PoliticalGraveyard.com
The Political Graveyard: A Database of American History
Murdered and Assassinated Politicians

Very incomplete list!

in chronological order

  John Baylis (c.1727-1765) — of Dumfries, Prince William County, Va. Born in Manassas, Va., about 1727. Lawyer; planter; member of Virginia House of Burgesses, 1761-65. Anglican. Killed in a duel with Cuthbert Bullitt, in Prince William County, Va., September 24, 1765 (age about 38 years). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of William Baylis; married 1754 to Jane Blackburn.
  Button Gwinnett (c.1732-1777) — of Georgia. Born in Down Hatherly, Gloucestershire, England, about 1732. Delegate to Continental Congress from Georgia, 1776; signer, Declaration of Independence, 1776; delegate to Georgia state constitutional convention, 1777; Governor of Georgia, 1777. Mortally wounded in a duel with Lachlan McIntosh, on May 16, 1777, and died three days later, near Savannah, Chatham County, Ga., May 19, 1777 (age about 45 years). Interment at Colonial Park Cemetery, Savannah, Ga.
  Gwinnett County, Ga. is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  George Wells (1744-1780) — of Georgia. Born in Queen Anne's County, Md., March 3, 1744. Physician; served in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; Governor of Georgia, 1780; died in office 1780. Mortally wounded in a duel with James Jackson, and died soon after, in Augusta, Richmond County, Ga., February 15, 1780 (age 35 years, 349 days). Burial location unknown.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  John Adam Treutlen (1734-1782) — also known as John A. Treutlen; Hans Adam Treuettlen — of Georgia. Born in Germany, January 16, 1734. Merchant; planter; justice of the peace; Governor of Georgia, 1777-78. Lutheran. German ancestry. Member, Freemasons. Murdered in Savannah, Chatham County, Ga., March 1, 1782 (age 48 years, 44 days). Cenotaph at Veterans Park of Effingham County, Springfield, Ga.
  Relatives: Son of Johann Michael Treutlin and Magdalena Klara Treutlin; married to Margaretha Dupuis; great-granduncle by marriage of Charles Rittenhouse Pendleton (1850-1914).
  Political family: Pendleton-Lee family (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Treutlen County, Ga. is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about John Adam Treutlen: Helene M. Riley, John Adam Treutlen. The European Heritage of Georgia's First Governor
  Richard Dobbs Spaight (1758-1802) — of Craven County, N.C. Born in New Bern, Craven County, N.C., March 25, 1758. Democrat. Member of North Carolina state legislature, 1781; Delegate to Continental Congress from North Carolina, 1783-85; member, U.S. Constitutional Convention, 1787; Governor of North Carolina, 1792-95; U.S. Representative from North Carolina, 1798-1801 (10th District 1798-99, at-large 1799-1801); member of North Carolina state senate, 1801. Episcopalian. Mortally wounded in in a duel with John Stanly, his opponent and successor in Congress, and died in New Bern, Craven County, N.C., September 6, 1802 (age 44 years, 165 days). Interment a private or family graveyard, Craven County, N.C.
  Relatives: Father of Richard Dobbs Spaight, Jr. (1796-1850); grandfather of Richard Spaight Donnell.
  Political family: Spaight family of New Bern, North Carolina.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
Alexander Hamilton Alexander Hamilton (1757-1804) — also known as "Alexander the Coppersmith" — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in Charles Town, Nevis, January 11, 1757. Delegate to Continental Congress from New York, 1782; member of New York state assembly from New York County, 1786-87; member, U.S. Constitutional Convention, 1787; delegate to New York convention to ratify U.S. constitution from New York County, 1788; U.S. Secretary of the Treasury, 1789-95. Episcopalian. Scottish and French ancestry. Member, Freemasons; Society of the Cincinnati. Elected to the Hall of Fame for Great Americans in 1915. Shot and mortally wounded in a duel with Aaron Burr, on July 11, 1804, and died the next day in New York, New York County, N.Y., July 12, 1804 (age 47 years, 183 days). Interment at Trinity Churchyard, Manhattan, N.Y.; statue at Treasury Building Grounds, Washington, D.C.; statue at Commonwealth Avenue Mall, Boston, Mass.
  Relatives: Son of James Hamilton and Rachel (Faucette) Hamilton; married, December 14, 1780, to Elizabeth Schuyler (1757-1854; daughter of Philip John Schuyler; sister of Philip Jeremiah Schuyler); father of Alexander Hamilton, Jr., James Alexander Hamilton (1788-1878) and William Stephen Hamilton; great-grandfather of Robert Ray Hamilton; second great-grandfather of Laurens M. Hamilton; ancestor *** of Robert Hamilton Woodruff.
  Political families: Livingston-Schuyler family of New York; VanRensselaer family of Albany, New York (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Cross-reference: Nathaniel Pendleton — Robert Troup — John Tayler — William P. Van Ness
  Hamilton counties in Fla., Ill., Ind., Kan., Neb., N.Y., Ohio and Tenn. are named for him.
  The city of Hamilton, Ohio, is named for him.  — Hamilton Hall (dormitory, built 1926), at Harvard University Business School, Boston, Massachusetts, is named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: Alexander H. BuellAlexander H. HolleyHamilton FishAlexander H. StephensAlexander H. BullockAlexander H. BaileyAlexander H. RiceAlexander Hamilton JonesAlexander H. WatermanAlexander H. CoffrothAlexander H. DudleyAlexander H. RevellAlexander Hamilton HargisAlexander Hamilton PhillipsAlex Woodle
  Coins and currency: His portrait appears on the U.S. $10 bill; from the 1860s to the 1920s, his portrait also appeared on U.S. notes and certificates of various denominations from $2 to $1,000.
  Personal motto: "Do it better yet."
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about Alexander Hamilton: Richard Brookhiser, Alexander Hamilton, American — Forrest McDonald, Alexander Hamilton: A Biography — Gertrude Atherton, Conqueror : Dramatized Biography of Alexander Hamilton — Ron Chernow, Alexander Hamilton — Thomas Fleming, Duel: Alexander Hamilton, Aaron Burr, and the Future of America — Arnold A. Rogow, A Fatal Friendship: Alexander Hamilton and Aaron Burr — Willard Sterne Randall, Alexander Hamilton: A Life — John Harper, American Machiavelli : Alexander Hamilton and the Origins of U.S. Foreign Policy — Stephen F. Knott, Alexander Hamilton and the Persistence of Myth — Charles Cerami, Young Patriots: The Remarkable Story of Two Men. Their Impossible Plan and The Revolution That Created The Constitution — Donald Barr Chidsey, Mr. Hamilton and Mr. Jefferson
  Critical books about Alexander Hamilton: Thomas DiLorenzo, Hamilton's Curse : How Jefferson's Arch Enemy Betrayed the American Revolution -- and What It means for Americans Today
  Image source: U.S. postage stamp (1957)
  George Wythe (1726-1806) — of York County, Va. Born in Elizabeth City County, Va. (now part of Hampton, Va.), 1726. Member of Virginia state legislature, 1758-68; Delegate to Continental Congress from Virginia, 1775-77; signer, Declaration of Independence, 1776; state court judge in Virginia, 1777; member, U.S. Constitutional Convention, 1787; delegate to Virginia convention to ratify U.S. constitution from York County, 1788. Episcopalian. Apparently murderedpoisoned by his grandnephew — and died two weeks later, in Richmond, Va., June 8, 1806 (age about 79 years). Interment at St. John's Churchyard, Richmond, Va.
  Wythe County, Va. is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  John Ward Gurley (c.1787-1808) — of Louisiana. Born in Lebanon, New London County, Conn., about 1787. Orleans territory attorney general, 1803. Killed in a duel with Philip L. Jones, in New Orleans, Orleans Parish, La., March 3, 1808 (age about 21 years). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Brother of Henry Hosford Gurley (1788-1833).
  Meriwether Lewis (1774-1809) — of Missouri. Born near Ivy, Albemarle County, Va., August 18, 1774. Governor of Louisiana (Missouri) Territory, 1807-09; died in office 1809. English and Welsh ancestry. Member, Freemasons. Commanded expedition with William Clark to Oregon, 1803-04. Died from gunshot wounds under mysterious circumstances (murder or suicide?) at Grinder's Stand, an inn on the Natchez Trace near Hohenwald, Lewis County, Tenn., October 11, 1809 (age 35 years, 54 days). Interment at Meriwether Lewis Park, Near Hohenwald, Lewis County, Tenn.
  Relatives: Son of William Lewis (1733-1779) and Lucy (Meriwether) Lewis (1852-1837); first cousin once removed of John Walker, David Meriwether (1755-1822), James Meriwether (1755-1817), Francis Walker and George Rockingham Gilmer; first cousin five times removed of Arthur Sidney Demarest; second cousin of James Meriwether (1788-1852), David Meriwether (1800-1893) and James Archibald Meriwether; second cousin once removed of George Washington, Thomas Walker Gilmer and Reuben Handy Meriwether; second cousin thrice removed of Hubbard T. Smith; second cousin four times removed of Archer Woodford; third cousin of Theodorick Bland, Robert Brooke, Bushrod Washington, George Madison and Richard Aylett Buckner; third cousin once removed of John Randolph of Roanoke, Henry St. George Tucker, John Thornton Augustine Washington, Zachary Taylor and Aylette Buckner; third cousin twice removed of John Strother Pendleton, Albert Gallatin Pendleton, Aylett Hawes Buckner and Nathaniel Beverly Tucker; third cousin thrice removed of James Francis Buckner, Key Pittman and Vail Montgomery Pittman.
  Political families: Demarest-Meriwether family of New Jersey; Marshall-Harrison-Randolph-Cabell family of Virginia; Meriwether-Kellogg-Tyler family of Virginia and Connecticut (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Cross-reference: George F. Shannon
  Lewis counties in Idaho, Ky., Mo., Tenn. and Wash. are named for him; Lewis and Clark County, Mont. is named partly for him.
  Other politicians named for him: Meriwether Lewis RandolphMeriwether Lewis Walker
  Coins and currency: His portrait appeared (along with Clark's) on the $10 U.S. Note from 1898 to 1927.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Books about Meriwether Lewis: Thomas C. Danisi, Uncovering the Truth About Meriwether Lewis — Donald Barr Chidsey, Lewis and Clark: The Great Adventure
  David Ramsay (1749-1815) — of South Carolina. Born in Lancaster County, Pa., April 2, 1749. Physician; author; member of South Carolina state house of representatives, 1776-83; served in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; Delegate to Continental Congress from South Carolina, 1782-83, 1785-86; member of South Carolina state senate, 1801-15. Shot and mortally wounded by a crazed patient, and died two days later, in Charleston, Charleston County, S.C., May 8, 1815 (age 66 years, 36 days). Interment at Circular Congregational Church Burying Ground, Charleston, S.C.
  Relatives: Son of James Rufus Ramsay (1705-1786) and Jane (Montgomery) Ramsay (1711-1755); brother of Nathaniel Ramsey (1741-1817); married to Martha Laurens (1759-1811; daughter of Henry Laurens).
  Political family: Pinckney-Middleton-Laurens family of Charleston, South Carolina (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Thomas K. Harris (c.1777-1816) — of Tennessee. Born in Tennessee, about 1777. Democrat. Member of Tennessee state senate, 1809-11; U.S. Representative from Tennessee at-large, 1813-15. Died from wounds received in an encounter with Col. John Simpson, on the old Kentucky Road at Shells Ford of Collins River, near McMinnville, Warren County, Tenn., March 18, 1816 (age about 39 years). Burial location unknown.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Armistead Thomson Mason (1787-1819) — also known as Armistead T. Mason — of Virginia. Born in Louisa County, Va., August 4, 1787. Democrat. Colonel in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812; U.S. Senator from Virginia, 1816-17. As a result of a bitter election campaign, was killed in a duel with Col. John Mason McCarty, at Bladensburg, Prince George's County, Md., February 6, 1819 (age 31 years, 186 days). Interment at Episcopal Churchyard, Leesburg, Va.
  Relatives: Son of Mary Elizabeth 'Polly' (Armistead) Mason (1760-1825) and Stevens Thomson Mason (1760-1803); brother of Catherine Armistead Mason (born 1795; who married William Taylor Barry), John Thomson Mason (1787-1850) and Mary Thomson Mason (1791-1813; who married Benjamin Howard); married, May 1, 1817, to Charlotte Eliza Taylor (died 1846); nephew of John Thomson Mason (1765-1824); uncle of Stevens Thomson Mason (1811-1843); grandson of Thomson Mason; grandnephew of George Mason; first cousin of John Thomson Mason, Jr.; second cousin of Thomson Francis Mason and James Murray Mason.
  Political family: Mason family of Virginia (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — NNDB dossier
  Joshua Barton (1792-1823) — of Missouri. Born in Jefferson County, Tenn., July 28, 1792. Secretary of state of Missouri, 1820-21; resigned 1821; U.S. Attorney for Missouri, 1822-23. Killed in a duel with Thomas C. Rector, on Bloody Island, St. Louis, Mo., June 30, 1823 (age 30 years, 337 days). Interment somewhere in St. Charles, Mo.
  Joseph Selden (1787-1824) — of Arkansas. Born in Henrico County, Va., May 7, 1787. Major in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812; justice of Arkansas territorial supreme court, 1820-24; died in office 1824. Killed in a duel with Andrew Scott, on an island in the Mississippi River, near Helena (now part of Helena-West Helena), Phillips County, Ark., May 26, 1824 (age 37 years, 19 days). Burial location unknown.
  Solomon P. Sharp (1780-1825) — of Kentucky. Born in Abingdon, Washington County, Va., 1780. Democrat. Member of Kentucky state house of representatives, 1809; U.S. Representative from Kentucky, 1813-17 (at-large 1813-15, 6th District 1815-17); Kentucky state attorney general, 1821-25. Stabbed and killed, by Jereboam O. Beauchamp, in Frankfort, Franklin County, Ky., November 7, 1825 (age about 45 years). Interment at Frankfort Cemetery, Frankfort, Ky.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Robert Brank Vance (1793-1827) — of Nashville, Nash County, N.C. Born near Asheville, Buncombe County, N.C., 1793. Democrat. U.S. Representative from North Carolina 12th District, 1823-25. Mortally wounded in a duel with Samuel P. Carson, who had defeated him for Congress; died the next day at a hotel in Henderson County, N.C., 1827 (age about 34 years). Interment a private or family graveyard, Buncombe County, N.C.
  Relatives: Uncle of Robert Brank Vance (1828-1899) and Zebulon Baird Vance.
  Political family: Vance family of Asheville, North Carolina.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Henry Wharton Conway (1793-1827) — also known as Henry W. Conway — of Little Rock, Pulaski County, Ark. Born near Greeneville, Greene County, Tenn., March 18, 1793. Served in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812; postmaster at Little Rock, Ark., 1821-23; Delegate to U.S. Congress from Arkansas Territory, 1823-27; died in office 1827. Mortally wounded in a duel with Robert Crittenden on October 29, 1827, and died at Arkansas Post, Arkansas County, Ark., November 9, 1827 (age 34 years, 236 days). Interment at Scull Cemetery, Arkansas Post, Ark.
  Relatives: Son of Thomas C. Conway (1771-1835) and Nancy Ann Elizabeth (Rector) Conway (1771-1845); brother of James Sevier Conway, William Conway and Elias Nelson Conway; first cousin of Ambrose Hundley Sevier and Henry Massey Rector (1816-1899); second cousin twice removed of George Taylor Conway and Walter B. Conway; second cousin thrice removed of Charles Mitchell Conway; third cousin of James Lawson Kemper.
  Political family: Conway-Norvell-Johnson family.
  Conway County, Ark. is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Spencer Darwin Pettis (1802-1831) — also known as Spencer D. Pettis — of Fayette, Howard County, Mo. Born in Culpeper County, Va., 1802. Democrat. Secretary of state of Missouri, 1826-28; U.S. Representative from Missouri at-large, 1829-31; died in office 1831. The fierce campaign of 1830 led to a quarrel and ultimately a duel with Maj. Thomas Biddle, in which both fell mortally wounded; died the next day, in St. Louis, Mo., August 28, 1831 (age about 29 years). Interment at Old City Cemetery, St. Louis, Mo.
  Pettis County, Mo. is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Jonathan Cilley (1802-1838) — of Thomaston, Knox County, Maine. Born in Nottingham, Rockingham County, N.H., July 2, 1802. Lawyer; member of Maine state house of representatives, 1831-36; Speaker of the Maine State House of Representatives, 1835-36; U.S. Representative from Maine 3rd District, 1837-38; died in office 1838. Killed in a duel by Representative William J. Graves of Kentucky, on the Marlboro Pike, in Prince George's County, Md., February 24, 1838 (age 35 years, 237 days). Interment at Elm Grove Cemetery, Thomaston, Maine; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery, Washington, D.C.
  Relatives: Brother of Joseph Cilley; nephew of Bradbury Cilley (1760-1831).
  Political family: Cilley family of Nottingham, New Hampshire.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — NNDB dossier
  Augustus A. Alston (1805-1839) — of Georgia. Born in Hancock County, Ga., 1805. Member of Georgia state house of representatives, 1828-29. Killed in a duel with Gen. Leigh Read, in Tallahassee, Leon County, Fla., 1839 (age about 34 years). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Brother of Henrietta Alston (who married Augustus Holmes Kenan (1805-1870)) and Philoclea Alston (who married David Shelby Walker); nephew of Willis Alston; uncle of Robert Augustus Alston and Lewis Holmes Kenan.
  Political family: Walker-Alston family of North Carolina.
