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The Political Graveyard: A Database of American History
Washington city
District of Columbia

Cemeteries and Memorial Sites of Politicians in Washington city

Index to Locations

  • Washington Unknown location
  • Washington Capitol Grounds
  • Washington Chevy Chase Circle
  • Washington Columbian Harmony Cemetery (now gone)
  • Washington Congressional Cemetery
  • Washington Connecticut Avenue
  • Washington Dumbarton Oaks Rose Garden
  • Washington Federal Triangle
  • Washington Garfield Circle
  • Washington Georgetown University Jesuit Cemetery
  • Washington Glenwood Cemetery
  • Washington Gompers Square
  • Washington Graceland Cemetery
  • Washington Hancock Circle
  • Washington Holy Rood Cemetery
  • Washington John A. Wilson Building Grounds
  • Washington Judiciary Park
  • Washington Lafayette Park
  • Washington Meridian Hill Park
  • Washington Mt. Olivet Cemetery
  • Washington National Mall
  • Washington Oak Hill Cemetery
  • Washington Rawlins Park
  • Washington Rock Creek Cemetery
  • Washington St. Mary's Catholic Cemetery
  • Washington Scott Circle
  • Washington Treasury Building Grounds
  • Washington U.S. Soldiers' & Airmen's Home National Cemetery
  • Washington Ward Circle
  • Washington Washington Circle
  • Washington Washington National Cathedral
  • Washington West Potomac Park
  • Washington Woodlawn Cemetery
  • Washington Private or family graveyards
  • Georgetown, Washington Old Presbyterian Cemetery (now gone)
  • Lafayette Square, Washington St. John's Church Cemetery


    Unknown Locations
    Washington, District of Columbia
    Politicians buried here:
      Walter Maximillian Bastian (1891-1975) — of Washington, D.C. Born in Washington, D.C., November 16, 1891. Republican. Lawyer; served in the U.S. Army during World War I; U.S. District Judge for the District of Columbia, 1950-54; Judge of U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit, 1954-65; took senior status 1965. Methodist. Member, American Bar Association; Freemasons; Kiwanis. Died March 12, 1975 (age 83 years, 116 days). Interment somewhere.
      Relatives: Son of Charles Sandal Bastian and Katherine (Draeger) Bastian; married, July 3, 1914, to Eva E. Alger.
      See also federal judicial profile
      Henry Fay Greene (1859-1915) — also known as Henry F. Greene — of Duluth, St. Louis County, Minn. Born in New Bern, Craven County, N.C., May 30, 1859. Lawyer; member, U.S. Civil Service Commission, 1903-07. Died in Duluth, St. Louis County, Minn., December 20, 1915 (age 56 years, 204 days). Interment somewhere.
      Joseph Henry Adams (c.1859-1924) — also known as Joseph H. Adams — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born in Washington, D.C., about 1859. Republican. Lawyer; member of New York state assembly from New York County 21st District, 1904. Episcopalian. Member, Sons of the Revolution. Died in Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., August 19, 1924 (age about 65 years). Interment somewhere.
      Thomas Patrick Dillon (d. 1985) — also known as Thomas P. Dillon — U.S. Vice Consul in Moscow, as of 1943. Died in 1985. Interment somewhere.


    Capitol Grounds
    Washington, District of Columbia

    Politicians who have monuments here:
    Robert A. Taft Robert Alphonso Taft (1889-1953) — also known as Robert A. Taft; "Mr. Republican"; "Mr. Integrity"; "Our Illustrious Dunderhead" — of Indian Hill, Hamilton County, Ohio. Born in Cincinnati, Hamilton County, Ohio, September 8, 1889. Republican. Lawyer; member of Ohio state house of representatives, 1921-26; Speaker of the Ohio State House of Representatives, 1926; delegate to Republican National Convention from Ohio, 1928 (member, Resolutions Committee; speaker), 1932, 1944; member of Ohio state senate, 1931-32; U.S. Senator from Ohio, 1939-53; died in office 1953; candidate for Republican nomination for President, 1940, 1944, 1948, 1952. Episcopalian. Member, Psi Upsilon. Co-sponsor of the Taft-Hartley Act. Died, from malignant tumors, in New York Hospital, Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., July 31, 1953 (age 63 years, 326 days). Interment at Indian Hill Episcopal Church Cemetery, Indian Hill, Cincinnati, Ohio; memorial monument at Capitol Grounds.
      Relatives: Son of William Howard Taft and Helen (Herron) Taft (1861-1943); brother of Charles Phelps Taft II (1897-1983); married, October 17, 1914, to Martha Wheaton Bowers (1889-1958; daughter of Lloyd Wheaton Bowers; granddaughter of Thomas Wilson); father of William Howard Taft III and Robert Taft, Jr.; nephew of Charles Phelps Taft and Henry Waters Taft; uncle of Seth Chase Taft; grandson of Alphonso Taft and John Williamson Herron; grandfather of Robert Alphonso Taft III; grandnephew of William Collins; great-grandson of Peter Rawson Taft and Ela Collins; first cousin of Walbridge S. Taft; second cousin thrice removed of Willard J. Chapin; distant relative *** of Ezra Taft Benson.
      Political family: Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
      Books about Robert A. Taft: James T. Patterson, Mr. Republican : A Biography of Robert A. Taft
      Image source: U.S. postage stamp (1960)


    Chevy Chase Circle
    Washington, District of Columbia

    Politicians who have monuments here:
    Francis G. Newlands Francis Griffith Newlands (1848-1917) — also known as Francis G. Newlands — of San Francisco, Calif.; Reno, Washoe County, Nev. Born near Natchez, Adams County, Miss., August 28, 1848. Lawyer; trustee of the estate of U.S. Senator William Sharon, 1886; U.S. Representative from Nevada at-large, 1893-1903; U.S. Senator from Nevada, 1903-17; died in office 1917; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Nevada, 1904, 1916. Died in Washington, D.C., December 24, 1917 (age 69 years, 118 days). Interment at Oak Hill Cemetery; memorial monument at Chevy Chase Circle.
      Relatives: Son of James Birney Newlands and Jessie (Barland) Newlands; married 1874 to Clara Adelaide Sharon (1853-1882; daughter of William Sharon (1821-1885)); married 1888 to Edith McAllister (1860-1939).
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
      Image source: American Monthly Review of Reviews, July 1902


    Columbian Harmony Cemetery (now gone)
    Washington, District of Columbia
    See also Findagrave page for this location.
    Politicians formerly buried here:
      John Adams Hyman (1840-1891) — of North Carolina. Born in Warrenton, Warren County, N.C., July 23, 1840. Republican. Delegate to North Carolina state constitutional convention, 1868; member of North Carolina state senate, 1869-75; U.S. Representative from North Carolina 2nd District, 1875-77. African ancestry. Died in Washington, D.C., September 14, 1891 (age 51 years, 53 days). Original interment at Columbian Harmony Cemetery; reinterment in 1959 at National Harmony Memorial Park, Landover, Md.
      Presumably named for: John Adams
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial


    Congressional Cemetery
    1801 E Street, S.E.
    Washington, District of Columbia
    Founded 1807
    Listed in National Register of Historic Places, 1969
    See also Findagrave page for this location.

