "R.F.K." — of Boston, Suffolk County, Mass.; Barnstable, Barnstable County, Mass.; Glen Cove, Nassau County, Long Island, N.Y. Born in Boston, Suffolk County, Mass., November 20, 1925. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Navy during World War II; lawyer; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Massachusetts, 1956, 1960; U.S. Attorney General, 1961-64; U.S. Senator from New York, 1965-68; died in office 1968; candidate for Democratic nomination for President, 1968. Catholic. Member, American Bar Association; Veterans of Foreign Wars; American Legion. On June 5, 1968, while running for president, having just won the California presidential primary, was shot and mortally wounded by Sirhan Sirhan, in the Ambassador Hotel, and died the next day in in Good Samaritan Hospital, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, Calif., June 6, 1968 (age 42 years, 199 days). Interment at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Va.
  Relatives: Son of Joseph Patrick Kennedy, Sr. and Rose (Fitzgerald) Kennedy (1890-1995); brother of Joseph Patrick Kennedy, Jr., John Fitzgerald Kennedy, Eunice Mary Kennedy (1921-2009; who married Robert Sargent Shriver, Jr.), Patricia Kennedy Lawford (who married Peter Lawford), Jean Kennedy Smith and Edward Moore Kennedy; married, June 17, 1950, to Ethel Skakel; father of Kathleen Kennedy Townsend, Joseph Patrick Kennedy II and Kerry Kennedy (who married Andrew Mark Cuomo); uncle of John Fitzgerald Kennedy, Jr., Mark Kennedy Shriver (1964-) and Patrick Joseph Kennedy (1967-); grandson of Patrick Joseph Kennedy (1858-1929) and John Francis Fitzgerald.
  Political family: Kennedy family.
  Cross-reference: Benjamin Altman — John Bartlow Martin — Frank Mankiewicz — Paul Schrade
  The Robert F. Kennedy Department of Justice Building (opened 1935, renamed 2001), in Washington, D.C., is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about Robert F. Kennedy: Arthur M. Schlesinger Jr., Robert Kennedy and His Times — Evan Thomas, Robert Kennedy : His Life — Joseph A. Palermo, In His Own Right — Thurston Clarke, The Last Campaign: Robert F. Kennedy and 82 Days That Inspired America — Nicholas deB. Katzenbach, Some of It Was Fun: Working with RFK and LBJ — Bill Eppridge, A Time it Was: Bobby Kennedy in the Sixties
  Critical books about Robert F. Kennedy: Allen Roberts, Robert Francis Kennedy: Biography of a Compulsive Politician — Victor Lasky, RFK: Myth and Man — Darwin Porter & Danforth Prince, The Kennedys: All the Gossip Unfit for Print
  Leon M. Jordan (1905-1970) — of Kansas City, Jackson County, Mo. Born in Kansas City, Jackson County, Mo., May 6, 1905. Democrat. Police officer; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Missouri, 1960; member of Missouri state house of representatives, 1965-70 (Jackson County 4th District 1965-66, 11th District 1967-70); died in office 1970. Episcopalian. African ancestry. Member, Elks; Kappa Alpha Psi. During his campaign for re-election, was shot and killed while leaving the Green Duck Tavern, which he owned and operated, in Kansas City, Jackson County, Mo., July 15, 1970 (age 65 years, 70 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Married, August 15, 1932, to Orchid Nee Ramsey.
  Thomas Hale Boggs, Sr. (1914-1972) — also known as Hale Boggs — of New Orleans, Orleans Parish, La. Born in Long Beach, Harrison County, Miss., February 15, 1914. Democrat. Lawyer; U.S. Representative from Louisiana 2nd District, 1941-43, 1947-72; died in office 1972; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Louisiana, 1948, 1956, 1960, 1968; Parliamentarian, 1964; chair, Resolutions and Platform Committee, chair, 1968; candidate in primary for Governor of Louisiana, 1952; Vice-Chair of Democratic National Committee, 1957; member, President's Commission on the Assassination of President KNDY, 1963-64. Catholic. Member, American Legion; Amvets; Catholic War Veterans; Sons of the American Revolution; Knights of Columbus; American Bar Association; American Judicature Society; Phi Beta Kappa; Beta Theta Pi; Omicron Delta Kappa. Disappeared while on a campaign flight from Anchorage to Juneau, and presumed killed in a plane crash, somewhere in Alaska, October 16, 1972 (age 58 years, 244 days). The wreckage was never found. Cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery, Washington, D.C.
  Relatives: Son of William Robertson Boggs and Claire Josephine (Hale) Boggs; married, January 22, 1938, to Corinne Claiborne (1916-2013); father of Barbara Boggs Sigmund, Thomas Hale Boggs, Jr. and Cokie Roberts (National Public Radio reporter and commentator).
  Boggs Peak in the Chugach Mountains, Anchorage, Alaska, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Books about Thomas Hale Boggs: Gary Boulard, The Big Lie: Hale Boggs, Lucille May Grace, and Leander Perez
  Nicholas Joseph Begich (1932-1972) — also known as Nick Begich — of Anchorage, Alaska. Born in Eveleth, St. Louis County, Minn., April 6, 1932. Democrat. Member of Alaska state senate, 1963-71; U.S. Representative from Alaska at-large, 1971-72; died in office 1972; alternate delegate to Democratic National Convention from Alaska, 1972. Alaska Native and Croatian ancestry. Disappeared while on a campaign flight from Anchorage to Juneau, and presumed killed in a plane crash, somewhere in Alaska, October 16, 1972 (age 40 years, 193 days). The wreckage was never found. Cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery, Washington, D.C.