  Robert Potter (c.1800-1842) — of Oxford, Granville County, N.C. Born near Williamsboro, Vance County, N.C., about 1800. Member of North Carolina house of commons from Granville County, 1828, 1834; U.S. Representative from North Carolina 6th District, 1829-31; delegate to Texas Republic Republic constitutional convention from District of Nacogdoches, 1836; signer, Texas Declaration of Independence, 1836; Texas Republic Secretary of the Navy, 1836; member of Texas Republic Senate from District of Red River and Fannin, 1840-42; died in office 1842. Resigned from the U.S. Congress in 1831 after maiming two men in a jealous rage; convicted, and sentenced to six months in prison. Expelled in 1834 from the North Carolina House for cheating at cards. Shot and killed by members of an opposing faction who surrounded his home, in Harrison County (part now in Marion County), Tex., March 2, 1842 (age about 42 years). Original interment at a private or family graveyard, Marion County, Tex.; reinterment in 1928 at Texas State Cemetery, Austin, Tex.
  Potter County, Tex. is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  William Hester Patton (1808-1842) — of Texas. Born in Hopkinsville, Christian County, Ky., 1808. Served in the Texas Army during the Texas War of Independence; member of Texas Republic House of Representatives, 1837-38. Murdered, June 12, 1842 (age about 33 years). Burial location unknown.
  George Augustus Waggaman (1782-1843) — also known as George A. Waggaman — of New Orleans, Orleans Parish, La. Born in Caroline County, Md., 1782. Circuit judge in Louisiana, 1818; secretary of state of Louisiana, 1830-32; U.S. Senator from Louisiana, 1831-35. Mortally wounded in a duel, and died in New Orleans, Orleans Parish, La., March 22, 1843 (age about 60 years). Original interment at Girod Street Cemetery (which no longer exists), New Orleans, La.; reinterment to unknown location.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  John M. Hansford (c.1800-1844) — of Texas. Born about 1800. Member of Texas Republic House of Representatives, 1838-40; judge of Texas Republic, 1840-42. Resigned as judge in 1842 while being impeached over his handling of a trial arising out of the "Regulator-Moderator War" in East Texas. Killed by members of the Regulators who had seized his home, in Texas, 1844 (age about 44 years). Burial location unknown.
  Hansford County, Tex. is named for him.
  John Gordon Chalmers (1803-1847) — also known as John G. Chalmers — of La Grange, Fayette County, Tex. Born in Halifax County, Va., August 25, 1803. Newspaper editor; member of Virginia state legislature, 1830; Texas Republic Secretary of the Treasury, 1841. During a fight with Joshua Holden, he was Stabbed and mortally wounded; he died soon after, January 1, 1847 (age 43 years, 129 days). Interment at Oakwood Cemetery, Austin, Tex.
  Relatives: Son of James Ronald Chalmers and Sarah Lanier (Williams) Chalmers; brother of Joseph Williams Chalmers (1807-1853); married 1827 to Mary Wade Henderson; uncle of H. H. Chalmers and James Ronald Chalmers (1831-1898).
  Political family: Chalmers family of Mississippi.
  Moses W. Formwalt (1820-1852) — of Atlanta, DeKalb County (now Fulton County), Ga. Born in Tennessee, 1820. Tinsmith; mayor of Atlanta, Ga., 1848-49; deputy sheriff. Stabbed and killed by a prisoner he was escorting, in May, 1852 (age about 31 years). Interment at Oakland Cemetery, Atlanta, Ga.
  See also Wikipedia article
  Edward Gilbert (c.1819-1852) — of San Francisco, Calif. Born in Cherry Valley, Otsego County, N.Y., about 1819. Democrat. Printer; newspaper editor; delegate to California state constitutional convention from San Francisco District, 1849; U.S. Representative from California at-large, 1850-51. Killed in a duel with Col. James W. Denver, near Sacramento, Sacramento County, Calif., August 2, 1852 (age about 33 years). Original interment at Laurel Hill Cemetery (which no longer exists), San Francisco, Calif.; reinterment to unknown location.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Solomon Weathersbee Downs (1801-1854) — also known as Solomon W. Downs — of Louisiana. Born in Montgomery County, Tenn., 1801. Democrat. Lawyer; U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of Louisiana, 1845-46; U.S. Senator from Louisiana, 1847-53; U.S. Collector of Customs, 1853. Mortally wounded in a duel, and subsequently died, at Crab Orchard Springs, Lincoln County, Ky., August 14, 1854 (age about 53 years). Original interment at a private or family graveyard, Ouachita Parish, La.; reinterment at Riverview Cemetery, Monroe, La.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  John Gallagher Montgomery (1805-1857) — of Pennsylvania. Born in Northumberland, Northumberland County, Pa., June 27, 1805. Democrat. Member of Pennsylvania state house of representatives, 1855; U.S. Representative from Pennsylvania 12th District, 1857; died in office 1857. Presumed to have been deliberately poisoned at a banquet during the inauguration of President James Buchanan, in Washington, D.C., and subsequently died, at Danville, Montour County, Pa., April 24, 1857 (age 51 years, 301 days). Interment at Episcopal Cemetery, Danville, Pa.; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery, Washington, D.C.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  John Anthony Quitman (1799-1858) — also known as John A. Quitman — of Mississippi. Born in Rhinebeck, Dutchess County, N.Y., September 1, 1799. Democrat. Lawyer; member of Mississippi state house of representatives, 1826-27; delegate to Mississippi state constitutional convention, 1832; member of Mississippi state senate, 1835-36; Governor of Mississippi, 1835-36, 1850-51; state court judge in Mississippi, 1838; general in the U.S. Army during the Mexican War; candidate for Democratic nomination for Vice President, 1848, 1856; U.S. Representative from Mississippi 5th District, 1855-58; died in office 1858. Member, Freemasons. Presumed to have been deliberately poisoned at a banquet during the inauguration of President James Buchanan, in Washington, D.C., and subsequently died, near Natchez, Adams County, Miss., July 17, 1858 (age 58 years, 319 days). Interment at Natchez City Cemetery, Natchez, Miss.; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery, Washington, D.C.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — NNDB dossier
  Books about John A. Quitman: Robert E. May, John A. Quitman: Old South Crusader
  Philip Barton Key (1818-1859) — of Washington, D.C. Born in Georgetown, Washington, D.C., April 5, 1818. U.S. Attorney for the District of Columbia, 1853-59; died in office 1859. Shot and killed by Daniel E. Sickles, in retaliation for Key's affair with his wife Teresa, at Lafayette Park, Washington, D.C., February 27, 1859 (age 40 years, 328 days). Interment at Oak Hill Cemetery, Washington, D.C.; cenotaph at Westminster Burying Ground, Baltimore, Md.
  Relatives: Son of Francis Scott Key and Mary Tayloe (Lloyd) Key (1784-1859); brother of Mary Alicia 'Alice' Key (1824-1886; who married George Hunt Pendleton (1825-1889)); married, November 18, 1845, to Ellen Swan; nephew of Anne Phoebe Charlton Key (who married Roger Brooke Taney); uncle of Francis Key Pendleton; grandnephew of Philip Barton Key; first cousin twice removed of Philip Key; fourth cousin once removed of Vinson Martlow Whitley.
  Political families: Pendleton-Lee family; Key family of Maryland (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  David Fullerton Robison (1816-1859) — of Pennsylvania. Born near Greencastle, Franklin County, Pa., May 28, 1816. U.S. Representative from Pennsylvania 17th District, 1855-57. Presumed to have been deliberately poisoned at a banquet during the inauguration of President James Buchanan, in Washington, D.C., and subsequently died, at Chambersburg, Franklin County, Pa., June 24, 1859 (age 43 years, 27 days). Interment at Cedar Hill Cemetery, Greencastle, Pa.
  Relatives: Nephew of David Fullerton (1772-1843).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Robert Simpson Neighbors (1815-1859) — of Texas. Born in Virginia, November 3, 1815. Served in the Texas Army during the Texas War of Independence; member of Texas state house of representatives, 1852-53; Federal Superintendent of Indians. Shot and killed by Edward Cornett, at Fort Belknap (now Belknap), Young County, Tex., September 14, 1859 (age 43 years, 315 days). Interment at Fort Belknap Civilian Cemetery, Belknap, Tex.
  David Colbreth Broderick (1820-1859) — also known as David C. Broderick — of New York; San Francisco, Calif. Born in Washington, D.C., February 4, 1820. Democrat. Candidate for U.S. Representative from New York, 1846; went to California for the 1849 Gold Rush; member of California state senate, 1850-52; Lieutenant Governor of California, 1851-52; U.S. Senator from California, 1857-59; died in office 1859. Irish ancestry. Mortally wounded in a duel on September 13, 1859 with David S. Terry, chief justice of the California Supreme Court, and died in San Francisco, Calif., September 16, 1859 (age 39 years, 224 days). Original interment at Laurel Hill Cemetery (which no longer exists), San Francisco, Calif.; reinterment in 1942 at Cypress Lawn Memorial Park, Colma, Calif.
  Relatives: Son of Thomas Broderick and Honora (Colbert) Broderick; cousin *** of Andrew Kennedy and Case Broderick (1839-1920).
  Political family: Broderick-Kennedy family of Indianapolis and Muncie, Indiana.
  The former town of Broderick, now part of West Sacramento, California, was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  John C. Bell (c.1831-1860) — of El Dorado County, Calif. Born about 1831. Member of California state assembly 18th District, 1860; died in office 1860. During an argument just outside the Assembly session in the California State Capitol, was shot and stabbed by Dr. W. H. Stone, mortally wounded, and died four days later, in Sacramento, Sacramento County, Calif., April 15, 1860 (age about 29 years). Interment at Sacramento City Cemetery, Sacramento, Calif.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  William Augustus Lake (1808-1861) — Born near Cambridge, Dorchester County, Md., January 6, 1808. Member of Maryland state house of delegates, 1831; member of Mississippi state senate, 1848; U.S. Representative from Mississippi 4th District, 1855-57; member of Mississippi state house of representatives, 1859. Killed in a duel by Henry Cousins Chambers, his opponent for Confederate Congress, at Hopefield, Crittenden County, Ark., October 15, 1861 (age 53 years, 282 days). Interment at Cedar Hill Cemetery, Vicksburg, Miss.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  William T. Casto (1824-1862) — Born January 24, 1824. Lawyer; mayor of Maysville, Ky., 1850; arrested in 1861 and imprisoned for allegedly aiding the Confederacy; released in 1862. Blamed Col. Leonidas Metcalfe (son of Gov. Thomas Metcalfe) for his imprisonment; challenged him to a duel; the weapons were Colt rifles at 60 yards; Casto was shot and killed on the first fire, in Bracken County, Ky., May 8, 1862 (age 38 years, 104 days). Interment at Maysville Cemetery, Maysville, Ky.
  Relatives: Son of Abijah Casto.
  Epitaph: "A Patriot, his Country's firm unwavering friend, he was willing to die for his Principles and as a man of Honor nobly fell a Veteran of the sacred and invincible right of personal liberty."
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Joshua Chilton (1818-1862) — of Shannon County, Mo. Born in Wayne County, Tenn., September 28, 1818. Democrat. Member of Missouri state house of representatives from Shannon County, 1846-55; member of Missouri state senate 24th District, 1860-61. Member, Freemasons. Arrested by Union troops as an alleged Southern sympathizer, and while a prisoner, was shot and killed, near Rolla, Phelps County, Mo., August 28, 1862 (age 43 years, 334 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Thomas Boggs Chilton (1782-1865) and Susannah (Inman) Chilton (1785-1827); married to Elizabeth Chilton (1822-1899); father of Commodore Perry Chilton; uncle of Shadrach Chilton; first cousin twice removed of John Smith (1750-1836); second cousin of Thomas Chilton and William Parish Chilton; second cousin twice removed of Horace George Chilton and Arthur Bounds Chilton.
  Political family: Chilton family of Missouri.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Thomas Johnson (1802-1865) — of Kansas. Born in 1802. Member of Kansas territorial legislature, 1855. Robbed and murdered, 1865 (age about 63 years). Burial location unknown.
  Johnson County, Kan. is named for him.
  Alfred Walker Bethea (1816-1865) — also known as Alfred W. Bethea — of Reedy Creek, Marion District (now Dillon County), S.C. Born November 12, 1816. Physician; delegate to South Carolina secession convention from Marion, 1860-62. Shot and killed by a deserter, February 18, 1865 (age 48 years, 98 days). Interment at Sweet Swamp Cemetery, Dillon County, S.C.
  Relatives: Son of John Bethea (1787-1827) and Hannah (Walker) Bethea (1788-1865); married to Flora Jane Bethea (1822-1897).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
Abraham Lincoln Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865) — also known as "Honest Abe"; "Old Abe"; "The Rail-Splitter"; "The Illinois Baboon" — of New Salem, Menard County, Ill.; Springfield, Sangamon County, Ill. Born in a log cabin, Hardin County (part now in Larue County), Ky., February 12, 1809. Republican. Served in the U.S. Army during the Black Hawk War; postmaster; lawyer; member of Illinois state house of representatives, 1834-41; U.S. Representative from Illinois 7th District, 1847-49; candidate for Republican nomination for Vice President, 1856; candidate for U.S. Senator from Illinois, 1858; President of the United States, 1861-65; died in office 1865; His election as president in 1860 precipitated the Civil War; determined to preserve the Union, he led the North to victory on the battlefield, freed the slaves in the conquered states, and in doing this, redefined American nationhood. He was. English ancestry. Elected in 1900 to the Hall of Fame for Great Americans. Shot by the assassin John Wilkes Booth, during a play at Ford's Theater, in Washington, D.C., April 14, 1865; died at Peterson's Boarding House, across the street, the following day, April 15, 1865 (age 56 years, 62 days). Interment at Oak Ridge Cemetery, Springfield, Ill.; memorial monument at National Mall, Washington, D.C.; statue erected 1868 at Judiciary Park, Washington, D.C.
  Relatives: Son of Thomas Lincoln (1778-1851) and Nancy (Hanks) Lincoln (1784-1818); married, November 4, 1842, to Mary Ann Todd (1818-1882; sister-in-law of Ninian Wirt Edwards (1809-1889); half-sister-in-law of N. H. R. Dawson; aunt of Martha Dee Todd; grandniece of David Rittenhouse Porter); father of Robert Todd Lincoln; second cousin four times removed of Richard Henry Lee, Francis Lightfoot Lee and Arthur Lee; third cousin twice removed of Levi Lincoln; third cousin thrice removed of Thomas Sim Lee, Henry Lee, Charles Lee, Edmund Jennings Lee and Zachary Taylor; fourth cousin once removed of Levi Lincoln, Jr. and Enoch Lincoln.
  Political families: Lincoln-Lee family; Edwards-Cook family of Illinois and Nebraska (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Cross-reference: Clement Claiborne Clay, Jr. — Isham N. Haynie — William M. Stone — John Pitcher — Stephen Miller — John T. Stuart — William H. Seward — Henry L. Burnett — Judah P. Benjamin — Robert Toombs — Richard Taylor Jacob — George W. Jones — James Adams — John G. Nicolay — Edward Everett — Stephen T. Logan — Francis P. Blair — John Hay — Henry Reed Rathbone — James A. Ekin — Frederick W. Seward — John H. Surratt — John H. Surratt, Jr. — James Shields
  Lincoln counties in Ark., Colo., Idaho, Kan., La., Minn., Miss., Mont., Neb., Nev., N.M., Okla., Ore., Wash., W.Va., Wis. and Wyo. are named for him.
  The city of Lincoln, Nebraska, is named for him.  — Lincoln Memorial University, in Harrogate, Tennessee, is named for him.  — Lincoln University, in Jefferson City, Missouri, is named for him.  — Lincoln University, near Oxford, Pennsylvania, is named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: Abraham L. KeisterAbraham L. TuckerAbraham L. BrickAbraham L. KelloggAbraham Lincoln BernsteinA. Lincoln ReileyA. L. HelmickAbraham L. SuttonA. Lincoln AckerAbraham L. OsgoodAbraham L. WitmerAbraham L. PhillipsAbraham L. PaytonA. L. AuthA. Lincoln MooreA. Lincoln NiditchAbraham L. RubensteinAbraham L. Davis, Jr.Abraham L. FreedmanA. L. MarovitzLincoln GordonAbraham L. BannerAbraham Lincoln Tosti
  Coins and currency: His portrait has appeared on the U.S. penny (one cent coin) since 1909, and on the $5 bill since 1913. From the 1860s until 1927, his portrait also appeared on U.S. notes and certificates of various denominations from $1 to $500.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about Abraham Lincoln: David Herbert Donald, Lincoln — George Anastaplo, Abraham Lincoln : A Constitutional Biography — G. S. Boritt, ed., The Lincoln Enigma : The Changing Faces of an American Icon — Albert J. Beveridge, Abraham Lincoln 1809-1858 — Geoffrey Perret, Lincoln's War : The Untold Story of America's Greatest President as Commander in Chief — David Herbert Donald, We Are Lincoln Men : Abraham Lincoln and His Friends — Edward Steers, Jr., Blood on the Moon: The Assassination of Abraham Lincoln — Mario Cuomo, Why Lincoln Matters : Today More Than Ever — Michael W. Kauffman, American Brutus : John Wilkes Booth and the Lincoln Conspiracies — Doris Kearns Goodwin, Team of Rivals : The Political Genius of Abraham Lincoln — Joshua Wolf Shenk, Lincoln's Melancholy : How Depression Challenged a President and Fueled His Greatness — John Channing Briggs, Lincoln's Speeches Reconsidered — Ronald C. White, Jr., The Eloquent President : A Portrait of Lincoln Through His Words — Harold Holzer, Lincoln at Cooper Union : The Speech That Made Abraham Linco ln President — Michael Lind, What Lincoln Believed : The Values and Convictions of America's Greatest President — Doris Kearns Goodwin, Team of Rivals : The Political Genius of Abraham Lincoln — Michael Burlingame, ed., Abraham Lincoln: The Observations of John G. Nicolay and John Hay — Thomas J. Craughwell, Stealing Lincoln's Body — Roy Morris, Jr., The Long Pursuit: Abraham Lincoln's Thirty-Year Struggle with Stephen Douglas for the Heart and Soul of America — John Stauffer, Giants: The Parallel Lives of Frederick Douglass and Abraham Lincoln — Karen Judson, Abraham Lincoln (for young readers) — Maira Kalman, Looking at Lincoln (for young readers)
  Critical books about Abraham Lincoln: Thomas J. DiLorenzo, The Real Lincoln : A New Look at Abraham Lincoln, His Agenda, and an Unnecessary War
  Fiction about Abraham Lincoln: Gore Vidal, Lincoln: A Novel
  Image source: Portrait & Biographical Album of Washtenaw County (1891)
  Aaron H. Conrow (1824-1865) — of Missouri. Born near Cincinnati, Hamilton County, Ohio, June 19, 1824. Delegate from Missouri to the Confederate Provisional Congress, 1861-62; Representative from Missouri in the Confederate Congress, 1862-65; served in the Confederate Army during the Civil War. Killed along with M. M. Parsons and four others, by bandits in Nuevo León, August 15, 1865 (age 41 years, 57 days). Interment at Shotwell Cemetery, Richmond, Mo.
