PoliticalGraveyard.com
The Political Graveyard: A Database of American History
Politicians Whose Bodies Were Never Found

Very incomplete list!

in chronological order

  Thomas Lynch, Jr. (1749-1779) — of South Carolina. Born in South Carolina, August 5, 1749. Member of South Carolina state legislature, 1776; Delegate to Continental Congress from South Carolina, 1776; signer, Declaration of Independence, 1776. While on an ocean voyage to France, was lost at sea, in the North Atlantic Ocean, 1779 (age about 29 years). His remains were not recovered.
  Relatives: Son of Thomas Lynch, Sr. (1727-1776).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  James Carr (1777-1818) — of Massachusetts. Born in Bangor, Penobscot County, Maine, September 9, 1777. Member of Massachusetts state house of representatives, 1806-11; U.S. Representative from Massachusetts 17th District, 1815-17. Drowned in the Ohio River, at Louisville, Jefferson County, Ky., August 24, 1818 (age 40 years, 349 days). His body was apparently not recovered. Cenotaph at Mt. Hope Cemetery, Bangor, Maine.
  Relatives: Son of Francis Carr (1751-1821).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  William Johnson (1771-1834) — of South Carolina. Born in Charleston, Charleston County, S.C., December 27, 1771. Member of South Carolina state house of representatives, 1794; state court judge in South Carolina, 1799; Associate Justice of U.S. Supreme Court, 1804-34. Presbyterian. Died in New York, New York County, N.Y., August 4, 1834 (age 62 years, 220 days). His remains were apparently lost in transit. Cenotaph at St. Philip's Churchyard, Charleston, S.C.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Oliver Hillhouse Prince (1782-1837) — also known as Oliver H. Prince — of Macon, Bibb County, Ga. Born in Montville, New London County, Conn., 1782. Member of Georgia state senate, 1824; U.S. Senator from Georgia, 1828-29. Perished in the wreck of the packet ship Home, in the North Atlantic Ocean off Ocracoke Inlet, N.C., October 9, 1837 (age about 55 years); his remains were never recovered.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  William Beatty Rochester (1789-1838) — also known as William B. Rochester — of Bath, Steuben County, N.Y. Born in Hagerstown, Washington County, Md., January 29, 1789. Democrat. Member of New York state assembly from Allegany and Steuben counties, 1816-18; U.S. Representative from New York, 1821-23 (20th District 1821-23, 28th District 1823); candidate for Governor of New York, 1826. One of 128 people who perished on the the steam packet ship Pulaski, en route from Charleston to Baltimore, when it suffered a boiler explosion and sank in the North Atlantic Ocean off the coast of North Carolina, June 14, 1838 (age 49 years, 136 days); his remains were never recovered.
  Relatives: Son of Nathaniel Rochester and Sophia (Beatty) Rochester (1768-1845); brother of Thomas Hart Rochester (1797-1874); married 1812 to Harriet Irwin (1793-1815); married, January 31, 1816, to Amanda Hopkins (1799-1831); married, April 9, 1832, to Eliza (Hatch) Powers (1800-1885; widow of Gershom Powers).
  Political family: Rochester family of New York (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  John Adams Cameron (1788-1838) — also known as John A. Cameron — of Fayetteville, Cumberland County, N.C.; Florida. Born in Mecklenburg County, Va., 1788. Newspaper editor; member of North Carolina house of commons from Fayetteville, 1810-12, 1820; major in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812; U.S. Consul in Veracruz, 1831-32; U.S. District Judge for Florida, 1832-38. Member, Freemasons. Perished in the wreck of the steamer Pulaski, off the coast of North Carolina, in the North Atlantic Ocean, June 14, 1838 (age about 49 years). His remains were probably not recovered.
  Presumably named for: John Adams
  Relatives: Son of Rev. John Cameron (1744-1815) and Anne Owen (Nash) Cameron (1753-1825); brother of Thomas N. Cameron; married 1815 to Eliza Ann Adam (1798-1817); married 1818 to Catherine (McQueen) Halliday; father of Catherine LaFayette Cameron (1825-1866; who married William Marcus Shipp (1819-1890)).