    Politicians buried here:
      Elbridge Gerry (1744-1814) — of Cambridge, Middlesex County, Mass. Born in Marblehead, Essex County, Mass., July 17, 1744. Delegate to Continental Congress from Massachusetts, 1776-80, 1782-85; signer, Declaration of Independence, 1776; signer, Articles of Confederation, 1777; member of Massachusetts state house of representatives, 1786; member, U.S. Constitutional Convention, 1787; U.S. Representative from Massachusetts 3rd District, 1789-93; Governor of Massachusetts, 1810-12; defeated, 1801, 1812; Vice President of the United States, 1813-14; died in office 1814. Episcopalian. Member, Freemasons. The word gerrymander ("Gerry" plus "salamander") was coined to describe an oddly shaped Massachusetts senate district his party created in 1811, and later came to mean any unfair districting. Died in Washington, D.C., November 23, 1814 (age 70 years, 129 days). Interment at Congressional Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Thomas Gerry (1702-1774) and Elizabeth (Greenleaf) Gerry (1716-1771); married to Ann Thompson (1763-1849); grandfather of Elbridge Gerry (1813-1886) and Elbridge Thomas Gerry; great-grandfather of Peter Goelet Gerry.
      Political family: Gerry family (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      The town of Elbridge, New York, is named for him.  — The town of Gerry, New York, is named for him.  — The town of Gerry (now Phillipston, Massachusetts), was named for him until 1812.
      Other politicians named for him: Elbridge G. BaldwinElbridge G. KnowltonElbridge G. CreacraftElbridge G. SpauldingElbridge G. GaleElbridge GerryElbridge G. LaphamEldridge Gerry PearlElbridge G. MoultonElbridge G. CracraftElbridge G. KelleyElbridge G. HaynesElbridge G. BrownElbridge G. Davis
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
      Books about Elbridge Gerry: George Athan Billias, Elbridge Gerry, Founding Father and Republican Statesman
    William Wirt William Wirt (1772-1834) — of Virginia. Born near Bladensburg, Prince George's County, Md., November 8, 1772. Lawyer; prosecuting attorney at the treason trial of Aaron Burr, 1807; U.S. Attorney for Virginia, 1816-17; U.S. Attorney General, 1817-29; Anti-Masonic candidate for President of the United States, 1832. Presbyterian. German and Swiss ancestry. Died in Washington, D.C., February 18, 1834 (age 61 years, 102 days). Interment at Congressional Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Jacob Wirt (1729-1774) and Henrietta Wirt (died 1780); married, May 28, 1795, to Mildred 'Millie' Gilmer (1772-1799; niece of John Walker and Francis Walker; aunt of Thomas Walker Gilmer); married, September 7, 1802, to Elizabeth Washington Gamble (1784-1857; sister-in-law of William Henry Cabell); father of Catherine Gratten Wirt (1807-1853; who married Alexander Randall); grandfather of John Wirt Randall; great-grandfather of Hannah Parker Randall (1880-1970) (who married William Bladen Lowndes).
      Wirt County, W.Va. is named for him.
      Other politicians named for him: Wirt AdamsWilliam Wirt VirginWilliam Wirt WatkinsWilliam Wirt VaughanWilliam W. WarrenWilliam Wirt CulbertsonWilliam Wirt HerodWilliam W. DixonWilliam Wirt HendersonWilliam W. HastingsW. Wirt Courtney
      See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
      Books about William Wirt: Gregory Kurt Glassner, Adopted Son: The Life, Wit & Wisdom of William Wirt, 1772-1834
      Image source: The South in the Building of the Nation (1909)
    William Pinkney William Pinkney (1764-1822) — of Annapolis, Anne Arundel County, Md. Born in Annapolis, Anne Arundel County, Md., March 17, 1764. Delegate to Maryland convention to ratify U.S. constitution, 1788; member of Maryland state house of delegates, 1790-92, 1795 (Harford County 1790-92, Anne Arundel County 1795); U.S. Representative from Maryland, 1791, 1815-16 (at-large 1791, 5th District 1815-16); member of Maryland state executive council, 1792-95; mayor of Annapolis, Md., 1795-1800; Maryland state attorney general, 1805-06; U.S. Minister to Great Britain, 1808-11; Russia, 1816-18; member of Maryland state senate from Western Shore, 1811; U.S. Attorney General, 1811-14; major in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812; U.S. Senator from Maryland, 1819-22; died in office 1822. Episcopalian. Member, Freemasons. Died in Washington, D.C., February 25, 1822 (age 57 years, 345 days). Interment at Congressional Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Jonathan Pinkney and Ann (Rind) Pinkney; married to Anna Maria Rodgers; grandfather of William Pinkney Whyte (1824-1908).
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary
      Image source: The South in the Building of the Nation (1909)
      John Forsyth (1780-1841) — of Augusta, Richmond County, Ga. Born in Fredericksburg, Va., October 22, 1780. Democrat. Lawyer; Georgia state attorney general, 1808; U.S. Representative from Georgia, 1813-18, 1823-27 (at-large 1813-18, 1823-25, 2nd District 1825-27, at-large 1827); resigned 1827; U.S. Senator from Georgia, 1818-19, 1829-34; U.S. Minister to Spain, 1819-23; Governor of Georgia, 1827-29; U.S. Secretary of State, 1834-41. Died in Washington, D.C., October 21, 1841 (age 60 years, 364 days). Interment at Congressional Cemetery.
      Relatives: Father of John Forsyth (1812-1877).
      Forsyth County, Ga. is named for him.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier — Early American Foreign Service Database
    Philip Pendleton Barbour Philip Pendleton Barbour (1783-1841) — of Luckettsville, Orange County, Va. Born near Gordonsville, Orange County, Va., May 25, 1783. Democrat. Lawyer; member of Virginia state house of delegates, 1812-14; U.S. Representative from Virginia, 1814-25, 1827-30 (10th District 1814-15, 11th District 1815-25, 1827-30); Speaker of the U.S. House, 1821-23; state court judge in Virginia, 1825-27; delegate to Virginia state constitutional convention, 1829-30; U.S. District Judge for the Eastern District of Virginia, 1830-36; candidate for Democratic nomination for Vice President, 1832; Associate Justice of U.S. Supreme Court, 1836-41; died in office 1841. Episcopalian. Died in Washington, D.C., February 25, 1841 (age 57 years, 276 days). Interment at Congressional Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Col. Thomas Barbour and Mary (Thomas) Barbour; brother of James Barbour; married 1804 to Frances Johnson; cousin *** of John Strode Barbour (1790-1855).
      Political family: Barbour family of Virginia.
      Barbour County, W.Va. is named for him.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — federal judicial profile — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
      Image source: The South in the Building of the Nation (1909)
      Samuel Nicholls Smallwood (1772-1824) — also known as Samuel N. Smallwood — of Washington, D.C. Born in Charles County, Md., September 5, 1772. Mayor of Washington, D.C., 1819-22, 1824. Died in Washington, D.C., September 29, 1824 (age 52 years, 24 days). Interment at Congressional Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Samuel Smallwood (1748-1785) and Martha Ann (Berry) Smallwood (1752-1781); married, February 28, 1801, to Ruth Beall (1775-1806); second cousin once removed of William Smallwood; second cousin thrice removed of James Lester Smallwood; third cousin of Alfred William Grayson; third cousin once removed of Samuel Huntington; third cousin thrice removed of Carter Henry Harrison II; fourth cousin of Samuel H. Huntington; fourth cousin once removed of Nathaniel Huntington (1793-1828), James Huntington and Elisha Mills Huntington.
      Political family: Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      See also Find-A-Grave memorial
      Samuel Lewis Southard (1787-1842) — also known as Samuel L. Southard — of Hunterdon County, N.J.; Trenton, Mercer County, N.J. Born in Basking Ridge, Somerset County, N.J., June 9, 1787. Democrat. Lawyer; member of New Jersey state house of assembly from Hunterdon County, 1815; resigned 1815; associate justice of New Jersey state supreme court, 1815-20; Presidential Elector for New Jersey, 1820; U.S. Senator from New Jersey, 1821-23, 1833-42; died in office 1842; U.S. Secretary of the Navy, 1823-29; New Jersey state attorney general, 1829-33; Governor of New Jersey, 1832-33; chancellor of New Jersey court of chancery, 1832-33. Died in Fredericksburg, Va., June 26, 1842 (age 55 years, 17 days). Interment at Congressional Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Henry Southard; brother of Isaac Southard (1783-1850); father of Virginia E. Southard (who married Ogden Hoffman).
      Political family: Southard-Hoffman family of New York and New Jersey.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
      Marion S. Barry, Jr. (1936-2014) — also known as Marion Barry — of Washington, D.C. Born in Itta Bena, Leflore County, Miss., March 6, 1936. Democrat. Delegate to Democratic National Convention from District of Columbia, 1972 (alternate), 1980, 1996; mayor of Washington, D.C., 1979-91, 1995-99; convicted in 1990 of misdemeanor cocaine possession after being caught on videotape smoking crack cocaine; sentenced to six months in prison. African ancestry. Member, Alpha Phi Alpha. Died in Washington, D.C., November 23, 2014 (age 78 years, 262 days). Interment at Congressional Cemetery.
      See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
      Critical books about Marion Barry: Jonetta Rose Barras, The Last of the Black Emperors : The Hollow Comeback of Marion Barry in a New Age of Black Leaders
      John Walker Maury (c.1809-1855) — also known as John W. Maury — of Washington, D.C. Born about 1809. Mayor of Washington, D.C., 1852-54. Died in Washington, D.C., February 2, 1855 (age about 46 years). Interment at Congressional Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of William Grymes Maury (1784-1860) and Ann Hoomes 'Nancy' (Woolfolk) Maury (1793-1856); married, October 6, 1831, to Isabella Foyles (1813-1889); grandnephew of James Maury; second cousin of Dabney Herndon Maury (1822-1900); second cousin once removed of Abram Poindexter Maury; second cousin twice removed of Fontaine Maury Maverick; second cousin thrice removed of Fontaine Maury Maverick, Jr..
      Political family: Maury-Maverick family of San Antonio, Texas.
      William Winston Seaton — of Washington, D.C. Mayor of Washington, D.C., 1840-50. Interment at Congressional Cemetery.
      Buckner Thruston (1763-1845) — of Lexington, Fayette County, Ky. Born in Gloucester County, Va., February 9, 1763. Democrat. Member of Virginia state legislature, 1789; district judge in Kentucky, 1791; circuit judge in Kentucky, 1802-03; U.S. Senator from Kentucky, 1805-09; Judge of U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit, 1810-45; died in office 1845. Died in Washington, D.C., August 30, 1845 (age 82 years, 202 days). Interment at Congressional Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      James Jackson (1757-1806) — of Georgia. Born in Devon, England, September 21, 1757. Delegate to Georgia state constitutional convention, 1777; U.S. Representative from Georgia at-large, 1789-91; U.S. Senator from Georgia, 1793-95, 1801-06; died in office 1806; Governor of Georgia, 1798-1801. Killed George Wells in a duel in 1780; injured in both knees. Died in Washington, D.C., March 19, 1806 (age 48 years, 179 days). Original interment at Rock Creek Cemetery; reinterment in 1832 at Congressional Cemetery.
      Relatives: Father of Jabez Young Jackson (1790-?); grandfather of James Jackson.
      Political family: Jackson family of Georgia.
      Jackson County, Ga. is named for him.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
      Horatio King (1811-1897) — Born in Paris, Oxford County, Maine, June 21, 1811. U.S. Postmaster General, 1861. Died in Washington, D.C., May 20, 1897 (age 85 years, 333 days). Interment at Congressional Cemetery.
      Relatives: Married to Anne Collins; father of Horatio Collins King (1837-1918).
      Political family: Hart family of New York.
      See also Find-A-Grave memorial
      Roger C. Weightman — of Washington, D.C. Mayor of Washington, D.C., 1824-27. Interment at Congressional Cemetery.
      Joseph Gales, Jr. — of Washington, D.C. Mayor of Washington, D.C., 1827-30. Interment at Congressional Cemetery.
      James G. Berret — of Washington, D.C. Democrat. Postmaster at Washington, D.C., 1853-58; mayor of Washington, D.C., 1858-61; delegate to Democratic National Convention from District of Columbia, 1868. Interment at Congressional Cemetery.
      John Gaillard (1765-1826) — of Charleston, Charleston County, S.C.; Pendleton, Anderson County, S.C. Born in St. Stephens Parish, Charleston District (now part of Berkeley County), S.C., September 5, 1765. Democrat. Lawyer; member of South Carolina state house of representatives, 1794-96; member of South Carolina state senate, 1796-1804; U.S. Senator from South Carolina, 1804-26; died in office 1826. Died in Washington, D.C., February 26, 1826 (age 60 years, 174 days). Interment at Congressional Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of John Gaillard (1736-1800) and Judith (Peyre) Gaillard (1746-1789); married, November 22, 1792, to Mary Lord (1773-1799); uncle of Theodore Gaillard Hunt; great-granduncle of Thomas Porcher Stoney; first cousin once removed of Peter Charles Gaillard (1812-1889), Peter Gaillard Snowden and Franklin Gaillard; first cousin four times removed of John Palmer Gaillard, Jr..
      Political family: Gaillard family of Charleston, South Carolina.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
      Benjamin G. Orr — of Washington, D.C. Mayor of Washington, D.C., 1817-19. Interment at Congressional Cemetery.
      John Thomas Towers — of Washington, D.C. Mayor of Washington, D.C., 1854-56. Interment at Congressional Cemetery.
      Sayles J. Bowen — of Washington, D.C. Republican. Postmaster at Washington, D.C., 1863-68; member of Republican National Committee from District of Columbia, 1866-72; delegate to Republican National Convention from District of Columbia, 1868, 1880 (alternate); mayor of Washington, D.C., 1868-70. Interment at Congressional Cemetery.
      Uriah Tracy (1755-1807) — of Litchfield, Litchfield County, Conn. Born in Franklin, New London County, Conn., February 2, 1755. Lawyer; member of Connecticut state house of representatives, 1788-93; U.S. Representative from Connecticut at-large, 1793-96; resigned 1796; U.S. Senator from Connecticut, 1796-1807; died in office 1807. Died in Washington, D.C., July 19, 1807 (age 52 years, 167 days). Interment at Congressional Cemetery.
      Relatives: Married to Susannah Bull (1757-1843); father of Julia Tracy (1786-1857; who married Theron Metcalf (1784-1875)).
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
      James Noble (1785-1831) — of Brookville, Franklin County, Ind. Born near Berryville, Clarke County, Va., December 16, 1785. Lawyer; member of Indiana territorial House of Representatives, 1813-14; member Indiana territorial council, 1815; circuit judge in Indiana, 1815; delegate to Indiana state constitutional convention, 1816; member of Indiana state house of representatives, 1816; U.S. Senator from Indiana, 1816-31; died in office 1831. Scottish ancestry. Member, Freemasons. Died in Washington, D.C., February 26, 1831 (age 45 years, 72 days). Interment at Congressional Cemetery.
      Relatives: Brother of Noah Noble and Benjamin Sedgwick Noble (1809?-1869); father of Benjamin Sedgwick Noble (1805-1837).
      Political family: Noble family of Indiana.
      Noble County, Ind. is named for him.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
      Joseph Inslee Anderson (1757-1837) — also known as Joseph Anderson — of Tennessee. Born in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., November 5, 1757. Major in Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; lawyer; justice of Southwest Territory supreme court, 1791; delegate to Tennessee state constitutional convention, 1796; U.S. Senator from Tennessee, 1797-1815; Comptroller of the U.S. Treasury, 1815-36. Member, Society of the Cincinnati. Died in Washington, D.C., April 17, 1837 (age 79 years, 163 days). Interment at Congressional Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of William Anderson and Elizabeth (Inslee) Anderson; married 1797 to Only Patience Outlaw; father of Alexander Outlaw Anderson (1794-1869).
      Anderson County, Tenn. is named for him.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
      James Burrill, Jr. (1772-1820) — of Providence, Providence County, R.I. Born in Providence, Providence County, R.I., April 25, 1772. Rhode Island state attorney general, 1797-1812; member of Rhode Island state house of representatives, 1810; Speaker of the Rhode Island State House of Representatives, 1814-16; U.S. Senator from Rhode Island, 1817-20; died in office 1820. Died in Washington, D.C., December 25, 1820 (age 48 years, 244 days). Interment at Congressional Cemetery.
      Relatives: Grandfather of George William Curtis; great-grandfather of Theodore Francis Green (1867-1966).
      Political family: Arnold family of Providence, Rhode Island (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      The town of Burrillville, Rhode Island, is named for him.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
      William Upham (1792-1853) — of Vermont. Born in Massachusetts, 1792. Member of Vermont state legislature, 1830; U.S. Senator from Vermont, 1843-53; died in office 1853. Died in 1853 (age about 61 years). Interment at Congressional Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Daniel Rapine — of Washington, D.C. Mayor of Washington, D.C., 1812-13. Interment at Congressional Cemetery.
      William Pope Duval (1784-1854) — also known as William P. Duval — of Kentucky; Calhoun County, Fla. Born in Virginia, 1784. Democrat. U.S. Representative from Kentucky at-large, 1813-15; U.S. District Judge for the Eastern District of Florida, 1821-22; Governor of Florida Territory, 1822-34; delegate to Florida state constitutional convention from Calhoun County, 1838-39; member of Florida state senate, 1839-42. He was the model for Washington Irving's character "Ralph Ringwood" and James K. Paulding's character "Nimrod Wildfire". Died in Washington, D.C., March 19, 1854 (age about 69 years). Interment at Congressional Cemetery.
      Relatives: Father of Marcia Duval (who married George Washington Paschal (1812-1878)).
      Duval County, Fla. is named for him.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Theodorick Bland (1742-1790) — of Prince George County, Va. Born in Cawsons, Prince George County, Va., March 21, 1742. Physician; planter; served in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; Delegate to Continental Congress from Virginia, 1780-83; delegate to Virginia convention to ratify U.S. constitution from Prince George County, 1788; U.S. Representative from Virginia at-large, 1789-90; died in office 1790. Died in New York, New York County, N.Y., June 1, 1790 (age 48 years, 72 days). Original interment at Trinity Churchyard, Manhattan, N.Y.; reinterment in 1828 at Congressional Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Theodorick Bland (1708-1803) and Frances Elizabeth (Bolling) Bland (1724-1774); married 1768 to Martha Dangerfield; nephew of Richard Bland; uncle of John Randolph of Roanoke and Henry St. George Tucker; grandnephew of Richard Randolph; granduncle of Nathaniel Beverly Tucker; first cousin once removed of Peyton Randolph (1721-1775), Henry Lee, Charles Lee and Edmund Jennings Lee; first cousin thrice removed of Fitzhugh Lee; first cousin five times removed of William Welby Beverley (1889-1969); second cousin of Thomas Jefferson, Edmund Jenings Randolph and Beverley Randolph; second cousin once removed of John Marshall, James Markham Marshall, Thomas Mann Randolph, Jr., Alexander Keith Marshall, Dabney Carr, John Wayles Eppes, Theodorick Bland (1776-1846) and Peyton Randolph (1779-1828); second cousin twice removed of Thomas Marshall, Benjamin William Sheridan Cabell, James Keith Marshall, Francis Wayles Eppes, Dabney Smith Carr, Benjamin Franklin Randolph, Meriwether Lewis Randolph, George Wythe Randolph, Edmund Randolph and Carter Henry Harrison; second cousin thrice removed of William Lewis Cabell, Thomas Jefferson Coolidge, George Craighead Cabell, John Augustine Marshall, Carter Henry Harrison II, Frederick Madison Roberts and Douglass Townshend Bolling; second cousin four times removed of Thomas Lawton Davis, Connally Findlay Trigg, Benjamin Earl Cabell, John Gardner Coolidge, William Marshall Bullitt, Alexander Scott Bullitt, Francis Beverley Biddle and Richard Walker Bolling; second cousin five times removed of Henry De La Warr Flood, Joel West Flood and Earle Cabell; third cousin of David Meriwether (1755-1822), James Meriwether (1755-1817) and Meriwether Lewis; third cousin once removed of James Meriwether (1788-1852), David Meriwether (1800-1893) and James Archibald Meriwether; third cousin twice removed of George Rockingham Gilmer and Reuben Handy Meriwether; third cousin thrice removed of William Henry Robertson.
      Political families: Lee-Randolph family of Maryland and Virginia; Marshall-Harrison-Randolph-Cabell family of Virginia; Blackburn-Slaughter-Buckner-Madison family of Kentucky (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
      William Allen Trimble (1786-1821) — of Ohio. Born in Woodford County, Ky., April 4, 1786. Lawyer; major in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812; U.S. Senator from Ohio, 1819-21; died in office 1821. Died, from his war wounds, in Washington, D.C., December 13, 1821 (age 35 years, 253 days). Interment at Congressional Cemetery.
      Relatives: Brother of Allen Trimble (1783-1870).
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
      William Cranch (1769-1855) — of District of Columbia. Born in Weymouth, Norfolk County, Mass., July 17, 1769. Judge of U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit, 1801, 1806. Died in Washington, D.C., September 1, 1855 (age 86 years, 46 days). Interment at Congressional Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Richard Cranch (1726-1811) and Mary (Smith) Cranch (1741-1811); married, April 6, 1795, to Anna Nancy Greenleaf (1772-1843); nephew of Abigail Smith (1744-1818; who married John Adams); great-grandfather of Thomas Stearns Eliot (1888-1965; poet); first cousin of John Quincy Adams (1767-1848); first cousin once removed of George Washington Adams and Charles Francis Adams (1807-1886); first cousin twice removed of John Quincy Adams (1833-1894) and Brooks Adams; first cousin thrice removed of Charles Francis Adams (1866-1954); first cousin four times removed of Thomas Boylston Adams; third cousin once removed of Samuel Sewall (1757-1814) and Josiah Quincy; fourth cousin of Josiah Quincy, Jr.; fourth cousin once removed of Samuel Miller Quincy.
      Political families: Sherman family of Connecticut; Sewall-Adams-Cony family of Maine; Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      See also Find-A-Grave memorial
      Francis Malbone (1759-1809) — of Rhode Island. Born in Newport, Newport County, R.I., March 20, 1759. U.S. Representative from Rhode Island at-large, 1793-97; member of Rhode Island state house of representatives, 1807; U.S. Senator from Rhode Island, 1809; died in office 1809. Died on the steps of the U.S. Capitol Building, Washington, D.C., June 4, 1809 (age 50 years, 76 days). Interment at Congressional Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Richard Montgomery Young (1798-1861) — also known as Richard M. Young — of Jonesboro, Union County, Ill.; Quincy, Adams County, Ill. Born in Fayette County, Ky., February 20, 1798. Democrat. Member of Illinois state house of representatives, 1820-22; circuit judge in Illinois, 1825-37; Presidential Elector for Illinois, 1828; U.S. Senator from Illinois, 1837-43; justice of Illinois state supreme court, 1843-47. Died in Washington, D.C., November 28, 1861 (age 63 years, 281 days). Interment at Congressional Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
      John Dawson (1762-1814) — of Spotsylvania County, Va. Born in Virginia, 1762. Democrat. Lawyer; member of Virginia state house of delegates, 1786-89; Delegate to Continental Congress from Virginia, 1788; delegate to Virginia convention to ratify U.S. constitution from Spotsylvania County, 1788; U.S. Representative from Virginia, 1797-1814 (at-large 1797-1807, 10th District 1807-14); died in office 1814. Died in Washington, D.C., March 31, 1814 (age about 51 years). Interment at Congressional Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Lemuel Jackson Bowden (1815-1864) — of Virginia. Born in Williamsburg, Va., January 16, 1815. Republican. Member of Virginia state legislature, 1850; U.S. Senator from Virginia, 1863-64; died in office 1864. Died in Washington, D.C., January 2, 1864 (age 48 years, 351 days). Interment at Congressional Cemetery.
      Relatives: Uncle of George Edwin Bowden (1852-1908).
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      William Nathaniel Roach (1840-1902) — also known as William N. Roach — of Larimore, Grand Forks County, N.Dak. Born in District of Columbia, 1840. Democrat. Member of North Dakota state legislature, 1880; U.S. Senator from North Dakota, 1893-99. Died in 1902 (age about 62 years). Interment at Congressional Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
    John M. Thurston John Mellen Thurston (1847-1916) — also known as John M. Thurston — of Omaha, Douglas County, Neb. Born in Montpelier, Washington County, Vt., August 21, 1847. Republican. Lawyer; general solicitor for Union Pacific Railroad; delegate to Republican National Convention from Nebraska, 1872, 1888; Temporary Chair, 1888; Permanent Chair, 1896; speaker, 1896; chair, Committee to Notify Presidential Nominee, chair, 1896; member of Nebraska state house of representatives, 1875-77; Presidential Elector for Nebraska, 1880; U.S. Senator from Nebraska, 1895-1901; member of Republican National Committee from Nebraska, 1896; candidate for Republican nomination for Vice President, 1896. Died in Omaha, Douglas County, Neb., August 9, 1916 (age 68 years, 354 days). Cremated; ashes interred at Congressional Cemetery.
      Thurston County, Neb. is named for him.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
      Image source: The Parties and The Men (1896)
      Richard Stanford (1767-1816) — of Hawfields, Alamance County, N.C. Born near Vienna, Dorchester County, Md., March 2, 1767. Democrat. U.S. Representative from North Carolina, 1797-1816 (4th District 1797-99, at-large 1799-1803, 8th District 1803-05, at-large 1805-07, 8th District 1807-09, at-large 1809-11, 8th District 1811-13, at-large 1813-15, 8th District 1815-16); died in office 1816. Died in Georgetown, Washington, D.C., April 9, 1816 (age 49 years, 38 days). Interment at Congressional Cemetery.
      Relatives: Grandfather of William Robert Webb (1842-1926).
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Henry Gaither Worthington (1828-1909) — also known as Henry G. Worthington — of San Francisco, Calif.; Austin, Lander County, Nev.; Charleston, Charleston County, S.C. Born in Cumberland, Allegany County, Md., February 9, 1828. Republican. Member of California state assembly 8th District, 1862-63; U.S. Representative from Nevada at-large, 1864-65; U.S. Minister to Argentina, 1868-69; Uruguay, 1868-69; U.S. Collector of Customs, 1873-77. Died in Washington, D.C., July 29, 1909 (age 81 years, 170 days). Interment at Congressional Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — U.S. State Dept career summary
      Thomas Tudor Tucker (1745-1828) — of Charleston, Charleston County, S.C. Born in Port Royal, Bermuda, June 25, 1745. Physician; member of South Carolina state house of representatives, 1776, 1782-83, 1785, 1787-88; Delegate to Continental Congress from South Carolina, 1787-88; U.S. Representative from South Carolina at-large, 1789-93; treasurer of the United States, 1801-28. Died in Washington, D.C., May 2, 1828 (age 82 years, 312 days). Interment at Congressional Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Henry Tucker (1713-1787) and Ann (Butterfield) Tucker (1722-1797); brother of St. George Tucker; uncle of George Tucker and Henry St. George Tucker (1780-1848); granduncle of Nathaniel Beverly Tucker.
      Political families: Lee-Randolph family of Maryland and Virginia; Marshall-Harrison-Randolph-Cabell family of Virginia; Biddle-Randolph family of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Meriwether-Kellogg-Tyler family of Virginia and Connecticut; Walker-Bolling family of Huntsville, Alabama (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
      Samuel Allyne Otis (1740-1814) — of Boston, Suffolk County, Mass. Born in Barnstable, Barnstable County, Mass., November 24, 1740. Merchant; member of Massachusetts state house of representatives, 1776-85; Speaker of the Massachusetts State House of Representatives, 1784-85; delegate to Massachusetts state constitutional convention, 1780; Delegate to Continental Congress from Massachusetts, 1787-88; Secretary of the United States Senate, 1789-1814. Died in Washington, D.C., April 22, 1814 (age 73 years, 149 days). Interment at Congressional Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of James Otis (1702-1778) and Mary (Allyne) Otis (1702-1774); married, December 31, 1764, to Elizabeth Gray (1745-1779); married, March 28, 1782, to Mary (Smith) Gray; father of Harrison Gray Otis (1765-1848); great-grandfather of James Otis (1836-1898); third great-grandfather of Robert Helyer Thayer; first cousin twice removed of Nathaniel Freeman, Jr.; first cousin thrice removed of Benjamin Fessenden and Charles Backus Hyde Fessenden; first cousin four times removed of Albert Clinton Griswold; second cousin once removed of Asahel Otis; second cousin twice removed of Oran Gray Otis, Day Otis Kellogg, Asa H. Otis, Dwight Kellogg, John Otis, William Shaw Chandler Otis, David Perry Otis, Harris F. Otis, James Otis (1826-1875) and Harrison Gray Otis (1837-1917); second cousin thrice removed of Charles Augustus Otis, Sr., George Lorenzo Otis, John Grant Otis, Norton Prentiss Otis, Lauren Ford Otis and Charles Eugene Otis; second cousin four times removed of Ralph Chester Otis; third cousin once removed of Chillus Doty; third cousin twice removed of James Duane Doty, George Bailey Loring and Abraham Lansing; third cousin thrice removed of Charles Doty.
      Political families: Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York; Otis family of Connecticut (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
      Lemuel Dale Evans (1810-1877) — also known as Lemuel D. Evans — of Arkansas; Marshall, Harrison County, Tex. Born in Tennessee, January 8, 1810. Lawyer; Independent candidate for U.S. Representative from Arkansas at-large, 1842; U.S. Representative from Texas 1st District, 1855-57; justice of Texas state supreme court, 1870-73; chief justice of Texas state supreme court, 1870-71. Died in Washington, D.C., July 1, 1877 (age 67 years, 174 days). Interment at Congressional Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
      Alexander Cameron Hunt (1825-1894) — of Freeport, Stephenson County, Ill.; Denver, Colo. Born in Hammondsport, Steuben County, N.Y., December 25, 1825. Candidate for Delegate to U.S. Congress from Colorado Territory, 1866; Governor of Colorado Territory, 1867-69. Died in Washington, D.C., May 14, 1894 (age 68 years, 140 days). Interment at Congressional Cemetery.
      Thomas Blount (1759-1812) — of Tarboro, Edgecombe County, N.C. Born in Craven County (part now in Pitt County), N.C., May 10, 1759. Democrat. Served in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; member of North Carolina house of commons from Edgecombe County, 1789, 1792; U.S. Representative from North Carolina, 1793-99, 1805-09, 1811-12 (at-large 1793-97, 9th District 1797-99, at-large 1805-07, 3rd District 1807-09, 1811-12); died in office 1812; member of North Carolina state senate from Edgecombe County, 1799. Died in Washington, D.C., February 7, 1812 (age 52 years, 273 days). Interment at Congressional Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Jacob Blount and Barbara (Gray) Blount; brother of William Blount; married to Jacky Sullivan Sumner; uncle of William Grainger Blount (1784-1827).
      Political family: Blount family of North Carolina.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Rowland Blennerhassett Mahany (1864-1937) — also known as Rowland B. Mahany — of Buffalo, Erie County, N.Y.; Washington, D.C. Born in Buffalo, Erie County, N.Y., September 28, 1864. Newspaper editor; lawyer; U.S. Minister to Ecuador, 1892-93; U.S. Representative from New York 32nd District, 1895-99; defeated (Republican), 1892, 1898, 1900; delegate to Democratic National Convention from District of Columbia, 1924 (alternate), 1928 (member, Committee on Permanent Organization). Episcopalian. Member, Phi Beta Kappa; Psi Upsilon. Died in Washington, D.C., May 2, 1937 (age 72 years, 216 days). Interment at Congressional Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Kean Mahany and Catherine (Reynolds) Mahany.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
      John Smilie (1741-1812) — of Fayette City, Fayette County, Pa. Born in Ireland, 1741. Democrat. Member of Pennsylvania state house of representatives, 1784-86; delegate to Pennsylvania state constitutional convention, 1790; member of Pennsylvania state senate, 1790-93; U.S. Representative from Pennsylvania, 1793-95, 1799-1812 (8th District 1793-95, 11th District 1799-1803, 9th District 1803-12); died in office 1812. Died in Washington, D.C., December 30, 1812 (age about 71 years). Interment at Congressional Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      William Armisted Burwell (1780-1821) — also known as William A. Burwell — of Rocky Mount, Franklin County, Va. Born near Boydton, Mecklenburg County, Va., March 15, 1780. Democrat. Member of Virginia state house of delegates, 1804-06; U.S. Representative from Virginia, 1806-21 (at-large 1806-07, 13th District 1807-15, 14th District 1815-21); died in office 1821. Died February 16, 1821 (age 40 years, 338 days). Interment at Congressional Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Thomas Peter Lantos (1928-2008) — also known as Tom Lantos; Tamas Peter Lantos — of Millbrae, San Mateo County, Calif.; Hillsborough, San Mateo County, Calif.; San Mateo, San Mateo County, Calif. Born in Budapest, Hungary, February 1, 1928. Democrat. University professor; television news commentator; delegate to Democratic National Convention from California, 1976, 1988, 1996, 2000, 2004; U.S. Representative from California, 1981-2008 (11th District 1981-93, 12th District 1993-2008); died in office 2008. Jewish. Member, Phi Beta Kappa; Sigma Alpha Mu. Arrested for disorderly conduct in April 2006, while taking part civil disobedience action to protest genocide in Darfur, in front of the Sudanese embassy in Washington, D.C. Died, of cancer of the esophagus, in Bethesda Naval Medical Center, Bethesda, Montgomery County, Md., February 11, 2008 (age 80 years, 10 days). Interment at Congressional Cemetery.
      Relatives: Married 1950 to Annette Tillemann; father of Katrina Lantos (1952?-) (who married Richard Nelson Swett).
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — votes in Congress from the Washington Post — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — Find-A-Grave memorial
      James Gillespie (c.1742-1805) — of North Carolina. Born in Kenansville, Duplin County, N.C., about 1742. Delegate to North Carolina state constitutional convention, 1776; member of North Carolina house of commons, 1779-83; member of North Carolina state senate, 1784-86; U.S. Representative from North Carolina, 1793-99, 1803-05 (at-large 1793-97, 6th District 1797-99, 5th District 1803-05); died in office 1805. Died in Washington, D.C., January 11, 1805 (age about 63 years). Original interment at Old Presbyterian Cemetery (which no longer exists); reinterment in 1893 at Congressional Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
      Alexander Smyth (1765-1830) — of Wythe County, Va. Born in Ireland, 1765. Member of Virginia state legislature, 1792; member of Virginia state senate, 1808; U.S. Representative from Virginia, 1817-25, 1827-30 (6th District 1817-21, 22nd District 1821-25, 1827-30); died in office 1830. Died in Washington, D.C., April 17, 1830 (age about 64 years). Interment at Congressional Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      George Edward Mitchell (1781-1832) — also known as George E. Mitchell — of Elkton, Cecil County, Md. Born in Head of Elk (now Elkton), Cecil County, Md., March 3, 1781. Democrat. Member of Maryland state house of delegates, 1806-09; member of Maryland state executive council, 1809-12; colonel in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812; U.S. Representative from Maryland 6th District, 1823-27, 1829-32; died in office 1832; candidate for Governor of Maryland, 1829. Died in Washington, D.C., June 28, 1832 (age 51 years, 117 days). Interment at Congressional Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Tilman Bacon Parks (1872-1950) — also known as Tilman B. Parks — of Hope, Hempstead County, Ark.; Camden, Ouachita County, Ark. Born near Lewisville, Lafayette County, Ark., May 14, 1872. Democrat. Lawyer; member of Arkansas state house of representatives, 1901-04, 1909-10; Presidential Elector for Arkansas, 1904; prosecuting attorney; U.S. Representative from Arkansas 7th District, 1921-37. Baptist. Member, Freemasons; Odd Fellows; Knights of Pythias; Woodmen; Elks; Lions. Died in Washington, D.C., February 12, 1950 (age 77 years, 274 days). Interment at Congressional Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of William P. Parks and Mattie (Douglass) Parks; married, March 4, 1897, to Fay Newton.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Elijah Brigham (1751-1816) — of Massachusetts. Born in Westborough (part now in Northborough), Worcester County, Mass., July 7, 1751. Merchant; member of Massachusetts state house of representatives, 1791-93; common pleas court judge in Massachusetts, 1795-1811; member of Massachusetts state senate, 1796, 1798, 1801-05, 1807-10; member of Massachusetts Governor's Council, 1799-1800, 1806; U.S. Representative from Massachusetts, 1811-16 (10th District 1811-13, at-large 1813-15, 12th District 1815-16); died in office 1816. Died in Washington, D.C., February 22, 1816 (age 64 years, 230 days). Interment at Congressional Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Christopher Rankin (1788-1826) — of Natchez, Adams County, Miss. Born in Pennsylvania, 1788. Democrat. Member of Mississippi territorial House of Representatives, 1813; Mississippi territory attorney general Western District, 1814-17; member of Mississippi state legislature, 1810; U.S. Representative from Mississippi at-large, 1819-26; died in office 1826. Died in 1826 (age about 38 years). Interment at Congressional Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      George Holcombe (1786-1828) — of Allentown, Monmouth County, N.J. Born in Amwell Township (part now in Lambertville), Hunterdon County, N.J., March, 1786. Democrat. Physician; member of New Jersey state house of assembly from Monmouth County, 1815-16; U.S. Representative from New Jersey, 1821-28 (at-large 1821-23, 2nd District 1823-25, at-large 1825-28); died in office 1828. Died in Allentown, Monmouth County, N.J., January 14, 1828 (age 41 years, 0 days). Interment at Congressional Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
      Daniel Azro Ashley Buck (1789-1841) — also known as D. Azro A. Buck — of Chelsea, Orange County, Vt. Born in Norwich, Windsor County, Vt., April 19, 1789. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812; lawyer; member of Vermont state house of representatives, 1816-26, 1828-30, 1833-35; Speaker of the Vermont State House of Representatives, 1820-22, 1825-26, 1829; Orange County State's Attorney, 1819-22, 1830-34; Presidential Elector for Vermont, 1820; U.S. Representative from Vermont, 1823-25, 1827-29 (4th District 1823-25, 5th District 1827-29). Died in Washington, D.C., December 24, 1841 (age 52 years, 249 days). Interment at Congressional Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Daniel Buck (1753-1816).
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      William Lee Ball (1781-1824) — of Nuttsville, Lancaster County, Va. Born in Lancaster County, Va., January 2, 1781. Democrat. Member of Virginia state legislature, 1810; U.S. Representative from Virginia, 1817-24 (9th District 1817-21, 13th District 1821-24); died in office 1824. Died in Washington, D.C., February 28, 1824 (age 43 years, 57 days). Interment at Congressional Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of John Ball (1746-1814) and Mary Ann (Thrift) Ball (1750-1804); married to Sarah Cassidy (1789-1863); father of Edward Ball (1811-1872).
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      James Blair (1786-1834) — of South Carolina. Born in The Waxhaws, Lancaster County, S.C., September 26, 1786. Democrat. Planter; sheriff; U.S. Representative from South Carolina, 1821-22, 1829-34 (9th District 1821-22, 8th District 1829-34); resigned 1822; died in office 1834; in 1832, he assaulted newspaper editor Duff Green, breaking some bones, and fined $350. Scotch-Irish ancestry. Died from a self-inflicted gunshot, in Washington, D.C., April 1, 1834 (age 47 years, 187 days). Interment at Congressional Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
      Nathaniel Hazard (1776-1820) — of Newport, Newport County, R.I.; Middletown, Newport County, R.I. Born in Newport, Newport County, R.I., 1776. Democrat. Member of Rhode Island state house of representatives, 1810-19; Speaker of the Rhode Island State House of Representatives, 1810, 1818-19; U.S. Representative from Rhode Island at-large, 1819-20; died in office 1820. Died in Washington, D.C., December 17, 1820 (age about 44 years). Interment at Congressional Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of George Hazard (1724-1791); first cousin once removed of Rufus Wheeler Peckham; first cousin twice removed of Rufus Wheeler Peckham, Jr.; first cousin four times removed of Stephen E. Peckham; third cousin once removed of Ezekiel Cornell (1733-1800), Ebenezer Hazard and Augustus George Hazard; fourth cousin of Erskine Hazard; fourth cousin once removed of Samuel Austin Gager.
      Political families: Sherman family of Connecticut; Durfee-Wanton family of Newport, Rhode Island; Cornell family of New York; Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York; King family; Hatfield-Cornell-Woolsey family of New York; Pendleton family of Connecticut (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Joseph Lawrence (1786-1842) — of Washington, Washington County, Pa. Born near Hunterstown, Adams County, Pa., 1786. Whig. Member of Pennsylvania state house of representatives, 1818; U.S. Representative from Pennsylvania, 1825-29, 1841-42 (15th District 1825-29, 21st District 1841-42); died in office 1842; Pennsylvania state treasurer, 1835-36; delegate to Whig National Convention from Pennsylvania, 1839. Died April 17, 1842 (age about 55 years). Interment at Congressional Cemetery.
      Relatives: Father of George Van Eman Lawrence (1818-1904).