  Mosby Monroe Parsons (1822-1865) — also known as M. M. Parsons — of Missouri. Born in Charlottesville, Va., May 21, 1822. Lawyer; served in the U.S. Army during the Mexican War; U.S. Attorney for the Western District of Missouri, 1857-58; general in the Confederate Army during the Civil War. Killed, along with Aaron H. Conrow and four others, by bandits in Nuevo León, August 15, 1865 (age 43 years, 86 days). Interment somewhere in Nuevo León; cenotaph at Maplewood Cemetery, Charlottesville, Va.; cenotaph at Woodlawn Cemetery, Jefferson City, Mo.
  Relatives: Son of Gustavus Adolphus Parsons.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Caleb Claiborne Herbert (c.1814-1867) — of Texas. Born in Goochland County, Va., about 1814. Member of Texas state senate, 1857-59; Representative from Texas in the Confederate Congress, 1862-65. Shot and killed outside a saloon in Columbus, Colorado County, Tex., July 5, 1867 (age about 53 years). Interment a private or family graveyard, Colorado County, Tex.
  Cornelius Springer Hamilton (1821-1867) — of Union County, Ohio. Born in Gratiot, Muskingum County, Ohio, January 2, 1821. Republican. Delegate to Ohio state constitutional convention from Union County, 1850-51; member of Ohio state senate, 1856-57; U.S. Representative from Ohio 8th District, 1867; died in office 1867. Killed by his insane son, in Marysville, Union County, Ohio, December 22, 1867 (age 46 years, 354 days). Interment at Oakdale Cemetery, Marysville, Ohio; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery, Washington, D.C.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Benjamin Franklin Randolph (d. 1868) — also known as Benjamin F. Randolph — of Orangeburg County, S.C. Delegate to South Carolina state constitutional convention from Orangeburg County, 1868. African ancestry. Murdered as he stepped off a train, 1868. Original interment in unknown location; reinterment at Randolph Cemetery, Columbia, S.C.
  Presumably named for: Benjamin Franklin
  George W. Ashburn (c.1814-1868) — of Muscogee County, Ga. Born about 1814. Hotelier; cotton broker; colonel in the Union Army during the Civil War; opposed to secession, and led a regiment of Southern loyalists; delegate to Georgia state constitutional convention, 1867. Shot and killed by a group of masked men, in a boarding house at Columbus, Muscogee County, Ga., March 31, 1868 (age about 54 years). Interment at Rose Hill Cemetery, Macon, Ga.
  Relatives: Married 1847 to Martha Ann Smith.
  Cross-reference: W. D. Chipley
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Thomas Carmichael Hindman (1828-1868) — also known as Thomas C. Hindman — of Mississippi; Helena (now part of Helena-West Helena), Phillips County, Ark. Born in Knoxville, Knox County, Tenn., January 28, 1828. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army during the Mexican War; member of Mississippi state house of representatives, 1852; U.S. Representative from Arkansas 1st District, 1859-61; general in the Confederate Army during the Civil War. Assassinated in Helena (now part of Helena-West Helena), Phillips County, Ark., September 27, 1868 (age 40 years, 243 days). Interment at Maple Hill Cemetery, Helena-West Helena, Ark.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  James Hinds (1833-1868) — of Arkansas. Born near Salem, Washington County, N.Y., December 5, 1833. Republican. U.S. Representative from Arkansas 2nd District, 1868; died in office 1868. Shot and killed by George A. Clark, who was drunk at the time, near Indian Bay, Monroe County, Ark., October 22, 1868 (age 34 years, 322 days). Interment somewhere in East Norwich, Long Island, N.Y.; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery, Washington, D.C.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Thomas Haughey (1826-1869) — of Elyton (now part of Birmingham), Jefferson County, Ala.; Decatur, Morgan County, Ala. Born in Glasgow, Scotland, 1826. Republican. Physician; surgeon; delegate to Alabama state constitutional convention, 1867; U.S. Representative from Alabama 6th District, 1868-69. While making a political speech, he was assaulted by A. B. Collins, who shot and mortally wounded him; he died six days later, in Courtland, Lawrence County, Ala., August 5, 1869 (age about 43 years). Interment at Green Cemetery, Pinson, Ala.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  John Huyler (1808-1870) — of Hackensack, Bergen County, N.J. Born in New York, New York County, N.Y., April 9, 1808. Democrat. Member of New Jersey state house of assembly from Bergen County, 1850-52; Speaker of the New Jersey State House of Assembly, 1851; Judge, New Jersey Court of Errors and Appeals, 1854-57; U.S. Representative from New Jersey 4th District, 1857-59; defeated, 1858; delegate to Democratic National Convention from New Jersey, 1860. Assassinated in Hackensack, Bergen County, N.J., January 9, 1870 (age 61 years, 275 days). Interment at Maple Grove Park Cemetery, Hackensack, N.J.
  Relatives: Married to Magdalen Rutan.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Edward Dexter Holbrook (1836-1870) — also known as Edward D. Holbrook — of Idaho City, Boise County, Idaho. Born in Elyria, Lorain County, Ohio, May 6, 1836. Lawyer; Delegate to U.S. Congress from Idaho Territory, 1865-69. Censured by the House of Representatives in 1869 for use of unparliamentary language. Shot and mortally wounded by Charles H. Douglas, and died the next day, in Idaho City, Boise County, Idaho, June 18, 1870 (age 34 years, 43 days). Interment at Masonic Burial Ground, Idaho City, Idaho.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Alexander Parker Crittenden (1816-1870) — also known as Alexander P. Crittenden — of Santa Clara County, Calif.; San Francisco, Calif.; Virginia City, Storey County, Nev. Born in Lexington, Fayette County, Ky., January 14, 1816. Lawyer; went to California for the 1849 Gold Rush; member of California state assembly, 1849-51, 1852-53 (Los Angeles District 1849-51, 5th District 1852-53). Shot and mortally wounded by his ex-lover, Laura D. Fair, on board a ferry boat in San Francisco Bay, and died two days later, in San Francisco, Calif., November 5, 1870 (age 54 years, 295 days). Fair was tried, found guilty, and sentenced to death, but the state supreme court ordered a new trial, and she was acquitted. Interment at Cypress Lawn Memorial Park, Colma, Calif.
  Relatives: Son of Thomas Turpin Crittenden (1788-1832) and Mary Wilson (Parker) Crittenden (1792-1869); brother of Thomas Turpin Crittenden (1825-1905; Union general); married to Clara Churchill (1820-1881); nephew of John Jordan Crittenden and Robert Crittenden; grandson of John Crittenden (1754-1806); first cousin of Thomas Leonidas Crittenden and Thomas Theodore Crittenden; first cousin once removed of Thomas Theodore Crittenden, Jr.; first cousin thrice removed of Thomas Jefferson; second cousin twice removed of Dabney Carr; third cousin once removed of Francis Wayles Eppes, Dabney Smith Carr, Benjamin Franklin Randolph, Meriwether Lewis Randolph and George Wythe Randolph; fourth cousin of Thomas Jefferson Coolidge and Frederick Madison Roberts; fourth cousin once removed of John Gardner Coolidge.
  Political family: Lee-Randolph family of Maryland and Virginia (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Lewis Holmes Kenan (1833-1871) — of Georgia. Born in Milledgeville, Baldwin County, Ga., 1833. Member of Georgia state senate 20th District, 1867-68. Shot and killed in Milledgeville, Baldwin County, Ga., 1871 (age about 38 years). Interment somewhere in Milledgeville, Ga.
  Relatives: Son of Augustus Holmes Kenan (1805-1870); nephew of Augustus A. Alston; grandnephew of Willis Alston; first cousin of Robert Augustus Alston.
  Political family: Walker-Alston family of North Carolina.
  James Holt Clanton (1827-1871) — also known as James H. Clanton — of Alabama. Born in Columbia County, Ga., January 8, 1827. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army during the Mexican War; lawyer; member of Alabama state house of representatives, 1850; Presidential Elector for Alabama, 1860; general in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Alabama, 1868. In a hostile encounter with attorney David Nelson, son of T. A. R. Nelson, on Gay Street in front of the Lamar House Hotel and the St. Nicholas Saloon, Knoxville, Knox County, Tenn., Nelson, who was intoxicated, shot and killed him, September 27, 1871 (age 44 years, 262 days). Nelson was charged with murder, but a jury found not guilty. Interment at Oakwood Cemetery, Montgomery, Ala.
  Relatives: Son of Nathaniel Holt Clanton.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Joseph R. Waldrop (1825-1872) — of Alabama. Born in Mississippi, 1825. Served in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; member of Alabama state house of representatives, 1869. Methodist. Member, Ku Klux Klan. Shot and killed while getting off his horse in front of a boarding house in Escatawpa, Washington County, Ala., 1872 (age about 47 years). Interment at Old Escatawpa Cemetery, Escatawpa, Ala.
  J. Goldsteen Dupree (d. 1873) — of Montgomery County, Tex. Member of Texas state house of representatives, 1870. African ancestry. Allegedly killed by white vigilantes who opposed his campaigning for Gov. Edmund J. Davis, 1873. Burial location unknown.
  Edwin Stanton McCook (1837-1873) — Born in Carrollton, Carroll County, Ohio, March 26, 1837. General in the Union Army during the Civil War; secretary of Dakota Territory, 1872-73; died in office 1873. Member, Freemasons. Shot and killed by Peter P. Wintermute, a banker and political adversary, at a saloon in Yankton, Yankton County, Dakota Territory (now S.Dak.), September 11, 1873 (age 36 years, 169 days). Interment at Spring Grove Cemetery, Cincinnati, Ohio.
  Relatives: Brother of George Wythe McCook; first cousin of Edward Moody McCook (1833-1909) and Anson George McCook.
  Political family: McCook family of Steubenville, Ohio.
  McCook County, S.Dak. is named for him.
  Thomas Neel Stilwell (1830-1874) — also known as Thomas N. Stilwell — of Anderson, Madison County, Ind. Born in Stilwell, Butler County, Ohio, August 29, 1830. Republican. Lawyer; banker; member of Indiana state house of representatives, 1856; served in the Union Army during the Civil War; U.S. Representative from Indiana 11th District, 1865-67; U.S. Minister to Venezuela, 1867-68. During an argument over financial matters, he drew his pistol and fired at John E. Corwin, wounding him in the leg; Corwin then shot Stilwell in the head, killing him, in Anderson, Madison County, Ind., January 14, 1874 (age 43 years, 138 days). Interment at Maplewood Cemetery, Anderson, Ind.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Harvey Myers (1828-1874) — of Kentucky. Born February 10, 1828. Lawyer; candidate for U.S. Representative from Kentucky 6th District, 1872. Shot and killed by Col. William G. Terrell, whose wife he had represented in a divorce case, in the Stevenson & Myers law office, Greer Building, Covington, Kenton County, Ky., March 28, 1874 (age 46 years, 46 days). Interment at Highland Cemetery, Fort Mitchell, Ky.
  Benjamin Long (1838-1877) — of Dallas, Dallas County, Tex. Born March 7, 1838. Mayor of Dallas, Tex., 1868-70, 1872-74; defeated, 1874. Killed when he attempted to stop three people from leaving a saloon without paying, June 23, 1877 (age 39 years, 108 days). Interment at Greenwood Cemetery, Dallas, Tex.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Robert Augustus Alston (1832-1879) — also known as Robert A. Alston — of DeKalb County, Ga. Born in Milledgeville, Baldwin County, Ga., 1832. Lawyer; farmer; newspaper publisher; served in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; member of Georgia state house of representatives, 1878-79; died in office 1879. Methodist. A farmer named Ed Cox, angry over the sale of a prison labor lease which Alston had negotiated, armed himself, announced he would kill Alston, sought him in the Georgia state capitol building, and found him in the State Treasurer's office. Both men drew their pistols. Alston was mortally wounded by a shot to the head, and died later that day, in Atlanta, Fulton County, Ga., March 11, 1879 (age about 46 years). Cox was also shot and injured, but recovered, was convicted of murder, and sentenced to life imprisonment. Interment at Decatur Cemetery, Decatur, Ga.
  Relatives: Married to Mary Charlotte Magill (1839-1884); nephew of Augustus A. Alston and Thomas Coke Howard; grandnephew of Willis Alston; first cousin of Lewis Holmes Kenan (1833-1871).
  Political family: Walker-Alston family of North Carolina.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  John Milton Elliott (1820-1879) — also known as John M. Elliott — of Prestonsburg, Floyd County, Ky. Born in Scott County, Va., May 20, 1820. Democrat. Member of Kentucky state house of representatives, 1847, 1860-61; U.S. Representative from Kentucky 6th District, 1853-59; Delegate from Kentucky to the Confederate Provisional Congress, 1861-62; Representative from Kentucky in the Confederate Congress, 1862-65; circuit judge in Kentucky, 1868-74; Judge, Kentucky Court of Appeals, 1876-79; died in office 1879. Expelled from the Kentucky legislature in 1861 for supporting the Confederacy. Shot and killed by Col. Thomas Buford, in front of the ladies' entrance to the Capitol Hotel, in Frankfort, Franklin County, Ky., March 26, 1879 (age 58 years, 310 days). Interment at Frankfort Cemetery, Frankfort, Ky.; statue at Boyd County Courthouse Grounds, Catlettsburg, Ky.
  Relatives: Son of John Elliott and Jane Elliott.
  Elliott County, Ky. is named for him.
  Epitaph: "Assassinated, for having done his duty as a Judge."
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  John Strong, Sr. (1798-1881) — of Greenfield Township (now part of Detroit), Wayne County, Mich. Born in Wroxton, Oxfordshire, England, November 26, 1798. Democrat. Farmer; member of Michigan state house of representatives from Wayne County, 1835-36. Episcopalian. Attacked by a burglar, wounded, and died as a result, in Greenfield Township (now part of Detroit), Wayne County, Mich., February 23, 1881 (age 82 years, 89 days). Interment at Elmwood Cemetery, Detroit, Mich.
  Relatives: Father of John Strong, Jr.; grandfather of John Strong Haggerty (1866-1950).
  Political family: Buhl-Strong family of Detroit, Michigan.
James A. Garfield James Abram Garfield (1831-1881) — also known as James A. Garfield — of Hiram, Portage County, Ohio. Born in a log cabin near Orange, Cuyahoga County, Ohio, November 19, 1831. Republican. Lawyer; college professor; president, Eclectic University (now Hiram College); member of Ohio state senate, 1859-61; general in the Union Army during the Civil War; U.S. Representative from Ohio 19th District, 1863-81; President of the United States, 1881; died in office 1881. Disciples of Christ. English ancestry. Member, Freemasons; Delta Upsilon. Shot by the assassin Charles J. Guiteau, in the Baltimore & Potomac Railroad Station, Washington, D.C., July 2, 1881, and died from the effects of the wound and infection, in Elberon, Monmouth County, N.J., September 19, 1881 (age 49 years, 304 days). Interment at Lake View Cemetery, Cleveland, Ohio; statue erected 1887 at Garfield Circle, Washington, D.C.; statue at Golden Gate Park, San Francisco, Calif.
  Relatives: Son of Abram Garfield (1799-1833) and Elizabeth (Ballou) Garfield (1801-1888); married, November 11, 1858, to Lucretia "Crete" Rudolph (1832-1918); father of James Rudolph Garfield; fourth cousin of Eli Thayer; fourth cousin once removed of John Alden Thayer (1857-1917).
  Political families: Conger-Hungerford family; Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Cross-reference: William S. Maynard
  Garfield counties in Colo., Mont., Neb., Okla., Utah and Wash. are named for him.
  Garfield Mountain, in the Cascade Range, King County, Washington, is named for him.  — The city of Garfield, New Jersey, is named for him.
  Politician named for him: James G. Stewart
  Coins and currency: His portrait appeared on the U.S. $20 gold certificate in 1898-1905.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Books about James A. Garfield: Allan Peskin, Garfield: A Biography — Justus D. Doenecke, The Presidencies of James A. Garfield and Chester A. Arthur
  Image source: James G. Blaine, Twenty Years of Congress, vol. 2 (1886)
  Henry Clay Cole (1838-1881) — also known as Henry C. Cole — of Kokomo, Howard County, Ind. Born in Ripley County, Ind., 1838. Physician; mayor of Kokomo, Ind., 1881; died in office 1881. Shot and killed by a sheriff's posse, allegedly while he was attempting to rob and burn a grist mill, in Kokomo, Howard County, Ind., September 19, 1881 (age about 43 years). The shooters were personal enemies of his, so some suspected a conspiracy. Four members of the posse were indicted for manslaughter by a grand jury, but the charges were later dismissed. Interment at Crown Point Cemetery, Kokomo, Ind.