  Political family: Iredell-Johnston-Cameron family of North Carolina.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Archibald McNeill (d. 1849) — of North Carolina. Born in Moore County, N.C. Member of North Carolina house of commons, 1808-09; member of North Carolina state senate, 1811-13, 1820-21; U.S. Representative from North Carolina 7th District, 1821-23, 1825-27. In 1849 he was captain of about one hundred men traveling from Texas to California; struck by a desert sandstorm in what is now Arizona, he and most of the men were killed; his remains were not recovered.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  John B. Macy (1799-1856) — of Fond du Lac, Fond du Lac County, Wis. Born in Nantucket, Nantucket County, Mass., March 25, 1799. Democrat. U.S. Representative from Wisconsin 3rd District, 1853-55. Lost his life in the burning and sinking of the steamer Niagara, a few miles from Port Washington, Wisconsin, in Lake Michigan, September 24, 1856 (age 57 years, 183 days). His remains were not found. Cenotaph at Forest Lawn Cemetery, Buffalo, N.Y.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Stephen Clarendon Phillips (1801-1857) — also known as Stephen C. Phillips — of Massachusetts. Born in Salem, Essex County, Mass., November 4, 1801. Member of Massachusetts state house of representatives, 1824-29; member of Massachusetts state senate, 1830; U.S. Representative from Massachusetts 2nd District, 1834-38; mayor of Salem, Mass., 1838-42; Free Soil candidate for Governor of Massachusetts, 1848, 1849. He was among 253 passengers and crew who perished in the burning of the steamship Montreal, on the St. Lawrence River, near Quebec City, Quebec, June 26, 1857 (age 55 years, 234 days). His remains were never recovered. Cenotaph at Harmony Grove Cemetery, Salem, Mass.
  Relatives: Son of Stephen Phillips and Dorcas (Woodbridge) Phillips.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  James Hamilton, Jr. (1786-1857) — of Charleston, Charleston District (now Charleston County), S.C. Born in Charleston, Charleston County, S.C., May 8, 1786. Major in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812; lawyer; intendant of Charleston, South Carolina, 1821-22; member of South Carolina state house of representatives, 1820; U.S. Representative from South Carolina 2nd District, 1822-29; Governor of South Carolina, 1830-32. While en route from New Orleans to Galveston, through some mishap, was drowned in the Gulf of Mexico, November 15, 1857 (age 71 years, 191 days). His remains were probably never found.
  Relatives: Brother-in-law of Barnard Elliott Bee (1787-1853).
  Political family: Bee family of Charleston, South Carolina.
  Hamilton County, Tex. is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  Thomas Francis Meagher (1823-1867) — of Montana. Born in Ireland, August 3, 1823. General in the Union Army during the Civil War; secretary of Montana Territory, 1865; Governor of Montana Territory, 1865-66. Fell from a steamboat into the Missouri River and presumably drowned, at Fort Benton, Chouteau County, Mont., July 1, 1867 (age 43 years, 332 days). His body was never found. Statue at State Capitol Grounds, Helena, Mont.
  Meagher County, Mont. is named for him.
  Rufus Wheeler Peckham (1809-1873) — also known as Rufus W. Peckham — of Albany, Albany County, N.Y. Born in Rensselaerville, Albany County, N.Y., December 20, 1809. Democrat. Lawyer; law partner of Lyman Tremain; U.S. Representative from New York 14th District, 1853-55; Justice of New York Supreme Court, 1861-69; judge of New York Court of Appeals, 1870-73; died in office 1873. Member, Kappa Alpha Society. En route to Europe on the steamer Ville du Havre, he was among 226 passengers and crew who perished when the steamer collided with the Scottish sailing vessel Loch Earn, and sank, in the North Atlantic Ocean, November 22, 1873 (age 63 years, 337 days). His remains were never found. Cenotaph at Albany Rural Cemetery, Menands, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Peleg Peckham (1762-1828) and Desire (Watson) Peckham (1767-1852); married to Isabella Adaline Lacey (c.1813-1848) and Mary Elizabeth Foote (c.1830-1873); father of Rufus Wheeler Peckham, Jr. (1838-1909); uncle of Isabella Peckham (1838-1864; daughter-in-law of Andrew Galbraith Miller); first cousin once removed of Nathaniel Hazard; first cousin thrice removed of Stephen E. Peckham; third cousin twice removed of Ezekiel Cornell and Ebenezer Hazard; fourth cousin of Augustus George Hazard; fourth cousin once removed of Erskine Hazard.