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Ezra Darby (1768-1808) — of Scot's Plains, Essex County (now Scotch Plains, Union County), N.J. Born in Scot's Plains, Essex County (now Scotch Plains, Union County), N.J., June 7, 1768. Democrat. Member of New Jersey state house of assembly from Essex County, 1802-04; U.S. Representative from New Jersey, 1805-08 (1st District 1805-07, at-large 1807-08); died in office 1808. Died in Washington, D.C., January 27, 1808 (age 39 years, 234 days). Interment at Congressional Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Warren Ransom Davis (1793-1835) — also known as Warren R. Davis — of Pendleton, Anderson County, S.C. Born in Columbia, Richland County, S.C., May 8, 1793. Lawyer; U.S. Representative from South Carolina 6th District, 1827-35; died in office 1835. Died in Washington, D.C., January 29, 1835 (age 41 years, 266 days). His funeral service at the U.S. Capitol was disrupted when Richard Lawrence, a house painter, fired two guns at President Andrew Jackson. Interment at Congressional Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      James Bennett Hunt (1799-1857) — also known as James B. Hunt — of Pontiac, Oakland County, Mich. Born in Demerara (now part of Guyana), August 13, 1799. Democrat. State court judge in Michigan, 1836; U.S. Representative from Michigan 3rd District, 1843-47. Died in Washington, D.C., August 15, 1857 (age 58 years, 2 days). Interment at Congressional Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Levi Casey (c.1752-1807) — of South Carolina. Born in South Carolina, about 1752. General in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; member of South Carolina state senate, 1781-82, 1800-02; state court judge in South Carolina, 1785; member of South Carolina state house of representatives, 1786-88, 1792-95, 1798-99; U.S. Representative from South Carolina 6th District, 1803-07; died in office 1807. Died in Washington, D.C., February 3, 1807 (age about 55 years). Interment at Congressional Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Jesse Slocumb (1780-1820) — of North Carolina. Born in Spring Bank, Wayne County, N.C., 1780. U.S. Representative from North Carolina 4th District, 1817-20; died in office 1820. Died December 20, 1820 (age about 40 years). Interment at Congressional Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      David Walker (d. 1820) — of Kentucky. Born in Brunswick County, Va. Served in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; member of Kentucky state house of representatives, 1793-96; served in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812; U.S. Representative from Kentucky 6th District, 1817-20; died in office 1820. Died in Washington, D.C., March 1, 1820. Interment at Congressional Cemetery.
      Relatives: Brother of George Walker; father of David Shelby Walker; grandfather of James David Walker (1830-1906) and David Shelby Walker, Jr..
      Political family: Walker-Alston family of North Carolina.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
      Philip Doddridge (1773-1832) — of Virginia. Born in Bedford County, Va., May 17, 1773. Member of Virginia state legislature, 1810; U.S. Representative from Virginia 18th District, 1829-32; died in office 1832. Died in Washington, D.C., November 19, 1832 (age 59 years, 186 days). Interment at Congressional Cemetery.
      Doddridge County, W.Va. is named for him.
      The World War II Liberty ship SS Philip Doddridge (built 1943, scrapped 1969) was named for him.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
      William Taylor (1788-1846) — of Virginia. Born in Alexandria, Va., April 5, 1788. Democrat. Member of Virginia state legislature, 1821; U.S. Representative from Virginia, 1843-46 (2nd District 1843-45, 11th District 1845-46); died in office 1846. Died January 17, 1846 (age 57 years, 287 days). Interment at Congressional Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Benjamin Thompson (1798-1852) — of Charlestown, Middlesex County (now part of Boston, Suffolk County), Mass. Born in Charlestown, Middlesex County (now part of Boston, Suffolk County), Mass., August 5, 1798. Member of Massachusetts state house of representatives, 1830-31, 1833-36; member of Massachusetts state senate, 1841; U.S. Representative from Massachusetts, 1845-47, 1851-52 (4th District 1845-47, 9th District 1851-52); died in office 1852. Died in Charlestown, Middlesex County (now part of Boston, Suffolk County), Mass., September 24, 1852 (age 54 years, 50 days). Interment at Congressional Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      John Philip Sousa (1854-1932) — Born in Washington, D.C., November 6, 1854. Republican. Band conductor; composer; honored guest, Republican National Convention, 1924. Bavarian and Portugese ancestry. Member, Freemasons; Knights Templar; Shriners; Elks; Audubon Society. He was elected to the Hall of Fame for Great Americans in 1973. Died, in his room at the Abraham Lincoln Hotel, Reading, Berks County, Pa., March 6, 1932 (age 77 years, 121 days). Interment at Congressional Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Antonio John Sousa (1824-1892) and Marie Elizabeth (Trinkhaus) Sousa (1826-1908); married to Jane van Middlesworth Bellis (1862-1944); great-grandfather of John Philip Sousa IV (1950?-).
      The John Philip Sousa Bridge (built 1938-41), which takes Pennsylvania Avenue over the Anacostia River in Washington, D.C., is named for him.
      See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
      George Cornelius Wortley (1926-2014) — also known as George C. Wortley — of Fayetteville, Onondaga County, N.Y. Born in Syracuse, Onondaga County, N.Y., December 8, 1926. Republican. U.S. Representative from New York, 1981-89 (32nd District 1981-83, 27th District 1983-89); defeated, 1976. Catholic. Died in Fort Lauderdale, Broward County, Fla., January 21, 2014 (age 87 years, 44 days). Interment at Congressional Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — NNDB dossier
      James Jones (d. 1801) — of Georgia. Born in Maryland. Republican. Member of Georgia state house of representatives, 1796-98; delegate to Georgia state constitutional convention, 1798; U.S. Representative from Georgia at-large, 1799-1801; died in office 1801. Died January 11, 1801. Interment at Congressional Cemetery.
      Jones County, Ga. is named for him.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Joab Lawler (1796-1838) — of Alabama. Born in Union County, N.C., June 12, 1796. Member of Alabama state house of representatives, 1826; member of Alabama state senate, 1831; U.S. Representative from Alabama 3rd District, 1835-38; died in office 1838. Died May 8, 1838 (age 41 years, 330 days). Interment at Congressional Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Felix Grundy McConnell (1809-1846) — also known as Felix G. McConnell — of Talladega, Talladega County, Ala. Born in Nashville, Davidson County, Tenn., April 1, 1809. Democrat. Member of Alabama state house of representatives, 1838; member of Alabama state senate, 1839; U.S. Representative from Alabama 7th District, 1843-46; died in office 1846. Died September 10, 1846 (age 37 years, 162 days). Interment at Congressional Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Edward Bradley (1808-1847) — of Marshall, Calhoun County, Mich. Born in East Bloomfield, Ontario County, N.Y., 1808. Democrat. Common pleas court judge in New York, 1836; Calhoun County Prosecuting Attorney, 1842; member of Michigan state senate 4th District, 1843; U.S. Representative from Michigan 2nd District, 1847; died in office 1847. Died in New York, New York County, N.Y., August 5, 1847 (age about 39 years). Interment at Congressional Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Philip Stuart (1761-1830) — also known as Philip Stewart — of Port Tobacco, Charles County, Md. Born in Stafford County (part now in King George County), Va., February 22, 1761. Served in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; member of Maryland state house of delegates, 1800-06, 1808-09; U.S. Representative from Maryland 1st District, 1811-19; general in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812. Died in Washington, D.C., August 14, 1830 (age 69 years, 173 days). Interment at Congressional Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Jeremiah McLene (1767-1837) — of Ohio. Born in Pennsylvania, 1767. Democrat. Secretary of state of Ohio, 1808-31; U.S. Representative from Ohio 8th District, 1833-37. Died in 1837 (age about 70 years). Interment at Congressional Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      William Stephen Morgan (1801-1878) — of Virginia. Born in Virginia, 1801. Democrat. U.S. Representative from Virginia, 1835-39 (16th District 1835-37, 14th District 1837-39); member of Virginia state legislature, 1840. Died in 1878 (age about 77 years). Interment at Congressional Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      John Brademas (1927-2016) — of South Bend, St. Joseph County, Ind. Born in Mishawaka, St. Joseph County, Ind., March 2, 1927. Democrat. Rhodes scholar; legislative assistant to U.S. Sen. Patrick McNamara; administrative assistant to U.S. Rep Thomas L. Ashley; executive assistant to presidential candidate Adlai E. Stevenson; college professor; U.S. Representative from Indiana 3rd District, 1959-81; defeated, 1954, 1956; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Indiana, 1964, 1968, 1972; president, New York University, 1981-92. Methodist. Greek ancestry. Member, American Legion; Freemasons; Order of Ahepa; Eagles; Moose; Phi Beta Kappa. Died in Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., July 11, 2016 (age 89 years, 131 days). Entombed at Congressional Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Stephen J. Brademas and Beatrice Cenci (Goble) Brademas.
      Cross-reference: Tim Roemer
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
      George Mumford (d. 1818) — of North Carolina. Born in Rowan County, N.C. Democrat. Member of North Carolina house of commons, 1810-11; U.S. Representative from North Carolina 10th District, 1817-18; died in office 1818. Died in 1818. Interment at Congressional Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Charles Clement Johnston (1795-1832) — of Virginia. Born in Longwood, Prince Edward County, Va., April 30, 1795. U.S. Representative from Virginia 22nd District, 1831-32; died in office 1832. Drowned near one of the docks in Alexandria, Va., June 17, 1832 (age 37 years, 48 days). Interment at Congressional Cemetery.
      Relatives: Brother of Joseph Eggleston Johnston (1807-1891); uncle of John Warfield Johnston.
      Political families: Johnston family of Abingdon, Virginia; McLane family of Baltimore, Maryland (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Thomas Day Singleton (d. 1833) — of South Carolina. Born near Kingstree, Williamsburg County, S.C. Member of South Carolina state house of representatives, 1826-33; U.S. Representative from South Carolina 3rd District, 1833; died in office 1833. Died in Raleigh, Wake County, N.C., November 25, 1833. Interment at Congressional Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Littleton Purnell Dennis (1786-1834) — of Maryland. Born in Worcester County, Md., July 21, 1786. Member of Maryland state house of delegates, 1810, 1815-16, 1819-21; member of Maryland state senate, 1826-33; U.S. Representative from Maryland 1st District, 1833-34; died in office 1834. Died in Washington, D.C., April 14, 1834 (age 47 years, 267 days). Interment at Congressional Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Henry Dennis (1757-1785) and Anne (Purnell) Dennis; nephew of Littleton Dennis and John Dennis (1771-1806); first cousin of John Dennis (1807-1859); third cousin once removed of Edward Southey White and King Valentine Dennis White; third cousin twice removed of John Edward White, Wallace Henry White and Arthur Percival White; third cousin thrice removed of Edward Homer White, Jr..
      Political family: White-Dennis-Adkins family of Maryland.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Francis Jacob Harper (1800-1837) — also known as Francis J. Harper — of Pennsylvania. Born in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., March 5, 1800. Democrat. Member of Pennsylvania state house of representatives, 1832; member of Pennsylvania state senate 2nd District, 1834-36; U.S. Representative from Pennsylvania 3rd District, 1837; died in office 1837. Died in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., March 18, 1837 (age 37 years, 13 days). Original interment at Frankford Cemetery, Frankford, Philadelphia, Pa.; reinterment in 1848 at Congressional Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Timothy Jarvis Carter (1800-1838) — of Maine. Born in Bethel, Oxford County, Maine, August 18, 1800. Democrat. U.S. Representative from Maine 2nd District, 1837-38; died in office 1838. Died in Washington, D.C., March 14, 1838 (age 37 years, 208 days). Interment at Congressional Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Albert Galliton Harrison (1800-1839) — of Missouri. Born in Mt. Sterling, Montgomery County, Ky., June 26, 1800. U.S. Representative from Missouri at-large, 1835-39. Died in Fulton, Callaway County, Mo., September 7, 1839 (age 39 years, 73 days). Interment at Congressional Cemetery.
      Presumably named for: Albert Gallatin
      Harrison County, Mo. is named for him.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Henry Frick (1795-1844) — of Milton, Northumberland County, Pa. Born in Northumberland, Northumberland County, Pa., March 17, 1795. Served in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812; newspaper publisher; member of Pennsylvania state house of representatives, 1828-31; U.S. Representative from Pennsylvania 13th District, 1843-44; died in office 1844. Died in Washington, D.C., March 1, 1844 (age 48 years, 350 days). Interment at Congressional Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Frank Morey (1840-1889) — of Louisiana. Born in Massachusetts, 1840. Republican. Member of Louisiana state legislature, 1860; U.S. Representative from Louisiana 5th District, 1869-76. Died in 1889 (age about 49 years). Interment at Congressional Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Thomas Hartley Crawford (1786-1863) — also known as Thomas H. Crawford — of Chambersburg, Franklin County, Pa. Born in Chambersburg, Franklin County, Pa., November 14, 1786. U.S. Representative from Pennsylvania 11th District, 1829-33; member of Pennsylvania state house of representatives, 1833; judge in District of Columbia, 1845. Died in Washington, D.C., January 27, 1863 (age 76 years, 74 days). Interment at Congressional Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Philip Bond Fouke (1818-1876) — also known as Philip B. Fouke — of Belleville, St. Clair County, Ill. Born in Kaskaskia, Randolph County, Ill., January 23, 1818. Democrat. Civil engineer; newspaper publisher; lawyer; prosecuting attorney for 2nd circuit, 1846-50; member of Illinois state house of representatives, 1851; U.S. Representative from Illinois 8th District, 1859-63; colonel in the Union Army during the Civil War. Died in Washington, D.C., October 3, 1876 (age 58 years, 254 days). Interment at Congressional Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Charles Case (1817-1883) — of Fort Wayne, Allen County, Ind. Born in Austinburg, Ashtabula County, Ohio, December 21, 1817. Democrat. U.S. Representative from Indiana 10th District, 1857-61. Died in Brighton, Washington County, Iowa, June 30, 1883 (age 65 years, 191 days). Interment at Congressional Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Daniel Hiester (1774-1834) — of West Chester, Chester County, Pa. Born in Chester County, Pa., 1774. Chester County Prothonotary and Clerk, 1800-09; U.S. Representative from Pennsylvania 3rd District, 1809-11; banker; chief burgess of West Chester, Pennsylvania, 1815-17. Died in Hagerstown, Washington County, Md., March 8, 1834 (age about 59 years). Interment at Congressional Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of John Hiester and Hannah (Pawling) Hiester (1747-1822); married to Catharina Roos; nephew of Daniel Hiester; first cousin of William Hiester; first cousin once removed of Joseph Hiester, Daniel Robeadeau Clymer, Isaac Ellmaker Hiester and Hiester Clymer; first cousin four times removed of Edward Brooke Lee; first cousin five times removed of Blair Lee III and Edward Brooke Lee, Jr.; second cousin once removed of Henry Augustus Muhlenberg (1823-1854); second cousin thrice removed of Frederick Augustus Muhlenberg and Hiester Henry Muhlenberg.
      Political families: Lee-Randolph family of Maryland and Virginia; Muhlenberg-Hiester family of Pennsylvania (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Selah Reeve Hobbie (1797-1854) — of Delhi, Delaware County, N.Y. Born in Newburgh, Orange County, N.Y., March 10, 1797. Lawyer; Delaware County District Attorney, 1823-27; U.S. Representative from New York 11th District, 1827-29. Died in Washington, D.C., March 23, 1854 (age 57 years, 13 days). Interment at Congressional Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      John Edward Bouligny (1824-1864) — also known as John E. Bouligny — of New Orleans, Orleans Parish, La. Born in New Orleans, Orleans Parish, La., February 5, 1824. U.S. Representative from Louisiana 1st District, 1859-61. Died in Washington, D.C., February 20, 1864 (age 40 years, 15 days). Interment at Congressional Cemetery.
      Relatives: Nephew of Charles Joseph Dominique Bouligny (1773-1833).
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Jacob Broom (1808-1864) — of Pennsylvania. Born in Baltimore, Md., July 25, 1808. Lawyer; U.S. Representative from Pennsylvania 4th District, 1855-57. Died in Washington, D.C., November 28, 1864 (age 56 years, 126 days). Interment at Congressional Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of James Madison Broom; grandson of Jacob Broom (1752-1810).
      Political family: Broom family of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Charles West Kendall (1828-1914) — of Sacramento, Sacramento County, Calif.; Hamilton, White Pine County, Nev.; Denver, Colo. Born in Searsmont, Waldo County, Maine, April 22, 1828. Democrat. Went to California for the 1849 Gold Rush; newspaper editor; lawyer; member of California state assembly 12th District, 1862-63; U.S. Representative from Nevada at-large, 1871-75. Died in Mt. Rainier, Prince George's County, Md., June 25, 1914 (age 86 years, 64 days). Interment at Congressional Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
      William Helmick (1817-1888) — of Ohio. Born near Canton, Stark County, Ohio, September 6, 1817. Republican. U.S. Representative from Ohio 15th District, 1859-61. Died March 31, 1888 (age 70 years, 207 days). Interment at Congressional Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Clyde Howard Tavenner (1882-1942) — also known as Clyde H. Tavenner — of Cordova, Rock Island County, Ill. Born in Cordova, Rock Island County, Ill., February 4, 1882. Democrat. U.S. Representative from Illinois 14th District, 1913-17. Died February 6, 1942 (age 60 years, 2 days). Interment at Congressional Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of John E. Tavenner and Lucinda (Vanderburgh) Tavenner.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Charles Horace Upton (1812-1877) — of Virginia. Born in Massachusetts, 1812. Republican. U.S. Representative from Virginia 7th District, 1861-62. Died in 1877 (age about 65 years). Interment at Congressional Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Alexander Contee Magruder (1779-1853) — also known as Alexander C. Magruder — of Annapolis, Anne Arundel County, Md. Born in Maryland, 1779. Lawyer; member of Maryland state executive council, 1812-15; member of Maryland state senate, 1838-41; mayor of Annapolis, Md., 1840-43; Judge, Maryland Court of Appeals, 1844-51. Died in Fort Washington, Prince George's County, Md., January 31, 1853 (age about 73 years). Interment at Congressional Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of John Read Magruder (1736-1811) and Barbara (Contee) Magruder (1741-1796); married to Rebecca Bellicum Thomas (1777-1814; daughter of Philip Thomas; granddaughter of John Hanson); granduncle of John Read Magruder (1829-1916); first cousin of Alexander Contee Hanson; second cousin of Thomas Sim Lee; second cousin once removed of Daniel Carroll, Charles Carroll of Carrollton and John Lee; second cousin thrice removed of John Lee Carroll; second cousin five times removed of Outerbridge Horsey (1910-1983); third cousin thrice removed of John Howell Carroll.
      Political families: Lee-Randolph family of Maryland and Virginia; Carroll-Hanson family of Maryland (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
      Narsworthy Hunter (d. 1802) — of Mississippi. Born in Virginia. Delegate to U.S. Congress from Mississippi Territory, 1801-02; died in office 1802. Died in Washington, D.C., March 11, 1802. Interment at Congressional Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      William Trent Rossell (1849-1919) — of Washington, D.C. Born in Mt. Vernon, Mobile County, Ala., October 11, 1849. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers; member District of Columbia board of commissioners, 1891-93. Died in New Brighton, Staten Island, Richmond County, N.Y., October 11, 1919 (age 70 years, 0 days). Interment at Congressional Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of William Henry Rossell (1820-1885) and Margaret Dauge (Martin) Rossell (1827-1886); married 1882 to Jane Graham 'Jeannie' Ellis (1860-1898; daughter of John Willis Ellis (1820-1861)); father of Edward Graham Daves Rossell (1895-1918; killed at Verdun, France, during World War I); great-grandson of William Henry Rossell (1760-1840); second cousin once removed of Benjamin Wood Richards.
      Political family: Rossell-Ellis-Conger-Richards family of New Jersey (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      See also Find-A-Grave memorial
      Henry Rowe Schoolcraft (1793-1864) — also known as Henry R. Schoolcraft — of Mackinac Island, Mackinac County, Mich. Born in Guilderland, Albany County, N.Y., March 28, 1793. Glassmaker; geologist; U.S. Indian Agent, 1822-41; member Michigan territorial council from Brown, Chippewa, Crawford and Michilimackinac counties, 1828-31. Died in Washington, D.C., December 10, 1864 (age 71 years, 257 days). Interment at Congressional Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Lawrence Schoolcraft (1757-1840) and Margaret Anna Barbara (Rowe) Schoolcraft (1759-1832); married, October 12, 1823, to Jane Johnston (1800-1842); married, January 12, 1847, to Mary Howard (1820-1878); uncle of John Lawrence Schoolcraft (1804-1860) and Richard Updike Sherman; granduncle of James Schoolcraft Sherman and James Teller Schoolcraft; first cousin once removed of Peter P. Schoolcraft.
      Political families: Seward family of New York; Schoolcraft-Seward family of New York (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      Schoolcraft County, Mich. is named for him.
      See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
      Tobias Lear (1762-1816) — of Virginia. Born in Portsmouth, Rockingham County, N.H., September 19, 1762. Private secretary to George Washington, 1790-99; U.S. Commercial Agent (Consul) in Cape Hatien, 1801-03. Killed himself, in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., October 11, 1816 (age 54 years, 22 days). Interment at Congressional Cemetery.
      Relatives: Married to Mary 'Polly' Long (1769-1793) and Frances (Bassett) Washington (1767-1796; sister of Burwell Bassett (1764-1841)).
      Political families: Marshall-Harrison-Randolph-Cabell family of Virginia; Washington family (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      See also Find-A-Grave memorial
      Augustus W. Scharit — of Missouri. U.S. Consul in Falmouth, 1854-63. Interment at Congressional Cemetery.
      Benjamin Brown French (1800-1870) — also known as Benjamin B. French — of Washington, D.C. Born in Chester, Rockingham County, N.H., September 4, 1800. Republican. Delegate to Republican National Convention from District of Columbia, 1856 (Honorary Secretary; member, Credentials Committee; speaker). Member, Freemasons; Knights Templar. Died in Washington, D.C., August 12, 1870 (age 69 years, 342 days). Interment at Congressional Cemetery.
      Relatives: Grandfather of Ellen F. FitzSimons; great-grandfather of William Henry Vanderbilt III (1901-1981).
      Political families: Whitney-Nye family of Massachusetts and New York; Belmont-Perry family of New York City, New York; Vanderbilt-Tuck-Pickering-Webster family; Morgenthau-Lehman family of New York City, New York; Vanderbilt-Colby-Burden-French family of New York City, New York (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      See also Find-A-Grave memorial
      William Otto Anderson (1920-1964) — also known as William O. Anderson — of Shelbyville, Shelby County, Ind. Born in Shelbyville, Shelby County, Ind., August 21, 1920. U.S. Naval Reserve Intelligence Officer, 1943; U.S. Vice Consul in Cape Town, 1945-48; U.S. Consul in Singapore, 1954-56. Methodist. Member, Phi Beta Kappa. Died, following a myocardial infarction, in Suburban Hospital, Bethesda, Montgomery County, Md., January 1, 1964 (age 43 years, 133 days). Interment at Congressional Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Bertie Anderson (1895-1945) and Gertie Bernice (Bennett) Anderson (1898-1988); married, August 29, 1942, to Annie Vergene Marguerite Owens (born 1919).
      André Louis Bagger (1846-1895) — also known as André L. Bagger — of Washington, D.C. Born in Copenhagen, Denmark, 1846. Fought on the German side in the Franco-Prussian War, 1870; patent attorney; during a controversy with D.C. Governor Alexander R. Shepherd, challenged him to a duel, but nothing came of it; Vice-Consul for Denmark in Washington, D.C., 1886-95; Vice-Consul for Sweden & Norway in Washington, D.C., 1887-95. Danish ancestry. Member, Freemasons. Died, reportedly from apoplexy, in his room at the DeWitt House hotel, Ocean Grove, Monmouth County, N.J., May 23, 1895 (age about 48 years). Interment at Congressional Cemetery.
      See also Find-A-Grave memorial
    Politicians formerly buried here:
    Zachary Taylor Zachary Taylor (1784-1850) — also known as "Old Rough and Ready" — Born in Orange County, Va., November 24, 1784. Whig. Major in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812; colonel in the U.S. Army during the Black Hawk War; general in the U.S. Army during the Mexican War; President of the United States, 1849-50; died in office 1850. Episcopalian. Died, probably of gastroenteritis, in the White House, Washington, D.C., July 9, 1850 (age 65 years, 227 days). Based on the theory that he was poisoned, his remains were tested for arsenic in 1991; the results tended to disconfirm the theory. Original interment at Congressional Cemetery; reinterment in private or family graveyard; reinterment in 1926 at Zachary Taylor National Cemetery, Louisville, Ky.
      Relatives: Son of Richard Taylor (1744-1829) and Sarah Dabney (Strother) Taylor (1760-1822); married, June 21, 1810, to Margaret Mackall 'Peggy' Smith (1778-1852; niece of Benjamin Mackall IV and Thomas Mackall); father of Sarah Knox Taylor (who married Jefferson Finis Davis); granduncle of Edmund Haynes Taylor, Jr.; ancestor *** of Victor D. Crist (1957-); first cousin twice removed of Edmund Pendleton; first cousin thrice removed of Elliot Woolfolk Major and Edgar Bailey Woolfolk; second cousin of James Madison and William Taylor Madison; second cousin once removed of Richard Henry Lee, Francis Lightfoot Lee, Arthur Lee, Nathaniel Pendleton, George Madison, Coleby Chew, John Strother Pendleton, Albert Gallatin Pendleton, Aylett Hawes Buckner and Thomas Leonidas Crittenden; second cousin twice removed of John Walker, John Tyler (1747-1813) and Francis Walker; second cousin thrice removed of George Cassety Pendleton, Hubbard T. Smith, Charles M. Pendleton, Sidney Fletcher Taliaferro, Daniel Micajah Pendleton and Max Rogers Strother; second cousin four times removed of Charles Sumner Pendleton; third cousin of Thomas Sim Lee, Henry Lee, Charles Lee, Richard Bland Lee, Edmund Jennings Lee, Philip Clayton Pendleton, Edmund Henry Pendleton and Nathanael Greene Pendleton; third cousin once removed of Robert Brooke, Meriwether Lewis, Richard Aylett Buckner, John Lee, John Tyler (1790-1862), Philip Coleman Pendleton, George Hunt Pendleton and Joseph Henry Pendleton; third cousin twice removed of Hancock Lee Jackson, Fitzhugh Lee, William Barret Pendleton, James Francis Buckner, Francis Key Pendleton, Charles Rittenhouse Pendleton, John Overton Pendleton and Francis Preston Blair Lee; third cousin thrice removed of Abraham Lincoln, John Lee Carroll, Charles Kellogg, James Sansome Lakin and Edward Brooke Lee; fourth cousin of Thomas Walker Gilmer, Aylette Buckner and David Gardiner Tyler; fourth cousin once removed of Charles Willing Byrd.
      Political family: Pendleton-Lee family (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      Cross-reference: David R. Atchison — Thomas Ewing
      Taylor counties in Fla., Ga., Iowa and Ky. are named for him.
      Other politicians named for him: Zachary T. CoyZachary T. BielbyZachary T. Harris
      Campaign slogan (1848): "General Taylor never surrenders."
      See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
      Books about Zachary Taylor: K. Jack Bauer, Zachary Taylor: Soldier, Planter, Statesman of the Old Southwest — Elbert B. Smith, The Presidencies of Zachary Taylor and Millard Fillmore
      Image source: Portrait & Biographical Album of Washtenaw County (1891)
    George Clinton George Clinton (1739-1812) — of Ulster County, N.Y.; New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in Little Britain, Orange County, N.Y., July 26, 1739. Delegate to Continental Congress from New York, 1775-76; Governor of New York, 1777-95, 1801-04; delegate to New York convention to ratify U.S. constitution from Ulster County, 1788; member of New York state assembly from New York County, 1800-01; Vice President of the United States, 1805-12; died in office 1812. Christian Reformed. Scotch-Irish ancestry. Member, Freemasons. Died in Washington, D.C., April 20, 1812 (age 72 years, 269 days). Original interment at Congressional Cemetery; reinterment in 1908 at First Reformed Dutch Churchyard, Kingston, N.Y.
      Relatives: Son of Charles Clinton (1690-1773) and Elizabeth (Denniston) Clinton; brother of James Clinton; married, February 7, 1770, to Cornelia Tappen; father of Catherine Clinton (who married Pierre Van Cortlandt, Jr.); uncle of Charles Clinton (1767-1829), De Witt Clinton, George Clinton, Jr. (1771-1809), Mary Clinton (1773-1808; who married Ambrose Spencer (1765-1848)), Katherine Clinton (1778-1837; who married Ambrose Spencer (1765-1848)) and James Graham Clinton.
      Political families: Clinton-DeWitt-Smoot family of New York; DeWitt-Bruyn-Hasbrouck-Kellogg family of New York (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      Clinton counties in N.Y. and Ohio are named for him.
      See also congressional biography — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
      Books about George Clinton: John P. Kaminski, George Clinton : Yeoman Politician of the New Republic
      Image source: New York Public Library
      Abel Parker Upshur (1790-1844) — of Virginia. Born in Northampton County, Va., June 17, 1790. Member of Virginia state house of delegates, 1812-13, 1824-27; state court judge in Virginia, 1826-41; delegate to Virginia state constitutional convention, 1829-30; U.S. Secretary of the Navy, 1841-43; U.S. Secretary of State, 1843-44; died in office 1844. Episcopalian. Among those killed in the explosion when a cannon accidentally burst on board the U.S.S. Princeton, on the Potomac River near Fort Washington, Prince George's County, Md., February 28, 1844 (age 53 years, 256 days). Originally entombed at Congressional Cemetery; later interred in 1874 at Oak Hill Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Littleton Upshur (1760?-?).
      Upshur counties in Tex. and W.Va. are named for him.
      The World War II Liberty ship SS Abel Parker Upshur (built 1942, scrapped 1966) was named for him.
      See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
      John Aaron Rawlins (1831-1869) — Born in Galena, Jo Daviess County, Ill., February 13, 1831. General in the Union Army during the Civil War; U.S. Secretary of War, 1869; died in office 1869. Died, of consumption (tuberculosis), in Washington, D.C., September 6, 1869 (age 38 years, 205 days). Original interment at Congressional Cemetery; reinterment at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Va.; statue erected 1874 at Rawlins Park.
      See also Wikipedia article
      Thomas Walker Gilmer (1802-1844) — of Virginia. Born in Gilmerton, Albemarle County, Va., April 6, 1802. Lawyer; member of Virginia state house of delegates, 1829-36, 1838-39; Speaker of the Virginia State House of Delegates, 1838-39; Governor of Virginia, 1840-41; U.S. Representative from Virginia, 1841-44 (12th District 1841-43, 5th District 1843-44); U.S. Secretary of the Navy, 1844; died in office 1844. Among those killed in the explosion when a cannon accidentally burst on board the U.S.S. Princeton, on the Potomac River near Fort Washington, Prince George's County, Md., February 28, 1844 (age 41 years, 328 days). Originally entombed at Congressional Cemetery; reinterment at a private or family graveyard, Albemarle County, Va.
      Relatives: Son of George Gilmer (1778-1836) and Elizabeth Anderson (Hudson) Gilmer (1784-1820); married to Anne Elizabeth Baker (1809-1874); nephew of Mildred Gilmer (1772-1799; who married William Wirt); grandnephew of John Walker and Francis Walker; second cousin once removed of Meriwether Lewis (1774-1809); second cousin twice removed of Aylett Hawes; third cousin once removed of Robert Brooke, George Madison, Richard Aylett Buckner, Richard Hawes and Albert Gallatin Hawes; third cousin twice removed of Hubbard T. Smith; third cousin thrice removed of Archer Woodford; fourth cousin of Zachary Taylor, Aylette Buckner and Aylett Hawes Buckner; fourth cousin once removed of John Strother Pendleton, Albert Gallatin Pendleton and Harry Bartow Hawes.
      Political families: Pendleton-Lee family; Demarest-Meriwether family of New Jersey; Marshall-Harrison-Randolph-Cabell family of Virginia; Meriwether-Kellogg-Tyler family of Virginia and Connecticut; Washington family; Clay family of Kentucky (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      Gilmer County, W.Va. is named for him.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
      James Pinckney Henderson (1808-1858) — also known as J. Pinckney Henderson — of Marshville (unknown county), Tex. Born in Lincolnton, Lincoln County, N.C., March 31, 1808. Lawyer; general in the Texas Army during the Texas War of Independence; Attorney General of the Texas Republic, 1836-37; Texas Republic Secretary of State, 1837; delegate to Texas state constitutional convention, 1845; Governor of Texas, 1846-47; general in the U.S. Army during the Mexican War; U.S. Senator from Texas, 1857-58; died in office 1858. Died in Washington, D.C., June 4, 1858 (age 50 years, 65 days). Original interment and cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery; reinterment in 1930 at Texas State Cemetery, Austin, Tex.
      Henderson County, Tex. is named for him.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Robert Byington Mitchell (1823-1882) — of Mt. Gilead, Morrow County, Ohio. Born in Mansfield, Richland County, Ohio, April 4, 1823. Served in the U.S. Army during the Mexican War; member of Kansas territorial legislature, 1857-58; treasurer of Kansas Territory, 1859-61; general in the Union Army during the Civil War; Governor of New Mexico Territory, 1866-69. Died in Washington, D.C., January 26, 1882 (age 58 years, 297 days). Original interment at Congressional Cemetery; reinterment in 1895 at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Va.
      Richard Bland Lee (1761-1827) — Born in Prince William County, Va., January 20, 1761. Member of Virginia state legislature, 1784; U.S. Representative from Virginia, 1789-95 (at-large 1789-91, 4th District 1791-93, 17th District 1793-95); judge in District of Columbia, 1827. Died in Madison County, Ky., March 12, 1827 (age 66 years, 51 days). Original interment in private or family graveyard; subsequent interment at Congressional Cemetery; reinterment in 1975 at Sully, Chantilly, Va.
      Relatives: Son of Henry Lee (1729-1787) and Lucy Ludwell Gaines (Grymes) Lee (1734-1792); brother of Henry Lee (1756-1818) and Charles Lee; married to Elizabeth Collins Lee (1769-1858); grandnephew of Richard Bland; granduncle of Fitzhugh Lee (1835-1905); third great-grandfather of Lee Marvin; first cousin once removed of Richard Henry Lee; third cousin of Zachary Taylor.
      Political families: Lee-Randolph family of Maryland and Virginia; Marshall-Harrison-Randolph-Cabell family of Virginia; Mason family of Virginia; Pendleton-Lee family (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      James Lent (1782-1833) — of Newtown, Queens, Queens County, N.Y. Born in Newtown, Queens, Queens County, N.Y., 1782. State court judge in New York, 1823; U.S. Representative from New York 1st District, 1829-33; died in office 1833. Died in Washington, D.C., February 22, 1833 (age about 50 years). Original interment and cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery; reinterment at Presbyterian Cemetery, Newtown, Queens, N.Y.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Barker Burnell (1798-1843) — of Nantucket, Nantucket County, Mass. Born in Nantucket, Nantucket County, Mass., January 30, 1798. Whig. Member of Massachusetts state house of representatives, 1819; delegate to Massachusetts state constitutional convention, 1820; member of Massachusetts state senate, 1824-25; delegate to Whig National Convention from Massachusetts, 1839 (member, Balloting Committee; speaker); U.S. Representative from Massachusetts, 1841-43 (11th District 1841-43, 10th District 1843); died in office 1843. Died in Washington, D.C., June 15, 1843 (age 45 years, 136 days). Original interment and cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery; reinterment in 1844 at Prospect Hill Cemetery, Nantucket, Mass.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      David Spangler Kaufman (1813-1851) — also known as David S. Kaufman — of Nacogdoches, Nacogdoches County, Tex. Born in Boiling Springs, Cumberland County, Pa., December 18, 1813. Democrat. Member of Texas Republic House of Representatives, 1839-41; member of Texas Republic Senate, 1843-45; U.S. Representative from Texas 1st District, 1846-51; died in office 1851. Jewish. Member, Freemasons. Died in Washington, D.C., January 31, 1851 (age 37 years, 44 days). Original interment and cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery; reinterment in 1932 at Texas State Cemetery, Austin, Tex.
      Kaufman County, Tex. is named for him.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
      Pierre Evariste Jean Baptiste Bossier (1797-1844) — also known as Pierre E. J. B. Bossier — of Louisiana. Born in Natchitoches, Natchitoches Parish, La., March 22, 1797. Planter; member of Louisiana state senate, 1833-43; U.S. Representative from Louisiana 4th District, 1843-44; died in office 1844. Died in Washington, D.C., April 24, 1844 (age 47 years, 33 days). Original interment and cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery; reinterment at Catholic Cemetery, Natchitoches, La.
      Presumably named for: John the Baptist
      Bossier Parish, La. is named for him.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Virgil Maxcy (1785-1844) — of Maryland. Born in Attleboro, Bristol County, Mass., May 5, 1785. Lawyer; member of Maryland state executive council, 1815; member of Maryland state house of delegates, 1820; member of Maryland state senate, 1820; U.S. Charge d'Affaires to Belgium, 1837-42. Among those killed in the explosion when a cannon accidentally burst on board the U.S.S. Princeton, on the Potomac River near Fort Washington, Prince George's County, Md., February 28, 1844 (age 58 years, 299 days). Originally entombed at Congressional Cemetery; reinterment at a private or family graveyard, Anne Arundel County, Md.
      Relatives: Son of Levi Maxcy and Ruth (Newell) Maxcy; married to Mary Galloway.
      See also U.S. State Dept career summary
      David Gardiner (1784-1844) — of New York. Born in East Hampton, Suffolk County, Long Island, N.Y., May 29, 1784. Member of New York state senate 1st District, 1824-27. Among those killed in the explosion when a cannon accidentally burst on board the U.S.S. Princeton, on the Potomac River near Fort Washington, Prince George's County, Md., February 28, 1844 (age 59 years, 275 days). Originally entombed at Congressional Cemetery; later interred at South End Cemetery, East Hampton, Long Island, N.Y.
      Relatives: Son of Phebe Gardiner and Abraham Gardiner (1763-1796); married to Juliana MacLachlan (1799-1864); father of Julia Gardiner (1820-1889; who married John Tyler); grandfather of David Gardiner Tyler; third cousin thrice removed of John Lee Saltonstall; fourth cousin of Jonas Mapes; fourth cousin once removed of David Parshall Mapes (1798-1890).
      Political families: Mapes-Jennings-Denby-Neuman family of New York and Arizona; Tyler-Mapes family of New York (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      See also Find-A-Grave memorial
    Other politicians who have monuments here:
    John Quincy Adams John Quincy Adams (1767-1848) — also known as "Old Man Eloquent"; "The Accidental President"; "The Massachusetts Madman" — of Boston, Suffolk County, Mass.; Quincy, Norfolk County, Mass. Born in Braintree (part now in Quincy), Norfolk County, Mass., July 11, 1767. Lawyer; U.S. Minister to Netherlands, 1794-97; Prussia, 1797-1801; Russia, 1809-14; Great Britain, 1815-17; member of Massachusetts state senate, 1802; U.S. Senator from Massachusetts, 1803-08; resigned 1808; U.S. Secretary of State, 1817-25; President of the United States, 1825-29; U.S. Representative from Massachusetts, 1831-48 (11th District 1831-33, 12th District 1833-43, 8th District 1843-48); died in office 1848; candidate for Governor of Massachusetts, 1834. Unitarian. English ancestry. Member, American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Elected to the Hall of Fame for Great Americans in 1905. Suffered a stroke while speaking on the floor of the U.S. House of Representatives, February 21, 1848, and died two days later in the Speaker's office, U.S. Capitol Building, Washington, D.C., February 23, 1848 (age 80 years, 227 days). Original interment at Hancock Cemetery, Quincy, Mass.; reinterment at United First Parish Church, Quincy, Mass.; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of John Adams and Abigail (Smith) Adams (1744-1818); brother of Abigail Amelia Adams (1765-1813; who married William Stephens Smith); married, July 26, 1797, to Louisa Catherine Johnson (1775-1852; daughter of Joshua Johnson; sister-in-law of John Pope; niece of Thomas Johnson); father of George Washington Adams and Charles Francis Adams (1807-1886); grandfather of John Quincy Adams and Brooks Adams; great-grandfather of Charles Francis Adams (1866-1954); second great-grandfather of Thomas Boylston Adams; first cousin of William Cranch; second cousin once removed of Samuel Adams; second cousin twice removed of Edward M. Chapin; second cousin thrice removed of Arthur Chapin; second cousin five times removed of Denwood Lynn Chapin; third cousin of Joseph Allen; third cousin once removed of Samuel Sewall, Josiah Quincy and John Milton Thayer; third cousin twice removed of William Vincent Wells; third cousin thrice removed of Lyman Kidder Bass, Daniel T. Hayden, Arthur Laban Bates and Almur Stiles Whiting; fourth cousin of Jeremiah Mason, Josiah Quincy, Jr. and George Bailey Loring; fourth cousin once removed of Asahel Otis, Erastus Fairbanks, Charles Stetson, Henry Brewster Stanton, Charles Adams, Jr., Isaiah Stetson (1812-1880), Joshua Perkins, Eli Thayer, Bailey Frye Adams and Samuel Miller Quincy.