  Presumably named for: Henry Clay
  Relatives: Son of Jesse Cole and Elizabeth (Roberts) Cole.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Alonzo William Slayback (1838-1882) — also known as Alonzo W. Slayback; A. W. Slayback — of St. Louis, Mo. Born July 4, 1838. Democrat. Lawyer; colonel in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Missouri, 1876; candidate for U.S. Representative from Missouri 2nd District, 1876. Member, Elks. Shot and killed by John Cockerill, editor of the Post-Dispatch newspaper, in St. Louis, Mo., October 13, 1882 (age 44 years, 101 days). Cockerill pleaded self-defense and was not indicted by the grand jury. Interment at Machpelah Cemetery, Lexington, Mo.
  William Henry Haywood Tison (1822-1882) — also known as W. H. H. Tison — of Carrollville, Prentiss County, Miss. Born in Jackson County, Ala., November 6, 1822. Democrat. Farmer; lawyer; postmaster; dry goods merchant; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Mississippi, 1860, 1880; colonel in the Confederate Army during the Civil War. Murdered, in Baldwyn, Lee County, Miss., December 4, 1882 (age 60 years, 28 days). Interment at Baldwyn Masonic Cemetery, Baldwyn, Miss.
  Relatives: Married, April 19, 1853, to Sarah Celina Walker.
  Henry Cooper (1827-1884) — of Nashville, Davidson County, Tenn. Born in Columbia, Maury County, Tenn., August 22, 1827. Democrat. Member of Tennessee state house of representatives, 1853; state court judge in Tennessee, 1862; member of Tennessee state senate, 1869; U.S. Senator from Tennessee, 1871-77. Killed by bandits in Tierra Blanca, Guadelupe y Calvo, Chihuahua, February 3, 1884 (age 56 years, 165 days). Interment somewhere in Mexico; cenotaph at City Cemetery, Shelbyville, Tenn.
  Relatives: Brother of Edmund Cooper (1821-1911).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Thomas James Roberson Swafford (1849-1884) — also known as Thomas J. R. Swafford — Born December 27, 1849. Democrat. Member of Tennessee state senate, 1884; died in office 1884; shot through his arm by Jeff Dibrell, brother of George G. Dibrell; injured in several other gun and knife fights, in one of which he wounded two attackers and accidentally killed his father-in-law. Shot and killed during an armed confrontation with Monroe Hudson, shopkeeper, who had ordered him to leave his store, in Sparta, White County, Tenn., October 17, 1884 (age 34 years, 295 days). Interment at Old Sparta Cemetery, Sparta, Tenn.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  John B. Bowman (1832-1885) — of East St. Louis, St. Clair County, Ill. Born in Germany, 1832. Republican. Civil engineer; lawyer; real estate business; mayor of East St. Louis, Ill., 1865-66, 1868, 1872-74, 1877-78. German ancestry. Shot and killed by an unknown assailant, in front of his home, in East St. Louis, St. Clair County, Ill., November 21, 1885 (age about 53 years). Two East St. Louis policemen were later charged with his murder, but they were never tried. Interment at Bellefontaine Cemetery, St. Louis, Mo.
  Joseph Castle J. C. Eversole (1853-1888) — also known as J. C. Eversole — of Hazard, Perry County, Ky. Born in Perry County, Ky., July 26, 1853. Republican. Lawyer; merchant; delegate to Republican National Convention from Kentucky, 1884. Shot and killed, during the "French-Eversole War", in Perry County, Ky., April 15, 1888 (age 34 years, 264 days). Interment at Combs-Eversole Graveyard, Hazard, Ky.
  Relatives: Son of Nancy (Duff) Eversole (1828-1900) and John C. Eversole (1830-1864); married to Susan Combs.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  William Wirt Adams (1819-1888) — also known as Wirt Adams — of Jackson, Hinds County, Miss. Born in Frankfort, Franklin County, Ky., March 22, 1819. Democrat. Member of Mississippi state house of representatives, 1858-60; general in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; postmaster at Jackson, Miss., 1885-88. Shot and killed in a street encounter with John H. Martin, a newspaper editor with whom he had quarreled, in Jackson, Hinds County, Miss., May 1, 1888 (age 69 years, 40 days). Martin was also killed. Interment at Greenwood Cemetery, Jackson, Miss.; cenotaph at Confederate Cemetery, Okolona, Miss.
  Presumably named for: William Wirt
  Relatives: Son of George Adams (1784-1844) and Anna (Weisiger) Adams.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  David Smith Terry (1823-1889) — also known as David S. Terry — of Galveston, Galveston County, Tex.; San Francisco, Calif.; Stockton, San Joaquin County, Calif. Born in Christian County (part now in Todd County), Ky., March 8, 1823. Lawyer; went to California for the 1849 Gold Rush; advocated the extension of slavery to California; justice of California state supreme court, 1855-59; chief justice of California state supreme court, 1857-59; killed U.S. Senator David C. Broderick in a duel near San Francisco in 1859; tried for murder, but acquitted; served in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; delegate to California state constitutional convention, 1878-79; candidate for Presidential Elector for California, 1880; his wife Sarah Althea Hill claimed to be the widow and heir of wealthy U.S. Senator William Sharon; in September, 1888, when her claim was finally rejected by U.S. Supreme Court Justice Stephen J. Field (acting as a Court of Appeals judge for California), she and Terry caused an altercation in the courtroom and were jailed six months for contempt of court. Five months after his release from jail, he encountered Justice Field and slapped him in the face; he was then shot through the heart and killed by U.S. Deputy Marshal David Neagle, the justice's bodyguard, in the train station dining room at Lathrop, San Joaquin County, Calif., August 14, 1889 (age 66 years, 159 days). Neagle was arrested by local authorities, but later released on the demand of the U.S. government. Interment at Stockton Rural Cemetery, Stockton, Calif.
  Relatives: Son of Joseph Royal Terry (1792-1877) and Sarah David (Smith) Terry (1793-1837); brother of Benjamin Franklin Terry (1821-1861); married, November 26, 1852, to Cornelia Runnels (1829-1884; niece of Hardin Richard Runnels); married, January 7, 1886, to Sarah Althea Hill (1857-1937).
  Political family: Runnels-Terry family of Houston, Texas.
  Cross-reference: Peter Singleton Wilkes
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  William Cassius Goodloe (1841-1889) — also known as W. Cassius Goodloe — of Lexington, Fayette County, Ky. Born in Madison County, Ky., June 27, 1841. Republican. Lawyer; newspaper publisher; delegate to Republican National Convention from Kentucky, 1868, 1872 (delegation chair), 1884, 1888; member of Kentucky state house of representatives, 1871; defeated, 1867; member of Republican National Committee from Kentucky, 1872-; member of Kentucky state senate, 1873; candidate for Kentucky state attorney general, 1875; U.S. Minister to Belgium, 1878-80. Episcopalian. Member, Loyal Legion. During a violent encounter in the lobby of the Lexington Post Office, he repeatedly stabbed and ultimately killed a political enemy, Col. Armistead Swope, who meanwhile shot and badly wounded him; before any prosecution could ensue, he died of his own wounds two days later, in the Phoenix Hotel, Lexington, Fayette County, Ky., November 8, 1889 (age 48 years, 134 days). Interment at Lexington Cemetery, Lexington, Ky.
  Relatives: Son of David Short Goodloe (1811-1881) and Sally Anne Lewis Clay (Smith) Goodloe (1818-1875); brother of Green Clay Goodloe (son-in-law of James Burnie Beck (1822-1890)); married 1865 to Mary Elizabeth Mann (1845-1920); nephew of Cassius Marcellus Clay; grandfather of William Cassius Goodloe III.
  Political family: Wilson-Dunn-Goodloe family of Indiana (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also U.S. State Dept career summary — Find-A-Grave memorial
  William Preston Taulbee (1851-1890) — also known as William P. Taulbee — of Salyersville, Magoffin County, Ky. Born in Morgan County, Ky., October 22, 1851. Democrat. Ordained minister; lawyer; U.S. Representative from Kentucky 10th District, 1885-89. Shot and mortally wounded, by Charles E. Kincaid, a journalist with whom he had quarreled, in the U.S. Capitol Building, and died eleven days later at Providence Hospital, Washington, D.C., March 11, 1890 (age 38 years, 140 days). Kincaid pleaded self-defense and was found not guilty of murder in 1891. Interment a private or family graveyard, Morgan County, Ky.
  Relatives: Son of William Harrison Taulbee (1824-1905) and Mary Ann (Wilson) Taulbee (1831-1916); married to Lou Emma Oney (1852-1903).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
William L. Couch William Lewis Couch (1850-1890) — also known as William L. Couch — of Wichita, Sedgwick County, Kan.; Oklahoma City, Oklahoma County, Okla. Born in Wilkes County, N.C., November 20, 1850. Grocer; hardware business; horse and mule dealer; mayor of Oklahoma City, Okla., 1889; resigned 1889. Shot in the leg in dispute over a land claim; the wound probably became infected, and he subsequently died, in Oklahoma, April 21, 1890 (age 39 years, 152 days). Interment at Fairlawn Cemetery, Oklahoma City, Okla.
  Relatives: Son of Meshach H. Couch (1828-1895) and Mary 'Polly' (Bryan) Couch (1828-1908); married to Cynthia Gordon (1843-1918).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: City of Oklahoma City
  John Adam Henneman (1835-1891) — also known as J. A. Henneman — of Spartanburg, Spartanburg County, S.C. Born in Kronach, Bavaria (now Germany), 1835. Served in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; jeweler; mayor of Spartanburg, S.C., 1891; died in office 1891. German ancestry. Shot and killed by John Williams, in Spartanburg, Spartanburg County, S.C., September 27, 1891 (age about 56 years). Williams was hanged for the murder on October 7, 1892. Interment at Oakwood Cemetery, Spartanburg, S.C.
  Relatives: Married to Louisa Rate (1838-1909).
  R. D. McCotter (d. 1892) — of Pamlico County, N.C. Member of North Carolina state senate, 1892; died in office 1892. Shot and killed from ambush near his home, purportedly by the "White Caps", in Pamlico County, N.C., May 20, 1892. Burial location unknown.
  Carter Henry Harrison (1825-1893) — of Chicago, Cook County, Ill. Born near Lexington, Fayette County, Ky., February 15, 1825. Democrat. U.S. Representative from Illinois 2nd District, 1875-79; mayor of Chicago, Ill., 1879-87, 1893; died in office 1893; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Illinois, 1880, 1884; candidate for Governor of Illinois, 1884. Shot and killed at his home, by Patrick Eugene Prendergast, in Chicago, Cook County, Ill., October 28, 1893 (age 68 years, 255 days). Prendergast, who was defended by famed trial lawyer Clarence Darrow, was tried for murder, convicted, sentenced to death, and hanged. Interment at Graceland Cemetery, Chicago, Ill.
  Relatives: Son of Carter Henry Harrison (1796-1825) and Caroline Evaline (Russell) Harrison (1797-1875); married to Sophonisba Grayson Preston (1833-1876; great-grandniece of William Smallwood); father of Carter Henry Harrison II; grandson of William Russell (1758-1825); great-grandson of William Russell (1735-1793); great-grandnephew of Benjamin Harrison (1726-1791) and William Cabell; second great-grandnephew of Richard Randolph; first cousin once removed of Joseph Cabell Breckinridge, Benjamin William Sheridan Cabell (1793-1862) and Robert Jefferson Breckinridge; first cousin twice removed of Thomas Jefferson, Carter Bassett Harrison, William Cabell, Jr., William Henry Cabell and William Henry Harrison (1773-1841); first cousin thrice removed of Richard Bland, Peyton Randolph (1721-1775) and Robert Carter Nicholas (1729-1780); second cousin of John Cabell Breckinridge, Peter Augustus Porter (1827-1864), William Lewis Cabell, Robert Jefferson Breckinridge, Jr., William Campbell Preston Breckinridge and George Craighead Cabell; second cousin once removed of Dabney Carr, John Scott Harrison, Edward Carrington Cabell, Clifton Rodes Breckinridge, Peter Augustus Porter (1853-1925), Benjamin Earl Cabell, Levin Irving Handy, Desha Breckinridge and Henry Skillman Breckinridge; second cousin twice removed of Theodorick Bland, Edmund Jenings Randolph, George Nicholas, Beverley Randolph, Wilson Cary Nicholas, John Nicholas, John Randolph of Roanoke and Earle Cabell; third cousin of Francis Wayles Eppes, Dabney Smith Carr, Benjamin Franklin Randolph, Meriwether Lewis Randolph, George Wythe Randolph, John William Leftwich and Benjamin Harrison (1833-1901); third cousin once removed of John Marshall, Henry Lee, Charles Lee, James Markham Marshall, Thomas Mann Randolph, Jr., Alexander Keith Marshall, Edmund Jennings Lee, Peyton Randolph (1779-1828), Henry St. George Tucker, Robert Carter Nicholas (1787-1857), Stanley Matthews, Thomas Jefferson Coolidge, Russell Benjamin Harrison and Frederick Madison Roberts; third cousin twice removed of Burwell Bassett, John Gardner Coolidge and William Henry Harrison (1896-1990); third cousin thrice removed of Charles Carroll of Carrollton; fourth cousin of Thomas Marshall, James Keith Marshall, Peter Myndert Dox, Edmund Randolph and Nathaniel Beverly Tucker; fourth cousin once removed of John Wayles Eppes, Fitzhugh Lee, Connally Findlay Trigg, John Augustine Marshall, Richard Evelyn Byrd, Harry Bartow Hawes, William Welby Beverley and James Harlan Cleveland, Jr..
  Political families: Marshall-Harrison-Randolph-Cabell family of Virginia; Breckinridge-Preston-Cabell-Henry family of Virginia; Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York; Walker-Bolling family of Huntsville, Alabama (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Cross-reference: Robert E. Burke
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  Newton Woodward Hall (1864-1893) — also known as Newton W. Hall — of San Francisco, Calif. Born in Birmingham, England, 1864. Vice-Consul for Ecuador in San Francisco, Calif., 1891-93; Vice-Consul for Honduras in San Francisco, Calif., 1891-93. English ancestry. During an altercation with Edward A. Gillespie, he fell or was thrown down a flight of stairs, suffered a skull fracture, and died soon after at Receiving Hospital, San Francisco, Calif., November 27, 1893 (age about 29 years). Gillespie was arrested and charged with murder, but acquitted at trial in 1894. While in the hospital, Hall also received a probably fatal dose of opium. Burial location unknown.
  Peter R. Morrissey (1859-1895) — of St. Louis, Mo. Born in St. Louis County, Mo., August 14, 1859. Democrat. Saloon keeper; arrested in December 1886 on federal charges of vote fraud; found guilty in April 1887, but released because the indictment did not specify that the ballots were for a federal office; indicted again soon after, but the charges were dropped in November; indicted for naturalization fraud in 1889, but not convicted; member of Missouri state senate 31st District, 1893-95; died in office 1895. Catholic. Irish ancestry. While in bed, he was shot twice with his own pistol, and killed, by his mistress, Maud Lewis, in her "house of ill repute", in St. Louis, Mo., May 13, 1895 (age 35 years, 272 days). After a dramatic and highly publicized trial, Maud Lewis was convicted of second degree murder and sentenced to fifteen years in prison; she was pardoned by Gov. Lon Vest Stephens in January 1901. Interment at Calvary Cemetery, St. Louis, Mo.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Albert Jennings Fountain (1838-1896) — also known as Albert J. Fountain; Albert Jennings — of El Paso, El Paso County, Tex.; Mesilla, Dona Ana County, N.M. Born in Staten Island, Richmond County, N.Y., October 23, 1838. Republican. Served in the Union Army during the Civil War; U.S. Collector of Customs at El Paso; Assessor and Collector of Internal Revenue for the Western District of Texas; member of Texas state senate, 1869-70; fought a duel with Frank Williams, and killed him; lawyer. Presumed murdered near White Sands, Dona Ana County, N.M., February 1, 1896 (age 57 years, 101 days). His body was never found.
  Relatives: Son of Solomon Jennings and Catherine (de la Fontaine) Jennings; married 1862 to Mariana Perez.
  See also Wikipedia article
  Caleb Dorsey (1833-1896) — of Pike County, Mo.; Stanislaus County, Calif. Born in Patapsco, Anne Arundel County, Md., September 7, 1833. Colonel in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; livestock raiser; bank director; member of California state assembly 5th District, 1877-80. Member, Freemasons. Shot and killed by his mining partner, J. T. Newcomer, at Snell Mine, near Columbia, Tuolumne County, Calif., April 21, 1896 (age 62 years, 227 days). Newcomer claimed self-defense, but was convicted of murder and sentenced to prison. Interment at Stockton Rural Cemetery, Stockton, Calif.
  Relatives: Son of Edward Worthington Dorsey (1793-1858) and Eleanor Elizabeth (Brown) Dorsey (1804-1892); nephew of Thomas Beale Dorsey (1780-1855); first cousin once removed of George Riggs Gaither, Jr.; second cousin once removed of Daniel Dorsey and Andrew Dorsey; third cousin once removed of Richard Ridgely, Alexander Warfield and Clement F. Dorsey; third cousin thrice removed of Leonard Franklin Poffenbarger; fourth cousin once removed of Joseph Maull, Richard Yates and Alexander Warfield Dorsey.
  Political families: Dorsey-Poffenbarger family of Maryland; Maull family of Lewes, Delaware; Livingston-Schuyler family of New York (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Frazier B. Baker (c.1857-1898) — of Lake City, Florence County, S.C. Born about 1857. Republican. School teacher; postmaster at Lake City, S.C., 1897-98; his appointment as postmaster aroused strenuous opposition among white residents; U.S. Senators Ben Tillman and John L. McLaurin, and U.S. Rep. James Norton all demanded his removal from office "because of his color"; many violent incidents followed. African ancestry. Late at night, a mob of armed white men surrounded his home and post office, and set it on fire; when the family awoke and attempted to escape, they were met with a hail of bullets; Baker was shot and killed, in Lake City, Florence County, S.C., February 22, 1898 (age about 41 years). Federal prosecutors pressed charges against eleven men, none of whom were convicted. Burial location unknown.