  Political families: Cornell family of New York; Miller-Peckham-Walworth-Jenkins family of New York; King family (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  Thomas Taylor Minor (1844-1889) — also known as Thomas T. Minor — of Port Townsend, Jefferson County, Wash.; Seattle, King County, Wash. Born, of American parents, in Manepy, Ceylon (now Sri Lanka), February 20, 1844. Republican. Served in the Union Army during the Civil War; physician; one of the founders of the Seattle, Lake Shore and Eastern Railroad; delegate to Republican National Convention from Washington Territory, 1880; mayor of Port Townsend, Wash., 1881; mayor of Seattle, Wash., 1887-88. Member, Freemasons. Last seen traveling by canoe to Whidbey Island, with others, on a duck huting trip, and was never heard from again; presumed drowned in a watercraft accident, in Puget Sound, December 2, 1889 (age 45 years, 285 days). His canoe was recovered, but his remains were not found.
  Relatives: Son of Eastman Strong Minor and Judith (Manchester) Minor (1814-1900); married, August 20, 1872, to Sarah Montgomery (1840-1931); grandfather of Thomas Minor Pelly (1902-1973).
  Political family: Moriarty-Minor family of Seattle, Washington.
  The T.T. Minor School (built 1890, demolished 1940, rebuilt 1941, closed 2010, renovated and reopened 2016), in Seattle, Washington, is named for him.  — Minor Avenue, in Seattle, Washington, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Albert Jennings Fountain (1838-1896) — also known as Albert J. Fountain; Albert Jennings — of El Paso, El Paso County, Tex.; Mesilla, Dona Ana County, N.M. Born in Staten Island, Richmond County, N.Y., October 23, 1838. Republican. Served in the Union Army during the Civil War; U.S. Collector of Customs at El Paso; Assessor and Collector of Internal Revenue for the Western District of Texas; member of Texas state senate, 1869-70; fought a duel with Frank Williams, and killed him; lawyer. Presumed murdered near White Sands, Dona Ana County, N.M., February 1, 1896 (age 57 years, 101 days). His body was never found.
  Relatives: Son of Solomon Jennings and Catherine (de la Fontaine) Jennings; married 1862 to Mariana Perez.
  See also Wikipedia article
  Rounsevelle Wildman (1864-1901) — of California. Born in Batavia, Genesee County, N.Y., March 19, 1864. U.S. Consul in Singapore, 1889-97; U.S. Consul General in Hong Kong, 1897-1901, died in office 1901. En route from Hong Kong to San Francisco on the SS City of Rio de Janeiro, he and his family were among 135 who perished when the ship struck a reef in dense fog, and quickly sank, in San Francisco Bay, February 22, 1901 (age 36 years, 340 days); his remains were not found.
  Relatives: Son of Edwin Wildman (1829-1887) and Helen Pamela (Rounsevelle) Wildman (1834-1869); brother of Edwin Rounsevelle Wildman; married to Letitia Sherman Aldrich (1865-1901); third cousin once removed of Charles Beers Hatch, Joseph Russell Hatch and Norris Hatch; third cousin twice removed of David DeForest Wildman; third cousin thrice removed of Zalmon Wildman (1775-1835) and Nathaniel Hibbard Wildman.
  Political families: Wildman family of Danbury, Connecticut; Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  William Walter Wedemeyer (1873-1913) — also known as William W. Wedemeyer — of Ann Arbor, Washtenaw County, Mich. Born in Washtenaw County, Mich., March 22, 1873. Republican. Lawyer; law partner of Martin J. Cavanaugh, from 1896; U.S. Consul in Georgetown, 1905; member of Michigan Republican State Central Committee, 1907; U.S. Representative from Michigan 2nd District, 1911-13; defeated, 1912; died in office 1913. German ancestry. Member, Freemasons; Knights Templar; Shriners; Knights of Pythias. Accidentally drowned in the harbor at Colón, Panama, January 2, 1913 (age 39 years, 286 days); his remains were never recovered.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Frederick Van Dyne (1861-1915) — Born in Palmyra, Wayne County, N.Y., 1861. U.S. Consul in Lyon, 1915, died in office 1915. While a passenger on the steamship Sant'Anna, en route from New York to Naples, he jumped overboard and was presumed drowned, in the North Atlantic Ocean, April 21, 1915 (age about 53 years); his remains were not recovered.