  Relatives: Brother of Joseph R. Begich (1930-); married 1956 to Margaret Jendro; father of Nicholas J. Begich, Thomas Begich and Mark Begich (who married Deborah Bonito).
  Political family: Begich family of Anchorage, Alaska.
  Begich Peak in the Chugach Mountains, Anchorage, Alaska, is named for him.  — Begich Middle School, in Anchorage, Alaska, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Wayne Lyman Morse (1900-1974) — also known as Wayne L. Morse — of Eugene, Lane County, Ore. Born in Verona, Dane County, Wis., October 20, 1900. Lawyer; U.S. Senator from Oregon, 1945-69; defeated (Democratic), 1968, 1972; delegate to Republican National Convention from Oregon, 1952; member, Commission on Intergovernmental Relations, 1955; candidate for Democratic nomination for President, 1960; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Oregon, 1964. Congregationalist. Member, Freemasons; Americans for Democratic Action. Was actively engaged in campaigning for U.S. Senate when he died, in Portland, Multnomah County, Ore., July 22, 1974 (age 73 years, 275 days). Interment at Rest Haven Memorial Park, Eugene, Ore.
  Relatives: Son of Wilbur Frank Morse (1859-1936) and Jessie F. (White) Morse; married, June 18, 1924, to Mildred Martha Downie (1901-1994); second cousin four times removed of James Doolittle Wooster; second cousin five times removed of Oliver Ellsworth (1745-1807); third cousin thrice removed of Martin Olds.
  Political families: Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York; Morris-Ingersoll family of New York and Connecticut (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  The Wayne L. Morse U.S. Courthouse, in Eugene, Oregon, is named for him.
  Campaign slogan (1960): "The candidate who votes the way he talks."
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Books about Wayne Morse: Mason Drukman, Wayne Morse : A Political Biography
  Jerry Lon Litton (1937-1976) — also known as Jerry Litton — of Chillicothe, Livingston County, Mo. Born near Lock Springs, Daviess County, Mo., May 12, 1937. Democrat. U.S. Representative from Missouri 6th District, 1973-76; died in office 1976. Member, Omicron Delta Kappa; Alpha Zeta. While running for U.S. Senator, died in the crash of a private plane, shortly after takeoff from the Municipal Airport, Chillicothe, Livingston County, Mo., August 3, 1976 (age 39 years, 83 days). Interment at Resthaven Memorial Gardens, Chillicothe, Mo.
  Relatives: Married to Sharon Summerville.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — NNDB dossier
  Jim Waltermire (1949-1988) — of Montana. Born in Choteau, Teton County, Mont., February 15, 1949. Secretary of state of Montana, 1980-88; died in office 1988. While returning from a campaign appearance, was killed in a plane crash near Helena, Lewis and Clark County, Mont., April 8, 1988 (age 39 years, 53 days). Burial location unknown.
  Chester Merle Blaylock (1924-1996) — also known as Chet Blaylock — of Laurel, Yellowstone County, Mont. Born in Joliet, Carbon County, Mont., November 13, 1924. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Navy during World War II; delegate to Montana state constitutional convention, 1972; member of Montana state senate, 1975; candidate for U.S. Representative from Montana 2nd District, 1984; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Montana, 1996 (delegation chair). As a candidate for Governor, en route to a debate with his opponent, died of a heart attack at Deer Lodge, Powell County, Mont., October 23, 1996 (age 71 years, 345 days). Cremated; ashes interred at Joliet Cemetery, Joliet, Mont.
  Melvin Eugene Carnahan (1934-2000) — also known as Mel Carnahan — of Rolla, Phelps County, Mo. Born in Birch Tree, Shannon County, Mo., February 11, 1934. Democrat. Municipal judge in Missouri, 1951-52; member of Missouri state house of representatives from Phelps County, 1963-67; Democratic candidate for Missouri state senate, 1966, 1968 (primary); Missouri state treasurer, 1981-85; Lieutenant Governor of Missouri, 1989-93; Governor of Missouri, 1993-2000; defeated in primary, 1984; died in office 2000; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Missouri, 1996 (delegation chair), 2000; U.S. Senator from Missouri; elected 2000. Baptist. Member, Freemasons; Shriners; Kiwanis; American Legion; Order of the Coif. Died, in a plane crash while running for U.S. Senator, near Goldman, Jefferson County, Mo., October 16, 2000 (age 66 years, 248 days). Interment at Carson Hill Cemetery, Near Ellsinore, Carter County, Mo.
  Relatives: Son of Albert Sidney Johnson Carnahan and Mary Kathel (Schupp) Carnahan; married, June 12, 1954, to Jean Anne Carpenter; father of John Russell Carnahan (1958-) and Robin Carnahan.
  Political family: Carnahan family of St. Louis, Missouri.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
"Enjoy the hospitable entertainment of a political graveyard."
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