  See also Wikipedia article
  James Balbirnie (1838-1899) — of Muskegon, Muskegon County, Mich. Born in Ontario, 1838. Republican. Merchant; mayor of Muskegon, Mich., 1899; died in office 1899. Scottish ancestry. Shot and killed by John W. Tayer, who had been ousted as city poor director, in his store in his store at Muskegon, Muskegon County, Mich., June 29, 1899 (age about 60 years). Tayer died by suicide at the scene; he shot himself, then swallowed carbolic acid. Interment at Evergreen Cemetery, Muskegon, Mich.
  Relatives: Married to Ellen T. Watson (1847-1900).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Herbert Best Fellows (1860-1899) — also known as Herbert B. Fellows — of Scarsdale, Westchester County, N.Y. Born in Clifton Park, Saratoga County, N.Y., November 20, 1860. Democrat. Express agent; postmaster at Scarsdale, N.Y., 1894-99. shot, killed, and robbed, in Scarsdale, Westchester County, N.Y., December 4, 1899 (age 39 years, 14 days). A 19-year-old named Edgar C. Burnz confessed to the crime, was arrested, and held at the county jail in White Plains, where, in July 1900, he led about 100 prisoners in an unsuccessful escape attempt. Burnz smoked as many as eighty cigarettes a day, and the press dubbed him the "Cigarette Boy Murderer". At his murder trial in December 1900, his defense was that cigarette smoking had made him insane. He was convicted, sentenced to life in prison, but released about 1920, and became an Episcopal minister. Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of John Fellows and Sarah Catherine (Best) Fellows; married, September 21, 1889, to Amenia C. Fellows (1863-1953).
  William Justus Goebel (1856-1900) — also known as William J. Goebel; "Boss Bill"; "The Kenton King"; "William the Conqueror" — of Kentucky. Born in Sullivan County, Pa., January 4, 1856. Democrat. Lawyer; member of Kentucky state senate, 1887-99; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Kentucky, 1888; delegate to Kentucky state constitutional convention, 1890-91; Governor of Kentucky, 1900; died in office 1900. In 1895, he killed a factional rival, John Stanford, in a political quarrel; never tried. While contesting the outcome of a gubernatorial election, was shot and mortally wounded in front of the old Kentucky State Capitol; he was declared elected and sworn in as Governor before he died four days later, in Frankfort, Franklin County, Ky., February 3, 1900 (age 44 years, 30 days). Interment at Frankfort Cemetery, Frankfort, Ky.; statue at Old State Capitol Grounds, Frankfort, Ky.
  Relatives: Brother of Justus Goebel (1872?-?).
  Cross-reference: William S. Taylor — Caleb Powers — Charles Finley
  See also NNDB dossier
  William H. Mattox (1836-1900) — of Elbert County, Ga. Born in Elbert County, Ga., 1836. Planter; merchant; served in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; member of Georgia state house of representatives, 1865-66; delegate to Georgia state constitutional convention, 1877; member of Georgia state senate, 1880-81. Shot and killed by his son-in-law J. B. Jones, Jr., during a gunfight, in Elbert County, Ga., November 17, 1900 (age about 64 years). Interment at Elmhurst Cemetery, Elberton, Ga.
  Relatives: Married to Rebecca Allen (daughter of Singleton Walthall Allen; niece of George Washington Heard, Barnard Carroll Heard and Thomas Jefferson Heard; aunt by marriage of Willis B. Adams (1861-1913); granddaughter of Stephen Heard).
  Political family: Heard family of Elberton, Georgia.
William McKinley William McKinley, Jr. (1843-1901) — also known as "Idol of Ohio" — of Canton, Stark County, Ohio. Born in Niles, Trumbull County, Ohio, January 29, 1843. Republican. Major in the Union Army during the Civil War; lawyer; U.S. Representative from Ohio, 1877-84, 1885-91 (17th District 1877-79, 16th District 1879-81, 17th District 1881-83, 18th District 1883-84, 20th District 1885-87, 18th District 1887-91); delegate to Republican National Convention from Ohio, 1884, 1888; Governor of Ohio, 1892-96; President of the United States, 1897-1901; died in office 1901. Methodist. Scotch-Irish ancestry. Member, Loyal Legion; Freemasons; Grand Army of the Republic; Knights of Pythias; Sigma Alpha Epsilon. Shot by the assassin Leon Czolgosz, at a reception in the Temple of Music, at the Pan American Exposition in Buffalo, N.Y., September 6, 1901, and died eight days later, in Buffalo, Erie County, N.Y., September 14, 1901 (age 58 years, 228 days). Original interment at West Lawn Cemetery, Canton, Ohio; reinterment in 1907 at McKinley Monument, Canton, Ohio; statue at Lucas County Courthouse Grounds, Toledo, Ohio.
  Relatives: Son of William McKinley (1807-1892) and Nancy Campbell (Allison) McKinley (1809-1897); married, January 25, 1871, to Ida Saxton (1847-1907); first cousin of William McKinley Osborne; fourth cousin once removed of Henry Prather Fletcher (1873-1959).
  Political family: McKinley-Osborne-Fletcher-Allison family of Ohio.
  Cross-reference: Albert Halstead — Loran L. Lewis — George B. Cortelyou — John Goodnow
  McKinley County, N.M. is named for him.
  Mount McKinley (the highest peak in North America, now known by its traditional name, Denali), in Denali Borough, Alaska, was named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: William McKinley ThomasWilliam McKinley ThomasWilliam M. BellWilliam M. Branch
  Coins and currency: His portrait appeared on the U.S. $500 bill in 1928-46.
  Campaign slogan (1896): "The Full Dinner Pail."
  Campaign slogan (1896): "The Advance Agent of Prosperity."
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about William McKinley: Lewis L. Gould, The Presidency of William McKinley — Kevin Phillips, William McKinley — H. Wayne Morgan, William McKinley and His America
  Image source: American Monthly Review of Reviews, October 1901
  Nicholas Fish (1848-1902) — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in New York, New York County, N.Y., February 19, 1848. Republican. Lawyer; U.S. Charge d'Affaires to Switzerland, 1877-81; U.S. Minister to Belgium, 1882-85; banker; Presidential Elector for New York, 1896. Member, Society of the Cincinnati. Quarreled with Thomas J. Sharkey, a private detective, on the second floor of the Ehrhardt Brothers saloon; Sharkey struck him, so that he fell down the stairs into the street with a skull fracture; died the next day, without regaining consciousness, at Roosevelt Hospital, Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., September 16, 1902 (age 54 years, 209 days). Sharkey was later convicted of second-degree manslaughter and sentenced to ten years in prison. Interment at St. Philip's Cemetery, Garrison, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Hamilton Fish (1808-1893) and Julia (Kean) Fish (1816-1887); brother of Hamilton Fish, Jr. (1849-1936); married to Clemence S. Smith-Bryce; father of Hamilton Fish (1874-1898; sergeant in the U.S. Volunteer Cavalry Regiment, the "Rough Riders", in the Spanish-American war; killed in battle); uncle of Hamilton Fish, Jr. (1888-1991); grandson of Nicholas Fish; granduncle of Hamilton Fish, Jr. (1926-1996); great-grandson of John Kean (1756-1795); great-grandnephew of Robert Gilbert Livingston and Philip Peter Livingston; great-granduncle of Hamilton Fish (1951-) and Alexa Fish Ward; second great-grandson of Gilbert Livingston and Peter Van Brugh Livingston; second great-grandnephew of John Livingston, Robert Livingston (1688-1775), Robert Livingston (1708-1790), Philip Livingston and William Livingston; third great-grandson of Robert Livingston the Elder; third great-grandnephew of Pieter Schuyler (1657-1724) and Johannes Schuyler (1668-1747); fourth great-grandson of Pieter Stuyvesant and Pieter Van Brugh; fourth great-grandnephew of Abraham de Peyster, Johannes Cuyler and Johannes de Peyster; first cousin of John Kean (1852-1914) and Hamilton Fish Kean; first cousin once removed of Robert Winthrop Kean; first cousin twice removed of Pierre Van Cortlandt, Jr., Charles Ludlow Livingston (1800-1873) and Thomas Howard Kean; first cousin thrice removed of Robert R. Livingston (1718-1775), Peter Robert Livingston (1737-1794), Walter Livingston, Henry Brockholst Livingston and Thomas Howard Kean, Jr.; first cousin four times removed of Robert Livingston the Younger and Johannes Schuyler (1697-1746); first cousin five times removed of Nicholas Bayard (1644?-1707), David Davidse Schuyler, Myndert Davidtse Schuyler, Johannes DePeyster, Cornelis Cuyler and John Cruger, Jr.; second cousin once removed of Jonathan Mayhew Wainwright; second cousin twice removed of James Jay, John Jay, Robert R. Livingston (1746-1813), Frederick Jay, Edward Livingston (1764-1836), Stephen Van Rensselaer, Philip Schuyler Van Rensselaer, Henry Walter Livingston, Peter Augustus Jay (1776-1843), Rensselaer Westerlo, Edward Philip Livingston and William Jay; second cousin thrice removed of Stephanus Bayard, Philip John Schuyler, Philip P. Schuyler and Stephen John Schuyler; second cousin four times removed of Matthew Clarkson and Henry Cruger; third cousin of Gilbert Livingston Thompson; third cousin once removed of Philip Schuyler, Peter Robert Livingston (1789-1859), Edward Livingston (1796-1840), Henry Bell Van Rensselaer and John Jay II; third cousin twice removed of Nicholas Bayard (1736-1802), Jeremiah Van Rensselaer, Robert Van Rensselaer, Pieter Schuyler (1746-1792), James Livingston, Peter Samuel Schuyler, Philip Jeremiah Schuyler, Guy Vernor Henry and Montgomery Schuyler, Jr.; third cousin thrice removed of Philip DePeyster; fourth cousin of John Jacob Astor III, Kiliaen Van Rensselaer and Charles Ludlow Livingston (1870-?); fourth cousin once removed of Peter Robert Livingston (1766-1847), Jacob Rutsen Van Rensselaer, Maturin Livingston, James Alexander Hamilton, George Washington Schuyler, Philip N. Schuyler, William Waldorf Astor (1848-1919), Herbert Livingston Satterlee, Peter Augustus Jay (1877-1933), Robert Reginald Livingston, Bronson Murray Cutting and Brockholst Livingston.
  Political families: Livingston-Schuyler family of New York; Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary
Hale Johnson Hale Johnson (1847-1902) — of Newton, Jasper County, Ill. Born in Montgomery County, Ind., August 21, 1847. Served in the Union Army during the Civil War; lawyer; mayor of Newton, Ill.; Prohibition candidate for Vice President of the United States, 1896. Disciples of Christ. While attempting to collect a debt from a farmer, the debtor, Harry Harris, shot and killed him, in Bogota, Jasper County, Ill., November 4, 1902 (age 55 years, 75 days). Harris was arrested that day, but poisoned himself on the way to jail. Interment at Riverside Cemetery, Newton, Ill.
  Relatives: Son of John B. Johnson; married 1871 to Mary E. Loofbourrow (1848-1944).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: The Parties and The Men (1896)
  James Buchanan Marcum (1858-1903) — also known as J. B. Marcum — of Kentucky. Born January 9, 1858. Republican. Kentucky Republican state chair, 1903. Shot and killed, by Curtis Jett and Tom White, at the behest of county judge James H. Hargis, on the steps of the Breathitt County Courthouse, Jackson, Breathitt County, Ky., May 4, 1903 (age 45 years, 115 days). Interment at Sewell Cemetery, Jackson, Ky.
  Presumably named for: James Buchanan
  Relatives: Nephew by marriage of Thomas Frazier Hargis (1842-1903).
  Political family: Cockrell-South family of Kentucky.
  Andrew Haswell Green (1820-1903) — also known as Andrew H. Green; "Father of Greater New York"; "Handy Andy" — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Born near Worcester, Worcester County, Mass., October 6, 1820. Democrat. Delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1880; delegate to New York state constitutional convention 13th District, 1894. Protestant. Guided creation of Central Park in New York, and Niagara State Preserve (first state park in the U.S.); led crusade to consolidate the five boroughs into today's New York City; helped create the New York Public Library, the Bronx Zoo, and other cultural institutions. Shot and killed, by a murderer who mistook him for someone else, in front of his home, on Park Avenue, Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., November 13, 1903 (age 83 years, 38 days). Interment at Worcester Rural Cemetery, Worcester, Mass.
  Green Island, in the Niagara River, at Niagara Falls, New York, is named for him.
  Charles Harmon Kungle (1829-1904) — also known as Charles H. Kungle — of Yuba County, Calif. Born in Harrisburg, Dauphin County, Pa., December 19, 1829. Member of California state assembly 15th District, 1860-62. Murdered on a mining claim, near Carson City (unknown county), Nev., November 15, 1904 (age 74 years, 332 days). Burial location unknown.
  Jose Francisco Chaves (1833-1904) — also known as J. Francisco Chaves — of Santa Fe, Santa Fe County, N.M. Born in Los Padillas, Bernalillo County, N.M., June 27, 1833. Republican. Colonel in the Union Army during the Civil War; lawyer; Delegate to U.S. Congress from New Mexico Territory, 1865-67, 1869-71; member New Mexico territorial council, 1875; delegate to New Mexico state constitutional convention, 1889; New Mexico superintendent of public instruction, 1901-04; died in office 1904. Assassinated in Pinos Wells, Torrance County, N.M., November 26, 1904 (age 71 years, 152 days). Interment at Santa Fe National Cemetery, Santa Fe, N.M.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
  John McPherson Pinckney (1845-1905) — also known as John M. Pinckney — of Hempstead, Waller County, Tex. Born near Hempstead, Grimes County, Tex., May 4, 1845. Democrat. Served in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; state court judge in Texas, 1900-03; U.S. Representative from Texas 8th District, 1903-05; died in office 1905. Assaulted and killed at a meeting of the Waller County Prohibition League, Hempstead, Waller County, Tex., April 24, 1905 (age 59 years, 355 days). Interment at City Cemetery, Hempstead, Tex.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Frank Steunenberg (1861-1905) — of Caldwell, Canyon County, Idaho. Born in Keokuk, Lee County, Iowa, August 8, 1861. Governor of Idaho, 1897-1901. Murdered by a bomb wired to his front yard gate, in Caldwell, Canyon County, Idaho, December 30, 1905 (age 44 years, 144 days). Interment at Canyon Hill Cemetery, Caldwell, Idaho; statue at State Capitol Grounds, Boise, Idaho.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  William H. Stuart (c.1857-1906) — Born about 1857. Not U.S. citizen; shipbroker; exporter; U.S. Vice Consul in Batum, 1904-06, died in office 1906. Shot and killed, by an unknown perpetrator, in Batum, Russia (now Georgia), May 20, 1906 (age about 49 years). Burial location unknown.
  Arthur Brown (1843-1906) — of Kalamazoo, Kalamazoo County, Mich.; Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Utah. Born in Schoolcraft, Kalamazoo County, Mich., March 8, 1843. Republican. Lawyer; U.S. Senator from Utah, 1896-97; delegate to Republican National Convention from Utah, 1896 (member, Committee on Permanent Organization; speaker). Shot and killed, in his room at the Raleigh Hotel, by his former mistress Annie Bradley, in Washington, D.C., December 12, 1906 (age 63 years, 279 days). Interment at Mt. Olivet Cemetery, Salt Lake City, Utah.
  Relatives: Son of Asa Briggs Brown (1808-1887) and Lephia Olympia (Brown) Brown (1811-1900); married to Isabel Cameron (1842-1905); nephew of Ebenezer Lakin Brown; first cousin of Addison Makepeace Brown (1859-1931); first cousin twice removed of Calvin Coolidge and Garry Eldridge Brown; second cousin twice removed of Bradford R. Lansing.
  Political family: Lansing family of New York (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
  William J. Donohue (1873-1907) — of Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y. Born in 1873. Republican. Member of New York state assembly from Kings County 14th District, 1907; defeated, 1903; died in office 1907. Shot and killed himself, or was murdered, in the lavatory of a saloon in Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y., January 31, 1907 (age about 33 years). Interment at Calvary Cemetery, Woodside, Queens, N.Y.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  James Henderson Hargis (1862-1908) — also known as James H. Hargis; "Big Jim" — of Jackson, Breathitt County, Ky. Born in Jackson, Breathitt County, Ky., October 13, 1862. Democrat. County judge in Kentucky, 1890; member of Kentucky Democratic State Central Committee, 1899-1907. Tried and acquitted for the 1902-03 murders of J. B. Marcum and two others, but found liable for plotting the killings in a 1904 civil suit for money damages by surviving family members. Shot and killed by his son, Beech Hargis, in the Hargis Brothers general store, Jackson, Breathitt County, Ky., February 6, 1908 (age 45 years, 116 days). Interment at Hargis Family Cemetery, Jackson, Ky.
  Relatives: Son of John Seldon Hargis; brother of Alexander Hamilton Hargis (1859-1943); grandnephew of John Louis Hargis; first cousin of Thomas Frazier Hargis.
  Political family: Cockrell-South family of Kentucky.
  Edward Ward Carmack (1858-1908) — also known as Edward W. Carmack — of Memphis, Shelby County, Tenn. Born near Castalian Springs, Sumner County, Tenn., November 5, 1858. Democrat. Lawyer; member of Tennessee state house of representatives, 1885; editor of newspapers, including the Nashville American, the Memphis Commercial, and the Nashville Tennesseean; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Tennessee, 1896, 1904; U.S. Representative from Tennessee 10th District, 1897-1901; U.S. Senator from Tennessee, 1901-07; candidate for Governor of Tennessee, 1908. Member, Freemasons. Shot and killed by Robin J. Cooper, whose father, Col. Duncan B. Cooper, had been ridiculed in the Tennesseean, in Nashville, Davidson County, Tenn., November 9, 1908 (age 50 years, 4 days). Robin and Duncan Cooper were convicted of second-degree murder and sentenced to prison, but Duncan Cooper was pardoned, and Robin Cooper's conviction was overturned on appeal; in 1919, Robin Cooper was himself murdered in an apparent robbery. Interment at Rose Hill Cemetery, Columbia, Tenn.; statue (now gone) at State Capitol Grounds, Nashville, Tenn.