      Political families: Kidder family of Connecticut; Greene family of Providence, Rhode Island; DuPont family of Wilmington, Delaware; Thayer-Capron-Aldrich-Stetson family; Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York; Stetson family of New York and Massachusetts (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      Cross-reference: John Smith — Thurlow Weed
      Adams counties in Ill. and Ind. are named for him.
      Mount Quincy Adams, in the White Mountains, Coos County, New Hampshire, is named for him.  — Mount Quincy Adams, on the border between British Columbia, Canada, and Hoonah-Angoon Census Area, Alaska, is named for him.
      Other politicians named for him: John Q. A. BrackettJohn Q. A. SheldenJ. Q. A. Reber
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
      Books about John Quincy Adams: Paul C. Nagel, John Quincy Adams : A Public Life, a Private Life — Lynn Hudson Parsons, John Quincy Adams — Robert V. Remini, John Quincy Adams — Joseph Wheelan, Mr. Adams's Last Crusade: John Quincy Adams's Extraordinary Post-Presidential Life in Congress
      Image source: Portrait & Biographical Album of Washtenaw County (1891)
    Henry Clay Henry Clay (1777-1852) — also known as "The Sage of Ashland"; "The Great Compromiser" — of Lexington, Fayette County, Ky. Born in Hanover County, Va., April 12, 1777. Member of Kentucky state house of representatives, 1803; U.S. Senator from Kentucky, 1806-07, 1810-11, 1831-42, 1849-52; died in office 1852; U.S. Representative from Kentucky, 1811-14, 1815-21, 1823-25 (5th District 1811-13, at-large 1813-14, 2nd District 1815-21, 3rd District 1823-25); Speaker of the U.S. House, 1811-14, 1815-20, 1823-25; candidate for President of the United States, 1824, 1832 (National Republican), 1844 (Whig); U.S. Secretary of State, 1825-29; candidate for Whig nomination for President, 1839. Member, Freemasons. In 1809, he fought a duel with Humphrey Marshall, in which both men were wounded. Elected to the Hall of Fame for Great Americans in 1900. Died in Washington, D.C., June 29, 1852 (age 75 years, 78 days). Interment at Lexington Cemetery, Lexington, Ky.; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of John Clay and Elizabeth (Hudson) Clay (1750-1829); brother of Porter Clay; married, April 11, 1799, to Lucretia (Hart) Erwin (1781-1864); father of Thomas Hart Clay, Henry Clay, Jr. and James Brown Clay; grandfather of Henry Clay; granduncle of Ellen Hart Ross (who married James Reily (1811-1863)); first cousin once removed of Matthew Clay (1754-1815) and Green Clay; second cousin of Matthew Clay (1795?-1827), Brutus Junius Clay (1808-1878) and Cassius Marcellus Clay; second cousin once removed of Brutus Junius Clay (1847-1932); second cousin thrice removed of Oliver Carroll Clay; second cousin four times removed of Archer Woodford; third cousin of Clement Comer Clay; third cousin once removed of Clement Claiborne Clay, Jr..
      Political family: Clay family of Kentucky (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      Clay counties in Ala., Fla., Ga., Ill., Ind., Kan., Minn., Miss., Mo., Neb., N.C., S.Dak., Tenn., Tex. and W.Va. are named for him.
      Mount Clay (also called Mount Reagan), in the White Mountains, Coos County, New Hampshire, is named for him.
      Other politicians named for him: Henry Clay LongneckerHenry Clay DeanH. Clay DickinsonHenry C. BrockmeyerH. Clay CockerillHenry Clay EwingHenry Clay CaldwellHenry Clay HallHenry Clay GoodingHenry Clay NaillHenry C. MyersHenry C. ColeH. Clay HarrisHenry C. MinerHenry C. WarmothHenry Clay ClevelandH. Clay EvansHenry C. PayneHenry C. BatesH. Clay FosterHenry C. McCormickHenry C. IdeHenry Clay WilliamsHenry C. SimmsHenry Clay FergusonHenry C. GloverH. Clay ParkHenry C. HansbroughHenry C. SnodgrassH. Clay MaydwellHenry C. GleasonHenry C. LoudenslagerH. Clay Van VoorhisHenry C. ClippingerH. Clay CrawfordH. Clay BascomH. Clay MichieH. Clay ChisolmH. Clay HowardHenry C. HallHenry Clay McDowellH. Clay JonesH. Clay DayHenry Clay HinesH. Clay HeatherHenry Clay MeachamHenry Clay CallowayH. Clay SuterH. Clay WarthHenry Clay ElwoodH. Clay KennedyH. Clay DavisH. Clay NeedhamHenry Clay EthertonH. Clay MaceH. Clay ArmstrongH. Clay BaldwinH. Clay HaynesH. Clay BurkholderMrs. H. Clay KauffmanH. Clay BentleyHenry C. GreenbergH. Clay Gardenhire, Jr.Henry Clay CoxH. Clay Myers, Jr.H. Clay Johnson
      Coins and currency: His portrait appeared on some U.S. currency issued in the 19th and early 20th centuries.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
      Books about Henry Clay: Robert Vincent Remini, Henry Clay: Statesman for the Union — Maurice G. Baxter, Henry Clay the Lawyer — Richard B. Cheney & Lynne V. Cheney, Kings Of The Hill : How Nine Powerful Men Changed The Course of American History — Merrill D. Peterson, The Great Triumvirate: Webster, Clay, and Calhoun — Scott Farris, Almost President: The Men Who Lost the Race but Changed the Nation — David S. Heidler & Jeanne T. Heidler, Henry Clay: The Essential American — Fergus M. Bordewich, America's Great Debate: Henry Clay, Stephen A. Douglas, and the Compromise That Preserved the Union
      Image source: James Smith Noel Collection, Louisiana State University in Shreveport
    John C. Calhoun John Caldwell Calhoun (1782-1850) — also known as John C. Calhoun — of Pickens District (now Pickens County), S.C. Born in Abbeville District (part now in McCormick County), S.C., March 18, 1782. Member of South Carolina state house of representatives, 1808; U.S. Representative from South Carolina 6th District, 1811-17; U.S. Secretary of War, 1817-25; Vice President of the United States, 1825-32; U.S. Senator from South Carolina, 1832-43, 1845-50; died in office 1850; U.S. Secretary of State, 1844-45. Scotch-Irish ancestry. Died in Washington, D.C., March 31, 1850 (age 68 years, 13 days). Interment at St. Philip's Churchyard, Charleston, S.C.; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery; memorial monument at Marion Park, Charleston, S.C.
      Relatives: Son of James Patrick Calhoun (1727-1795) and Martha (Caldwell) Calhoun (1750-1802); married, December 27, 1809, to Floride Bonneau (1792-1866); father of Anna Maria Calhoun (1817-1875; who married Thomas Green Clemson (1807-1888)); uncle of John Alfred Calhoun and Martha Catherine Calhoun (1809-1869; who married Armistead Burt); great-granduncle of John Temple Graves; first cousin of John Ewing Colhoun and Joseph Calhoun; first cousin once removed of Andrew Pickens; first cousin twice removed of Francis Wilkinson Pickens; second cousin once removed of Sarah Ann Calhoun (1811-1892; who married Alexander Henry Brown); second cousin twice removed of William Francis Calhoun.
      Political family: Calhoun-Pickens family of South Carolina (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      Calhoun counties in Ala., Ark., Fla., Ga., Ill., Iowa, Mich., Miss., S.C., Tex. and W.Va. are named for him.
      The John C. Calhoun State Office Building (opened 1926), in Columbia, South Carolina, is named for him.
      Other politicians named for him: John C. JohnsonJohn Calhoun NichollsJohn Calhoun CookJohn C. SheppardJohn C. BellJohn C. C. MayoJohn C. Phillips
      Coins and currency: His portrait appeared on Confederate States $1,000 notes (1861) and $100 notes (1862).
      Campaign slogan: "Liberty dearer than union."
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
      Books about John C. Calhoun: Margaret L. Coit, John C. Calhoun : American Portrait — Clyde N. Wilson, John C. Calhoun — Merrill D. Peterson, The Great Triumvirate: Webster, Clay, and Calhoun — Warren Brown, John C. Calhoun (for young readers)
      Image source: James Smith Noel Collection, Louisiana State University in Shreveport
    Thomas P. O'Neill, Jr. Thomas Phillip O'Neill, Jr. (1912-1994) — also known as Thomas P. O'Neill, Jr.; "Tip" — of Cambridge, Middlesex County, Mass. Born in Cambridge, Middlesex County, Mass., December 9, 1912. Democrat. Member of Massachusetts state house of representatives, 1937-52; Speaker of the Massachusetts State House of Representatives, 1949-52; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Massachusetts, 1952, 1960, 1964; Honorary Chair, 1984; U.S. Representative from Massachusetts, 1953-87 (11th District 1953-63, 8th District 1963-87); Speaker of the U.S. House, 1977-87. Catholic. Irish ancestry. Received the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1991. Died, of cardiac arrest, in Boston, Suffolk County, Mass., January 5, 1994 (age 81 years, 27 days). Interment at Mt. Pleasant Cemetery, Harwich Port, Harwich, Mass.; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Thomas P. O'Neill and Rose Anne (Tolan) O'Neill; married, June 17, 1941, to Mildred Anne Miller; father of Thomas P. O'Neill III (1944-).
      The O'Neill Tunnel (opened 2003), which carries Interstate 93, Highway 1, and Route 3, in Boston, Massachusetts, is named for him.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile
      Books by Thomas P. O'Neill: Man of the House : The Life and Political Memoirs of Speaker Tip O'Neill (1989)
      Books about Thomas P. O'Neill: John Aloysius Farrell, Tip O' Neill and the Democratic Century: A Biography — Chris Matthews, Tip and the Gipper: When Politics Worked
      Image source: Public Officers of Massachusetts, 1979-80
      John Fairfield (1797-1847) — of Saco, York County, Maine. Born in Saco, York County, Maine, January 30, 1797. Democrat. Lawyer; U.S. Representative from Maine, 1835-38 (3rd District 1835-37, 4th District 1837-38); resigned 1838; Governor of Maine, 1839-41, 1842-43; defeated, 1840; U.S. Senator from Maine, 1843-47; died in office 1847. Died in Washington, D.C., December 24, 1847 (age 50 years, 328 days). Interment at Laurel Hill Cemetery, Saco, Maine; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery.
      Fort Fairfield (old military installation), and the town of Fort Fairfield, Maine, were named for him.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
      Josiah Stoddard Johnston (1784-1833) — also known as Josiah S. Johnston — of Alexandria, Rapides Parish, La. Born in Salisbury, Litchfield County, Conn., November 24, 1784. Democrat. Member of Orleans territorial legislature, 1805; state court judge in Louisiana, 1812; U.S. Representative from Louisiana at-large, 1821-23; U.S. Senator from Louisiana, 1824-33; died in office 1833. Killed by an explosion on the steamboat Lioness, on the Red River, in Louisiana, May 19, 1833 (age 48 years, 176 days). Interment at Rapides Cemetery, Pineville, La.; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery.
      Relatives: Half-brother of Albert Sidney Johnston (1803-1862).
      Political families: Marshall-Harrison-Randolph-Cabell family of Virginia; Breckinridge-Preston-Cabell-Henry family of Virginia; Johnston-Preston family of Kentucky and Virginia (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Elias Kent Kane (1794-1835) — also known as Elias K. Kane — of Kaskaskia, Randolph County, Ill. Born in New York, New York County, N.Y., June 7, 1794. Democrat. Lawyer; delegate to Illinois state constitutional convention from Randolph County, 1818; secretary of state of Illinois, 1818-22; member of Illinois state house of representatives, 1824; U.S. Senator from Illinois, 1825-35; died in office 1835. Died in Washington, D.C., December 12, 1835 (age 41 years, 188 days). Original interment in private or family graveyard; reinterment at Evergreen Cemetery, Chester, Ill.; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery.
      Relatives: Father of Elizabeth Kane (who married William Henry Bissell (1811-1860)).
      Kane County, Ill. is named for him.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
      Andrew Pickens Butler (1796-1857) — also known as Andrew P. Butler — of Edgefield, Edgefield District (now Edgefield County), S.C. Born in Edgefield, Edgefield District (now Edgefield County), S.C., November 18, 1796. Member of South Carolina state house of representatives, 1820; member of South Carolina state senate, 1824-33; common pleas court judge in South Carolina, 1835-46; U.S. Senator from South Carolina, 1846-57; died in office 1857. Died near Edgefield, Edgefield District (now Edgefield County), S.C., May 25, 1857 (age 60 years, 188 days). Interment at Big Creek Butler Churchyard, Edgefield, S.C.; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of William Butler (1759-1821); brother of William Butler (1790-1850) and Pierce Mason Butler (1798-1847); uncle of Matthew Calbraith Butler.
      Political family: Butler family of Edgefield, South Carolina (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      Butler County, Kan. is named for him.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
      Thomas Jefferson Rusk (1803-1857) — also known as Thomas J. Rusk — of Nacogdoches, Nacogdoches County, Tex. Born in South Carolina, December 5, 1803. Democrat. Delegate to Texas Consultation of 1835 from District of Nacogdoches, 1835; delegate to Texas Republic Republic constitutional convention from District of Nacogdoches, 1836; signer, Texas Declaration of Independence, 1836; general in the Texas Army during the Texas War of Independence; Texas Republic Secretary of War, 1836, 1836-37; member of Texas Republic House of Representatives, 1837-38; justice of Texas Republic supreme court, 1838-40; delegate to Texas state constitutional convention, 1845; U.S. Senator from Texas, 1846-57; died in office 1857. Killed himself, in Nacogdoches, Nacogdoches County, Tex., July 29, 1857 (age 53 years, 236 days). Interment at Oak Grove Cemetery, Nacogdoches, Tex.; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery; statue at Rusk County Courthouse Grounds, Henderson, Tex.
      Presumably named for: Thomas Jefferson
      Rusk County, Tex. is named for him.
      The city of Rusk, Texas, is named for him.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
      Moses Norris, Jr. (1799-1855) — of Pittsfield, Merrimack County, N.H.; Manchester, Hillsborough County, N.H. Born in New Hampshire, 1799. Democrat. Member of New Hampshire Governor's Council, 1841-42; U.S. Representative from New Hampshire at-large, 1843-47; U.S. Senator from New Hampshire, 1849-55; died in office 1855. Died January 11, 1855 (age about 55 years). Interment at Floral Park Cemetery, Pittsfield, N.H.; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Nathan Fellows Dixon (1774-1842) — of Rhode Island. Born in Plainfield, Windham County, Conn., December 13, 1774. Member of Rhode Island state legislature, 1810; U.S. Senator from Rhode Island, 1839-42; died in office 1842. Died in Washington, D.C., January 29, 1842 (age 67 years, 47 days). Interment at River Bend Cemetery, Westerly, R.I.; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery.
      Relatives: Father of Nathan Fellows Dixon II; grandfather of Nathan Fellows Dixon III (1847-1897).
      Political family: Dixon family of Westerly, Rhode Island.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Nathan Smith (1770-1835) — of New Haven, New Haven County, Conn. Born in Woodbury, Litchfield County, Conn., January 8, 1770. Whig. Lawyer; New Haven County Prosecuting Attorney, 1817-35; delegate to Connecticut state constitutional convention, 1818; candidate for Governor of Connecticut, 1825; member of Connecticut state senate at-large, 1827; U.S. Attorney for Connecticut, 1829; U.S. Senator from Connecticut, 1833-35; died in office 1835. Died in Washington, D.C., December 6, 1835 (age 65 years, 332 days). Interment at Grove Street Cemetery, New Haven, Conn.; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery.
      Relatives: Brother of Nathaniel Smith; uncle of Truman Smith (1791-1884).
      Political family: Smith family of Woodbury, Connecticut.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
      Isaac Samuels Pennybacker (1805-1847) — of Virginia. Born in Virginia, 1805. Democrat. U.S. Representative from Virginia 16th District, 1837-39; U.S. Senator from Virginia, 1845-47; died in office 1847. Died in 1847 (age about 42 years). Interment at Woodbine Cemetery, Harrisonburg, Va.; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery.
      Relatives: Brother of Joel Pennybacker; father of John D. Pennybacker; uncle of Benjamin Pennybacker Douglass (1820-?); first cousin of Green Berry Samuels; first cousin once removed of Benjamin M. Samuels; third cousin once removed of Samuel Whitaker Pennypacker.
      Political family: Pennybacker-Anderson family of Virginia.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Chester Ashley (1790-1848) — of Little Rock, Pulaski County, Ark. Born in Westfield, Hampden County, Mass., June 1, 1790. Democrat. U.S. Senator from Arkansas, 1844-48; died in office 1848. Died in Washington, D.C., April 29, 1848 (age 57 years, 333 days). Interment at Mt. Holly Cemetery, Little Rock, Ark.; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Nancy (Pomeroy) Ashley (1761-1792) and William Ashley (1763-1847); married, July 4, 1821, to Mary Worthington Watkins Elliot (1798-1865); first cousin five times removed of Boyd Kenneth Benedict; second cousin once removed of Samuel Clesson Allen; second cousin twice removed of Aaron Kellogg; third cousin of Elisha Hunt Allen; third cousin once removed of Jason Kellogg, Charles Kellogg (1773-1842), Orsamus Cook Merrill, Timothy Merrill, Daniel Fiske Kellogg, William Fessenden Allen and Frederick Hobbes Allen; fourth cousin of Luther Walter Badger, Silas Dewey Kellogg, Greene Carrier Bronson, Daniel Kellogg (1791-1875), Alvan Kellogg, Alvah Nash, John Russell Kellogg, Day Otis Kellogg, Dwight Kellogg, Laman Ingersoll, George Smith Catlin, Albert Gallatin Kellogg, Francis William Kellogg, Ensign Hosmer Kellogg, Farrand Fassett Merrill (1814-1859) and Charles Kellogg (1839-1903); fourth cousin once removed of Amaziah Brainard, Orlando Kellogg, William Dean Kellogg, Stephen Wright Kellogg, George Bradley Kellogg, William Pitt Kellogg, Daniel Kellogg (1835-1918), Arthur Tappan Kellogg, Selah Merrill, Edwin W. Kellogg and Samuel Herbert Kellogg.
      Political families: Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York; Woodruff-Hornblower-Seymour-Wadsworth family of Connecticut; Murphy-Merrill family of Harbor Beach, Michigan (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      Ashley County, Ark. is named for him.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
      James Bell (1804-1857) — of Laconia, Belknap County, N.H. Born in Francestown, Hillsborough County, N.H., November 13, 1804. Member of New Hampshire state house of representatives, 1846, 1850; delegate to New Hampshire state constitutional convention, 1850; candidate for Governor of New Hampshire, 1854, 1855; U.S. Senator from New Hampshire, 1855-57; died in office 1857. Died in Laconia, Belknap County, N.H., May 26, 1857 (age 52 years, 194 days). Interment at Exeter Cemetery, Exeter, N.H.; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Samuel Bell; uncle of Samuel Newell Bell; cousin *** of Charles Henry Bell (1823-1893).
      Political family: Bell family of Chester, New Hampshire.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Josiah James Evans (1786-1858) — also known as Josiah J. Evans — of Society Hill, Darlington County, S.C. Born in Marlborough District (now Marlboro County), S.C., November 27, 1786. Lawyer; member of South Carolina state house of representatives, 1812-13; circuit judge in South Carolina, 1829-35; U.S. Senator from South Carolina, 1853-58; died in office 1858. Died in Washington, D.C., May 6, 1858 (age 71 years, 160 days). Interment a private or family graveyard, Darlington County, S.C.; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
      Gabriel Holmes (1769-1829) — of Clinton, Sampson County, N.C. Born near Clinton, Sampson County, N.C., 1769. Lawyer; member of North Carolina house of commons, 1794-95; member of North Carolina state senate, 1797-1802, 1812-13; Governor of North Carolina, 1821-24; U.S. Representative from North Carolina 5th District, 1825-29; died in office 1829. Died near Clinton, Sampson County, N.C., September 26, 1829 (age about 60 years). Original interment at a private or family graveyard, Sampson County, N.C.; reinterment in 1984 at John Sampson Cemetery, Clinton, N.C.; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery.
      Relatives: Father of Theophilus H. Holmes (1804-1880; Confederate general in Civil War).
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
      Thaddeus Betts (1789-1840) — of Norwalk, Fairfield County, Conn. Born in Norwalk, Fairfield County, Conn., February 4, 1789. Member of Connecticut state house of representatives from Norwalk, 1815, 1830; member of Connecticut state senate, 1828, 1831 (at-large 1828, 12th District 1831); Lieutenant Governor of Connecticut, 1832-33, 1834-35; U.S. Senator from Connecticut, 1839-40; died in office 1840. Died in Washington, D.C., April 7, 1840 (age 51 years, 63 days). Interment at Union Cemetery, Norwalk, Conn.; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of William Maltby Betts (1759-1832) and Lucretia (Gregory) Betts (1763-1830); married 1815 to Antoinette Cannon (1789-1864); great-grandnephew of Abraham Davenport (1715-1789); first cousin twice removed of John Davenport and James Davenport; first cousin thrice removed of Alfred Collins Lockwood (1875-1951); second cousin once removed of Abraham Davenport (1767-1837) and Theodore Davenport; third cousin once removed of Philip Frisbee, Daniel Lockwood, Gold Selleck Silliman, Benjamin Silliman, DeGrasse Maltby, Hanford Nichols Lockwood and Joseph Pomeroy Root; third cousin twice removed of Ebenezer Lockwood and Aaron Kitchell; fourth cousin of Martin Keeler, James Lockwood Conger, Benjamin Douglas Silliman and Homer Nichols Lockwood; fourth cousin once removed of Samuel Huntington, Horatio Lockwood, Ira Yale, Gideon Hotchkiss, Asahel Augustus Hotchkiss, Stephen Hiram Keeler, Julius Hotchkiss, Giles Waldo Hotchkiss, Samuel DeWitt Maltby and Benjamin Josiah Maltby.
      Political families: Conger family of New York; Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York; Lockwood-Lanning family of New Jersey (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
      John Anthony Quitman (1799-1858) — also known as John A. Quitman — of Mississippi. Born in Rhinebeck, Dutchess County, N.Y., September 1, 1799. Democrat. Lawyer; member of Mississippi state house of representatives, 1826-27; delegate to Mississippi state constitutional convention, 1832; member of Mississippi state senate, 1835-36; Governor of Mississippi, 1835-36, 1850-51; state court judge in Mississippi, 1838; general in the U.S. Army during the Mexican War; candidate for Democratic nomination for Vice President, 1848, 1856; U.S. Representative from Mississippi 5th District, 1855-58; died in office 1858. Member, Freemasons. Presumed to have been deliberately poisoned at a banquet during the inauguration of President James Buchanan, in Washington, D.C., and subsequently died, near Natchez, Adams County, Miss., July 17, 1858 (age 58 years, 319 days). Interment at Natchez City Cemetery, Natchez, Miss.; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — NNDB dossier
      Books about John A. Quitman: Robert E. May, John A. Quitman: Old South Crusader
      Richard Irvine Manning (1789-1836) — of South Carolina. Born near Sumter, Sumter District (now Sumter County), S.C., May 1, 1789. Democrat. Member of South Carolina state house of representatives, 1820; member of South Carolina state senate, 1822; Governor of South Carolina, 1824-26; U.S. Representative from South Carolina, 1834-36 (8th District 1834-35, 7th District 1835-36); died in office 1836. Died in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., May 1, 1836 (age 47 years, 0 days). Interment at Trinity Episcopal Cathedral Cemetery, Columbia, S.C.; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Laurence P. Manning (1756-1804) and Susannah (Richardson) Manning; father of John Laurence Manning; nephew of James Burchill Richardson; grandfather of Richard Irvine Manning (1859-1931); first cousin and brother-in-law of John Peter Richardson (1801-1864); first cousin once removed of John Peter Richardson (1831-1899); first cousin thrice removed of James Haselden Manning; first cousin four times removed of James Douglass Manning.
      Political family: Manning-Richardson-Ellerbe-Haselden family of South Carolina.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
      Robert Rantoul, Jr. (1805-1852) — of Massachusetts. Born in Massachusetts, August 13, 1805. Democrat. Member of Massachusetts state legislature, 1840; U.S. Attorney for Massachusetts, 1845-50; U.S. Senator from Massachusetts, 1851; U.S. Representative from Massachusetts 4th District, 1851-52; died in office 1852. Died August 7, 1852 (age 46 years, 360 days). Interment at Beverly Central Cemetery, Beverly, Mass.; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Daniel Hiester (1747-1804) — Born in Upper Salford Township, Montgomery County, Pa., June 25, 1747. U.S. Representative from Pennsylvania, 1789-96 (at-large 1789-93, 4th District 1793-95, 5th District 1795-96); U.S. Representative from Maryland at-large, 1801-04; died in office 1804. Christian Reformed. Died in Washington, D.C., March 7, 1804 (age 56 years, 256 days). Interment at Zion Reformed Graveyard, Hagerstown, Md.; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Daniel Hiester (1713-1795) and Catharina (Shuler) Hiester (1719-1789); brother of John Hiester; married 1770 to Rosanna Hager (1752-1810); uncle of Daniel Hiester (1774-1834) and William Hiester; granduncle of Daniel Robeadeau Clymer, Isaac Ellmaker Hiester and Hiester Clymer; third great-granduncle of Edward Brooke Lee; fourth great-granduncle of Blair Lee III and Edward Brooke Lee, Jr.; first cousin of Joseph Hiester; first cousin twice removed of Henry Augustus Muhlenberg (1823-1854); first cousin four times removed of Frederick Augustus Muhlenberg and Hiester Henry Muhlenberg.
      Political families: Lee-Randolph family of Maryland and Virginia; Muhlenberg-Hiester family of Pennsylvania (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Thomas Hartley (1748-1800) — of Pennsylvania. Born in Reading, Berks County, Pa., August 7, 1748. Colonel in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; member of Pennsylvania state house of representatives, 1778; delegate to Pennsylvania state constitutional convention, 1787; U.S. Representative from Pennsylvania, 1789-1800 (at-large 1789-93, 7th District 1793-95, 8th District 1795-1800); died in office 1800. Died in York, York County, Pa., December 21, 1800 (age 52 years, 136 days). Interment at St. John's Churchyard, York, Pa.; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Peterson Goodwyn (1745-1818) — of Petersburg, Va. Born in Dinwiddie County, Va., 1745. Democrat. Planter; lawyer; colonel in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; member of Virginia state house of delegates, 1789-1802; U.S. Representative from Virginia, 1803-18 (at-large 1803-07, 18th District 1807-15, 19th District 1815-18); died in office 1818. Died in Dinwiddie County, Va., February 21, 1818 (age about 72 years). Interment a private or family graveyard, Dinwiddie County, Va.; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery.
      Relatives: Father-in-law of Patrick Magruder (1768-1819).
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Richard Wylly Habersham (1786-1842) — also known as Richard W. Habersham — of Clarkesville, Habersham County, Ga. Born in Savannah, Chatham County, Ga., December, 1786. U.S. Attorney for Georgia, 1819-27; Georgia state attorney general, 1830; U.S. Representative from Georgia at-large, 1839-42; died in office 1842. Died in Clarkesville, Habersham County, Ga., December 2, 1842 (age about 56 years). Interment at Old Clarkesville Cemetery, Clarkesville, Ga.; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of James Habersham (1745-1799) and Esther Rebecca (Wylly) Habersham (1754-1808); married, May 18, 1808, to Sarah Hazzard Elliott (c.1792-1854); nephew of Joseph Habersham and John Habersham (1754-1799).
      Political family: Habersham family of Savannah, Georgia.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
      Lewis Williams (1782-1842) — of Panther Creek, Surry County, N.C. Born in Surry County, N.C., February 1, 1782. Member of North Carolina house of commons, 1813-14; U.S. Representative from North Carolina 13th District, 1815-42; died in office 1842. Died in Washington, D.C., February 23, 1842 (age 60 years, 22 days). Interment at Panther Creek Cemetery, Surry County, N.C.; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Joseph Williams of Shallow Ford and Rebecca (Lanier) Williams (1757-1832); brother of Robert Overton Williams, John Williams and Frances Lanier Williams (1796-1872; who married John Patton Erwin); uncle of Joseph Lanier Williams, Margaret McClung Williams (1817-1899; who married John Gaines Miller) and Melinda Williams (1820-1862; who married William Barclay Napton (1808-1883)); cousin *** of Marmaduke Williams; first cousin by marriage of Matthew Clay; first cousin thrice removed of George Venable Allen; twin brother of Thomas Lanier Williams.
      Political family: Williams family of North Carolina (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
      George Coke Dromgoole (1797-1847) — of Virginia. Born in Lawrenceville, Brunswick County, Va., May 15, 1797. Democrat. Member of Virginia state house of delegates, 1823; member of Virginia state senate, 1826; U.S. Representative from Virginia, 1835-41, 1843-47 (6th District 1835-37, 5th District 1837-39, 6th District 1839-41, 2nd District 1843-47); died in office 1847. Died in Brunswick County, Va., April 27, 1847 (age 49 years, 347 days). Interment in private or family graveyard; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery.
      Relatives: Uncle of Alexander Dromgoole Sims (1803-1848).
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      John Bennett Dawson (1798-1845) — of New Orleans, Orleans Parish, La. Born near Nashville, Davidson County, Tenn., March 17, 1798. Planter; candidate for Governor of Louisiana, 1834; member of Louisiana state house of representatives, 1830; U.S. Representative from Louisiana, 1841-45 (2nd District 1841-43, 3rd District 1843-45); died in office 1845; postmaster at New Orleans, La., 1843. Died in St. Francisville, West Feliciana Parish, La., June 26, 1845 (age 47 years, 101 days). Interment at Grace Episcopal Churchyard, St. Francisville, La.; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery.
      Relatives: Father of Anna Ruffin Dawson (who married Robert Charles Wickliffe (1819-1895)).
      Political family: Wickliffe-Holt family of Louisville, Kentucky.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Thomas Hale Boggs, Sr. (1914-1972) — also known as Hale Boggs — of New Orleans, Orleans Parish, La. Born in Long Beach, Harrison County, Miss., February 15, 1914. Democrat. Lawyer; U.S. Representative from Louisiana 2nd District, 1941-43, 1947-72; died in office 1972; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Louisiana, 1948, 1956, 1960, 1968; Parliamentarian, 1964; chair, Resolutions and Platform Committee, chair, 1968; candidate in primary for Governor of Louisiana, 1952; Vice-Chair of Democratic National Committee, 1957; member, President's Commission on the Assassination of President KNDY, 1963-64. Catholic. Member, American Legion; Amvets; Catholic War Veterans; Sons of the American Revolution; Knights of Columbus; American Bar Association; American Judicature Society; Phi Beta Kappa; Beta Theta Pi; Omicron Delta Kappa. Disappeared while on a campaign flight from Anchorage to Juneau, and presumed killed in a plane crash, somewhere in Alaska, October 16, 1972 (age 58 years, 244 days). The wreckage was never found. Cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of William Robertson Boggs and Claire Josephine (Hale) Boggs; married, January 22, 1938, to Corinne Claiborne (1916-2013); father of Barbara Boggs Sigmund, Thomas Hale Boggs, Jr. and Cokie Roberts (National Public Radio reporter and commentator).
      Boggs Peak in the Chugach Mountains, Anchorage, Alaska, is named for him.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
      Books about Thomas Hale Boggs: Gary Boulard, The Big Lie: Hale Boggs, Lucille May Grace, and Leander Perez
      Isaac McKim (1775-1838) — of Baltimore, Md. Born in Baltimore, Md., July 21, 1775. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812; member of Maryland state senate, 1821-23; U.S. Representative from Maryland, 1823-25, 1833, 1835-38 (5th District 1823-25, 1833, 4th District 1835-38); died in office 1838. Episcopalian. Died in Baltimore, Md., April 1, 1838 (age 62 years, 254 days). Interment at Old St. Paul's Cemetery, Baltimore, Md.; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery.
      Relatives: Nephew of Alexander McKim (1748-1832).
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
      Thomas Henry Bayly (1810-1856) — also known as Thomas H. Bayly — of Accomac Court House, Accomack County, Va. Born in Accomack County, Va., December 11, 1810. Member of Virginia state house of delegates, 1836-42; superior court judge in Virginia, 1842-44; U.S. Representative from Virginia, 1844-56 (7th District 1844-53, 1st District 1853-56); died in office 1856. Died in Accomack County, Va., June 23, 1856 (age 45 years, 195 days). Interment at Mt. Custis Cemetery, Accomac, Va.; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Thomas Monteagle Bayly (1775-1834).
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
    Thaddeus Stevens Thaddeus Stevens (1792-1868) — of Gettysburg, Adams County, Pa.; Lancaster, Lancaster County, Pa. Born in Danville, Caledonia County, Vt., April 4, 1792. Republican. Lawyer; member of Pennsylvania state house of representatives, 1833-35, 1837, 1841; delegate to Pennsylvania state constitutional convention, 1838; U.S. Representative from Pennsylvania, 1849-53, 1859-68 (8th District 1849-53, 9th District 1859-68); died in office 1868; delegate to Republican National Convention from Pennsylvania, 1856 (speaker), 1860. Died in Washington, D.C., August 11, 1868 (age 76 years, 129 days). Interment at Shreiner-Concord Cemetery, Lancaster, Pa.; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Joshua Stevens (1774-1814) and Sarah 'Sally' (Morrill) Stevens (1774-1852); married to Lydia Hamilton Smith (1816-1884); fourth cousin once removed of Charles Rowell (1785-1867).
      Political families: Sargent-Arnold-Pike-Davis family of New Hampshire; Eastman-Webster-Rowell family; Sargent-Webster-Rowell family of New York (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      The Thaddeus Stevens Post Office Building, in Danville, Vermont, is named for him.
      Epitaph: "I repose in this quiet and secluded spot / not from any natural preference for solitude / but, finding other cemeteries limited as to race / by charter rules / I have chosen this, that I might illustrate / in my death / the principles which I advocated / through a long life / EQUALITY OF MAN BEFORE HIS CREATOR."
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
      Books about Thaddeus Stevens: Charles W. Boyd, Your Legacy from Thaddeus Stevens : Republican of the First Kind — Richard B. Cheney & Lynne V. Cheney, Kings Of The Hill : How Nine Powerful Men Changed The Course of American History
      Image source: Life and Work of James G. Blaine (1893)
      Jacob Crowninshield (1770-1808) — of Salem, Essex County, Mass. Born in Salem, Essex County, Mass., March 31, 1770. Democrat. Member of Massachusetts state legislature, 1800; U.S. Representative from Massachusetts, 1803-08 (at-large 1803-05, 2nd District 1805-08); died in office 1808. Died in Washington, D.C., April 15, 1808 (age 38 years, 15 days). Interment at Harmony Grove Cemetery, Salem, Mass.; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery.
      Relatives: Brother of Benjamin Williams Crowninshield; married, June 5, 1796, to Sarah Gardner (1773-1807); grandfather of William Crowninshield Endicott (1826-1900); great-granduncle of Charles Francis Adams.
      Political families: Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York; Roosevelt family; Crowninshield-Adams family of Savannah, Georgia (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      William Jones Lowndes (1782-1822) — also known as William Lowndes — of South Carolina. Born in South Carolina, February 11, 1782. Democrat. Lawyer; planter; member of South Carolina state house of representatives, 1806-08; U.S. Representative from South Carolina, 1811-22 (4th District 1811-13, 2nd District 1813-22). Died aboard a ship in the North Atlantic Ocean while en route to England, October 27, 1822 (age 40 years, 258 days). Buried at sea in North Atlantic Ocean; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Rawlins Lowndes and Sarah (Jones) Lowndes (1757-1801); brother of Thomas Lowndes; married 1802 to Elizabeth Brewton Pinckney (1781-1857; daughter of Thomas Pinckney (1750-1828)); second great-granduncle of Burnet Rhett Maybank; third great-granduncle of Burnet Rhett Maybank, Jr.; first cousin twice removed of Charles Pinckney Brown.
      Political families: Lowndes-DeSaussure-Aiken-Maybank family of Charleston, South Carolina; Pinckney-Middleton-Laurens family of Charleston, South Carolina (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      Lowndes counties in Ala., Ga. and Miss. are named for him.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
      Patrick Farrelly (1770-1826) — of Meadville, Crawford County, Pa. Born in Ireland, 1770. Democrat. Lawyer; member of Pennsylvania state house of representatives, 1811-12; major in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812; U.S. Representative from Pennsylvania, 1821-26 (15th District 1821-23, 18th District 1823-26); died in office 1826. Died in Meadville, Crawford County, Pa., January 12, 1826 (age about 55 years). Original interment at Old Meadville Cemetery (which no longer exists), Meadville, Pa.; reinterment at Greendale Cemetery, Meadville, Pa.; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery.
      Relatives: Married to Elizabeth Mead (1786-1811); father of David M. Farrelly and John Wilson Farrelly (1809-1860).
      Political family: Farrelly family of Meadville, Pennsylvania.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
    Thomas L. Hamer Thomas Lyon Hamer (1800-1846) — also known as Thomas L. Hamer — of Georgetown, Brown County, Ohio. Born in Northumberland County, Pa., July, 1800. Democrat. School teacher; lawyer; member of Ohio state house of representatives, 1825, 1828-29; Speaker of the Ohio State House of Representatives, 1829; Presidential Elector for Ohio, 1828; U.S. Representative from Ohio 5th District, 1833-39; general in the U.S. Army during the Mexican War. Nominated Ulysses S. Grant to be a cadet at the U.S. Military Academy at West Point. Died in the military service, probably from dysentery, at Monterrey, Nuevo León, December 2, 1846 (age 46 years, 0 days). Original interment somewhere in near Monterrey, Nuevo León; reinterment at Old Georgetown Cemetery, Georgetown, Ohio; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery.
      Relatives: Uncle of Thomas Ray Hamer (1864-1950).
      The village of Hamersville, Ohio, is named for him.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
      Image source: Unknown
      James Meacham (1810-1856) — of Middlebury, Addison County, Vt. Born in Vermont, 1810. U.S. Representative from Vermont, 1849-56 (3rd District 1849-53, 1st District 1853-56); died in office 1856. Died in 1856 (age about 46 years). Interment at West Cemetery, Middlebury, Vt.; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      William Osborne Goode (1798-1859) — also known as William O. Goode — of Boydton, Mecklenburg County, Va. Born in Inglewood, Mecklenburg County, Va., September 16, 1798. Democrat. Member of Virginia state house of delegates, 1822, 1824-32, 1839-40, 1845-46, 1852; delegate to Virginia state constitutional convention, 1829-30; U.S. Representative from Virginia 4th District, 1841-43, 1853-59; defeated, 1832; died in office 1859; delegate to Virginia state constitutional convention, 1850. Died in Boydton, Mecklenburg County, Va., July 3, 1859 (age 60 years, 290 days). Interment a private or family graveyard, Mecklenburg County, Va.; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Henry Grider (1796-1866) — of Bowling Green, Warren County, Ky. Born in Garrard County, Ky., July 16, 1796. Whig. Served in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812; lawyer; member of Kentucky state house of representatives, 1827, 1831; U.S. Representative from Kentucky 3rd District, 1843-47, 1861-66; died in office 1866. Died in Bowling Green, Warren County, Ky., September 7, 1866 (age 70 years, 53 days). Interment at Pioneer Cemetery, Bowling Green, Ky.; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
      Nathan Bryan (1748-1798) — of Jones County, N.C. Born in Craven County (part now in Jones County), N.C., 1748. Member of North Carolina state senate from Jones County, 1781-83; member of North Carolina house of commons, 1787, 1791-94; U.S. Representative from North Carolina, 1795-98 (at-large 1795-97, 10th District 1797-98); died in office 1798. Died in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., June 4, 1798 (age about 49 years). Original interment at Baptist Burial Ground on Second Street, Philadelphia, Pa.; reinterment to unknown location; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      John Linn (1763-1821) — of Sussex County, N.J. Born in Hardwick Township, Warren County, N.J., December 3, 1763. Served in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; member of New Jersey state house of assembly from Sussex County, 1801-04; common pleas court judge in New Jersey, 1805-21; died in office 1821; Sussex County Sheriff, 1812; U.S. Representative from New Jersey, 1817-21 (10th District 1817-19, 1st District 1819-21); died in office 1821. Died in Washington, D.C., January 5, 1821 (age 57 years, 33 days). Interment at North Hardyston Cemetery, Hamburg, N.J.; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
      Thomas Tyler Bouldin (1781-1834) — of Virginia. Born near Charlotte Court House, Charlotte County, Va., 1781. Democrat. U.S. Representative from Virginia, 1829-33, 1833-34 (5th District 1829-33, 8th District 1833-34); died in office 1834. Died while addressing the House of Representatives in the U.S. Capitol Building, Washington, D.C., February 11, 1834 (age about 52 years). Interment in private or family graveyard; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery.
      Relatives: Brother of James Wood Bouldin (1792-1854); ancestor *** of David M. Steele III.