  Robert Ney McNeely (1883-1915) — also known as Robert McNeely — of Monroe, Union County, N.C. Born in Union County, N.C., November 12, 1883. Lawyer; member of North Carolina state house of representatives, 1909-10; U.S. Consul in Aden, 1915, died in office 1915. While en route to Aden as a passenger on the British liner Persia, he was one of 385 passengers and crew who perished when the ship was hit by a German torpedo, and sank, in the Mediterranean Sea, December 20, 1915 (age 32 years, 38 days). His body was apparently not recovered.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Alfred Louis Moreau Gottschalk (1873-1918) — also known as Alfred L. M. Gottschalk — Born in New York, New York County, N.Y., February 8, 1873. Newspaper correspondent; sugar grower; U.S. Consul in Callao, 1903-05; U.S. Consul General in Callao, 1905-06; Mexico City, 1906-08; , 1908-11; Rio de Janeiro, 1916-18, died in office 1918. Member, Delta Kappa Epsilon. While en route from Bahia, Brazil to Baltimore on the U.S. Navy ship Cyclops, during World War I, he was one of 306 sailors and passengers who perished when the ship sank, in the North Atlantic Ocean, March, 1918 (age 45 years, 0 days). The wreckage was never found.
  Relatives: Son of L. G. Gottschalk and Louise de L. (Boucher) Gottschalk.
  Carl Frederick Zeidler (1908-1942) — also known as Carl Zeidler; "Singing Mayor"; "Boy Mayor" — of Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, Wis. Born in Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, Wis., January 4, 1908. Mayor of Milwaukee, Wis., 1940-42; resigned 1942; served in the U.S. Navy during World War II. Killed when the munitions ship La Salle was struck by torpedos, exploded, and sank, about 350 miles southeast of the Cape of Good Hope, in the Indian Ocean, November 7, 1942 (age 34 years, 307 days); his remains were never found. Cenotaph at Forest Home Cemetery, Milwaukee, Wis.
  Relatives: Brother of Frank P. Zeidler (1912-2006).
  Carl F. Zeidler Park (now Zeidler Union Square), in downtown Milwaukee, Wisconsin, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Thomas Hale Boggs, Sr. (1914-1972) — also known as Hale Boggs — of New Orleans, Orleans Parish, La. Born in Long Beach, Harrison County, Miss., February 15, 1914. Democrat. Lawyer; U.S. Representative from Louisiana 2nd District, 1941-43, 1947-72; died in office 1972; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Louisiana, 1948, 1956, 1960, 1968; Parliamentarian, 1964; chair, Resolutions and Platform Committee, chair, 1968; candidate in primary for Governor of Louisiana, 1952; Vice-Chair of Democratic National Committee, 1957; member, President's Commission on the Assassination of President KNDY, 1963-64. Catholic. Member, American Legion; Amvets; Catholic War Veterans; Sons of the American Revolution; Knights of Columbus; American Bar Association; American Judicature Society; Phi Beta Kappa; Beta Theta Pi; Omicron Delta Kappa. Disappeared while on a campaign flight from Anchorage to Juneau, and presumed killed in a plane crash, somewhere in Alaska, October 16, 1972 (age 58 years, 244 days). The wreckage was never found. Cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery, Washington, D.C.
  Relatives: Son of William Robertson Boggs and Claire Josephine (Hale) Boggs; married, January 22, 1938, to Corinne Claiborne (1916-2013); father of Barbara Boggs Sigmund, Thomas Hale Boggs, Jr. and Cokie Roberts (National Public Radio reporter and commentator).