  Relatives: Married 1890 to Elizabeth Cobey Dunnington.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  John T. Carmody (1861-1909) — of Cedar Rapids, Linn County, Iowa. Born in Ireland, December, 1861. Foundry owner; mayor of Cedar Rapids, Iowa, 1909; died in office 1909. Shot and badly wounded in the abdomen by a burglar on May 23, and subsequently died, probably due to infection, in Cedar Rapids, Linn County, Iowa, August 7, 1909 (age 47 years, 0 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Married 1892 to Mary E. Buckingham (1868-1913; third cousin of Ellzy Van Buren Buckingham (1839-1922)).
  Armin Ernest Brunn (1860-1909) — also known as Armin E. Brunn — of South Woodstock, Woodstock, Windham County, Conn. Born in Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y., December 18, 1860. Republican. Physician; member of Connecticut state house of representatives from Woodstock; elected 1906. German and Irish ancestry. Shot by his brother, Constantine F. Brunn, mortally wounded, and died the next day, in South Woodstock, Woodstock, Windham County, Conn., September 30, 1909 (age 48 years, 286 days). His sister, Freda Brunn, was also shot, and died immediately; Constantine shot and killed himself at the scene. Interment at Fair Lawn Memorial Cemetery, Fair Lawn, N.J.
  Relatives: Son of Julius William Brunn (1833-1907) and Charlotte Elizabeth (Going) Brunn; brother of Constantine Fernow Brunn (1858-1909).
  John E. Mullally (1875-1912) — of San Francisco, Calif. Born in 1875. Saloon keeper; member of California state assembly 30th District, 1911-12; died in office 1912. Catholic. Irish ancestry. Attacked by three masked holdup men in his saloon, shot, mortally wounded, and died soon after, in Central Emergency Hospital, San Francisco, Calif., January 15, 1912 (age about 36 years). Interment at Holy Cross Catholic Cemetery, Colma, Calif.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  William Bruce MacMaster, Jr. (1875-1912) — also known as William B. MacMaster, Jr. — of New York. Born, of American parents, in Colombia, June 28, 1875. Rancher; U.S. Vice Consul in Cartagena, 1904-08; U.S. Vice & Deputy Consul in Cartagena, 1908-12, died in office 1912; stabbed by two Colombians in the summer of 1909; pressed charges against his attackers, one of whom was an influential newspaper editor; arrested by Colombian authorities in June 1910 on charges that, years earlier, he shot a a Colombian citizen, in what he said was self-defense; initially acquitted, then found guilty, then exonerated by a higher court. While hunting alone, was shot multiple times and killed by an unknown assassin, near Cartagena, Colombia, August 11, 1912 (age 37 years, 44 days). Interment at Church and Convent of Santo Domingo, Cartagena, Colombia.
  Relatives: Son of William Bruce MacMaster (1838-1891).
  John Schuyler Crosby (1839-1914) — of Montana. Born in Albany, Albany County, N.Y., September 19, 1839. Republican. Colonel in the Union Army during the Civil War; U.S. Consul in Florence, 1876-82; Governor of Montana Territory, 1883-84. Attacked and beaten by a deranged servant, and died as a result, in Newport, Newport County, R.I., August 8, 1914 (age 74 years, 323 days). Interment at Albany Rural Cemetery, Menands, N.Y.
  Relatives: Married, June 26, 1863, to Harriet Van Rensselaer.
  William Henry Clark (1859-1921) — also known as William H. Clark; "Senator Bill" — of McKee, Jackson County, Ky. Born in Clay County, Ky., December 19, 1859. Lawyer; member of Kentucky state senate, 1900. Member, Freemasons; Odd Fellows. Shot and killed by William Pearson, reportedly at a poker game, near McKee, Jackson County, Ky., November 6, 1921 (age 61 years, 322 days). Interment at McKee Cemetery, McKee, Ky.
  Relatives: Son of Henry Jackson Clark (1815-1890) and Patience (Bledsoe) Clark (1821-1899); married 1883 to Demanda 'Demie' McQuire (1861-1951).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  W. Wallace Greene (1871-1923) — of Kansas City, Jackson County, Mo. Born near Raytown, Jackson County, Mo., October 13, 1871. Democrat. Lawyer; member of Missouri state senate 7th District, 1909-20. Shot and killed by Ross Richardson, in the basement garage of his home, in Kansas City, Jackson County, Mo., June 30, 1923 (age 51 years, 260 days). Richardson was convicted of murder and sentenced to 99 years in prison. Interment at Forest Hill Cemetery, Kansas City, Mo.
  Relatives: Son of Thaddeus Greene and Eliza Greene; married, July 22, 1903, to Edna L. Coleman.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Robert W. Imbrie (d. 1924) — Born in Baltimore, Md. U.S. Vice Consul in Petrograd, as of 1918; Viborg, as of 1920; Constantinople, as of 1921; Teheran, 1924, died in office 1924. Beaten to death by a mob in Teheran, Persia (now Tehran, Iran), July 18, 1924. Interment at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Va.
  Relatives: Married 1922 to Katherine Gillespie.
  Frank Bosworth Brandegee (1864-1924) — also known as Frank B. Brandegee — of New London, New London County, Conn. Born in New London, New London County, Conn., July 8, 1864. Republican. Lawyer; member of Connecticut state house of representatives from New London, 1889, 1899-1900; Speaker of the Connecticut State House of Representatives, 1899-1900; alternate delegate to Republican National Convention from Connecticut, 1900; member of Connecticut Republican State Central Committee, 1901; U.S. Representative from Connecticut 3rd District, 1902-05; U.S. Senator from Connecticut, 1905-24; died in office 1924. Member, Union League. Killed himself by inhaling from a gaslight, in Washington, D.C., October 14, 1924 (age 60 years, 98 days). Five years later, U.S. Sen. Cole Blease of South Carolina received a letter from a woman alleging that Brandegee had been murdered; the letter was turned over to a Senate committee to investigate the mystery, but nothing came of it. Interment at Cedar Grove Cemetery, New London, Conn.
  Relatives: Son of Augustus Brandegee and Nancy Christine (Bosworth) Brandegee; first cousin seven times removed of Roger Wolcott; second cousin five times removed of Matthew Griswold; third cousin once removed of William Henderson Packwood; fourth cousin once removed of Alonzo Mark Leffingwell and Otis Larry Packwood (1927-2008).
  Political family: Wolcott-Packwood-Griswold family of Connecticut (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Albert Edward Bogdon (1891-1927) — also known as Albert E. Bogdon — of Denver, Colo. Born in Mahanoy City, Schuylkill County, Pa., 1891. Republican. Lawyer; member of Colorado state senate 1st District, 1925-27; died in office 1927. While visiting his mistress, (scandalous behavior at the time), he was shot and killed by her estranged husband, Joseph S. Minter, in Denver, Colo., June 10, 1927 (age about 35 years). Entombed in mausoleum at Crown Hill Cemetery, Wheat Ridge, Colo.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
John F. Parrish John Festus Parrish (1887-1928) — also known as John F. Parrish; Jaddo Parrish — of Lamar, Prowers County, Colo. Born in Colorado, July 8, 1887. Republican. Alternate delegate to Republican National Convention from Colorado, 1928. Shot and killed, along with his father Amos N. Parrish, by the Fleagle Gang, who were robbing the First National Bank, in Lamar, Prowers County, Colo., May 23, 1928 (age 40 years, 320 days). The gang members were captured in 1929, tried, convicted, sentenced to death and excuted. Interment at Fairmount Cemetery, Lamar, Colo.
  Relatives: Son of Amos Newton Parrish and May (Labrick) Parrish; third cousin of Harry Wayne Hamilton, Sr. (1897-1966).
  Political family: Parrish family of Lamar, Colorado.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: The Fleagle Gang: Betrayed by a Fingerprint
Amos N. Parrish Amos Newton Parrish (1851-1928) — also known as A. Newton Parrish — of Lamar, Prowers County, Colo. Born in Missouri, April 2, 1851. Republican. Rancher; banker; member of Colorado state house of representatives, 1890; delegate to Republican National Convention from Colorado, 1908 (alternate), 1912. Shot and killed, along with his son, John F. Parrish, by the Fleagle Gang, who were robbing the First National Bank, in Lamar, Prowers County, Colo., May 23, 1928 (age 77 years, 51 days). The gang members were captured in 1929, tried, convicted, sentenced to death and excuted. Interment at Fairmount Cemetery, Lamar, Colo.
  Relatives: Son of John Comley Parrish (1819-1854) and Mary Ann (Prichard) Parrish; married to May Labrick; father of John Festus Parrish (1887-1928); second cousin once removed of Harry Wayne Hamilton, Sr..
  Political family: Parrish family of Lamar, Colorado.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: The Fleagle Gang: Betrayed by a Fingerprint
  David Fulton Rice (1889-1929) — of Centerville, Appanoose County, Iowa. Born near Exline, Appanoose County, Iowa, September 13, 1889. Democrat. Lawyer; served in the U.S. Army during World War I; member of Iowa state house of representatives, 1925. Methodist. Member, Knights of Pythias; Freemasons; American Legion. Shot and killed by a disgruntled law client, George Domyancich, as he was leaving the Appanoose County Courthouse, Centerville, Appanoose County, Iowa, February 28, 1929 (age 39 years, 168 days). Interment at Oakland Cemetery, Centerville, Iowa.
  Harold Merriman Deane (1891-1929) — also known as Harold M. Deane — of Connecticut; Providence, Providence County, R.I. Born in Waterbury, New Haven County, Conn., October 24, 1891. Foreign Service officer; U.S. Consul in Valparaiso, 1925-27; Montreal, 1927-29, died in office 1929. Found hanged in his apartment -- the coroner's jury was unable to decide whether his death was murder or suicide -- in Montreal, Quebec, August 28, 1929 (age 37 years, 308 days). Interment somewhere in Waterbury, Conn.
  Motley H. Flint (1864-1930) — of Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, Calif. Born in Somerville, Middlesex County, Mass., February 19, 1864. Republican. Postmaster at Los Angeles, Calif., 1904-10; banker; provided critical support for the Warner Brothers Movie studio in its early years; one of the promoters of Julian Petroleum Corporation, a Ponzi scheme which collapsed in 1927; about 40,000 investors lost their money; tainted by the scandal, he moved to Europe for a time. Member, Freemasons. Called as a witness in a civil suit involving David O. Selznick; after his testimony, as he returned to the audience section of the courtroom, in Los Angeles City Hall, he was shot and killed by Frank Keaton, in Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, Calif., July 14, 1930 (age 66 years, 145 days). Keaton, who had lost his money in Julian Petroleum, was immediately arrested, and subsequently tried, convicted, and hanged. Entombed in mausoleum at Forest Lawn Memorial Park, Glendale, Calif.
  Relatives: Son of Francis Eaton Flint (1823-1887) and Althea Louise (Hewes) Flint (1841-1930); brother of Frank Putnam Flint; fourth cousin once removed of Benjamin Dexter Sprague (1827-1893).
  Political families: Bache-Dallas family of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Flint-Bache family (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Edward James Dennis (c.1876-1930) — also known as E. J. Dennis — of Berkeley County, S.C. Born about 1876. Member of South Carolina state senate from Berkeley County, 1911-14, 1927-30; died in office 1930. Tried and acquitted in 1929 for conspiracy to violate the alcohol prohibition law. Shot and mortally wounded by W. L. Thornley, on the street in front of the post office in Moncks Corner, S.C., and died the next day in a hospital at Charleston, Charleston County, S.C., July 25, 1930 (age about 54 years). Burial location unknown.
  S. S. Mincey (d. 1930) — of Ailey, Montgomery County, Ga. Republican. Delegate to Republican National Convention from Georgia, 1908 (alternate), 1912, 1916, 1920. African ancestry. Taken from his home by a group of Ku Klux Klan members, and lynched, in Uvalda, Montgomery County, Ga., July 29, 1930. Interment at Live Oak Baptist Church Cemetery, Ailey, Ga.
  A. J. Rosier (d. 1932) — of Rawlins, Carbon County, Wyo. Lawyer; member of Wyoming state senate, 1932; died in office 1932. Shot and killed by Thomas Lacey, Rawlins, Carbon County, Wyo., April 15, 1932. Lacey, who then killed himself, had been convicted of gambling, and was angered by Rosier's refusal to file a lawsuit on his behalf against county authorities. Burial location unknown.
  William Montross Inglis (1875-1932) — also known as William M. Inglis — of Seattle, King County, Wash. Born in Clyde Township, St. Clair County, Mich., January 7, 1875. Republican. Colonel in the U.S. Army during World War I; delegate to Republican National Convention from Washington, 1924, 1928 (alternate). Killed by a single gunshot behind his ear, under mysterious circumstances, and posthumously accused of attempted murder, in Seattle, King County, Wash., October 22, 1932 (age 57 years, 289 days). The only witness, Mary Nash, who shared the apartment, said that he had been despondent and drinking heavily; that she had hidden his pistol, but he had found it; that without warning, he shot her twice (she was badly injured but survived), and then immediately killed himself; investigators questioned her story, and thought he might have been murdered, but she was not charged. Interment at Lake View Cemetery, Seattle, Wash.
  Relatives: Son of John Jacob Inglis (1848-1908) and Martha Ann (Montross) Inglis (1850-1927); married to Anne Hughes (died 1919).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Anton Joseph Cermak (1873-1933) — also known as Anton J. Cermak; "Pushcart Tony" — of Chicago, Cook County, Ill. Born in Kladno, Bohemia (now Czechia), May 9, 1873. Democrat. Delegate to Democratic National Convention from Illinois, 1924, 1928, 1932; candidate for U.S. Senator from Illinois, 1928; mayor of Chicago, Ill., 1931-33; died in office 1933. Bohemian ancestry. On February 15, 1933, while he was standing on the running board of an open car from which president-elect Franklin D. Roosevelt had just given a speech, was shot and badly wounded by Italian-American bricklayer Guiseppe Zangara, who had aimed for Roosevelt; over the next month, the wound became infected, and he died, in Jackson Memorial Hospital, Miami, Dade County (now Miami-Dade County), Fla., March 6, 1933 (age 59 years, 301 days). Entombed at Bohemian National Cemetery, Chicago, Ill.
  Relatives: Father of Helena I. Cermak (who married Otto Kerner, Jr. (1908-1976)) and Lillian Cermak (who married Richey V. Graham).
  Political family: Kerner-Cermak family of Chicago, Illinois.
  Cermak Road (formerly 22nd Street), from Chicago to Oak Brook, Illinois, is named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS A. J. Cermak (built 1943, scrapped 1964) was named for him.
  Epitaph: "I Am Glad It Was Me, Instead of You."
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
Huey P. Long Huey Pierce Long (1893-1935) — also known as Huey P. Long; Hugh Pierce Long; "The Kingfish" — of Shreveport, Caddo Parish, La.; New Orleans, Orleans Parish, La. Born near Winnfield, Winn Parish, La., August 30, 1893. Democrat. Lawyer; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Louisiana, 1928; Governor of Louisiana, 1928-32; member of Democratic National Committee from Louisiana, 1928; impeached by the Louisiana House in 1929 over multiple charges including his attempt to impose an oil tax and his unauthorized demolition of the governor's mansion, but not convicted by the Senate; U.S. Senator from Louisiana, 1932-35; died in office 1935. Baptist. Member, Elks. Shot and mortally wounded by Dr. Carl Weiss (who was immediately killed at the scene), in the Louisiana State Capitol Building, September 8, 1935, and died two days later at Our Lady of the Lake Hospital, Baton Rouge, East Baton Rouge Parish, La., September 10, 1935 (age 42 years, 11 days). Interment at State Capitol Grounds, Baton Rouge, La.
  Relatives: Son of Hugh Pierce Long (1852-1937) and Caledonia Palestine (Tison) Long (1860-1913); brother of George Shannon Long and Earl Kemp Long (1895-1960) (who married Blanche B. Revere); married, April 12, 1913, to Rose McConnell; father of Russell Billiu Long; second cousin once removed of Gillis William Long and Speedy Oteria Long.
  Political family: Long family of Louisiana.
  Cross-reference: Cecil Morgan — John H. Overton — Harvey G. Fields — Gerald L. K. Smith
  The Huey P. Long - O.K. Allen Bridge (opened 1940), which carries U.S. Highway 190 and a rail line over the Mississippi River, between East Baton Rouge Parish and West Baton Rouge Parish, Louisiana, is partly named for him.  — Senador Huey Pierce Long, a street in Asunsion, Paraguay, is named for him.
  Campaign slogan: "Every Man a King."
  Campaign slogan: "Share Our Wealth."
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile
  Books by Huey P. Long: Every Man a King : The Autobiography of Huey P. Long
  Books about Huey P. Long: T. Harry Williams, Huey Long — Harnett T. Kane, Huey Long's Louisiana Hayride: The American Rehearsal for Dictatorship 1928-1940 — Richard D. White, Kingfish: The Reign of Huey P. Long — David R. Collins, Huey P. Long : Talker and Doer (for young readers)
  Image source: KnowLA Encyclopedia of Louisiana
  John W Martin (c.1890-1935) — of Mena, Polk County, Ark. Born about 1890. Postmaster at Mena, Ark., 1933-35. Shot and killed during an apparent robbery of the post office, in Mena, Polk County, Ark., November 24, 1935 (age about 45 years). Burial location unknown.