      Political family: Bouldin family of Charlotte County, Virginia.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Henry Nes (1799-1850) — of York, York County, Pa. Born in York, York County, Pa., May 20, 1799. Physician; U.S. Representative from Pennsylvania 15th District, 1843-45, 1847-50; died in office 1850. Died in York, York County, Pa., September 10, 1850 (age 51 years, 113 days). Interment at Prospect Hill Cemetery, York, Pa.; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Daniel Putnam King (1801-1850) — also known as Daniel P. King — of South Danvers (now Peabody), Essex County, Mass. Born in Danvers, Essex County, Mass., January 8, 1801. Member of Massachusetts state house of representatives, 1836; Speaker of the Massachusetts State House of Representatives, 1843; member of Massachusetts state senate, 1838; U.S. Representative from Massachusetts 2nd District, 1843-50; died in office 1850. Died in South Danvers (now Peabody), Essex County, Mass., July 25, 1850 (age 49 years, 198 days). Interment at King Cemetery, Peabody, Mass.; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      John Gaines Miller (1812-1856) — also known as John G. Miller — of Boonville, Cooper County, Mo. Born in Danville, Boyle County, Ky., November 29, 1812. Lawyer; member of Missouri state house of representatives from Cooper County, 1840-43; U.S. Representative from Missouri, 1851-56 (3rd District 1851-53, 5th District 1853-56); died in office 1856. Died near Marshall, Saline County, Mo., May 11, 1856 (age 43 years, 164 days). Interment at Mt. Olive Cemetery, Marshall, Mo.; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Gen. William H. Miller (1782-1853) and Elizabeth (Gaines) Miller (1788-1864); married to Margaret McClung Williams (1817-1899; daughter of Thomas Lanier Williams (1782-1856); niece of Robert Overton Williams, John Williams and Lewis Williams).
      Political family: Williams family of North Carolina (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
      Thomas Langrell Harris (1816-1858) — also known as Thomas L. Harris — of Illinois. Born in Norwich, New London County, Conn., October 29, 1816. Democrat. Member of Illinois state senate, 1846; U.S. Representative from Illinois, 1849-51, 1855-58 (7th District 1849-51, 6th District 1855-58); died in office 1858; member of Illinois Democratic State Committee, 1852-56. Died November 24, 1858 (age 42 years, 26 days). Interment at Rose Hill Cemetery, Petersburg, Ill.; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Owen Lovejoy (1811-1864) — of Princeton, Bureau County, Ill. Born in Albion, Kennebec County, Maine, January 6, 1811. Republican. Minister; member of Illinois state house of representatives, 1854-56; delegate to Republican National Convention from Illinois, 1856 (speaker); U.S. Representative from Illinois, 1857-64 (3rd District 1857-63, 5th District 1863-64); died in office 1864. Congregationalist. Died in Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y., March 25, 1864 (age 53 years, 79 days). Interment at Oakland Cemetery, Princeton, Ill.; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Elizabeth Gordon (Pattee) Lovejoy (1772-1857) and Rev. Daniel Lovejoy (1776-1833); brother of Elijah Parish Lovejoy (1802-1837; abolitionist newspaper editor, killed by a pro-slavery mob in Alton, Ill.); married 1843 to Eunice Conant (Storrs) Denham (1809-1899); cousin *** of Nathan Allen Farwell (1812-1893); third cousin twice removed of John H. Lovejoy.
      Political family: Lovejoy-Farwell family of Rockland, Maine.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Philip Johnson (1818-1867) — of Pennsylvania. Born in Polkville, Warren County, N.J., January 17, 1818. Member of Pennsylvania state house of representatives, 1853; U.S. Representative from Pennsylvania, 1861-67 (13th District 1861-63, 11th District 1863-67); died in office 1867; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Pennsylvania, 1864. Died in Washington, D.C., January 29, 1867 (age 49 years, 12 days). Interment at Easton Cemetery, Easton, Pa.; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Samuel Brenton (1810-1857) — of Indiana. Born in Gallatin County, Ky., November 22, 1810. Minister; lawyer; member of Indiana state house of representatives, 1838-39, 1840-41; U.S. Representative from Indiana 10th District, 1851-53, 1855-57; defeated, 1852; died in office 1857. Methodist. Member, Odd Fellows. Died, of pneumonia, in Fort Wayne, Allen County, Ind., March 29, 1857 (age 46 years, 127 days). Interment at Lindenwood Cemetery, Fort Wayne, Ind.; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
      Preston Smith Brooks (1819-1857) — also known as Preston S. Brooks — of Ninety Six, Edgefield District (now Greenwood County), S.C. Born in Edgefield, Edgefield District (now Edgefield County), S.C., August 5, 1819. Lawyer; member of South Carolina state house of representatives, 1844; U.S. Representative from South Carolina 4th District, 1853-56, 1856-57; died in office 1857. Suffered a hip wound in a duel with Louis T. Wigfall, 1839, and could walk only with a cane for the rest of his life. In May, 1856, furious over an anti-slavery speech, he went to the Senate and beat Senator Charles Sumner with a cane, causing severe injuries; an attempt to expel him from Congress failed for lack of the necessary two-thirds vote, but he resigned; re-elected to his own vacancy. Died in Washington, D.C., January 27, 1857 (age 37 years, 175 days). Interment at Willow Brook Cemetery, Edgefield, S.C.; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Whitefield Brooks and Mary P. (Carroll) Brooks; married 1841 to Caroline Means (1820-1843); married 1843 to Martha Means; cousin *** of Milledge Luke Bonham (1813-1890).
      Political family: Bonham family of Edgefield, South Carolina.
      Cross-reference: L. M. Keitt
      Brooks County, Ga. is named for him.
      The city of Brooksville, Florida, is named for him.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
      Sampson Willis Harris (1809-1857) — of Wetumpka, Elmore County, Ala. Born in Elbert County, Ga., February 23, 1809. Democrat. Member of Alabama state house of representatives, 1834, 1844; U.S. Representative from Alabama, 1847-57 (3rd District 1847-55, 7th District 1855-57). Died April 1, 1857 (age 48 years, 37 days). Interment at Oconee Hill Cemetery, Athens, Ga.; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      John William Noell (1816-1863) — also known as John W. Noell — of Perryville, Perry County, Mo. Born in Virginia, 1816. Democrat. Member of Missouri state legislature, 1850; U.S. Representative from Missouri, 1859-63 (7th District 1859-63, 3rd District 1863); died in office 1863. Died March 14, 1863 (age about 46 years). Interment at St. Mary's Cemetery, Perryville, Mo.; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery.
      Relatives: Father of Thomas Estes Noell (1839-1867).
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Orlando Kellogg (1809-1865) — of Elizabethtown, Essex County, N.Y. Born in Elizabethtown, Essex County, N.Y., June 18, 1809. Carpenter; lawyer; Essex County Surrogate, 1840-44; U.S. Representative from New York, 1847-49, 1863-65 (14th District 1847-49, 16th District 1863-65); died in office 1865; delegate to Republican National Convention from New York, 1860. Died in Elizabethtown, Essex County, N.Y., August 24, 1865 (age 56 years, 67 days). Interment at Riverside Cemetery, Elizabethtown, N.Y.; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Rowland Kellogg (1785-1826) and Sarah (Titus) Kellogg (1787-1868); married 1837 to Polly Woodruff (1817-1884); father of Rowland Case Kellogg; second cousin once removed of Frank Billings Kellogg; second cousin twice removed of Charles Kellogg (1773-1842); second cousin thrice removed of Aaron Kellogg; third cousin of William Dean Kellogg; third cousin once removed of Alvan Kellogg, Day Otis Kellogg, Dwight Kellogg, Ensign Hosmer Kellogg and Alphonso Alva Hopkins; third cousin twice removed of Jason Kellogg, Orsamus Cook Merrill, Timothy Merrill and Daniel Fiske Kellogg; third cousin thrice removed of Samuel Swayze Seward; fourth cousin once removed of Luther Walter Badger, Silas Dewey Kellogg, Greene Carrier Bronson, Chester Ashley, Daniel Kellogg, Alvah Nash, John Russell Kellogg (1793-1868), Laman Ingersoll, Thomas Belden Butler, George Smith Catlin, Albert Gallatin Kellogg, Francis William Kellogg, Farrand Fassett Merrill and Charles Kellogg (1839-1903).
      Political family: Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Henry Wilson (1778-1826) — of Allentown, Lehigh County, Pa. Born in Pennsylvania, 1778. Democrat. U.S. Representative from Pennsylvania 7th District, 1823-26; died in office 1826. Died in 1826 (age about 48 years). Interment at Union and West End Cemetery, Allentown, Pa.; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Robert Pryor Henry (1788-1826) — also known as Robert P. Henry — of Hopkinsville, Christian County, Ky. Born in Scott County, Ky., November 24, 1788. Lawyer; served in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812; U.S. Representative from Kentucky 12th District, 1823-26; died in office 1826. Died in Hopkinsville, Christian County, Ky., August 25, 1826 (age 37 years, 274 days). Interment at Pioneer Cemetery, Hopkinsville, Ky.; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of William Henry (1761-1824) and Elizabeth Julia (Flournoy) Henry (1768-1813); brother of John Flournoy Henry and Gustavus Adolphus Henry (1804-1880); married, March 19, 1812, to Gabriella Frances Pitts; second cousin of Thomas Stanhope Flournoy; second cousin once removed of James Speed; third cousin once removed of Richard Aylett Buckner, Luke Pryor Blackburn and Joseph Clay Stiles Blackburn; third cousin twice removed of James Madison and William Taylor Madison; third cousin thrice removed of Smith Alford Blackburn; fourth cousin of Aylette Buckner; fourth cousin once removed of Aylett Hawes Buckner and James Francis Buckner.
      Political families: Blackburn-Slaughter-Buckner-Madison family of Kentucky; Meriwether-Kellogg-Tyler family of Virginia and Connecticut; Pendleton-Lee family; Bullitt-Fry-Henry family (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Jonathan Hunt (1787-1832) — of Vermont. Born in Vernon, Windham County, Vt., August 12, 1787. Member of Vermont state house of representatives, 1811, 1816-17, 1824; U.S. Representative from Vermont 1st District, 1827-32; died in office 1832. Died in Washington, D.C., May 15, 1832 (age 44 years, 277 days). Interment somewhere in Brattleboro, Vt.; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Orin Fowler (1791-1852) — of Plainfield, Windham County, Conn.; Fall River, Bristol County, Mass. Born in Lebanon, New London County, Conn., July 29, 1791. Missionary; minister; member of Massachusetts state senate, 1848; U.S. Representative from Massachusetts, 1849-52 (9th District 1849-51, 2nd District 1851-52); died in office 1852. Congregationalist. Died in Washington, D.C., September 3, 1852 (age 61 years, 36 days). Interment at North Burial Ground, Fall River, Mass.; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Brookins Campbell (1808-1853) — of Washington College, Washington County, Tenn. Born in Washington County, Tenn., 1808. Democrat. Lawyer; member of Tennessee state house of representatives, 1835-39, 1841-47, 1851-52; Speaker of the Tennessee State House of Representatives, 1845-47; major in the U.S. Army during the Mexican War; U.S. Representative from Tennessee 1st District, 1853; died in office 1853. Died in Washington, D.C., December 25, 1853 (age about 45 years). Interment at Providence Presbyterian Churchyard, Greeneville, Tenn.; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      James Lockhart (1806-1857) — of Indiana. Born in Auburn, Cayuga County, N.Y., February 13, 1806. Democrat. State court judge in Indiana, 1846; delegate to Indiana state constitutional convention, 1850-51; U.S. Representative from Indiana 1st District, 1851-53, 1857; died in office 1857. Died in Evansville, Vanderburgh County, Ind., September 7, 1857 (age 51 years, 206 days). Interment at Oak Hill Cemetery, Evansville, Ind.; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      James Humphrey (1811-1866) — of Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y. Born in Fairfield, Fairfield County, Conn., October 9, 1811. Republican. Lawyer; U.S. Representative from New York, 1859-61, 1865-66 (2nd District 1859-61, 3rd District 1865-66); died in office 1866. Died in Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y., June 16, 1866 (age 54 years, 250 days). Interment at Green-Wood Cemetery, Brooklyn, N.Y.; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
      John Coffee (1782-1836) — of Georgia. Born in Prince Edward County, Va., December 3, 1782. Democrat. Member of Georgia state legislature, 1820; U.S. Representative from Georgia at-large, 1833-36; died in office 1836. Died near Jacksonville, Telfair County, Ga., September 25, 1836 (age 53 years, 297 days). Original interment at a private or family graveyard, Telfair County, Ga.; reinterment in 1921 at McRae City Cemetery, McRae, Ga.; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery.
      Coffee County, Ga. is named for him.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      George L. Kinnard (1803-1836) — of Indiana. Born in Pennsylvania, 1803. Democrat. Member of Indiana state house of representatives, 1827; U.S. Representative from Indiana 6th District, 1833-36; died in office 1836. Died from injuries received in an explosion on the steamer Flora on the Ohio River, November 26, 1836 (age about 33 years). Interment at Presbyterian Burying Ground, Cincinnati, Ohio; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Jonathan Cilley (1802-1838) — of Thomaston, Knox County, Maine. Born in Nottingham, Rockingham County, N.H., July 2, 1802. Lawyer; member of Maine state house of representatives, 1831-36; Speaker of the Maine State House of Representatives, 1835-36; U.S. Representative from Maine 3rd District, 1837-38; died in office 1838. Killed in a duel by Representative William J. Graves of Kentucky, on the Marlboro Pike, in Prince George's County, Md., February 24, 1838 (age 35 years, 237 days). Interment at Elm Grove Cemetery, Thomaston, Maine; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery.
      Relatives: Brother of Joseph Cilley; nephew of Bradbury Cilley (1760-1831).
      Political family: Cilley family of Nottingham, New Hampshire.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — NNDB dossier
    Charles Ogle Charles Ogle (1798-1841) — of Somerset, Somerset County, Pa. Born in Somerset, Somerset County, Pa., 1798. Whig. Lawyer; U.S. Representative from Pennsylvania 18th District, 1837-41; died in office 1841. Noted for the "Gold Spoon Oration" which satirized President Martin Van Buren's expensive tastes; though little of it was true, the speech was widely reprinted and helped defeat Van Buren. Died, from tuberculosis, in Somerset, Somerset County, Pa., May 10, 1841 (age about 42 years). Interment at Union Cemetery, Somerset, Pa.; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Alexander Ogle (1766-1832); uncle of Andrew Jackson Ogle.
      Political family: Ogle family of Somerset, Pennsylvania.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
      Image source: Twentieth-Century Bench and Bar of Pennsylvania (1903)
      James Wray Williams (1792-1842) — of Maryland. Born in Maryland, October 8, 1792. Democrat. Member of Maryland state house of delegates, 1825, 1837-39; Speaker of the Maryland State House of Delegates, 1839; U.S. Representative from Maryland 3rd District, 1841-42; died in office 1842. Died in Harford County, Md., December 2, 1842 (age 50 years, 55 days). Interment a private or family graveyard, Harford County, Md.; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      William Soden Hastings (1798-1842) — of Massachusetts. Born in Mendon, Worcester County, Mass., June 3, 1798. Democrat. Member of Massachusetts state house of representatives, 1828; member of Massachusetts state senate, 1829-33; U.S. Representative from Massachusetts 9th District, 1837-42; died in office 1842. Died in Red Sulphur Springs, Monroe County, Va (now W.Va.), June 17, 1842 (age 44 years, 14 days). Interment at Old Cemetery, Mendon, Mass.; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Seth Hastings (1762-1831).
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      James Augustus Black (1793-1848) — of South Carolina. Born near Abbeville, Ninety Six District (now Abbeville County), S.C., 1793. Served in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812; iron manufacturer; member of South Carolina state house of representatives, 1826-28, 1832-35; U.S. Representative from South Carolina 1st District, 1843-48; died in office 1848. Died in Washington, D.C., April 3, 1848 (age about 54 years). Interment at First Presbyterian Churchyard, Columbia, S.C.; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
      Alexander Dromgoole Sims (1803-1848) — of South Carolina. Born in Virginia, 1803. Democrat. Member of South Carolina state legislature, 1840; U.S. Representative from South Carolina 4th District, 1845-48; died in office 1848. Died in 1848 (age about 45 years). Interment at First Baptist Cemetery, Darlington, S.C.; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery.
      Relatives: Nephew of George Coke Dromgoole (1797-1847).
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Chester Pierce Butler (1798-1850) — also known as Chester P. Butler — of Wilkes-Barre, Luzerne County, Pa. Born in Wilkes-Barre, Luzerne County, Pa., March 21, 1798. Member of Pennsylvania state house of representatives, 1832; U.S. Representative from Pennsylvania 11th District, 1847-50; died in office 1850. Died in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., October 5, 1850 (age 52 years, 198 days). Interment at Hollenback Cemetery, Wilkes-Barre, Pa.; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      John Henry Harmanson (1803-1850) — also known as John H. Harmanson — of Simmesport, Avoyelles Parish, La. Born in Norfolk, Va., January 15, 1803. Democrat. Member of Louisiana state senate, 1844; U.S. Representative from Louisiana 3rd District, 1845-50; died in office 1850. Died in New Orleans, Orleans Parish, La., October 24, 1850 (age 47 years, 282 days). Interment a private or family graveyard, Pointe Coupee Parish, La.; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Charles Andrews (1814-1852) — of Maine. Born in Paris, Oxford County, Maine, February 11, 1814. Democrat. Member of Maine state house of representatives, 1839-43; Speaker of the Maine State House of Representatives, 1842; U.S. Representative from Maine 4th District, 1851-52; died in office 1852. Died in Paris, Oxford County, Maine, April 30, 1852 (age 38 years, 79 days). Interment at Hillside Cemetery, Paris, Maine; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Presley Underwood Ewing (1822-1854) — of Russellville, Logan County, Ky. Born in Russellville, Logan County, Ky., September 1, 1822. Member of Kentucky state house of representatives, 1848-49; U.S. Representative from Kentucky 3rd District, 1851-54; died in office 1854. Died in Mammoth Cave, Edmonson County, Ky., September 27, 1854 (age 32 years, 26 days). Interment at Maple Grove Cemetery, Russellville, Ky.; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Silas Mainville Burroughs (1810-1860) — also known as Silas M. Burroughs — of Medina, Orleans County, N.Y. Born in Ovid, Seneca County, N.Y., July 16, 1810. Republican. Lawyer; member of New York state assembly from Orleans County, 1837, 1850-51, 1853; U.S. Representative from New York 31st District, 1857-60; died in office 1860. Died in Medina, Orleans County, N.Y., June 3, 1860 (age 49 years, 323 days). Interment at Boxwood Cemetery, Medina, N.Y.; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Truman Harrison Hoag (1816-1870) — of Toledo, Lucas County, Ohio. Born in Manlius, Onondaga County, N.Y., April 9, 1816. Democrat. Candidate for mayor of Toledo, Ohio, 1867; U.S. Representative from Ohio 10th District, 1869-70; died in office 1870. Died in Washington, D.C., February 5, 1870 (age 53 years, 302 days). Interment at Forest Cemetery, Toledo, Ohio; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      William Wilson Potter (1792-1839) — also known as William W. Potter — of Bellefonte, Centre County, Pa. Born in Potters Mills, Centre County, Pa., December 18, 1792. Democrat. Lawyer; U.S. Representative from Pennsylvania 14th District, 1837-39; died in office 1839. Died in Bellefonte, Centre County, Pa., October 28, 1839 (age 46 years, 314 days). Interment at Union Cemetery, Bellefonte, Pa.; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Joseph Hopkins Peyton (1808-1845) — of Tennessee. Born in Tennessee, 1808. Member of Tennessee state legislature, 1840; U.S. Representative from Tennessee 8th District, 1843-45; died in office 1845. Died in 1845 (age about 37 years). Interment a private or family graveyard, Sumner County, Tenn.; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery.
      Relatives: Brother of Balie Peyton (1803-1878).
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Rodolphus Dickinson (1797-1849) — of Ohio. Born in Hatfield, Hampshire County, Mass., December 28, 1797. Democrat. Lawyer; U.S. Representative from Ohio 6th District, 1847-49; died in office 1849. Died in Washington, D.C., March 20, 1849 (age 51 years, 82 days). Original interment in unknown location; reinterment at Oakwood Cemetery, Fremont, Ohio; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Charles Denison (1818-1867) — of Pennsylvania. Born in Wyoming Valley, Luzerne County, Pa., January 23, 1818. Democrat. Lawyer; U.S. Representative from Pennsylvania 12th District, 1863-67; died in office 1867; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Pennsylvania, 1864. Died in Wilkes-Barre, Luzerne County, Pa., June 27, 1867 (age 49 years, 155 days). Interment at Forty Fort Cemetery, Forty Fort, Pa.; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery.
      Relatives: Nephew of George Denison (1790-1831).
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Elijah Hise (1802-1867) — of Russellville, Logan County, Ky. Born in Allegheny County, Pa., July 4, 1802. Democrat. Lawyer; member of Kentucky state house of representatives, 1829; candidate for Lieutenant Governor of Kentucky, 1836; U.S. Charge d'Affaires to Guatemala, 1848-49; U.S. Representative from Kentucky 3rd District, 1866-67; died in office 1867. German ancestry. Died by a self-inflicted pistol shot, in Russellville, Logan County, Ky., May 8, 1867 (age 64 years, 308 days). He left a note declaring that he had "lost all hope of . saving the country from the impending disasters and ruin in which despotic and unconstitutional rule has involved her." However, later news reports disclosed that he had been about to be indicted for perjury and tax evasion, based on his statements as a candidate. Interment at Maple Grove Cemetery, Russellville, Ky.; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Frederick Hise and Nancy (Eckstein) Hise.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary
      James Hinds (1833-1868) — of Arkansas. Born near Salem, Washington County, N.Y., December 5, 1833. Republican. U.S. Representative from Arkansas 2nd District, 1868; died in office 1868. Shot and killed by George A. Clark, who was drunk at the time, near Indian Bay, Monroe County, Ark., October 22, 1868 (age 34 years, 322 days). Interment somewhere in East Norwich, Long Island, N.Y.; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Benjamin Franklin Hopkins (1829-1870) — also known as Benjamin F. Hopkins — of Madison, Dane County, Wis. Born in Hebron, Washington County, N.Y., April 22, 1829. Republican. Telegraph operator; private secretary to Gov. Coles Bashford, 1856-57; member of Wisconsin state senate, 1862-63; member of Wisconsin state assembly, 1866; U.S. Representative from Wisconsin 2nd District, 1867-70; died in office 1870. Died in Madison, Dane County, Wis., January 1, 1870 (age 40 years, 254 days). Interment at Forest Hill Cemetery, Madison, Wis.; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery.
      Presumably named for: Benjamin Franklin
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      James Johnson (1774-1826) — of Kentucky. Born in Orange County, Va., January 1, 1774. Democrat. Member of Kentucky state senate, 1808; Presidential Elector for Kentucky, 1820; U.S. Representative from Kentucky 5th District, 1825-26; died in office 1826. Died in Washington, D.C., August 13, 1826 (age 52 years, 224 days). Interment in private or family graveyard; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery.
      Relatives: Brother of Richard Mentor Johnson and John Telemachus Johnson; uncle of Robert Ward Johnson (1814-1879).
      Political family: Conway-Norvell-Johnson family.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Hedge Thompson (1780-1828) — of Salem, Salem County, N.J. Born in Salem, Salem County, N.J., January 28, 1780. Physician; member of New Jersey state house of assembly from Salem County, 1805-06; member of New Jersey State Council, 1819; U.S. Representative from New Jersey at-large, 1827-28; died in office 1828. Died, from a liver ailment, in Salem, Salem County, N.J., July 23, 1828 (age 48 years, 177 days). Interment at St. John's Episcopal Churchyard, Salem, N.J.; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
      Benjamin Franklin Deming (1790-1834) — also known as Benjamin F. Deming — of Vermont. Born in Danville, Caledonia County, Vt., August 12, 1790. Merchant; Caledonia County Clerk of Court, 1817-33; Caledonia County Probate Judge, 1821-33; member of Vermont Governor's Council, 1827-32; U.S. Representative from Vermont 5th District, 1833-34; died in office 1834. Died in Saratoga Springs, Saratoga County, N.Y., July 11, 1834 (age 43 years, 333 days). Interment at Danville Green Cemetery, Danville, Vt.; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery.
      Relatives: Married 1816 to Eunice Clark (1795-1870).
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
      David Dickson (d. 1836) — of Jackson, Hinds County, Miss. Born in Georgia. Physician; delegate to Mississippi state constitutional convention, 1817, 1832; member of Mississippi state senate, 1820-21; Lieutenant Governor of Mississippi, 1821; postmaster at Jackson, Miss., 1822-23; secretary of state of Mississippi, 1835; U.S. Representative from Mississippi at-large, 1835-36; died in office 1836. Died in Hot Springs, Garland County, Ark., 1836. Cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Alexander Hamilton Buell (1801-1853) — also known as Alexander H. Buell — of Herkimer County, N.Y. Born in Fairfield, Herkimer County, N.Y., July 4, 1801. Democrat. Member of New York state assembly from Herkimer County, 1845; U.S. Representative from New York 17th District, 1851-53; died in office 1853. Died in Washington, D.C., January 29, 1853 (age 51 years, 209 days). Interment at Episcopal Cemetery, Fairfield, N.Y.; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery.
      Presumably named for: Alexander Hamilton
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      George Whitfield Scranton (1811-1861) — of Pennsylvania. Born in Connecticut, 1811. Republican. U.S. Representative from Pennsylvania 12th District, 1859-61; died in office 1861. Died in 1861 (age about 50 years). Interment at Dunmore Cemetery, Dunmore, Pa.; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery.
      Relatives: Second cousin of Joseph Augustine Scranton (1838-1908).
      Political family: Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Thomas Estes Noell (1839-1867) — also known as Thomas E. Noell — of Perryville, Perry County, Mo. Born in Missouri, 1839. U.S. Representative from Missouri 3rd District, 1865-67; died in office 1867. Died in 1867 (age about 28 years). Interment at St. Mary's Cemetery, Perryville, Mo.; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of John William Noell (1816-1863).
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      David Heaton (1823-1870) — of Ohio; St. Anthony Falls, Hennepin County, Minn.; New Bern, Craven County, N.C. Born in Hamilton, Butler County, Ohio, March 10, 1823. Republican. Lawyer; member of Ohio state senate, 1855; member of Minnesota state senate, 1859-63 (23rd District 1859-60, 4th District 1861-63); delegate to North Carolina state constitutional convention, 1867; U.S. Representative from North Carolina 2nd District, 1868-70; died in office 1870. Died in Washington, D.C., June 25, 1870 (age 47 years, 107 days). Interment at National Cemetery, New Bern, N.C.; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of James Heaton (1779-1841) and Mary (Morrell) Heaton (1782-1871).
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial — Minnesota Legislator record
      Charles Slade (d. 1834) — of Illinois. Born in England. Democrat. Member of Illinois state house of representatives, 1820, 1826; U.S. Representative from Illinois 1st District, 1833-34; died in office 1834. Died near Vincennes, Knox County, Ind., July 26, 1834. Cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Zalmon Wildman (1775-1835) — of Danbury, Fairfield County, Conn. Born in Danbury, Fairfield County, Conn., February 16, 1775. Democrat. Hat manufacturer; banker; postmaster at Danbury, Conn., 1808-35; member of Connecticut state house of representatives, 1818-19; U.S. Representative from Connecticut at-large, 1835; died in office 1835. Died in Washington, D.C., December 10, 1835 (age 60 years, 297 days). Interment at Wooster Cemetery, Danbury, Conn.; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Ezekiel Wildman and Abigail (Hoyt) Wildman; half-brother of Nathaniel Hibbard Wildman; married, January 16, 1798, to Mary Betts Dibble (1776-1856); father of Frederick Seymour Wildman; first cousin of Eli Thacher Hoyt; first cousin thrice removed of Ira R. Wildman (1850-1939); third cousin of Abel Hoyt; third cousin once removed of David DeForest Wildman; third cousin twice removed of Charles Beers Hatch, Joseph Russell Hatch and Norris Hatch; third cousin thrice removed of Rounsevelle Wildman and Edwin Rounsevelle Wildman.
      Political families: Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York; Wildman family of Danbury, Connecticut (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
      James Church Alvord (1808-1839) — of Massachusetts. Born in Greenwich (now part of Quabbin Reservoir), Hampshire County, Mass., April 14, 1808. Member of Massachusetts state house of representatives, 1837; member of Massachusetts state senate, 1838; U.S. Representative from Massachusetts 6th District, 1839; died in office 1839. Died in Greenfield, Franklin County, Mass., September 27, 1839 (age 31 years, 166 days). Interment at Federal Street Cemetery, Greenfield, Mass.; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Simeon H. Anderson (1802-1840) — of Lancaster, Garrard County, Ky. Born near Lancaster, Garrard County, Ky., March 2, 1802. Member of Kentucky state house of representatives, 1828-29, 1832, 1836-38; U.S. Representative from Kentucky 5th District, 1839-40; died in office 1840. Died near Lancaster, Garrard County, Ky., August 11, 1840 (age 38 years, 162 days). Interment at Anderson Family Cemetery, Lancaster, Ky.; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery.
      Relatives: Father of William Clayton Anderson (1826-1861).
      Political family: Anderson family of Lancaster and Danville, Kentucky.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
      Anson Brown (1800-1840) — of Ballston Spa, Saratoga County, N.Y. Born in Charlton, Saratoga County, N.Y., 1800. Lawyer; one of the first directors of the Ballston Spa State Bank in 1830; U.S. Representative from New York 11th District, 1839-40; died in office 1840. Died in Ballston Spa, Saratoga County, N.Y., June 14, 1840 (age about 39 years). Interment at Ballston Spa Cemetery, Ballston Spa, N.Y.; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
      William Sterrett Ramsey (1810-1840) — also known as William S. Ramsey — of Carlisle, Cumberland County, Pa. Born in Carlisle, Cumberland County, Pa., June 12, 1810. Democrat. U.S. Representative from Pennsylvania 13th District, 1839-40; died in office 1840. Died in Baltimore, Md., October 17, 1840 (age 30 years, 127 days). Interment at Ashland Cemetery, Carlisle, Pa.; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Henry Black (1783-1841) — of Pennsylvania. Born near Somerset, Somerset County, Pa., February 25, 1783. Member of Pennsylvania state house of representatives, 1816-18; county judge in Pennsylvania, 1820-40; U.S. Representative from Pennsylvania 18th District, 1841; died in office 1841. Scotch-Irish ancestry. Died in Somerset, Somerset County, Pa., November 28, 1841 (age 58 years, 276 days). Interment a private or family graveyard, Somerset County, Pa.; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of James Black (1742-1803) and Jane (McDonough) Black (1756-1811); married 1809 to Mary Sullivan (1780-1852); father of Jeremiah Sullivan Black (1810-1883); grandfather of Chauncey Forward Black.
      Political family: Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Davis Dimock, Jr. (1801-1842) — of Pennsylvania. Born in Exeter, Luzerne County, Pa., September 17, 1801. Democrat. Lawyer; Susquehanna County Treasurer, 1834; U.S. Representative from Pennsylvania 17th District, 1841-42; died in office 1842. Died in Montrose, Susquehanna County, Pa., January 13, 1842 (age 40 years, 118 days). Interment at Montrose Cemetery, Montrose, Pa.; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
      John Millen (1804-1843) — of Savannah, Chatham County, Ga. Born in Savannah, Chatham County, Ga., 1804. Democrat. Lawyer; member of Georgia state house of representatives, 1828, 1834-35, 1839-40; U.S. Representative from Georgia at-large, 1843; died in office 1843. Episcopalian. Died in Savannah, Chatham County, Ga., October 15, 1843 (age about 39 years). Interment at Laurel Grove North Cemetery, Savannah, Ga.; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery.
      Relatives: First cousin of Richard Dennis Arnold (1808-1876).
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
      Heman Allen Moore (1809-1844) — of Ohio. Born in Plainfield, Washington County, Vt., August 27, 1809. Democrat. U.S. Representative from Ohio 10th District, 1843-44; died in office 1844. Died April 3, 1844 (age 34 years, 220 days). Interment at Green Lawn Cemetery, Columbus, Ohio; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Samuel Gardiner Wright (1781-1845) — also known as Samuel G. Wright — of Imlaystown, Monmouth County, N.J. Born in New Jersey, 1781. U.S. Representative from New Jersey 2nd District, 1845; died in office 1845. Quaker. Died July 30, 1845 (age about 64 years). Interment at East Branch Cemetery, Cox's Corner, N.J.; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Richard Platt Herrick (1791-1846) — also known as Richard P. Herrick — of Greenbush (now Rensselaer), Rensselaer County, N.Y. Born in Greenbush (now Rensselaer), Rensselaer County, N.Y., March 23, 1791. Member of New York state assembly from Rensselaer County, 1839; U.S. Representative from New York 12th District, 1845-46; died in office 1846. Died in Washington, D.C., June 20, 1846 (age 55 years, 89 days). Interment at Greenbush Cemetery, Rensselaer, N.Y.; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      John Westbrook Hornbeck (1804-1848) — of Allentown, Lehigh County, Pa. Born in Montague, Sussex County, N.J., January 24, 1804. Lawyer; U.S. Representative from Pennsylvania 6th District, 1847-48; died in office 1848. Died in Allentown, Lehigh County, Pa., January 16, 1848 (age 43 years, 357 days). Interment at Allentown Cemetery, Allentown, Pa.; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      John Milton Holley (1802-1848) — also known as John M. Holley — of Lyons, Wayne County, N.Y. Born in Salisbury, Litchfield County, Conn., November 10, 1802. Whig. Lawyer; member of New York state assembly from Wayne County, 1838, 1841; Wayne County District Attorney, 1842-45; U.S. Representative from New York 27th District, 1847-48; defeated, 1844; died in office 1848. Died in Jacksonville, Duval County, Fla., March 8, 1848 (age 45 years, 119 days). Interment at Rural Cemetery, Lyons, N.Y.; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Amos Eastman Wood (1810-1850) — of Ohio. Born in New York, 1810. Democrat. Member of Ohio state legislature, 1840; U.S. Representative from Ohio 6th District, 1849-50; died in office 1850. Died in 1850 (age about 40 years). Interment at Woodville Cemetery, Woodville, Ohio; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Henry Augustus Muhlenberg (1823-1854) — also known as Henry A. Muhlenberg — of Berks, Berks County, Pa. Born in Reading, Berks County, Pa., July 21, 1823. Democrat. Lawyer; member of Pennsylvania state senate 5th District, 1850-52; U.S. Representative from Pennsylvania 8th District, 1853-54; died in office 1854. German ancestry. Died, from tuberculosis, in Washington, D.C., January 9, 1854 (age 30 years, 172 days). Interment at Charles Evans Cemetery, Reading, Pa.; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Rebecca (Hiester) Muhlenberg (1781-1841) and Henry Augustus Philip Muhlenberg; married, November 16, 1847, to Anna Hall Muhlenberg (1829-1906); grandson of Joseph Hiester; grandnephew of John Peter Gabriel Muhlenberg (1746-1807) and Frederick Augustus Conrad Muhlenberg; granduncle of Frederick Augustus Muhlenberg and Hiester Henry Muhlenberg; first cousin once removed of Francis Swaine Muhlenberg and Henry Ernestus Muhlenberg; first cousin twice removed of John Hiester and Daniel Hiester (1747-1804); second cousin once removed of Daniel Hiester (1774-1834) and William Hiester; third cousin of Daniel Robeadeau Clymer, Isaac Ellmaker Hiester and Hiester Clymer; third cousin thrice removed of Edward Brooke Lee.
      Political family: Muhlenberg-Hiester family of Pennsylvania (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
      John Fryatt Snodgrass (1804-1854) — also known as John F. Snodgrass — of Parkersburg, Wood County, Va. (now W.Va.). Born in Berkeley County, Va. (now W.Va.), March 2, 1804. Democrat. Lawyer; delegate to Virginia state constitutional convention, 1850-51; U.S. Representative from Virginia 11th District, 1853-54; died in office 1854. Died suddenly, while arguing a case in court, in Parkersburg, Wood County, Va (now W.Va.), June 5, 1854 (age 50 years, 95 days). Interment at Riverview Cemetery, Parkersburg, W.Va.; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of William Snodgrass (1775-1836) and Ann (Fryatt) Snodgrass (1778-1852); married to Louisa Kinnaird; uncle of Isaac Breathed Snodgrass; granduncle of William Thornton Henshaw and John Snodgrass Henshaw; first cousin twice removed of Edgar Craven Henshaw (1859-1924).
      Political family: Henshaw-Breathitt-Snodgrass-Sappington family of West Virginia (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
      John Gallagher Montgomery (1805-1857) — of Pennsylvania. Born in Northumberland, Northumberland County, Pa., June 27, 1805. Democrat. Member of Pennsylvania state house of representatives, 1855; U.S. Representative from Pennsylvania 12th District, 1857; died in office 1857. Presumed to have been deliberately poisoned at a banquet during the inauguration of President James Buchanan, in Washington, D.C., and subsequently died, at Danville, Montour County, Pa., April 24, 1857 (age 51 years, 301 days). Interment at Episcopal Cemetery, Danville, Pa.; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Cyrus Spink (1793-1859) — of Ohio. Born in Berkshire County, Mass., March 24, 1793. Member of Ohio state legislature, 1830; Presidential Elector for Ohio, 1844; U.S. Representative from Ohio 14th District, 1859; died in office 1859. Died in Wooster, Wayne County, Ohio, May 31, 1859 (age 66 years, 68 days). Interment at Wooster Cemetery, Wooster, Ohio; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      John Schwartz (1793-1860) — of Reading, Berks County, Pa. Born in Sunbury, Northumberland County, Pa., October 27, 1793. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812; merchant; iron manufacturer; U.S. Representative from Pennsylvania 8th District, 1859-60; died in office 1860. Died in Washington, D.C., June 20, 1860 (age 66 years, 237 days). Interment at Charles Evans Cemetery, Reading, Pa.; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Philip Michael Schwartz (1758-1806) and Margaretha (Schlosser) Schwartz (1773-1841); married to Elizabeth Wood (1797-1879).
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
      Goldsmith Fox Bailey (1823-1862) — of Massachusetts. Born in Westmoreland, Cheshire County, N.H., July 17, 1823. Republican. Member of Massachusetts state house of representatives, 1857; member of Massachusetts state senate, 1858-60; U.S. Representative from Massachusetts 9th District, 1861-62; died in office 1862. Died in Fitchburg, Worcester County, Mass., May 8, 1862 (age 38 years, 295 days). Interment at Laurel Hill Cemetery, Fitchburg, Mass.; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Thomas Buchecker Cooper (1823-1862) — of Pennsylvania. Born in Coopersburg, Lehigh County, Pa., December 29, 1823. Democrat. U.S. Representative from Pennsylvania 7th District, 1861-62; died in office 1862. Died in Coopersburg, Lehigh County, Pa., April 4, 1862 (age 38 years, 96 days). Interment at Woodland Cemetery, Coopersburg, Pa.; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Luther Hanchett (1825-1862) — of Wisconsin. Born in Middlebury, Portage County, Ohio, October 25, 1825. Republican. Member of Wisconsin state senate, 1856-60; U.S. Representative from Wisconsin 2nd District, 1861-62; died in office 1862. Died in Plover, Portage County, Wis., November 24, 1862 (age 37 years, 30 days). Interment at Plover Cemetery, Plover, Wis.; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Cornelius Springer Hamilton (1821-1867) — of Union County, Ohio. Born in Gratiot, Muskingum County, Ohio, January 2, 1821. Republican. Delegate to Ohio state constitutional convention from Union County, 1850-51; member of Ohio state senate, 1856-57; U.S. Representative from Ohio 8th District, 1867; died in office 1867. Killed by his insane son, in Marysville, Union County, Ohio, December 22, 1867 (age 46 years, 354 days). Interment at Oakdale Cemetery, Marysville, Ohio; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Darwin Abel Finney (1814-1868) — also known as Darwin A. Finney — of Meadville, Crawford County, Pa. Born in Shrewsbury, Rutland County, Vt., August 11, 1814. Republican. Lawyer; burgess of Meadville, Pennsylvania, 1848; member of Pennsylvania state senate, 1856-61 (20th District 1856-57, 27th District 1858-61); U.S. Representative from Pennsylvania 20th District, 1867-68; died in office 1868. Died in Brussels, Belgium, August 25, 1868 (age 54 years, 14 days). Interment at Greendale Cemetery, Meadville, Pa.; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
      Nicholas Joseph Begich (1932-1972) — also known as Nick Begich — of Anchorage, Alaska. Born in Eveleth, St. Louis County, Minn., April 6, 1932. Democrat. Member of Alaska state senate, 1963-71; U.S. Representative from Alaska at-large, 1971-72; died in office 1972; alternate delegate to Democratic National Convention from Alaska, 1972. Alaska Native and Croatian ancestry. Disappeared while on a campaign flight from Anchorage to Juneau, and presumed killed in a plane crash, somewhere in Alaska, October 16, 1972 (age 40 years, 193 days). The wreckage was never found. Cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery.
      Relatives: Brother of Joseph R. Begich (1930-); married 1956 to Margaret Jendro; father of Nicholas J. Begich, Thomas Begich and Mark Begich (who married Deborah Bonito).
      Political family: Begich family of Anchorage, Alaska.
      Begich Peak in the Chugach Mountains, Anchorage, Alaska, is named for him.  — Begich Middle School, in Anchorage, Alaska, is named for him.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier


    Connecticut Avenue
    Washington, District of Columbia

    Politicians who have monuments here:
    George B. McClellan George Brinton McClellan (1826-1885) — also known as George B. McClellan; "Little Mac" — of New Jersey. Born in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., December 3, 1826. Democrat. General in the Union Army during the Civil War; candidate for President of the United States, 1864; Governor of New Jersey, 1878-81. Member, Freemasons; Loyal Legion. Died October 29, 1885 (age 58 years, 330 days). Interment at Riverview Cemetery, Trenton, N.J.; statue erected 1907 at Connecticut Avenue.
      Relatives: Son of George McClellan and Elizabeth Steinmetz (Brinton) McClellan; married to Mary Ellen Marcy (daughter of Gen. Randolph Barnes Marcy (1812-1887); granddaughter of Laban Marcy); father of George Brinton McClellan (1865-1940).
      Political family: Howe family of Massachusetts.
      Other politicians named for him: George HarveyGeorge B. HudnallGeorge B. McClellan
      See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
      Books about George B. McClellan: Stephen W. Sears, George B. McClellan : The Young Napoleon
      Image source: Life and Work of James G. Blaine (1893)


    Dumbarton Oaks Rose Garden
    Washington, District of Columbia
    See also Findagrave page for this location.
    Politicians buried here:
      Robert Woods Bliss (1875-1962) — of New York; Washington, D.C. Born in St. Louis, Mo., August 5, 1875. U.S. Consul in Venice, as of 1903; Foreign Service officer; U.S. Minister to Sweden, 1923-27; U.S. Ambassador to Argentina, 1927-33. Member, Council on Foreign Relations; American Academy of Political and Social Science. One of five retired diplomats who co-signed a famous 1954 letter protesting U.S. Sen. Joe McCarthy's attacks on the Foreign Service. Donated his Georgetown estate, Dumbarton Oaks, to Harvard University in 1940; after the war, it was the scene of the conference that led to the creation of the United Nations. Died in Washington, D.C., April 19, 1962 (age 86 years, 257 days). Cremated; ashes interred at Dumbarton Oaks Rose Garden.
      Relatives: Son of William Henry Bliss (1844-1932) and Annie Louise (Woods) Bliss; brother of Annie Louise Bliss (1878-1964; who married Charles Warren); married, April 14, 1908, to Mildred Barnes.
      Political family: Bliss-Warren family of Plymouth, Massachusetts.
      Epitaph: "Quod severeis metes." [as ye sow so ye shall reap.]
      See also U.S. State Dept career summary — Find-A-Grave memorial


    Federal Triangle
    Washington, District of Columbia

    Politicians who have monuments here:
    Franklin D. Roosevelt Franklin Delano Roosevelt (1882-1945) — also known as Franklin D. Roosevelt; "F.D.R." — of Hyde Park, Dutchess County, N.Y. Born in Hyde Park, Dutchess County, N.Y., January 30, 1882. Democrat. Lawyer; member of New York state senate 26th District, 1911-13; resigned 1913; U.S. Assistant Secretary of the Navy, 1913-20; candidate for Vice President of the United States, 1920; delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1920, 1924, 1928; speaker, 1944; contracted polio in the early 1920s; as a result, his legs were paralyzed for the rest of his life; Governor of New York, 1929-33; President of the United States, 1933-45; died in office 1945; on February 15, 1933, in Miami, Fla., he and Chicago mayor Anton J. Cermak were shot at by Guiseppe Zangara; Cermak was hit and mortally wounded. Episcopalian. Member, Freemasons; Alpha Delta Phi; Phi Beta Kappa; Elks; Grange; Knights of Pythias. Led the nation through the Depression and World War II. Died of a cerebral hemorrhage, in Warm Springs, Meriwether County, Ga., April 12, 1945 (age 63 years, 72 days). Interment at Roosevelt Home, Hyde Park, N.Y.; memorial monument at Federal Triangle; memorial monument at West Potomac Park.
      Relatives: Son of James Roosevelt (1828-1900) and Sara (Delano) Roosevelt (1854-1941); married, March 17, 1905, to Eleanor Roosevelt (niece of Theodore Roosevelt (1858-1919); first cousin of Corinne Douglas Robinson); father of James Roosevelt (1907-1991), Elliott Roosevelt and Franklin Delano Roosevelt, Jr.; half-uncle of Helen Roosevelt Robinson; second great-grandson of Edward Hutchinson Robbins; first cousin of Warren Delano Robbins (1885-1935) and Katharine Price Collier St. George; first cousin once removed of Helen Lloyd Aspinwall (1863-1929; who married Francis Emanuel Shober); first cousin four times removed of Ebenezer Huntington; first cousin six times removed of Benjamin Huntington; second cousin of Caroline Astor Drayton (who married William Phillips); second cousin thrice removed of Nicholas Roosevelt, Jr. and Jabez Williams Huntington; second cousin five times removed of Samuel Huntington, George Washington, Joshua Coit, Henry Huntington, Gurdon Huntington and Samuel Gager; third cousin twice removed of Philip DePeyster and James I. Roosevelt; third cousin thrice removed of Sulifand Sutherland Ross; fourth cousin once removed of Ulysses Simpson Grant, Robert Barnwell Roosevelt, Roger Wolcott and Theodore Roosevelt (1858-1919).
      Political families: Roosevelt family of New York City, New York; Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      Cross-reference: Ross T. McIntire — Milton Lipson — W. W. Howes — Bruce Barton — Hamilton Fish, Jr. — Joseph W. Martin, Jr. — Samuel I. Rosenman — Rexford G. Tugwell — Raymond Moley — Adolf A. Berle — George E. Allen — Lorence E. Asman — Grenville T. Emmet — Eliot Janeway — Jonathan Daniels — Ralph Bellamy
      The Franklin Delano Roosevelt Bridge (opened 1962), over Lubec Narrows, between Lubec, Maine and Campobello Island, New Brunswick, Canada, is named for him.  — The borough of Roosevelt, New Jersey (originally Jersey Homesteads; renamed 1945), is named for him.
      Politician named for him: Frank Garrison
      Coins and currency: His portrait appears on the U.S. dime (ten cent coin).
      See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — Find-A-Grave memorial
      Books about Franklin D. Roosevelt: James MacGregor Burns & Susan Dunn, The Three Roosevelts: Patrician Leaders Who Transformed America — Doris Kearns Goodwin, No Ordinary Time : Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt: The Home Front in World War II — Joseph Alsop & Roland Gelatt, FDR : 1882-1945 — Bernard Bellush, Franklin Roosevelt as Governor of New York — Robert H. Jackson, That Man : An Insider's Portrait of Franklin D. Roosevelt — Jonas Klein, Beloved Island : Franklin & Eleanor and the Legacy of Campobello — Conrad Black, Franklin Delano Roosevelt : Champion of Freedom — Charles Peters, Five Days in Philadelphia: The Amazing "We Want Willkie!" Convention of 1940 and How It Freed FDR to Save the Western World — Steven Neal, Happy Days Are Here Again : The 1932 Democratic Convention, the Emergence of FDR--and How America Was Changed Forever — H. W. Brands, Traitor to His Class: The Privileged Life and Radical Presidency of Franklin Delano Roosevelt — Hazel Rowley, Franklin and Eleanor: An Extraordinary Marriage — Alan Brinkley, Franklin Delano Roosevelt — Stanley Weintraub, Young Mr. Roosevelt: FDR's Introduction to War, Politics, and Life — Karen Bornemann Spies, Franklin D. Roosevelt (for young readers)
      Critical books about Franklin D. Roosevelt: Jim Powell, FDR's Folly: How Roosevelt and His New Deal Prolonged the Great Depression — John T. Flynn, The Roosevelt Myth — Burton W. Folsom, New Deal or Raw Deal?: How FDR's Economic Legacy Has Damaged America
      Fiction about Franklin D. Roosevelt: Philip Roth, The Plot Against America: A Novel
      Image source: New York Red Book 1936
    Andrew W. Mellon Andrew William Mellon (1855-1937) — also known as Andrew W. Mellon — of Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, Pa. Born in Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, Pa., March 24, 1855. Republican. Delegate to Republican National Convention from Pennsylvania, 1920, 1924 (speaker), 1928; U.S. Secretary of the Treasury, 1921-32; U.S. Ambassador to Great Britain, 1932-33. Episcopalian. Died in Southampton, Suffolk County, Long Island, N.Y., August 26, 1937 (age 82 years, 155 days). Original interment at Allegheny Cemetery, Pittsburgh, Pa.; subsequent interment at a private or family graveyard, Fauquier County, Va.; reinterment at Trinity Episcopal Church Cemetery, Upperville, Va.; memorial monument at Federal Triangle.
      Relatives: Son of Thomas Mellon (1813-1908) and Sarah Jane (Negley) Mellon (1817-1909); married 1900 to Nora McMullen (1878-1973); father of Ailsa Mellon (1901-1969; who married David Kirkpatrick Este Bruce); uncle of William Larimer Mellon (1868-1949); granduncle of Richard Mellon Scaife.
      Political family: Bruce-Mellon family of Virginia.
      Cross-reference: J. McKenzie Moss
      Carnegie Mellon University, in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, is partly named for him.  — Mellon Hall (dormitory, built 1926), at Harvard University Business School, Boston, Massachusetts, is named for him.
      See also Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
      Books about Andrew Mellon: David Cannadine, Mellon : An American Life
      Image source: American Review of Reviews, March 1922
    Oscar S. Straus Oscar Solomon Straus (1850-1926) — also known as Oscar S. Straus — of New York. Born in Germany, December 23, 1850. Progressive. Lawyer; U.S. Minister to Turkey, 1887-89, 1898-99; U.S. Secretary of Commerce and Labor, 1906-09; U.S. Ambassador to Turkey, 1909-10; candidate for Governor of New York, 1912; candidate for delegate to New York state constitutional convention at-large, 1914. Jewish. Member, Phi Beta Kappa. First Jewish U.S. cabinet member. Died in New York City (unknown county), N.Y., May 3, 1926 (age 75 years, 131 days). Interment at Beth El Cemetery, Glendale, Queens, N.Y.; memorial monument at Federal Triangle.
      Relatives: Son of Lazarus Straus (1809-1898) and Sara (Straus) Straus (1823-1876); brother of Isidor Straus; uncle of Jesse Isidor Straus and Nathan Straus, Jr.; granduncle of Stuart Scheftel (1911?-1994) and Ronald Peter Straus.
      Political family: Straus family of New York City, New York (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      See also U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
      Image source: Empire State Notables (1914)


    Garfield Circle
    Washington, District of Columbia

    Politicians who have monuments here:
    James A. Garfield James Abram Garfield (1831-1881) — also known as James A. Garfield — of Hiram, Portage County, Ohio. Born in a log cabin near Orange, Cuyahoga County, Ohio, November 19, 1831. Republican. Lawyer; college professor; president, Eclectic University (now Hiram College); member of Ohio state senate, 1859-61; general in the Union Army during the Civil War; U.S. Representative from Ohio 19th District, 1863-81; President of the United States, 1881; died in office 1881. Disciples of Christ. English ancestry. Member, Freemasons; Delta Upsilon. Shot by the assassin Charles J. Guiteau, in the Baltimore & Potomac Railroad Station, Washington, D.C., July 2, 1881, and died from the effects of the wound and infection, in Elberon, Monmouth County, N.J., September 19, 1881 (age 49 years, 304 days). Interment at Lake View Cemetery, Cleveland, Ohio; statue erected 1887 at Garfield Circle; statue at Golden Gate Park, San Francisco, Calif.
      Relatives: Son of Abram Garfield (1799-1833) and Elizabeth (Ballou) Garfield (1801-1888); married, November 11, 1858, to Lucretia "Crete" Rudolph (1832-1918); father of James Rudolph Garfield; fourth cousin of Eli Thayer; fourth cousin once removed of John Alden Thayer (1857-1917).
      Political families: Conger-Hungerford family; Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      Cross-reference: William S. Maynard
      Garfield counties in Colo., Mont., Neb., Okla., Utah and Wash. are named for him.
      Garfield Mountain, in the Cascade Range, King County, Washington, is named for him.  — The city of Garfield, New Jersey, is named for him.
      Politician named for him: James G. Stewart
      Coins and currency: His portrait appeared on the U.S. $20 gold certificate in 1898-1905.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
      Books about James A. Garfield: Allan Peskin, Garfield: A Biography — Justus D. Doenecke, The Presidencies of James A. Garfield and Chester A. Arthur
      Image source: James G. Blaine, Twenty Years of Congress, vol. 2 (1886)


    Georgetown University Jesuit Cemetery
    Washington, District of Columbia
    Politicians buried here:
      Richard T. McSorley (1914-2002) — of Washington, D.C. Born in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., October 2, 1914. Democrat. Jesuit priest; university professor; alternate delegate to Democratic National Convention from District of Columbia, 1968. Died in Washington, D.C., October 17, 2002 (age 88 years, 15 days). Interment at Georgetown University Jesuit Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Richard T. McSorley (1886-1972) and Marguerita V. (Cosgrove) McSorley (1887-1952).
      See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial


    Glenwood Cemetery
    2219 Lincoln Road N.E.
    Washington, District of Columbia
    Founded 1854
    See also Findagrave page for this location.
    Politicians buried here:
      Amos Kendall (1789-1869) — Born in Dunstable, Middlesex County, Mass., August 16, 1789. U.S. Postmaster General, 1835-40. Died in Washington, D.C., November 12, 1869 (age 80 years, 88 days). Interment at Glenwood Cemetery.
      Kendall County, Ill. is named for him.
      See also NNDB dossier
      Edwin Freemont Ladd (1859-1925) — also known as Edwin F. Ladd — of Fargo, Cass County, N.Dak. Born in Starks, Somerset County, Maine, December 13, 1859. Republican. Chemist; college professor; president, North Dakota Agricultural College (now North Dakota State University), 1916-21; U.S. Senator from North Dakota, 1921-25; died in office 1925. Member, Phi Gamma Delta. Died in Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, Md., June 22, 1925 (age 65 years, 191 days). Interment at Glenwood Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of John Ladd and Rosilla (Locke) Ladd; married, August 16, 1893, to Rizpah Sprogle.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      John Wesley Hoyt (1831-1912) — also known as John W. Hoyt — of Madison, Dane County, Wis. Born near Worthington, Franklin County, Ohio, October 13, 1831. Wisconsin railroad commissioner, 1874-76; Governor of Wyoming Territory, 1878-82. Methodist. Died in Chevy Chase, Montgomery County, Md., May 23, 1912 (age 80 years, 223 days). Interment at Glenwood Cemetery.
      Presumably named for: John Wesley
      Hoyt Peak, in Yellowstone National Park, Park County, Wyoming, is named for him.
      See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
      Thomas Welles Bartley (1812-1885) — also known as Thomas W. Bartley — of Mansfield, Richland County, Ohio. Born February 11, 1812. Democrat. Governor of Ohio, 1844; U.S. Attorney for Ohio, 1845-50; justice of Ohio state supreme court, 1852-59; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Ohio, 1860. Died June 20, 1885 (age 73 years, 129 days). Interment at Glenwood Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Mordecai Bartley (1783-1870).
      Alexander Gordon Penn (1799-1866) — also known as Alexander G. Penn — of near Covington, St. Tammany Parish, La.; New Orleans, Orleans Parish, La. Born in Patrick County, Va., May 10, 1799. Democrat. Planter; member of Louisiana state house of representatives, 1830; postmaster at New Orleans, La., 1843-49; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Louisiana, 1844, 1852, 1856; U.S. Representative from Louisiana 3rd District, 1850-53; lumber mill owner. Died in Washington, D.C., May 7, 1866 (age 66 years, 362 days). Interment at Glenwood Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Edmund William McGregor Mackey (1846-1884) — also known as Edmund W. M. Mackey — of Charleston, Charleston County, S.C. Born in Charleston, Charleston County, S.C., March 8, 1846. Republican. Lawyer; delegate to South Carolina state constitutional convention from Orangeburg County, 1868; Charleston County Sheriff, 1868-72; delegate to Republican National Convention from South Carolina, 1872, 1880; member of South Carolina state house of representatives, 1873, 1877; U.S. Representative from South Carolina, 1875-76, 1882-84 (2nd District 1875-76, 1882-83, 7th District 1883-84); died in office 1884. Died in Washington, D.C., January 27, 1884 (age 37 years, 325 days). Interment at Glenwood Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Chester Bidwell Darrall (1842-1908) — also known as Chester B. Darrall — of Brashear (now Morgan City), St. Mary Parish, La.; Franklin, St. Mary Parish, La. Born near Addison, Somerset County, Pa., June 24, 1842. Republican. Physician; served in the Union Army during the Civil War; merchant; planter; member of Louisiana state senate, 1868; U.S. Representative from Louisiana 3rd District, 1869-79, 1881-83; delegate to Republican National Convention from Louisiana, 1888. Died in Washington, D.C., January 1, 1908 (age 65 years, 191 days). Interment at Glenwood Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
      Jesse Johnson Yeates (1829-1892) — of North Carolina. Born near Murfreesboro, Hertford County, N.C., May 29, 1829. Democrat. Member of North Carolina house of commons, 1860-62; served in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; delegate to North Carolina state constitutional convention, 1871; U.S. Representative from North Carolina 1st District, 1875-79, 1881. Died in Washington, D.C., September 5, 1892 (age 63 years, 99 days). Interment at Glenwood Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      James Rankin Young (1847-1924) — of Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa.; Washington, D.C. Born in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., March 10, 1847. Republican. Served in the Union Army during the Civil War; newspaper reporter; U.S. Representative from Pennsylvania 4th District, 1897-1903. Died December 18, 1924 (age 77 years, 283 days). Interment at Glenwood Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of George Rankin Young and Eliza (Russell) Young; brother of John Russell Young (1840-1899); married 1874 to Mary Barclay; father of James Barclay Young.
      Political family: Young family of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Vannoy Hartrog Manning (1839-1892) — also known as Van H. Manning — of Hamburg, Ashley County, Ark.; Holly Springs, Marshall County, Miss. Born near Raleigh, Wake County, N.C., July 26, 1839. Democrat. Lawyer; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Arkansas, 1860; colonel in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; U.S. Representative from Mississippi 2nd District, 1877-83. Died in Branchville, Prince George's County, Md., November 2, 1892 (age 53 years, 99 days). Interment at Glenwood Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      William James Purman (1840-1928) — of Jackson County, Fla. Born in Pennsylvania, 1840. Republican. Delegate to Florida state constitutional convention from Jackson County, 1868; member of Florida state legislature, 1870; U.S. Representative from Florida, 1873-77 (at-large 1873-75, 1st District 1875-77); delegate to Republican National Convention from Florida, 1876. Died in 1928 (age about 88 years). Cremated; ashes interred at Glenwood Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Ransom Hooker Gillet (1800-1876) — also known as Ransom H. Gillet — of Ogdensburg, St. Lawrence County, N.Y. Born in New Lebanon, Columbia County, N.Y., January 27, 1800. Democrat. Lawyer; postmaster at Ogdensburg, N.Y., 1830-33; delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1832, 1840; U.S. Representative from New York 14th District, 1833-37. Died in Washington, D.C., October 24, 1876 (age 76 years, 271 days). Interment at Glenwood Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      John Jones Roane (1794-1869) — of Virginia. Born in Virginia, 1794. Democrat. Member of Virginia state legislature, 1830; U.S. Representative from Virginia 12th District, 1831-33. Died in 1869 (age about 75 years). Interment at Glenwood Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of John Roane (1766-1838).
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Hiram Walbridge (1821-1870) — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in Ithaca, Tompkins County, N.Y., February 2, 1821. Democrat. U.S. Representative from New York 3rd District, 1853-55. Died, at the Astor House hotel, New York, New York County, N.Y., December 6, 1870 (age 49 years, 307 days). Interment at Glenwood Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Chester Walbridge (1791-1860) and Mary (Walbridge) Walbridge (1795-1867); nephew of Henry Sanford Walbridge (1801-1869); grandnephew of Ebenezer William Walbridge; third cousin of John Jay Walbridge and David Safford Walbridge; third cousin once removed of John Hill Walbridge and Henry E. Walbridge; third cousin twice removed of Hiram Augustus Huse and Cyrus Packard Walbridge; third cousin thrice removed of Clair Hiram Walbridge.
      Political family: Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
      John Ambler Smith (1847-1892) — also known as J. Ambler Smith — of Richmond, Va. Born in Virginia, 1847. Republican. Member of Virginia state legislature, 1870; U.S. Representative from Virginia 3rd District, 1873-75. Died in 1892 (age about 45 years). Interment at Glenwood Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      William Embre Gaines (1844-1912) — also known as William E. Gaines — of Burkeville, Nottoway County, Va. Born near Charlotte Court House, Charlotte County, Va., August 30, 1844. Republican. Served in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; member of Virginia state senate, 1883-87; U.S. Representative from Virginia 4th District, 1887-89. Died in Washington, D.C., May 4, 1912 (age 67 years, 248 days). Interment at Glenwood Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Selucius Garfielde (1822-1881) — of Paris, Bourbon County, Ky.; El Dorado County, Calif.; Seattle, King County, Wash. Born in Shoreham, Addison County, Vt., December 8, 1822. Democrat. Delegate to Kentucky state constitutional convention, 1849; member of California state assembly 12th District, 1853-54; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Kentucky, 1856; Delegate to U.S. Congress from Washington Territory, 1869-73; defeated, 1860. Died in Washington, D.C., April 13, 1881 (age 58 years, 126 days). Interment at Glenwood Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Eugene Hermann Plumacher (1837-1910) — also known as Eugene H. Plumacher — of Nashville, Davidson County, Tenn. Born in Germany, 1837. Naturalized U.S. citizen; colonel in the Union Army during the Civil War; university professor; inventor; U.S. Consul in Maracaibo, 1883-1909. German ancestry. Member, Freemasons. Founded a leprosy hospital in Venezuela. Died in Washington, D.C., September 25, 1910 (age about 73 years). Interment at Glenwood Cemetery.
      Relatives: Married to Olga Maria Pauline Hunerwadel (1839-1895).
      See also Find-A-Grave memorial
      John Stewart (1822-1904) — of Washington, D.C. Born in Perth, Scotland, March 22, 1822. Civil engineer; Consul-General for Paraguay in Washington, D.C., 1884-1904. Scottish ancestry. Died in Washington, D.C., December 6, 1904 (age 82 years, 259 days). Interment at Glenwood Cemetery.
      Relatives: Married 1853 to Janet Crighton (1830-1890).
      See also Find-A-Grave memorial
      Alfred Schücking (1818-1898) — of Washington, D.C. Born in Münster, Prussia (now Germany), 1818. Lawyer; Vice-Consul for Netherlands in Washington, D.C., 1863-95; Consular Agent for Germany in Washington, D.C., 1873-97. Died in Washington, D.C., October 12, 1898 (age about 80 years). Interment at Glenwood Cemetery.
      See also Find-A-Grave memorial
      Josiah Love Pearcy (1843-1909) — also known as Josiah L. Pearcy — Born in Tennessee, 1843. Served in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; U.S. Consul in Aspinwall, as of 1897; secretary to U.S. Senator Robert L. Taylor of Tennessee. Member, Ku Klux Klan. Died, from Bright's disease, in Washington, D.C., June 18, 1909 (age about 65 years). Interment at Glenwood Cemetery.
      See also Find-A-Grave memorial
      Clifford Wayne McGlasson (1897-1939) — also known as Clifford W. McGlasson — of Washington, D.C. Born in Cincinnati, Hamilton County, Ohio, October 31, 1897. Stenographer; U.S. Vice Consul in Turin, 1924; Gothenberg, 1924-25; Prague, 1926-27, 1929; Port Said, 1927-29; Lausanne, 1929-32. Died in Prague, Czechoslovakia (now Czechia), 1939 (age about 41 years). Cremated; ashes interred at Glenwood Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Clifford Howell McGlasson (1878-1970) and Matilda (Veth) McGlasson (1879-1915); married, July 25, 1928, to Bozena Pospisilova.
      See also Find-A-Grave memorial
    Politicians formerly buried here:
      William Howard Thompson (1871-1928) — also known as William H. Thompson — of Garden City, Finney County, Kan. Born in Crawfordsville, Montgomery County, Ind., October 14, 1871. Democrat. District judge in Kansas, 1906-13; U.S. Senator from Kansas, 1913-19; defeated, 1918; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Kansas, 1916 (member, Platform and Resolutions Committee); candidate for U.S. Representative from Kansas 2nd District, 1922. Died, from heart disease, in Washington, D.C., February 9, 1928 (age 56 years, 118 days). Original interment at Glenwood Cemetery; reinterment in 1928 at Mt. Hope Cemetery, Topeka, Kan.
      Relatives: Son-in-law of Andrew Jackson Felt (1833-1912).
      Political family: Libby-Felt family of Maine (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial


    Gompers Square
    Washington, District of Columbia

    Politicians who have monuments here:
      Samuel Gompers (1850-1924) — Born in London, England, January 27, 1850. Democrat. Cigar maker; Founder and president, American Federation of Labor; candidate for delegate to New York state constitutional convention at-large, 1914. Jewish. Member, Freemasons; Scottish Rite Masons. Died in San Antonio, Bexar County, Tex., December 13, 1924 (age 74 years, 321 days). Interment at Sleepy Hollow Cemetery, Sleepy Hollow, N.Y.; memorial monument at Gompers Square; statue at Gompers Park, Chicago, Ill.
      Samuel Gompers High School (built 1930, closed about 2012), in Bronx, New York, was named for him.  — Gompers School (also known as Eastern High School), Baltimore, Maryland, was named for him.
      See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial


    Graceland Cemetery
    Washington, District of Columbia
    See also Findagrave page for this location.
    Politicians buried here:
      Richard Harvey Cain (1825-1887) — also known as Richard H. Cain — of Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y.; Charleston, Charleston County, S.C. Born in Greenbrier County, Va. (now W.Va.), April 12, 1825. Republican. Delegate to South Carolina state constitutional convention from Charleston County, 1868; member of South Carolina state senate, 1868-72; U.S. Representative from South Carolina, 1873-75, 1877-79 (at-large 1873-75, 2nd District 1877-79). Methodist. African ancestry. Bishop of African Methodist Episcopal Church, 1880-87. Died in Washington, D.C., January 18, 1887 (age 61 years, 281 days). Interment at Graceland Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page


    Hancock Circle
    Washington, District of Columbia

    Politicians who have monuments here:
    Winfield S. Hancock Winfield Scott Hancock (1824-1886) — also known as Winfield S. Hancock — of St. Louis, Mo.; Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, Calif.; New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in Montgomery County, Pa., February 14, 1824. Democrat. General in the Union Army during the Civil War; candidate for Democratic nomination for President, 1868, 1876; candidate for President of the United States, 1880. Member, Freemasons; Loyal Legion. Died in Governor's Island, New York County, N.Y., February 9, 1886 (age 61 years, 360 days). Interment at Montgomery Cemetery, Norristown, Pa.; statue erected 1896 at Hancock Circle.
      Presumably named for: Winfield Scott
      Relatives: Son of Benjamin Franklin Hancock (1800-1867) and Elizabeth (Hoxworth) Hancock (1801-1879); married, February 1, 1850, to Almira Dubois Russell (1832-1893); uncle of Laura Elizabeth Hancock (1850-1943; who married William Rush Merriam (1849-1931)).
      Political families: Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York; Grant-Dent family of San Francisco, California (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      Mount Hancock, in Yellowstone National Park, Teton County, Wyoming, is named for him.
      Coins and currency: His portrait appeared on the U.S. $2 silver certificate in the 1880s and early 1890s.
      See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
      Books about Winfield Scott Hancock: David M. Jordan, Winfield Scott Hancock : A Soldier's Life
      Image source: Cornell University Library


    Holy Rood Cemetery
    Washington, District of Columbia
    See also Findagrave page for this location.
    Politicians buried here:
      James Gordon Finley (1885-1929) — also known as James G. Finley — of Washington, D.C. Born in Washington, D.C., January 31, 1885. Wholesale grocery worker; real estate business; Foreign Service officer; U.S. Vice Consul in Lyon, 1917-19; Marseille, 1919-21, 1929, died in office 1929; Lille, 1921-23, 1923; La Rochelle, 1923; Boulogne-sur-Mer, 1923; Patras, 1923-25; Montreal, 1925, 1925-26; Sherbrooke, 1925; Le Havre, 1928-29. Died in Le Havre, France, May 26, 1929 (age 44 years, 115 days). Interment at Holy Rood Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Joseph Finley (1848-1895) and Bridget Finley (died 1901).
      See also Find-A-Grave memorial


    John A. Wilson Building Grounds
    Washington, District of Columbia

    Politicians who have monuments here:
      Alexander Robey Shepherd (1835-1902) — also known as Alexander R. Shepherd; "Boss Shepherd"; "The Father of Modern Washington" — of Washington, D.C.; Batopilas, Chihuahua. Born in Washington, D.C., January 30, 1835. Republican. Plumber; real estate developer; Governor of the District of Columbia, 1873-74. Died, from appendicitis and peritonitis, in Batopilas, Chihuahua, September 12, 1902 (age 67 years, 225 days). Entombed at Rock Creek Cemetery; statue at John A. Wilson Building Grounds.
      Relatives: Married, January 30, 1861, to Mary Grice Young (1843-1930).
      Cross-reference: André L. Bagger
      The World War II Liberty ship SS Alexander R. Shepherd (built 1944, scrapped 1965) was named for him.
      See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial


    Judiciary Park
    Washington, District of Columbia

    Politicians who have monuments here:
    Abraham Lincoln Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865) — also known as "Honest Abe"; "Old Abe"; "The Rail-Splitter"; "The Illinois Baboon" — of New Salem, Menard County, Ill.; Springfield, Sangamon County, Ill. Born in a log cabin, Hardin County (part now in Larue County), Ky., February 12, 1809. Republican. Served in the U.S. Army during the Black Hawk War; postmaster; lawyer; member of Illinois state house of representatives, 1834-41; U.S. Representative from Illinois 7th District, 1847-49; candidate for Republican nomination for Vice President, 1856; candidate for U.S. Senator from Illinois, 1858; President of the United States, 1861-65; died in office 1865; His election as president in 1860 precipitated the Civil War; determined to preserve the Union, he led the North to victory on the battlefield, freed the slaves in the conquered states, and in doing this, redefined American nationhood. He was. English ancestry. Elected in 1900 to the Hall of Fame for Great Americans. Shot by the assassin John Wilkes Booth, during a play at Ford's Theater, in Washington, D.C., April 14, 1865; died at Peterson's Boarding House, across the street, the following day, April 15, 1865 (age 56 years, 62 days). Interment at Oak Ridge Cemetery, Springfield, Ill.; memorial monument at National Mall; statue erected 1868 at Judiciary Park.
      Relatives: Son of Thomas Lincoln (1778-1851) and Nancy (Hanks) Lincoln (1784-1818); married, November 4, 1842, to Mary Ann Todd (1818-1882; sister-in-law of Ninian Wirt Edwards (1809-1889); half-sister-in-law of N. H. R. Dawson; aunt of Martha Dee Todd; grandniece of David Rittenhouse Porter); father of Robert Todd Lincoln; second cousin four times removed of Richard Henry Lee, Francis Lightfoot Lee and Arthur Lee; third cousin twice removed of Levi Lincoln; third cousin thrice removed of Thomas Sim Lee, Henry Lee, Charles Lee, Edmund Jennings Lee and Zachary Taylor; fourth cousin once removed of Levi Lincoln, Jr. and Enoch Lincoln.
      Political families: Lincoln-Lee family; Edwards-Cook family of Illinois and Nebraska (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      Cross-reference: Clement Claiborne Clay, Jr. — Isham N. Haynie — William M. Stone — John Pitcher — Stephen Miller — John T. Stuart — William H. Seward — Henry L. Burnett — Judah P. Benjamin — Robert Toombs — Richard Taylor Jacob — George W. Jones — James Adams — John G. Nicolay — Edward Everett — Stephen T. Logan — Francis P. Blair — John Hay — Henry Reed Rathbone — James A. Ekin — Frederick W. Seward — John H. Surratt — John H. Surratt, Jr. — James Shields
      Lincoln counties in Ark., Colo., Idaho, Kan., La., Minn., Miss., Mont., Neb., Nev., N.M., Okla., Ore., Wash., W.Va., Wis. and Wyo. are named for him.
      The city of Lincoln, Nebraska, is named for him.  — Lincoln Memorial University, in Harrogate, Tennessee, is named for him.  — Lincoln University, in Jefferson City, Missouri, is named for him.  — Lincoln University, near Oxford, Pennsylvania, is named for him.
      Other politicians named for him: Abraham L. KeisterAbraham L. TuckerAbraham L. BrickAbraham L. KelloggAbraham Lincoln BernsteinA. Lincoln ReileyA. L. HelmickAbraham L. SuttonA. Lincoln AckerAbraham L. OsgoodAbraham L. WitmerAbraham L. PhillipsAbraham L. PaytonA. L. AuthA. Lincoln MooreA. Lincoln NiditchAbraham L. RubensteinAbraham L. Davis, Jr.Abraham L. FreedmanA. L. MarovitzLincoln GordonAbraham L. BannerAbraham Lincoln Tosti
      Coins and currency: His portrait has appeared on the U.S. penny (one cent coin) since 1909, and on the $5 bill since 1913. From the 1860s until 1927, his portrait also appeared on U.S. notes and certificates of various denominations from $1 to $500.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — Find-A-Grave memorial
      Books about Abraham Lincoln: David Herbert Donald, Lincoln — George Anastaplo, Abraham Lincoln : A Constitutional Biography — G. S. Boritt, ed., The Lincoln Enigma : The Changing Faces of an American Icon — Albert J. Beveridge, Abraham Lincoln 1809-1858 — Geoffrey Perret, Lincoln's War : The Untold Story of America's Greatest President as Commander in Chief — David Herbert Donald, We Are Lincoln Men : Abraham Lincoln and His Friends — Edward Steers, Jr., Blood on the Moon: The Assassination of Abraham Lincoln — Mario Cuomo, Why Lincoln Matters : Today More Than Ever — Michael W. Kauffman, American Brutus : John Wilkes Booth and the Lincoln Conspiracies — Doris Kearns Goodwin, Team of Rivals : The Political Genius of Abraham Lincoln — Joshua Wolf Shenk, Lincoln's Melancholy : How Depression Challenged a President and Fueled His Greatness — John Channing Briggs, Lincoln's Speeches Reconsidered — Ronald C. White, Jr., The Eloquent President : A Portrait of Lincoln Through His Words — Harold Holzer, Lincoln at Cooper Union : The Speech That Made Abraham Linco ln President — Michael Lind, What Lincoln Believed : The Values and Convictions of America's Greatest President — Doris Kearns Goodwin, Team of Rivals : The Political Genius of Abraham Lincoln — Michael Burlingame, ed., Abraham Lincoln: The Observations of John G. Nicolay and John Hay — Thomas J. Craughwell, Stealing Lincoln's Body — Roy Morris, Jr., The Long Pursuit: Abraham Lincoln's Thirty-Year Struggle with Stephen Douglas for the Heart and Soul of America — John Stauffer, Giants: The Parallel Lives of Frederick Douglass and Abraham Lincoln — Karen Judson, Abraham Lincoln (for young readers) — Maira Kalman, Looking at Lincoln (for young readers)
      Critical books about Abraham Lincoln: Thomas J. DiLorenzo, The Real Lincoln : A New Look at Abraham Lincoln, His Agenda, and an Unnecessary War
      Fiction about Abraham Lincoln: Gore Vidal, Lincoln: A Novel
      Image source: Portrait & Biographical Album of Washtenaw County (1891)


    Lafayette Park
    Washington, District of Columbia

    Politicians who have monuments here:
    Andrew Jackson Andrew Jackson (1767-1845) — also known as "Old Hickory"; "The Farmer of Tennessee"; "King Andrew the First" — of Nashville, Davidson County, Tenn. Born, in a log cabin, in The Waxhaws, Lancaster County, S.C., March 15, 1767. Democrat. Lawyer; U.S. Attorney for Tennessee, 1790-97; U.S. Representative from Tennessee at-large, 1796-97; U.S. Senator from Tennessee, 1797-98, 1823-25; justice of Tennessee state supreme court, 1798; general in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812; Governor of Florida Territory, 1821; President of the United States, 1829-37; censured by the U.S. Senate in 1834 over his removal of federal deposits from the Bank of the United States; on January 30, 1835, while attending funeral services at the Capitol Building for Rep. Warren R. Davis of South Carolina, he was shot at with two guns -- which both misfired -- by Richard Lawrence, a house painter (later found not guilty by reason of insanity). Presbyterian. Scotch-Irish ancestry. Member, Freemasons. Killed Charles Dickinson in a pistol duel, May 30, 1806; also dueled with Thomas Hart Benton and Waightstill Avery. Elected in 1910 to the Hall of Fame for Great Americans. Died, of dropsy (congestive heart failure), in Nashville, Davidson County, Tenn., June 8, 1845 (age 78 years, 85 days). Interment at The Hermitage, Nashville, Tenn.; statue erected 1853 at Lafayette Park; statue erected 1856 at Jackson Square, New Orleans, La.
      Relatives: Son of Andrew Jackson (1730-1767) and Elizabeth (Hutchinson) Jackson (1737-1781); married, January 17, 1794, to Rachel (Donelson) Robards (1767-1828; aunt of Andrew Jackson Donelson (1799-1871)).
      Political families: Marshall-Harrison-Randolph-Cabell family of Virginia; Caffery family of Louisiana (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      Cross-reference: Francis P. Blair
      Jackson counties in Ala., Ark., Colo., Fla., Ill., Ind., Iowa, Kan., Ky., La., Mich., Miss., Mo., N.C., Ohio, Okla., Ore., Tenn., Tex., W.Va. and Wis., and Hickory County, Mo., are named for him.
      Other politicians named for him: Andrew J. DonelsonAndrew Jackson MillerAndrew J. FaulkAndrew Jackson TitusAndrew Jackson IsacksAndrew Jackson HamiltonAndrew J. HarlanAndrew J. KuykendallAndrew J. ThayerElam A. J. GreeleyAndrew Jackson IngleAndrew J. OgleAndrew Jackson CarrAndrew J. WatermanAndrew J. BentleyAndrew J. RogersWilliam A. J. SparksAndrew Jackson PoppletonAndrew J. HunterAndrew Jackson BryantAndrew J. BealeA. J. ClementsAndrew Jackson BakerAndrew J. FeltA. J. KingAndrew J. SawyerAndrew Jackson GreenfieldAndrew Jackson CaldwellAndrew Jackson GahaganAndrew Jackson BishipAndrew Jackson HoustonAndrew J. CobbAndrew J. MontagueAndrew J. BarchfeldAndrew J. BallietAndrew J. KirkAndrew J. LivingstonA. J. SherwoodAndrew Jackson StewartAndrew J. MayAndrew J. McConnicoAndrew J. SawyerAndrew J. BrewerAndrew BettwyAndrew J. TransueAndrew Jackson GravesAndrew Jackson GilbertAndrew J. GoodwinAndrew J. HinshawAndy YoungAndrew Jackson Kupper
      Coins and currency: His portrait appears on the U.S. $20 bill; from the 1860s until 1927, his portrait appeared on on U.S. notes and certificates of various denominations from $5 to $10,000. In 1861, his portrait appeared on Confederate States $1,000 notes.
      Campaign slogan: "Let the people rule."
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial — Tennessee Encyclopedia
      Books about Andrew Jackson: Robert Vincent Remini, The Life of Andrew Jackson — Robert Vincent Remini, Andrew Jackson : The Course of American Freedom, 1822-1832 — Robert Vincent Remini, Andrew Jackson : The Course of American Democracy, 1833-1845 — Robert Vincent Remini, Andrew Jackson : The Course of American Empire, 1767-1821 — Andrew Burstein, The Passions of Andrew Jackson — David S. Heidler & Jeanne T. Heidler, Old Hickory's War: Andrew Jackson and the Quest for Empire — Donald B. Cole, The Presidency of Andrew Jackson — H. W. Brands, Andrew Jackson : His Life and Times — Jon Meacham, American Lion: Andrew Jackson in the White House — Donald Barr Chidsey, Andrew Jackson, Hero
      Image source: Portrait & Biographical Album of Washtenaw County (1891)


    Meridian Hill Park
    Washington, District of Columbia

    Politicians who have monuments here:
    James Buchanan James Buchanan (1791-1868) — also known as "The Sage of Wheatland"; "Buck"; "Old Buck" — of Lancaster, Lancaster County, Pa. Born in a log cabin near Mercersburg, Franklin County, Pa., April 23, 1791. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812; lawyer; member of Pennsylvania state house of representatives, 1814; U.S. Representative from Pennsylvania, 1821-31 (3rd District 1821-23, 4th District 1823-31); U.S. Minister to Russia, 1832-33; Great Britain, 1853-56; U.S. Senator from Pennsylvania, 1834-45; resigned 1845; candidate for Democratic nomination for President, 1844, 1848, 1852; U.S. Secretary of State, 1845-49; President of the United States, 1857-61. Presbyterian. Member, Freemasons. Died near Lancaster, Lancaster County, Pa., June 1, 1868 (age 77 years, 39 days). Interment at Woodward Hill Cemetery, Lancaster, Pa.; memorial monument at Meridian Hill Park.
      Relatives: Son of James Buchanan (c.1761-1821) and Elizabeth (Speer) Buchanan (1767-1833).
      Cross-reference: David Fullerton Robison — John A. Quitman — John Gallagher Montgomery
      Buchanan counties in Iowa, Mo. and Va. are named for him.
      The city of Buchanan, Michigan, is named for him.
      Other politicians named for him: James B. DukeJames B. CullisonJames Buchanan SigginsJ. B. MarcumJames B. Searcy
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier
      Books about James Buchanan: Philip S. Klein, President James Buchanan: A Biography — Jean H. Baker, James Buchanan — R. G. Horton, The Life And Public Services Of James Buchanan: Late Minister To England And Formerly Minister To Russia, Senator And Representative In Congress, And Sec. Of State
      Critical books about James Buchanan: Nathan Miller, Star-Spangled Men : America's Ten Worst Presidents
      Image source: Portrait & Biographical Album of Washtenaw County (1891)