  Boggs Peak in the Chugach Mountains, Anchorage, Alaska, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Books about Thomas Hale Boggs: Gary Boulard, The Big Lie: Hale Boggs, Lucille May Grace, and Leander Perez
  Nicholas Joseph Begich (1932-1972) — also known as Nick Begich — of Anchorage, Alaska. Born in Eveleth, St. Louis County, Minn., April 6, 1932. Democrat. Member of Alaska state senate, 1963-71; U.S. Representative from Alaska at-large, 1971-72; died in office 1972; alternate delegate to Democratic National Convention from Alaska, 1972. Alaska Native and Croatian ancestry. Disappeared while on a campaign flight from Anchorage to Juneau, and presumed killed in a plane crash, somewhere in Alaska, October 16, 1972 (age 40 years, 193 days). The wreckage was never found. Cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery, Washington, D.C.
  Relatives: Brother of Joseph R. Begich (1930-); married 1956 to Margaret Jendro; father of Nicholas J. Begich, Thomas Begich and Mark Begich (who married Deborah Bonito).
  Political family: Begich family of Anchorage, Alaska.
  Begich Peak in the Chugach Mountains, Anchorage, Alaska, is named for him.  — Begich Middle School, in Anchorage, Alaska, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Henry Endicott Stebbins (1905-1973) — also known as Henry E. Stebbins — of Milton, Norfolk County, Mass. Born in Milton, Norfolk County, Mass., June 16, 1905. Foreign Service officer; U.S. Ambassador to Nepal, 1959-66; Uganda, 1966-69. Apparently fell from the deck of the ocean liner Leonardo da Vinci, and drowned, in the North Atlantic Ocean, March 28, 1973 (age 67 years, 285 days). His body was apparently never found.
  Relatives: Son of Rev. Roderick Stebbins (1859-1928) and Edith Endicott (Marean) Stebbins; married, June 22, 1951, to Barbara Jennifer Worthington; great-grandnephew of Charles Endicott; third great-grandson of James Endicott; first cousin twice removed of Eugene Frances Endicott (1848-1914).
  Political family: Tweedy family.
  See also U.S. State Dept career summary
  Lawrence Patton McDonald (1935-1983) — also known as Larry McDonald — of Georgia. Born in Atlanta, Fulton County, Ga., April 1, 1935. Democrat. U.S. Representative from Georgia 7th District, 1975-83; died in office 1983. Member, John Birch Society. Killed when the Korean Airlines jet on which he was a passenger was shot down by the Soviet military, over the Sea of Japan, September 1, 1983 (age 48 years, 153 days). His remains were never recovered.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — NNDB dossier
"Enjoy the hospitable entertainment of a political graveyard."
Henry L. Clinton, Apollo Hall, New York City, February 3, 1872
The Political Graveyard

The Political Graveyard is a web site about U.S. political history and cemeteries. Founded in 1996, it is the Internet's most comprehensive free source for American political biography, listing 312,576 politicians, living and dead.
  The listings are incomplete; development of the database is a continually ongoing project.  
  Information on this page — and on all other pages of this site — is believed to be accurate, but is not guaranteed. Users are advised to check with other sources before relying on any information here.  
  The official URL for this page is: https://politicalgraveyard.com/death/never-found.html.  
  Links to this or any other Political Graveyard page are welcome, but specific page addresses may sometimes change as the site develops.  
  If you are searching for a specific named individual, try the alphabetical index of politicians.  
  More information: FAQ; privacy policy; cemetery links.  
  If you find any error or omission in The Political Graveyard, or if you have information to share, please see the biographical checklist and submission guidelines.  
Copyright notices: (1) Facts are not subject to copyright; see Feist v. Rural Telephone. (2) Politician portraits displayed on this site are 70-pixel-wide monochrome thumbnail images, which I believe to constitute fair use under applicable copyright law. Where possible, each image is linked to its online source. However, requests from owners of copyrighted images to delete them from this site are honored. (3) Original material, programming, selection and arrangement are © 1996-2019 Lawrence Kestenbaum. (4) This work is also licensed for free non-commercial re-use, with attribution, under a Creative Commons License.
Site information: The Political Graveyard is created and maintained by Lawrence Kestenbaum, who is solely responsible for its structure and content. — The mailing address is The Political Graveyard, P.O. Box 2563, Ann Arbor MI 48106. — This site is hosted by HDL. — The Political Graveyard opened on July 1, 1996; the last full revision was done on March 10, 2021.

Creative 
Commons License Follow polgraveyard on Twitter [Amazon.com]