  Henry Herman Denhardt (1876-1937) — also known as Henry H. Denhardt — of Bowling Green, Warren County, Ky. Born in Bowling Green, Warren County, Ky., March 8, 1876. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army during the Spanish-American War; served in the U.S. Army during World War I; Lieutenant Governor of Kentucky, 1923-27; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Kentucky, 1924; shot and injured on Election Day 1931.; his girlfriend, Mrs. Verna Garr Taylor, was found shot to death in November 1936; he was charged with murder and tried in New Castle, Ky.; the jury could not reach a verdict. Before he could be tried a second time, he was shot and killed, at the Armstrong Hotel, Shelbyville, Shelby County, Ky., September 20, 1937 (age 61 years, 196 days). Interment at Fairview Cemetery, Bowling Green, Ky.
  Relatives: Son of Margaret (Geiger) Denhardt (1838-1901) and William Denhardt (1845-1900).
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  James Theodore Marriner (1892-1937) — also known as J. Theodore Marriner; Ted Marriner — Born in Portland, Cumberland County, Maine, May 17, 1892. U.S. Consul General in Beirut, 1935-37, died in office 1937. Member, Phi Beta Kappa. Shot and killed by Mejardich Karayan, an Armenian who thought he had been denied a U.S. visa, in Beirut, Syria (now Lebanon), October 12, 1937 (age 45 years, 148 days). The killer was sentenced to death and hanged soon after. Interment at Evergreen Cemetery, Portland, Maine.
  Relatives: Son of Harriet Cram (Thorpe) Marriner.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Eugene P. Booze (c.1880-1939) — of Mound Bayou, Bolivar County, Miss. Born in Mississippi, about 1880. Republican. Farmer; delegate to Republican National Convention from Mississippi, 1920, 1924, 1928, 1932, 1936. Shot by an unknown assailant as he was leaving his office, and died the next day in a hospital at Greenville, Washington County, Miss., November 7, 1939 (age about 59 years). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Married 1901 to Mary C. Booze (1878-1955) (daughter of Isaiah T. Montgomery).
  Political family: Booze family of Mound Bayou, Mississippi.
  Louis F. Edwards (c.1892-1939) — of Long Beach, Nassau County, Long Island, N.Y. Born about 1892. Democrat. Haberdashery business; paint manufacturer; mayor of Long Beach, N.Y., 1938-39; died in office 1939. Shot and killed by disgruntled police patrolman Alvin Dooley, in Long Beach, Nassau County, Long Island, N.Y., November 15, 1939 (age about 47 years). Burial location unknown.
  Thaddeus Franklin Daniel (1900-1942) — also known as T. Franklin Daniel — of Lynchburg, Va. Born in Brunswick County, Va., February 25, 1900. Democrat. Member of Virginia state house of delegates from Lynchburg city, 1934-42; died in office 1942. Methodist. Member, Phi Beta Kappa; Tau Kappa Alpha. Shot and killed, along with the Lynchburg city attorney, by Warren Guy Myers, in his office, in Lynchburg, Va., June 30, 1942 (age 42 years, 125 days). Myers was judged to be insane, committed to the Southwestern State Hospital, and died in 1963. Interment at Macedonia United Methodist Church Cemetery, Brunswick County, Va.
  Relatives: Son of Lee Andrew Daniel (1865-1950) and Susan (Pritchett) Daniel (1870-1958).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial — Virginia House History
  Warren Green Hooper (1904-1945) — also known as Warren G. Hooper — of Albion, Calhoun County, Mich. Born in Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, Calif., May 2, 1904. Republican. Newspaper reporter; member of Michigan state house of representatives from Calhoun County 1st District, 1939-44; member of Michigan state senate 9th District, 1945; died in office 1945. Episcopalian. Member, Theta Kappa Nu; Freemasons; Knights Templar. During a grand jury investigation, admitted to taking bribes and was given immunity from prosecution in return for his testimony against others; however, four days before the hearing, he was shot and killed in his car, alongside highway M-99, near Springport, Jackson County, Mich., January 11, 1945 (age 40 years, 254 days). Interment at Riverside Cemetery, Albion, Mich.
  Relatives: Married, May 23, 1936, to Callienetta Cobb; second great-grandson of William Hooper (1742-1790).
  Cross-reference: William Green — Frank D. McKay
  Epitaph: "With Honesty He Lived; For Honesty he was Taken."
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Joseph Warren Tolbert (1865-1946) — also known as Joseph W. Tolbert; "Tieless Joe" — of Greenwood, Greenwood County, S.C.; Ninety Six, Greenwood County, S.C. Born in Abbeville District (now Abbeville County), S.C., June 6, 1865. Republican. Delegate to Republican National Convention from South Carolina, 1900 (alternate), 1908, 1912, 1916, 1920, 1924, 1928, 1936 (member, Committee to Notify Presidential Nominee); member of Republican National Committee from South Carolina, 1912-24; South Carolina Republican state chair, 1925-31. Hit by a car (perhaps intentionally), in his front yard, and died soon after, in Ninety Six, Greenwood County, S.C., October 18, 1946 (age 81 years, 134 days). Interment at Elmwood Cemetery, Ninety Six, S.C.
  Relatives: Son of John Robert Tolbert and Elizabeth Pope (Payne) Tolbert (1839-1872); brother of Robert Red Tolbert; married to Julia Elizabeth DeLoach (1877-1963); first cousin once removed of Hettie Elizabeth Tolbert (1893-1958).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Thomas Campbell Wasson (1896-1948) — also known as Thomas C. Wasson — of Newark, Essex County, N.J. Born in Great Falls, Cascade County, Mont., February 8, 1896. Served in the U.S. Army during World War I; U.S. Vice Consul in Melbourne, 1925-29; Puerto Cortes, as of 1932; U.S. Consul in Florence, 1936; Lagos, as of 1938; U.S. Consul General in Jerusalem, 1948, died in office 1948. Shot by an unknown sniper, and died the next day, in Hadassah English Mission Hospital, Jerusalem, Israel, May 23, 1948 (age 52 years, 105 days). Entombed at Washington National Cathedral, Washington, D.C.
  Relatives: Son of Edmund Atwill Wasson and Mary (DeVeny) Wasson.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Vincent Luke Palmisano (1882-1953) — also known as Vincent L. Palmisano — of Baltimore, Md. Born in Termini, Sicily, Italy, August 5, 1882. Democrat. Lawyer; member of Maryland state house of delegates from Baltimore city 1st District, 1914-15; U.S. Representative from Maryland 3rd District, 1927-39; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Maryland, 1940. Catholic. Italian ancestry. Member, Foresters. Disappeared from his home, and either died by suicide or was murdered, January 12, 1953 (age 70 years, 160 days). His body was recovered from Baltimore Harbor, March 5, 1953. Interment at New Cathedral Cemetery, Baltimore, Md.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Allison D. Wade (1902-1954) — of Warren, Warren County, Pa. Born in Warren, Warren County, Pa., September 17, 1902. Republican. District judge in Pennsylvania 37th District, 1942-54; died in office 1954; alternate delegate to Republican National Convention from Pennsylvania, 1944. Shot and killed in his courtroom, in the Warren County Courthouse, by Norman W. Moon, Warren, Warren County, Pa., January 13, 1954 (age 51 years, 118 days). Moon, who attempted suicide at the time of his arrest, believed the judge was involved with his ex-wife, and would personally benefit from ordering payment of alimony. Moon was convicted of first degree murder and sentenced to death; the sentence was commuted to a mental institution by Gov. George M. Leader, and then to life imprisonment. Interment at Oakland Cemetery, Warren, Pa.
  Relatives: Son of Harrison Douglas Wade (1860-1928) and Alice Cary (Jones) Wade (1869-1935); married to Ruth Tillotson.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Albert L. Patterson (c.1891-1954) — of Phenix City, Russell County, Ala. Born about 1891. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army during World War I; lawyer; member of Alabama state senate, 1940; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Alabama, 1952; elected Alabama state attorney general 1954, but died before taking office. Shot and killed in his car, by an unknown assailant, in Phenix City, Russell County, Ala., June 18, 1954 (age about 63 years). Burial location unknown.
  Paul Allen Wallace (1901-1958) — also known as Paul A. Wallace — of Wallace, Marlboro County, S.C. Born in Bennettsville, Marlboro County, S.C., July 15, 1901. Democrat. Member of South Carolina state senate from Marlboro County, 1947-58; died in office 1958; delegate to Democratic National Convention from South Carolina, 1956. On the night of the 1958 Democratic primary, he and others gathered in the sheriff's office at the Marlboro County Courthouse to hear election returns on the radio; he had just learned he had won renomination, when Court Clerk Henry A. Rogers entered the room and shot him four times; he died about twenty minutes later, in the emergency room of a nearby hospital, in Bennettsville, Marlboro County, S.C., June 10, 1958 (age 56 years, 330 days). On June 27, Rogers hanged himself in the South Carolina state mental hospital. Interment at Wallace Baptist Church Cemetery, Wallace, S.C.
  Relatives: Son of James Percy Wallace and Lillie (Allen) Wallace; married, May 25, 1920, to Ethelyne Gardner (1900-1986); father of William Paul Wallace (1921-2013).
  Lake Paul Wallace, in Marlboro County, South Carolina, is named for him.
  Epitaph: "With forgetfulness of self, humility of spirit, and nobility of character, he followed in his Master's footsteps in service to his fellowman."
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Eunice A. Carreau (1901-1963) — also known as Eunice A. Stevens — of Merrick, Nassau County, Long Island, N.Y. Born in Portland, Cumberland County, Maine, September 14, 1901. Democrat. Alternate delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1944. Female. Shot in the throat during a robbery, and died soon after, in Puesto de Emergencia de Salas hospital, Caracas, Venezuela, March 24, 1963 (age 61 years, 191 days). Interment at Long Island National Cemetery, East Farmingdale, Long Island, N.Y.
  Relatives: Married to Rene Armand Carreau (1901-1980).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  John Fitzgerald Kennedy (1917-1963) — also known as John F. Kennedy; "J.F.K."; "Lancer" — of Boston, Suffolk County, Mass. Born in Brookline, Norfolk County, Mass., May 29, 1917. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Navy during World War II; U.S. Representative from Massachusetts 11th District, 1947-53; U.S. Senator from Massachusetts, 1953-60; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Massachusetts, 1956; candidate for Democratic nomination for Vice President, 1956; received a 1957 Pulitzer Prize for his book Profiles in Courage; President of the United States, 1961-63; died in office 1963. Catholic. Irish ancestry. Member, Knights of Columbus; American Legion; Elks. Kennedy was posthumously awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1963. Shot by a sniper, Lee Harvey Oswald, while riding in a motorcade, and died in Parkland Hospital, Dallas, Dallas County, Tex., November 22, 1963 (age 46 years, 177 days). Oswald was shot and killed two days later by Jack Ruby. Interment at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Va.; memorial monument at John F. Kennedy Memorial Plaza, Dallas, Tex.
  Relatives: Son of Joseph Patrick Kennedy, Sr. and Rose (Fitzgerald) Kennedy (1890-1995); step-brother-in-law of Nina Gore Auchincloss (who married Newton Ivan Steers, Jr.); brother of Joseph Patrick Kennedy, Jr., Eunice Mary Kennedy (1921-2009; who married Robert Sargent Shriver, Jr.), Patricia Kennedy Lawford (who married Peter Lawford), Robert Francis Kennedy, Jean Kennedy Smith and Edward Moore Kennedy (who married Virginia Joan Bennett); married, September 12, 1953, to Jacqueline Lee 'Jackie' Bouvier (1929-1994; step-daughter of Hugh Dudley Auchincloss; step-sister of Eugene Luther Gore Vidal, Jr. and Hugh Dudley Auchincloss III); father of John Fitzgerald Kennedy, Jr.; uncle of Maria Owings Shriver (who married Arnold Alois Schwarzenegger), Kathleen Kennedy Townsend, Joseph Patrick Kennedy II, Mark Kennedy Shriver (1964-) and Patrick Joseph Kennedy (1967-); grandson of Patrick Joseph Kennedy (1858-1929) and John Francis Fitzgerald.
  Political family: Kennedy family.
  Cross-reference: John B. Connally — Henry B. Gonzalez — Henry M. Wade — Walter Rogers — Gerry E. Studds — James B. McCahey, Jr. — Mark Dalton — Waggoner Carr — Theodore C. Sorensen — Pierre Salinger — John Bartlow Martin — Abraham Davenport
  The John F. Kennedy Memorial Bridge (opened 1963), which carries southbound I-65 over the Ohio River from Jeffersonville, Indiana, to Louisville, Kentucky, is named for him.
  Coins and currency: His portrait appears on the U.S. half dollar coin.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile
  Books by John F. Kennedy: Profiles in Courage
  Books about John F. Kennedy: Christopher Loviny & Vincent Touze, JFK : Remembering Jack — Robert Dallek, An Unfinished Life : John F. Kennedy, 1917-1963 — Michael O'Brien, John F. Kennedy : A Biography — Sean J. Savage, JFK, LBJ, and the Democratic Party — Thurston Clarke, Ask Not : The Inauguration of John F. Kennedy and the Speech That Changed America — Thomas Reeves, A Question of Character : A Life of John F. Kennedy — Chris Matthews, Jack Kennedy: Elusive Hero — Shelley Sommer, John F. Kennedy : His Life and Legacy (for young readers)
  Critical books about John F. Kennedy: Seymour Hersh, The Dark Side of Camelot — Lance Morrow, The Best Year of Their Lives: Kennedy, Johnson, and Nixon in 1948: Learning the Secrets of Power — Victor Lasky, JFK: the Man and the Myth
  Leo Bernard (1938-1966) — of Detroit, Wayne County, Mich. Born in Detroit, Wayne County, Mich., October 24, 1938. Socialist. Socialist Workers candidate for U.S. Representative from Michigan 17th District, 1964; Socialist Workers candidate for Presidential Elector for Michigan, 1964. Shot and killed, by Edward Waniolek, a former taxicab driver who wanted to "kill some Communists", in the offices of the Socialist Workers Party, Detroit, Wayne County, Mich., May 16, 1966 (age 27 years, 204 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Married, March 13, 1966, to Garlene Boone.
  Cross-reference: Jan Garrett
  George Lincoln Rockwell (1918-1967) — of Arlington, Arlington County, Va. Born in Bloomington, McLean County, Ill., March 9, 1918. Served in the U.S. Navy during World War II; served in the U.S. Navy during the Korean conflict; founder, in 1959, of the National Committee to Free America from Jewish Domination (later known as the American Nazi Party); arrested at various demonstrations during the 1960s; American Nazi candidate for Governor of Virginia, 1965. Shot and killed by a sniper, later identified as John Patler, while driving his car in the parking lot of Dominion Hills Shopping Center, Arlington, Arlington County, Va., August 25, 1967 (age 49 years, 169 days); Patler was convicted of the murder and sentenced to 20 years in prison. Rockwell's funeral procession was not allowed into Culpeper National Cemetery because of Nazi emblems worn by his supporters. Cremated.
  Relatives: Son of George Lovejoy 'Doc' Rockwell (1889-1978; vaudeville and radio comedian) and Claire (Schade) Rockwell; third cousin twice removed of Oliver Morgan Hungerford (1827-1888).
  Political families: Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York; Morris-Ingersoll family of New York and Connecticut; Conger-Hungerford family (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Robert Francis Kennedy (1925-1968) — also known as Robert F. Kennedy; Bobby Kennedy; "R.F.K." — of Boston, Suffolk County, Mass.; Barnstable, Barnstable County, Mass.; Glen Cove, Nassau County, Long Island, N.Y. Born in Boston, Suffolk County, Mass., November 20, 1925. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Navy during World War II; lawyer; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Massachusetts, 1956, 1960; U.S. Attorney General, 1961-64; U.S. Senator from New York, 1965-68; died in office 1968; candidate for Democratic nomination for President, 1968. Catholic. Member, American Bar Association; Veterans of Foreign Wars; American Legion. On June 5, 1968, while running for president, having just won the California presidential primary, was shot and mortally wounded by Sirhan Sirhan, in the Ambassador Hotel, and died the next day in in Good Samaritan Hospital, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, Calif., June 6, 1968 (age 42 years, 199 days). Interment at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Va.
  Relatives: Son of Joseph Patrick Kennedy, Sr. and Rose (Fitzgerald) Kennedy (1890-1995); brother of Joseph Patrick Kennedy, Jr., John Fitzgerald Kennedy, Eunice Mary Kennedy (1921-2009; who married Robert Sargent Shriver, Jr.), Patricia Kennedy Lawford (who married Peter Lawford), Jean Kennedy Smith and Edward Moore Kennedy; married, June 17, 1950, to Ethel Skakel; father of Kathleen Kennedy Townsend, Joseph Patrick Kennedy II and Kerry Kennedy (who married Andrew Mark Cuomo); uncle of John Fitzgerald Kennedy, Jr., Mark Kennedy Shriver (1964-) and Patrick Joseph Kennedy (1967-); grandson of Patrick Joseph Kennedy (1858-1929) and John Francis Fitzgerald.
  Political family: Kennedy family.
  Cross-reference: Benjamin Altman — John Bartlow Martin — Frank Mankiewicz — Paul Schrade
  The Robert F. Kennedy Department of Justice Building (opened 1935, renamed 2001), in Washington, D.C., is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about Robert F. Kennedy: Arthur M. Schlesinger Jr., Robert Kennedy and His Times — Evan Thomas, Robert Kennedy : His Life — Joseph A. Palermo, In His Own Right — Thurston Clarke, The Last Campaign: Robert F. Kennedy and 82 Days That Inspired America — Nicholas deB. Katzenbach, Some of It Was Fun: Working with RFK and LBJ — Bill Eppridge, A Time it Was: Bobby Kennedy in the Sixties
  Critical books about Robert F. Kennedy: Allen Roberts, Robert Francis Kennedy: Biography of a Compulsive Politician — Victor Lasky, RFK: Myth and Man — Darwin Porter & Danforth Prince, The Kennedys: All the Gossip Unfit for Print
  John Gordon Mein (1913-1968) — of Maryland. Born in Cadiz, Trigg County, Ky., September 10, 1913. Foreign Service officer; U.S. Ambassador to Guatemala, 1965-68, died in office 1968. Shot and killed by terrorists who ambushed his limousine, in Guatemala City, Guatemala, August 28, 1968 (age 54 years, 353 days). Interment at Rock Creek Cemetery, Washington, D.C.
  Relatives: Married to Elizabeth Ann Clay.
  See also U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Joseph A. Yablonski (1910-1969) — also known as Jock Yablonski — of East Bethlehem Township, Washington County, Pa. Born in Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, Pa., March 3, 1910. Democrat. Coal miner; district leader for the United Mine Workers, and candidate for union president in 1969; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Pennsylvania, 1956, 1960, 1964. Shot and killed, along with his wife and daughter, by three hit men hired by United Mine Workers President Tony Boyle, in East Bethlehem Township, Washington County, Pa., December 31, 1969 (age 59 years, 303 days). Interment at Washington Cemetery, Washington, Pa.
  Relatives: Married to Margaret Rita Wasicek.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Fred B. Cohen (1913-1970) — of Bremerton, Kitsap County, Wash. Born in Bremerton, Kitsap County, Wash., February 8, 1913. Democrat. Delegate to Democratic National Convention from Washington, 1944 (alternate), 1948; Kitsap County Prosecutor. Shot and killed on his porch by an unknown gunman, in Bremerton, Kitsap County, Wash., January 19, 1970 (age 56 years, 345 days). Entombed at Miller-Woodlawn Cemetery, Bremerton, Wash.
  Leon M. Jordan (1905-1970) — of Kansas City, Jackson County, Mo. Born in Kansas City, Jackson County, Mo., May 6, 1905. Democrat. Police officer; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Missouri, 1960; member of Missouri state house of representatives, 1965-70 (Jackson County 4th District 1965-66, 11th District 1967-70); died in office 1970. Episcopalian. African ancestry. Member, Elks; Kappa Alpha Psi. During his campaign for re-election, was shot and killed while leaving the Green Duck Tavern, which he owned and operated, in Kansas City, Jackson County, Mo., July 15, 1970 (age 65 years, 70 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Married, August 15, 1932, to Orchid Nee Ramsey.
  William Fred Duckworth (1899-1972) — also known as W. Fred Duckworth — of Norfolk, Va. Born in Brevard, Transylvania County, N.C., June 20, 1899. Served in the U.S. Army during World War I; plant manager for Ford Motor Company, 1933-42; automobile dealer; mayor of Norfolk, Va., 1950-62. Member, Freemasons. Shot and killed by an unknown assailant, while walking on Major Avenue, Norfolk, Va., March 4, 1972 (age 72 years, 258 days). Interment at Forest Lawn Cemetery, Norfolk, Va.
  Relatives: Married to Gertrude Summers.
  William J. McGovern (1905-1972) — of Jersey City, Hudson County, N.J. Born in Jersey City, Hudson County, N.J., August 25, 1905. Democrat. Tavern owner; delegate to Democratic National Convention from New Jersey, 1932 (alternate), 1944; elected (Wet) delegate to New Jersey convention to ratify 21st amendment from Hudson County 1933. Catholic. Member, Knights of Columbus. Killed by armed robbers at his tavern, in Jersey City, Hudson County, N.J., July 11, 1972 (age 66 years, 321 days). Interment at Holy Cross Cemetery, North Arlington, N.J.
  Silvio Joseph Failla (1910-1972) — also known as Silvio J. Failla; Si Failla — of Hoboken, Hudson County, N.J. Born in New Jersey, May 23, 1910. Democrat. Undertaker; mayor of Hoboken, N.J., 1965; member of New Jersey state house of assembly District 12-C, 1972; died in office 1972. Italian ancestry. According to published reports, he left a bar with a prostitute, Deborah Dell; just outside, he was robbed, shot multiple times, and killed, in Neptune Township, Monmouth County, N.J., September 16, 1972 (age 62 years, 116 days). Dell and an associate were later convicted of first-degree murder and sentenced to life in prison. Entombed in mausoleum at St. Catharine Cemetery, Sea Girt, N.J.
  Relatives: Son of Luigi Failla (1874-1943) and Vittoria 'Victoria' (Candio) Failla (1877-1963); married 1937 to Louise E. Picone (1912-1985).
  See also BillionGraves burial record
  Cleo Allen Noel, Jr. (1918-1973) — also known as Cleo A. Noel, Jr. — of Missouri. Born in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma County, Okla., August 6, 1918. U.S. Ambassador to Sudan, 1972-73, died in office 1973. Assassinated in Sudan, March 2, 1973 (age 54 years, 208 days). Interment at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Va.
  See also U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier
  Major B. Coxson (c.1929-1973) — of Camden, Camden County, N.J. Born about 1929. Convicted 10 times on fraud and larceny charges, most related to automobile theft; served 22 months in federal prison; candidate for mayor of Camden, N.J., 1973. African ancestry. Admitted four men to his house, who bound and gagged him and his family, and shot each one, killing him and wounding the others, in Cherry Hill, Camden County, N.J., June 9, 1973 (age about 44 years). Burial location unknown.
  Robert L. Roberts (1922-1973) — of Kansas City, Wyandotte County, Kan. Born in Fort Worth, Tarrant County, Tex., 1922. Republican. Served in the U.S. Army during World War II; postmaster at Kansas City, Kan., 1959-68, 1970-73 (acting, 1959); served in the U.S. Army during the Vietnam war. Stabbed and mortally wounded by Carroll Edward Noel, Jr., a former mail handler, in the office of the assistant postmaster, at the main post office, and was dead on arrival at Bethany Medical Center, Kansas City, Wyandotte County, Kan., November 29, 1973 (age about 51 years). Noel was tried for murder, and found not guilty by reason of insanity. Interment at Memorial Park Cemetery, Kansas City, Kan.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Rodger Paul Davies (1921-1974) — Born in Berkeley, Alameda County, Calif., May 7, 1921. Served in the U.S. Army during World War II; U.S. Ambassador to Cyprus, 1974, died in office 1974. Assassinated in Cyprus, August 19, 1974 (age 53 years, 104 days). Interment at Sunset View Cemetery, El Cerrito, Calif.
  See also U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier
  Francis Edward Meloy, Jr. (1917-1976) — also known as Francis E. Meloy, Jr. — of Washington, D.C. Born in Washington, D.C., March 28, 1917. Served in the U.S. Navy during World War II; Foreign Service officer; U.S. Vice Consul in Dhahran, 1946; personal assistant to Secretary of State Dean Acheson, 1946-53; U.S. Ambassador to Dominican Republic, 1969-73; Guatemala, 1973-76; Lebanon, 1976, died in office 1976. Kidnapped from his car, along with two others, and shot to death, in Beirut, Lebanon, June 16, 1976 (age 59 years, 80 days). Interment at Rock Creek Cemetery, Washington, D.C.
  Relatives: Son of Francis E. Meloy, Sr. and Anne Teresa (Connor) Meloy.
  See also Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Leo Joseph Ryan (1925-1978) — also known as Leo J. Ryan — of San Francisco, Calif.; South San Francisco, San Mateo County, Calif. Born in Lincoln, Lancaster County, Neb., May 5, 1925. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Navy during World War II; mayor of South San Francisco, Calif., 1962; member of California state assembly, 1963-73; delegate to Democratic National Convention from California, 1964, 1968; U.S. Representative from California 11th District, 1973-78; died in office 1978. Killed by followers of Jim Jones' People's Temple cult, in an ambush at the dirt airstrip of Port Kaituma, Guyana, November 18, 1978 (age 53 years, 197 days). Interment at Golden Gate National Cemetery, San Bruno, Calif.
  Cross-reference: Jackie Speier
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — NNDB dossier
  George Richard Moscone (1929-1978) — also known as George Moscone — of San Francisco, Calif. Born in San Francisco, Calif., November 24, 1929. Democrat. Candidate for California state assembly, 1960; member of California state senate, 1966-75; delegate to Democratic National Convention from California, 1968, 1972; mayor of San Francisco, Calif., 1976-78; died in office 1978. Shot and killed, along with Supervisor Harvey Milk, by Supervisor Dan White, in his office in San Francisco City Hall, San Francisco, Calif., November 27, 1978 (age 49 years, 3 days). Interment at Holy Cross Catholic Cemetery, Colma, Calif.
  Relatives: Son of George Joseph Moscone and Lena Moscone; married 1954 to Gina Bondanza.
  The George R. Moscone Convention Center, in San Francisco, California, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Adolph Dubs (1920-1979) — of Maryland. Born in Chicago, Cook County, Ill., August 4, 1920. Served in the U.S. Navy during World War II; U.S. Ambassador to Afghanistan, 1978-79, died in office 1979. Assassinated in Afghanistan, February 14, 1979 (age 58 years, 194 days). Interment at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Va.
  See also U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier
  John Howland Wood, Jr. (1916-1979) — also known as John H. Wood, Jr.; "Maximum John" — of San Antonio, Bexar County, Tex. Born in Rockport, Aransas County, Tex., March 31, 1916. Republican. Lawyer; served in the U.S. Navy during World War II; delegate to Republican National Convention from Texas, 1960; U.S. District Judge for the Western District of Texas, 1970-79; died in office 1979. Shot and killed in San Antonio, Bexar County, Tex., May 29, 1979 (age 63 years, 59 days). The killer was Charles Harrelson, a contract killer who was also the father of actor Woody Harrelson. Burial location unknown.
  The John H. Wood Federal Courthouse, in San Antonio, Texas, is named for him.  — John H. Wood Middle School, in San Antonio, Texas, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article
  Allard Kenneth Lowenstein (1929-1980) — also known as Allard K. Lowenstein — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y.; Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y.; Long Beach, Nassau County, Long Island, N.Y. Born in Newark, Essex County, N.J., January 16, 1929. Democrat. Lawyer; delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1960 (alternate), 1968, 1972; U.S. Representative from New York 5th District, 1969-71; defeated, 1970, 1972 (primary), 1972 (Liberal), 1974, 1976, 1978 (primary). Jewish. Member, Americans for Democratic Action. Shot and mortally wounded by Dennis Sweeney, in his law office in Rockefeller Center, and died about seven hours later, in St. Clare's Hospital, Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., March 14, 1980 (age 51 years, 58 days). Interment at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Va.
  Relatives: Son of Gabriel Abraham Lowenstein and Augusta (Goldberg) Lowenstein; married, November 25, 1966, to Jennifer Lyman.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Books about Allard K. Lowenstein: Richard Cummings, The Pied Piper : Allard K. Lowenstein and the Liberal Dream — William H. Chafe, Never Stop Running
Russell G. Lloyd Russell G. Lloyd, Sr. (1932-1980) — of Evansville, Vanderburgh County, Ind. Born in Kingston, Luzerne County, Pa., March 29, 1932. Republican. Lawyer; mayor of Evansville, Ind., 1972-79; alternate delegate to Republican National Convention from Indiana, 1972. Catholic. Shot and mortally wounded by Julia Van Orden; he died eight hours later, in St. Mary's Hospital, Evansville, Vanderburgh County, Ind., March 21, 1980 (age 47 years, 358 days). His killer was convicted of murder and sentenced to 40 years in prison. Interment at St. Joseph Catholic Cemetery, Evansville, Ind.
  Relatives: Father of Russell G. Lloyd, Jr. (1960?-).
  Image source: City of Evansville
  Marion Price Daniel, Jr. (1941-1981) — of Texas. Born June 8, 1941. Democrat. Lawyer; member of Texas state house of representatives, 1969-78; Speaker of the Texas State House of Representatives, 1973; delegate to Texas state constitutional convention, 1974; candidate in primary for Texas state attorney general, 1978. Shot and killed by his estranged wife, Vickie, near Liberty, Liberty County, Tex., January 19, 1981 (age 39 years, 225 days). She was arrested and indicted for his murder, but found not guilty at trial. Interment a private or family graveyard, Liberty County, Tex.
  Relatives: Son of Marion Price Daniel; married to Vickie Loretha Carroll; nephew of William Partlow Daniel (1915-2006); third great-grandson of Samuel Houston.
  Political family: Daniel-Houston family of Texas.
  Aloysius J. Rumely (c.1911-1982) — of LaPorte, LaPorte County, Ind. Born about 1911. Mayor of LaPorte, Ind., 1982. On May 31, 1982, former city employee Harold Lang shot him and his wife, leading to his death six months later, November 25, 1982 (age about 71 years). Burial location unknown.
  Lawrence Patton McDonald (1935-1983) — also known as Larry McDonald — of Georgia. Born in Atlanta, Fulton County, Ga., April 1, 1935. Democrat. U.S. Representative from Georgia 7th District, 1975-83; died in office 1983. Member, John Birch Society. Killed when the Korean Airlines jet on which he was a passenger was shot down by the Soviet military, over the Sea of Japan, September 1, 1983 (age 48 years, 153 days). His remains were never recovered.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — NNDB dossier
  Richard Joseph Daronco (1931-1988) — also known as Richard J. Daronco — Born in New York, New York County, N.Y., August 1, 1931. Lawyer; Justice of New York Supreme Court, 1979-87; U.S. District Judge for the Southern District of New York, 1987-88; died in office 1988. Catholic. Italian ancestry. Shot and killed, by Charles L. Koster, in Pelham Heights, Pelham, Westchester County, N.Y., May 21, 1988 (age 56 years, 294 days). Koster, a retired police officer, was angry over ruling the judge had issued two days earlier; he killed himself at the scene. Burial location unknown.
  The Richard J. Daronco Westchester County Courthouse, in White Plains, New York, is named for him.
  See also federal judicial profile — Wikipedia article
  Arnold Lewis Raphel (1943-1988) — also known as Arnold L. Raphel — of New Jersey. Born in 1943. Foreign Service officer; U.S. Ambassador to Pakistan, 1987-88, died in office 1988. Killed when a plane in which he was a passenger was blown up in midair by terrorists, near Bahawalpur, Pakistan, August 17, 1988 (age about 45 years). Interment at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Va.
  See also U.S. State Dept career summary
  Robert Smith Vance (1931-1989) — also known as Bob Vance — of Birmingham, Jefferson County, Ala.; Mountain Brook, Jefferson County, Ala. Born in Talladega, Talladega County, Ala., May 10, 1931. Democrat. Lawyer; Alabama Democratic state chair, 1966-77; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Alabama, 1968, 1972 (alternate); Judge of U.S. Court of Appeals for the 5th Circuit, 1977-81; Judge of U.S. Court of Appeals for the 11th Circuit, 1981-89; died in office 1989. Assassinated by way of a mail bomb, in Mountain Brook, Jefferson County, Ala., December 16, 1989 (age 58 years, 220 days). Walter Leroy Moody, Jr., who sent the bomb, was convicted of murder, sentenced to death, and executed in 2018. Cremated; ashes interred at St. Lukes Episcopal Columbarium, Mountain Brook, Ala.
  Relatives: Son of Harrell Taylor Vance (1897-1963) and Mae (Smith) Vance (1897-1951); married to Helen Vance (1934-2010).
  The Robert S. Vance Federal Building and U.S. Courthouse (built 1921, named 1990), in Birmingham, Alabama, is named for him.
  See also federal judicial profile — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Nelson Gerard Gross (1932-1997) — also known as Nelson G. Gross — of Hackensack, Bergen County, N.J.; Saddle River, Bergen County, N.J. Born January 9, 1932. Republican. Lawyer; member of New Jersey state house of assembly from Bergen County, 1962-63; candidate for New Jersey state senate District 13, 1965; delegate to Republican National Convention from New Jersey, 1968; chair of Bergen County Republican Party, 1969; New Jersey Republican state chair, 1969; candidate for U.S. Senator from New Jersey, 1970; real estate developer; restaurant owner. Jewish. Indicted in May 1973 on charges of falsifying a $5,000 contribution to the 1969 campaign of Gov. William T. Cahill, conspiring to commit tax evasion by disguising the contribution as a business expense, and counseling a witness to commit perjury; convicted in March 1974, and sentenced to two years jail; served six months. Kidnapped in Edgewater, N.J., robbed of $20,000, taken to New York, and stabbed to death, in Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., September 17, 1997 (age 65 years, 251 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Albert Gross.
  Tommy Burks (1940-1998) — of near Monterey, Putnam County, Tenn. Born in Cookeville, Putnam County, Tenn., May 22, 1940. Farmer; member of Tennessee state house of representatives, 1971-78; member of Tennessee state senate, 1979-98; died in office 1998. Church of Christ. Member, Lions; Farm Bureau. Shot and killed in his pickup truck by his opponent for re-election, Byron Low Tax Looper, near Monterey, Cumberland County, Tenn., October 19, 1998 (age 58 years, 150 days). Interment at Crestlawn Memorial Cemetery, Cookeville, Tenn.
  Relatives: Son of Walter Fred Burks and Christine Gilliam Burks; married 1960 to Charlotte Rose Gentry (1939?-).
  Cross-reference: McCracken Poston
  Jasper Baxter (1957-2001) — of Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa. Born in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., January 28, 1957. Democrat. Candidate in primary for Pennsylvania state house of representatives 186th District, 1986. African ancestry. Was conducting a seminar on the 93rd floor of 2 World Trade Center, when an airliner hijacked by terrorists was deliberately crashed into the building, causing an explosion, fire, and collapse of the structure, killing almost 3,000, in Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., September 11, 2001 (age 44 years, 226 days). Cenotaph at National September 11 Memorial, Manhattan, N.Y.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
"Enjoy the hospitable entertainment of a political graveyard."
Henry L. Clinton, Apollo Hall, New York City, February 3, 1872
The Political Graveyard

The Political Graveyard is a web site about U.S. political history and cemeteries. Founded in 1996, it is the Internet's most comprehensive free source for American political biography, listing 312,576 politicians, living and dead.
  The listings are incomplete; development of the database is a continually ongoing project.  
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