    Mt. Olivet Cemetery
    1300 Blandensburg Road N.E.
    Washington, District of Columbia
    See also Findagrave page for this location.
    Politicians buried here:
      Joseph McKenna (1843-1926) — of Suisun City, Solano County, Calif. Born in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., August 10, 1843. Republican. Member of California state assembly 19th District, 1875-77; U.S. Representative from California 3rd District, 1885-92; Judge of U.S. Circuit Court for the 9th Circuit, 1892-97; resigned 1897; Judge of U.S. Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit, 1892-97; resigned 1897; U.S. Attorney General, 1897-98; Associate Justice of U.S. Supreme Court, 1898-1925; retired 1925. Catholic. Died in Washington, D.C., November 21, 1926 (age 83 years, 103 days). Interment at Mt. Olivet Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — federal judicial profile — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
      Robert John Wynne (1851-1922) — also known as Robert J. Wynne — Born in New York, New York County, N.Y., November 18, 1851. Telegrapher; journalist; U.S. Postmaster General, 1904-05; U.S. Consul General in London, 1905-10; insurance executive. Catholic. Member, Loyal Legion. Died in Washington, D.C., March 11, 1922 (age 70 years, 113 days). Interment at Mt. Olivet Cemetery.
      Relatives: Married to Mary Ellen McCabe.
      See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
      Thomas Henry Carter (1854-1911) — also known as Thomas H. Carter — of Helena, Lewis and Clark County, Mont. Born near Portsmouth, Scioto County, Ohio, October 30, 1854. Republican. Delegate to U.S. Congress from Montana Territory, 1889; U.S. Representative from Montana at-large, 1889-91; defeated, 1890; Chairman of Republican National Committee, 1892-96; U.S. Senator from Montana, 1895-1901, 1905-11; delegate to Republican National Convention from Montana, 1900, 1904; speaker, 1896. Died in Washington, D.C., September 17, 1911 (age 56 years, 322 days). Interment at Mt. Olivet Cemetery.
      Relatives: Married to Ellen L. Galen.
      Carter County, Mont. is named for him.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
      William Matthew Merrick (1818-1889) — Born near Faulkner, Charles County, Md., September 1, 1818. Democrat. Judge of Circuit Court of the District of Columbia, 1855-63; delegate to Maryland state constitutional convention, 1867; member of Maryland state house of delegates, 1870; U.S. Representative from Maryland 5th District, 1871-73; Associate Justice, U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia, 1885-89; died in office 1889. Died in Washington, D.C., February 4, 1889 (age 70 years, 156 days). Interment at Mt. Olivet Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of William Duhurst Merrick (1793-1857).
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — federal judicial profile
    George Whitefield Davis George Whitefield Davis (1839-1918) — also known as George W. Davis — Born in Thompson, Windham County, Conn., July 26, 1839. Major in the Union Army during the Civil War; colonel in the U.S. Army during the Spanish-American War; Governor of Puerto Rico. Died in Washington, D.C., July 12, 1918 (age 78 years, 351 days). Interment at Mt. Olivet Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of George D. Davis.
      See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
      Image source: Library of Congress
      William Russell Smith (1815-1896) — also known as William R. Smith — of Fayette Court House (now Fayette), Fayette County, Ala. Born in Russellville, Logan County, Ky., March 27, 1815. Mayor of Tuscaloosa, Ala., 1839; member of Alabama state legislature, 1841-42; state court judge in Alabama, 1850; U.S. Representative from Alabama 4th District, 1851-57; delegate to Alabama secession convention, 1861; colonel in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; Representative from Alabama in the Confederate Congress 2nd District, 1862-65; candidate for Governor of Alabama, 1865. Died in Washington, D.C., February 26, 1896 (age 80 years, 336 days). Original interment in unknown location; reinterment at Mt. Olivet Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      William Franklin Sands (1874-1946) — also known as William F. Sands — of Washington, D.C. Born in Washington, D.C., July 29, 1874. U.S. Vice & Deputy Consul General in Seoul, as of 1898; U.S. Minister to Guatemala, 1909-10. Catholic. Member, Loyal Legion; American Society for International Law. Died in 1946 (age about 71 years). Interment at Mt. Olivet Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of James Hoban Sands (Rear Admiral, U.S. Navy) and Mary Elizabeth (Meade) Sands; married 1909 to Edith Gertrude Keating.
      See also U.S. State Dept career summary
      Timothy Thomas Ansberry (1871-1943) — also known as Timothy T. Ansberry — of Defiance, Defiance County, Ohio; Washington, D.C. Born in Defiance, Defiance County, Ohio, December 24, 1871. Democrat. Lawyer; Defiance County Prosecuting Attorney, 1895-1903; U.S. Representative from Ohio 5th District, 1907-15; defeated, 1904; Judge, Ohio Court of Appeals, 1915-16; Presidential Elector for Ohio, 1916; delegate to Democratic National Convention from District of Columbia, 1920; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Ohio, 1924 (alternate), 1928; law partner of Joseph E. Davies. Catholic. Member, Knights of Columbus; Ancient Order of Hibernians. Died following a gall bladder operation complicated by heart disease, in Doctors Hospital, Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., July 5, 1943 (age 71 years, 193 days). Interment at Mt. Olivet Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Edmond Ansberry and Elizabeth (Fitzpatrick) Ansberry; married, December 26, 1898, to Nellie Kettenring.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
      Charles Alexander Korbly (1871-1937) — also known as Charles A. Korbly — of Indianapolis, Marion County, Ind. Born in Madison, Jefferson County, Ind., March 24, 1871. Democrat. U.S. Representative from Indiana 7th District, 1909-15. Died July 26, 1937 (age 66 years, 124 days). Interment at Mt. Olivet Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Joseph Aloysius Conry (1868-1943) — also known as Joseph A. Conry — of Boston, Suffolk County, Mass. Born in Brookline, Norfolk County, Mass., September 12, 1868. Democrat. U.S. Representative from Massachusetts 9th District, 1901-03; defeated (Gold Democratic), 1902. Died June 22, 1943 (age 74 years, 283 days). Interment at Mt. Olivet Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Ralph Hunter Daughton (1885-1958) — of Norfolk, Va. Born in Washington, D.C., September 23, 1885. Democrat. Lawyer; member of Virginia state house of delegates, 1933-44; U.S. Representative from Virginia 2nd District, 1944-47. Methodist. Member, Freemasons; Elks; Knights of Pythias; Lions. Died in Norfolk, Va., December 22, 1958 (age 73 years, 90 days). Interment at Mt. Olivet Cemetery.
      Relatives: Married to Susan Taggart.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Michael Walsh Cluskey (1832-1873) — of Tennessee. Born in Savannah, Chatham County, Ga., 1832. Colonel in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; Representative from Tennessee in the Confederate Congress, 1864-65. Died in Louisville, Jefferson County, Ky., January 13, 1873 (age about 40 years). Interment at Mt. Olivet Cemetery.
      Samuel W. Taylor (1833-1892) — of Washington, D.C.; New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in Washington, D.C., February 11, 1833. Merchant; Prominent in Washington local politics. Died, from apoplexy, in New York, New York County, N.Y., July 31, 1892 (age 59 years, 171 days). Interment at Mt. Olivet Cemetery.
    Politicians formerly buried here:
      William Duhurst Merrick (1793-1857) — also known as William D. Merrick — of Allens Fresh, Charles County, Md. Born in Annapolis, Anne Arundel County, Md., October 25, 1793. Served in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812; member of Maryland state house of delegates, 1832-37, 1856-57; died in office 1857; U.S. Senator from Maryland, 1838-45; delegate to Maryland state constitutional convention, 1850. Died in Washington, D.C., February 5, 1857 (age 63 years, 103 days). Original interment at Mt. Olivet Cemetery; reinterment at St. Mary's Church Cemetery, Newport, Md.
      Relatives: Father of William Matthew Merrick (1818-1889).
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page


    National Mall
    Washington, District of Columbia

    Politicians who have monuments here:
    George Washington George Washington (1732-1799) — also known as "Father of His Country"; "The American Fabius" — of Virginia. Born in Westmoreland County, Va., February 22, 1732. Delegate to Continental Congress from Virginia, 1774-75; general in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; member, U.S. Constitutional Convention, 1787; President of the United States, 1789-97. Episcopalian. English ancestry. Member, Freemasons; Society of the Cincinnati; American Academy of Arts and Sciences. As the leader of the Revolution, he could have been King; instead, he served as the first President and voluntarily stepped down after two terms. Elected to the Hall of Fame for Great Americans in 1900. Died, probably from acute bacterial epiglottitis, at Mt. Vernon, Fairfax County, Va., December 14, 1799 (age 67 years, 295 days). Entombed at Mt. Vernon, Mt. Vernon, Va.; memorial monument at National Mall; statue erected 1860 at Washington Circle; statue erected 1869 at Boston Public Garden, Boston, Mass.
      Relatives: Son of Augustine Washington (1694-1743) and Mary (Ball) Washington (c.1709-1789); married, January 6, 1759, to Martha (Dandridge) Custis (1731-1802; aunt of Burwell Bassett); uncle of Bushrod Washington; granduncle by marriage of Charles Magill Conrad; granduncle of John Thornton Augustine Washington and George Corbin Washington; first cousin six times removed of Archer Woodford; second cousin once removed of Meriwether Lewis (1774-1809); second cousin twice removed of Sulifand Sutherland Ross; second cousin five times removed of Thomas Henry Ball, Jr., William de Bruyn Kops, Horace Lee Washington, Edwin McPherson Holden, Claude C. Ball, Arthur Wesley Holden and Franklin Delano Roosevelt; third cousin thrice removed of Samuel Bullitt Churchill and Thomas Leonidas Crittenden.
      Political families: Pendleton-Lee family; Demarest-Meriwether family of New Jersey; Marshall-Harrison-Randolph-Cabell family of Virginia; Meriwether-Kellogg-Tyler family of Virginia and Connecticut; Washington family; Clay family of Kentucky (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      Cross-reference: Henry Lee — Joshua Fry — Alexander Dimitry — Tobias Lear — David Mathews — Rufus Putnam
      Washington counties in Ala., Ark., Colo., Fla., Ga., Idaho, Ill., Ind., Iowa, Kan., Ky., La., Maine, Md., Minn., Miss., Mo., Neb., N.Y., N.C., Ohio, Okla., Ore., Pa., R.I., Tenn., Tex., Utah, Vt., Va. and Wis. are named for him.
      The city of Washington, D.C., is named for him.  — The state of Washington is named for him.  — Mount Washington (highest peak in the Northeast), in the White Mountains, Coos County, New Hampshire, is named for him.
      Other politicians named for him: George Washington Lent MarrGeorge Washington HeardGeorge Washington BarnettGeorge Washington DavisGeorge W. OwenGeorge W. TolandGeorge W. LayGeorge W. PattersonGeorge W. B. TownsGeorge Washington AdamsGeorge Washington HockleyGeorge W. SmythG. W. IngersollGeorge W. HopkinsGeorge Washington MontgomeryGeorge W. KittredgeGeorge W. JonesGeorge W. HarrisonGeorge Washington EwingGeorge Washington SeabrookGeorge W. MorrisonGeorge Washington WoodwardGeorge Washington WrightGeorge Washington TriplettGeorge Washington GlasscockGeorge W. SchuylerGeorge Washington HolmanGeorge W. GreeneGeorge W. WolcottGeorge W. PaschalGeorge Washington DunlapGeorge Washington WarrenGeorge Washington HillGeorge Washington LoganGeorge W. GetchellGeorge Washington WrightGeorge W. JulianGeorge Washington DyalGeorge W. LaddGeorge W. PeckGeorge Washington NesmithGeorge W. MorganGeorge Washington BrooksGeorge Washington CowlesGeorge W. GeddesGeorge Washington WhitmoreGeorge Washington BridgesGeorge W. CateGeorge W. HoukGeorge W. WebberGeorge W. BemisGeorge Washington FairbrotherGeorge Washington GlickGeorge W. JonesGeorge W. BakerGeorge W. ShellGeorge W. AndersonGeorge W. CrouseGeorge W. HulickGeorge W. AllenGeorge W. F. HarperGeorge Washington ClarkGeorge Washington McCraryGeorge W. GordonGeorge W. KingsburyGeorge W. CovingtonGeorge Washington FleegerGeorge W. SteeleGeorge W. WilsonGeorge Washington MartinGeorge W. E. DorseyGeorge W. PlunkittGeorge W. FurbushGeorge W. SuttonGeorge W. CurtinGeorge W. RayGeorge W. RooseveltGeorge W. SmithGeorge W. KippGeorge W. CampbellGeorge W. TaylorGeorge W. StoneGeorge W. BartchGeorge W. ShonkGeorge W. CookGeorge W. MurrayGeorge W. FarisGeorge W. FithianGeorge W. PrinceGeorge W. BucknerGeorge W. CromerGeorge W. DonagheyGeorge W. AldridgeGeorge Washington WagonerGeorge Washington GoethalsGeorge W. ArmstrongGeorge W. LovejoyGeorge W. OakesGeorge W. HaysGeorge W. EdmondsGeorge W. LindsayGeorge Washington JonesT. G. W. TarverGeorge W. DardenGeorge W. MeadGeorge W. GibbonsGeorge W. ListGeorge W. CalkinGeorge W. RauchGeorge W. MichellGeorge Washington JacksonGeorge W. BlanchardGeorge Washington HerzGeorge W. BristowGeorge Washington HardyGeorge W. BallardGeorge W. McKownGeorge Thomas WashingtonGeorge W. CollinsGeorge A. Washington
      Coins and currency: His portrait appears on the U.S. quarter (25 cent coin), and on the $1 bill. His portrait also appeared on various other denominations of U.S. currency, and on the Confederate States $50 note during the Civil War.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
      Books about George Washington: Richard Brookhiser, Founding Father: Rediscovering George Washington — James Thomas Flexner, Washington: The Indispensable Man — Willard Sterne Randall, George Washington : A Life — Richard Norton Smith, Patriarch : George Washington and the New American Nation — Henry Wiencek, An Imperfect God : George Washington, His Slaves, and the Creation of America — James MacGregor Burns, George Washington — Joseph J. Ellis, His Excellency, George Washington — Gore Vidal, Inventing A Nation: Washington, Adams, Jefferson — David Barton, The Bulletproof George Washington: An Account of God's Providential Care — Wendie C. Old, George Washington (for young readers)
      Image source: Portrait & Biographical Album of Washtenaw County (1891)
    Abraham Lincoln Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865) — also known as "Honest Abe"; "Old Abe"; "The Rail-Splitter"; "The Illinois Baboon" — of New Salem, Menard County, Ill.; Springfield, Sangamon County, Ill. Born in a log cabin, Hardin County (part now in Larue County), Ky., February 12, 1809. Republican. Served in the U.S. Army during the Black Hawk War; postmaster; lawyer; member of Illinois state house of representatives, 1834-41; U.S. Representative from Illinois 7th District, 1847-49; candidate for Republican nomination for Vice President, 1856; candidate for U.S. Senator from Illinois, 1858; President of the United States, 1861-65; died in office 1865; His election as president in 1860 precipitated the Civil War; determined to preserve the Union, he led the North to victory on the battlefield, freed the slaves in the conquered states, and in doing this, redefined American nationhood. He was. English ancestry. Elected in 1900 to the Hall of Fame for Great Americans. Shot by the assassin John Wilkes Booth, during a play at Ford's Theater, in Washington, D.C., April 14, 1865; died at Peterson's Boarding House, across the street, the following day, April 15, 1865 (age 56 years, 62 days). Interment at Oak Ridge Cemetery, Springfield, Ill.; memorial monument at National Mall; statue erected 1868 at Judiciary Park.
      Relatives: Son of Thomas Lincoln (1778-1851) and Nancy (Hanks) Lincoln (1784-1818); married, November 4, 1842, to Mary Ann Todd (1818-1882; sister-in-law of Ninian Wirt Edwards (1809-1889); half-sister-in-law of N. H. R. Dawson; aunt of Martha Dee Todd; grandniece of David Rittenhouse Porter); father of Robert Todd Lincoln; second cousin four times removed of Richard Henry Lee, Francis Lightfoot Lee and Arthur Lee; third cousin twice removed of Levi Lincoln; third cousin thrice removed of Thomas Sim Lee, Henry Lee, Charles Lee, Edmund Jennings Lee and Zachary Taylor; fourth cousin once removed of Levi Lincoln, Jr. and Enoch Lincoln.
      Political families: Lincoln-Lee family; Edwards-Cook family of Illinois and Nebraska (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      Cross-reference: Clement Claiborne Clay, Jr. — Isham N. Haynie — William M. Stone — John Pitcher — Stephen Miller — John T. Stuart — William H. Seward — Henry L. Burnett — Judah P. Benjamin — Robert Toombs — Richard Taylor Jacob — George W. Jones — James Adams — John G. Nicolay — Edward Everett — Stephen T. Logan — Francis P. Blair — John Hay — Henry Reed Rathbone — James A. Ekin — Frederick W. Seward — John H. Surratt — John H. Surratt, Jr. — James Shields
      Lincoln counties in Ark., Colo., Idaho, Kan., La., Minn., Miss., Mont., Neb., Nev., N.M., Okla., Ore., Wash., W.Va., Wis. and Wyo. are named for him.
      The city of Lincoln, Nebraska, is named for him.  — Lincoln Memorial University, in Harrogate, Tennessee, is named for him.  — Lincoln University, in Jefferson City, Missouri, is named for him.  — Lincoln University, near Oxford, Pennsylvania, is named for him.
      Other politicians named for him: Abraham L. KeisterAbraham L. TuckerAbraham L. BrickAbraham L. KelloggAbraham Lincoln BernsteinA. Lincoln ReileyA. L. HelmickAbraham L. SuttonA. Lincoln AckerAbraham L. OsgoodAbraham L. WitmerAbraham L. PhillipsAbraham L. PaytonA. L. AuthA. Lincoln MooreA. Lincoln NiditchAbraham L. RubensteinAbraham L. Davis, Jr.Abraham L. FreedmanA. L. MarovitzLincoln GordonAbraham L. BannerAbraham Lincoln Tosti
      Coins and currency: His portrait has appeared on the U.S. penny (one cent coin) since 1909, and on the $5 bill since 1913. From the 1860s until 1927, his portrait also appeared on U.S. notes and certificates of various denominations from $1 to $500.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — Find-A-Grave memorial
      Books about Abraham Lincoln: David Herbert Donald, Lincoln — George Anastaplo, Abraham Lincoln : A Constitutional Biography — G. S. Boritt, ed., The Lincoln Enigma : The Changing Faces of an American Icon — Albert J. Beveridge, Abraham Lincoln 1809-1858 — Geoffrey Perret, Lincoln's War : The Untold Story of America's Greatest President as Commander in Chief — David Herbert Donald, We Are Lincoln Men : Abraham Lincoln and His Friends — Edward Steers, Jr., Blood on the Moon: The Assassination of Abraham Lincoln — Mario Cuomo, Why Lincoln Matters : Today More Than Ever — Michael W. Kauffman, American Brutus : John Wilkes Booth and the Lincoln Conspiracies — Doris Kearns Goodwin, Team of Rivals : The Political Genius of Abraham Lincoln — Joshua Wolf Shenk, Lincoln's Melancholy : How Depression Challenged a President and Fueled His Greatness — John Channing Briggs, Lincoln's Speeches Reconsidered — Ronald C. White, Jr., The Eloquent President : A Portrait of Lincoln Through His Words — Harold Holzer, Lincoln at Cooper Union : The Speech That Made Abraham Linco ln President — Michael Lind, What Lincoln Believed : The Values and Convictions of America's Greatest President — Doris Kearns Goodwin, Team of Rivals : The Political Genius of Abraham Lincoln — Michael Burlingame, ed., Abraham Lincoln: The Observations of John G. Nicolay and John Hay — Thomas J. Craughwell, Stealing Lincoln's Body — Roy Morris, Jr., The Long Pursuit: Abraham Lincoln's Thirty-Year Struggle with Stephen Douglas for the Heart and Soul of America — John Stauffer, Giants: The Parallel Lives of Frederick Douglass and Abraham Lincoln — Karen Judson, Abraham Lincoln (for young readers) — Maira Kalman, Looking at Lincoln (for young readers)
      Critical books about Abraham Lincoln: Thomas J. DiLorenzo, The Real Lincoln : A New Look at Abraham Lincoln, His Agenda, and an Unnecessary War
      Fiction about Abraham Lincoln: Gore Vidal, Lincoln: A Novel
      Image source: Portrait & Biographical Album of Washtenaw County (1891)


    Oak Hill Cemetery
    3001 R Street N.W. (at 29th Street)
    Washington, District of Columbia
    Founded 1848
    See also Findagrave page for this location.

    Politicians buried here:
      Edwin McMasters Stanton (1814-1869) — also known as Edwin M. Stanton; "The Great Energy" — Born in Steubenville, Jefferson County, Ohio, December 19, 1814. U.S. Attorney General, 1860-61; U.S. Secretary of War, 1862-68. Quaker. Died in Washington, D.C., December 24, 1869 (age 55 years, 5 days). Interment at Oak Hill Cemetery.
      Relatives: Grandfather of Cora Van Voorhis Stanton (who married Ernest Lee Jahncke (1877-1960)).
      Political family: Jahncke-Stanton family of New Orleans, Louisiana.
      Cross-reference: Daniel E. Sickles
      Coins and currency: His portrait appeared on the $1 U.S. Treasury note in the 1880s and 1890s.
      See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
      Books about Edwin M. Stanton: Amy Allison, Edwin Stanton, Union War Secretary — Doris Kearns Goodwin, Team of Rivals : The Political Genius of Abraham Lincoln
      Edward Douglass White (1845-1921) — of Louisiana. Born near Thibodaux, Lafourche Parish, La., November 3, 1845. Democrat. Served in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; member of Louisiana state senate, 1874; justice of Louisiana state supreme court, 1879-80; U.S. Senator from Louisiana, 1891-94; Associate Justice of U.S. Supreme Court, 1894-1910; Chief Justice of U.S. Supreme Court, 1910-21; died in office 1921. Catholic. Died, following unspecified surgery, at Garfield Hospital, Washington, D.C., May 19, 1921 (age 75 years, 197 days). Interment at Oak Hill Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Edward Douglass White; grandson of James White (1749-1809).
      Political family: White family of Louisiana.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Ballotpedia article — NNDB dossier
      Books about Edward Douglass White: Robert Baker Highsaw, Edward Douglass White: Defender of the Conservative Faith
      Robert John Walker (1801-1869) — also known as Robert J. Walker — of Madisonville, Madison County, Miss.; Washington, D.C. Born in Northumberland, Northumberland County, Pa., July 19, 1801. Democrat. Lawyer; U.S. Senator from Mississippi, 1835-45; resigned 1845; U.S. Secretary of the Treasury, 1845-49; Governor of Kansas Territory, 1857; newspaper publisher. Died in Washington, D.C., November 11, 1869 (age 68 years, 115 days). Interment at Oak Hill Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Jonathan Hoge Walker and Lucretia (Duncan) Walker; married, April 4, 1825, to Mary Blechenden Bache (1808-1873; daughter of Richard Bache, Jr.; brother of Alexander Dallas Bache (1806-1867; physicist); niece of George Mifflin Dallas; granddaughter of Richard Bache and Alexander James Dallas; great-granddaughter of Benjamin Franklin); father of Mary Walker (1839-1886; who married Benjamin Harris Brewster); second great-grandfather of Daniel Baugh Brewster (1923-2007).
      Political families: Marshall-Harrison-Randolph-Cabell family of Virginia; Bache-Dallas family of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Claiborne-Dallas family of Virginia and Louisiana (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      Walker County, Tex. is named for him.
      The community of Walker, Kansas (founded 1872), is named for him.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
      John Henry Eaton (1790-1856) — also known as John H. Eaton — of Nashville, Davidson County, Tenn. Born near Scotland Neck, Halifax County, N.C., June 18, 1790. Democrat. Lawyer; served in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812; member of Tennessee state house of representatives, 1815-16; U.S. Senator from Tennessee, 1818-21, 1821-29; U.S. Secretary of War, 1829-31; Governor of Florida Territory, 1834-36; U.S. Minister to Spain, 1836-40. Member, Freemasons. Resigned from Cabinet in 1831 during the scandal (called the "Petticoat Affair") over past infedelities of his second wife, Peggy Eaton. Died in Washington, D.C., November 17, 1856 (age 66 years, 152 days). Interment at Oak Hill Cemetery.
      Eaton County, Mich. is named for him.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary
    Dean Acheson Dean Gooderham Acheson (1893-1971) — also known as Dean Acheson — of Washington, D.C. Born in Middletown, Middlesex County, Conn., April 11, 1893. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Navy during World War I; lawyer; private secretary to U.S. Supreme Court Justice Louis D. Brandeis, 1919-21; undersecretary of treasury, 1933; U.S. Secretary of State, 1949-53. Episcopalian. English ancestry. Member, American Bar Association; American Academy of Arts and Sciences; Delta Kappa Epsilon; Council on Foreign Relations. Received the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1964; received a Pulitzer Prize in History, 1970, for his book Present At The Creation: My Years In The State Department. Died, probably from a heart attack, over his desk in his study, Sandy Spring, Montgomery County, Md., October 12, 1971 (age 78 years, 184 days). Interment at Oak Hill Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Edward Campion Acheson (1858-1934; Episcopal bishop of Connecticut) and Eleanor Gertrude (Gooderham) Acheson (1870-1958); married, May 5, 1917, to Alice Caroline Stanley (1895-1996; artist); father of David Campion Acheson (1921-?).
      Cross-reference: Lucius D. Battle — Francis E. Meloy, Jr.
      See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
      Books by Dean Acheson: Present at the Creation : My Years in the State Department (1969)
      Books about Dean Acheson: Walter Isaacson, The Wise Men : Six Friends and the World They Made — Robert L. Beisner, Dean Acheson : A Life in the Cold War
      Image source: Christian Science Monitor, September 25, 2010
      William Adams Richardson (1821-1896) — of Massachusetts. Born in Tyngsborough, Middlesex County, Mass., November 2, 1821. Republican. Probate judge in Massachusetts, 1856; U.S. Secretary of the Treasury, 1873-74; while Secretary of the Treasury, he hired John D. Sanborn to collect unpaid taxes and receive a commission, some of which went as a kickback to Richardson himself; this arrangement caused an uproar, and Richardson resigned under fire; Judge of U.S. Court of Claims, 1874-96. Unitarian. Died in Washington, D.C., October 19, 1896 (age 74 years, 352 days). Interment at Oak Hill Cemetery.
      See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
      David Kirkpatrick Este Bruce (1898-1977) — also known as David K. E. Bruce — of Baltimore, Md.; Charlotte Court House, Charlotte County, Va.; Elkridge, Howard County, Md. Born in Baltimore, Md., February 12, 1898. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army during World War I; lawyer; farmer; member of Maryland state house of delegates, 1924-26; U.S. Vice Consul in Rome, as of 1926; member of Virginia state house of delegates, 1940-43; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Virginia, 1940; served in the U.S. Army Air Force in World War II; U.S. Ambassador to France, 1949-52; Germany, 1957-59; Great Britain, 1961-69; U.S. Liaison to China, 1973-74. Episcopalian. Member, Council on Foreign Relations. Received the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1976. Died, as a result of a heart attack, in Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington, D.C., December 5, 1977 (age 79 years, 296 days). Interment at Oak Hill Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of William Cabell Bruce and Louise Este (Fisher) Bruce (1864-1945); brother of James Bruce (1892-1980); married, May 29, 1926, to Ailsa Mellon (1901-1969; divorced 1945; daughter of Andrew William Mellon); married, April 23, 1945, to Evangeline Bell (1914-1995); grandnephew of James Alexander Seddon; first cousin of Howard Bruce.
      Political family: Bruce-Mellon family of Virginia.
      See also Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
      John Peter Van Ness (1770-1846) — also known as John P. Van Ness — of New York; Washington, D.C. Born in Claverly (now Ghent), Columbia County, N.Y., 1770. Democrat. U.S. Representative from New York 6th District, 1801-03; mayor of Washington, D.C., 1830-34. Dutch ancestry. Died in Washington, D.C., March 7, 1846 (age about 75 years). Entombed in mausoleum at Oak Hill Cemetery.
      Relatives: Brother of William Peter Van Ness (1778-1826) and Cornelius Peter Van Ness.
      Political family: VanNess family of New York City, New York.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      William Henry Hunt (1823-1884) — also known as William H. Hunt — of Louisiana. Born in Charleston, Charleston County, S.C., June 12, 1823. Colonel in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; Louisiana state attorney general, 1876; Judge of U.S. Court of Claims, 1878-81; U.S. Secretary of the Navy, 1881-82; U.S. Minister to Russia, 1882-84, died in office 1884. Died in St. Petersburg, Russia, February 27, 1884 (age 60 years, 260 days). Interment at Oak Hill Cemetery.
      Relatives: Father of William Henry Hunt (1857-1949).
      See also Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary
      James Noble Tyner (1826-1904) — of Indiana. Born in Brookville, Franklin County, Ind., January 17, 1826. Republican. U.S. Representative from Indiana 8th District, 1869-75; U.S. Postmaster General, 1876-77. Died in Washington, D.C., December 5, 1904 (age 78 years, 323 days). Interment at Oak Hill Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
    Cornelius P. Van_Ness Cornelius Peter Van Ness (1782-1852) — also known as Cornelius P. Van Ness — of Burlington, Chittenden County, Vt.; New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in Kinderhook, Columbia County, N.Y., January 26, 1782. Democrat. Lawyer; postmaster at Burlington, Vt., 1809-14; U.S. Attorney for Vermont, 1810-13; U.S. Collector of Customs, 1813; member of Vermont state house of representatives, 1820-21; chief justice of Vermont Supreme Court, 1821-23; Governor of Vermont, 1823-26; U.S. Minister to Spain, 1829-36; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Vermont, 1840; U.S. Collector of Customs, 1844-45. Dutch ancestry. Died in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., December 15, 1852 (age 70 years, 324 days). Interment at Oak Hill Cemetery.
      Relatives: Brother of John Peter Van Ness (1770-1846) and William Peter Van Ness; father of James Peter Van Ness.
      Political family: VanNess family of New York City, New York.
      Cross-reference: Daniel Kellogg
      See also Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — Find-A-Grave memorial
      Image source: Men of Vermont (1894)
      John Barton Payne (1855-1935) — of Kingwood, Preston County, W.Va.; Chicago, Cook County, Ill.; Washington, D.C. Born in Pruntytown, Taylor County, Va. (now W.Va.), January 26, 1855. Democrat. Lawyer; chair of Preston County Democratic Party, 1877-82; superior court judge in Illinois, 1893-98; U.S. Secretary of the Interior, 1920-21. Methodist. Member, American Bar Association. Died January 24, 1935 (age 79 years, 363 days). Interment at Oak Hill Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Dr. Amos Payne and Elizabeth (Barton) Payne; married, October 17, 1878, to Kate Bunker; married, May 1, 1913, to Jennie Byrd Bryan (died 1919).
      See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
      Hoffman Philip (1872-1951) — also known as Herman Hoffman Philip — of New York. Born in Washington, D.C., July 13, 1872. Served in the U.S. Army during the Spanish-American War; Foreign Service officer; U.S. Deputy Consul General in Tangier, 1901-02; U.S. Vice & Deputy Consul General in Tangier, 1902-06; U.S. Consul General in Tangier, 1906-08; U.S. Minister to Abyssinia, 1908-10; Colombia, 1917-22; Uruguay, 1922-25; Persia, 1925-28; Norway, 1930-35; U.S. Ambassador to Chile, 1935-37. Died, in Cottage Hospital, Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara County, Calif., October 31, 1951 (age 79 years, 110 days). Interment at Oak Hill Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of William Henry Philip (1824-1881) and Eliza Phillips (Worthington) Philip (1842-1896); married, November 7, 1925, to Josephine Roberts (1887-1989).
      See also U.S. State Dept career summary — Find-A-Grave memorial
    Arthur Pue Gorman Arthur Pue Gorman (1839-1906) — also known as Arthur P. Gorman — of Laurel, Prince George's County, Md. Born in Woodstock, Howard County, Md., March 11, 1839. Democrat. U.S. Collector of Internal Revenue for Maryland, 1866-69; member of Maryland state house of delegates, 1870-72; member of Maryland state senate, 1876-82; U.S. Senator from Maryland, 1881-99, 1903-06; died in office 1906; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Maryland, 1884 (alternate), 1888 (member, Resolutions Committee; speaker), 1904; member of Democratic National Committee from Maryland, 1888. Presbyterian. Died in Washington, D.C., June 4, 1906 (age 67 years, 85 days). Interment at Oak Hill Cemetery.
      Relatives: Father-in-law of Richard A. Johnson (1874?-?); father of Arthur Pue Gorman, Jr..
      Political family: Gorman-Norris family of Laurel, Maryland.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
      Image source: Munsey's Magazine, October 1903
    Francis G. Newlands Francis Griffith Newlands (1848-1917) — also known as Francis G. Newlands — of San Francisco, Calif.; Reno, Washoe County, Nev. Born near Natchez, Adams County, Miss., August 28, 1848. Lawyer; trustee of the estate of U.S. Senator William Sharon, 1886; U.S. Representative from Nevada at-large, 1893-1903; U.S. Senator from Nevada, 1903-17; died in office 1917; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Nevada, 1904, 1916. Died in Washington, D.C., December 24, 1917 (age 69 years, 118 days). Interment at Oak Hill Cemetery; memorial monument at Chevy Chase Circle.
      Relatives: Son of James Birney Newlands and Jessie (Barland) Newlands; married 1874 to Clara Adelaide Sharon (1853-1882; daughter of William Sharon (1821-1885)); married 1888 to Edith McAllister (1860-1939).
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
      Image source: American Monthly Review of Reviews, July 1902
      David Levy Yulee (1810-1886) — also known as David Levy; "Father of Florida's Railroads" — of St. Augustine, St. Johns County, Fla.; Homosassa, Citrus County, Fla. Born in St. Thomas, Virgin Islands, June 12, 1810. Republican. Lawyer; delegate to Florida state constitutional convention from St. Johns County, 1838-39; Delegate to U.S. Congress from Florida Territory, 1841-45; U.S. Senator from Florida, 1845-51, 1855-61. Jewish. Imprisoned as a Confederate at Fort Pulaski, Fla. for a time after the Civil War. Died in New York, New York County, N.Y., October 10, 1886 (age 76 years, 120 days). Interment at Oak Hill Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son-in-law of Charles Anderson Wickliffe (1788-1869).
      Political family: Wickliffe-Holt family of Louisville, Kentucky.
      Levy County, Fla. is named for him.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
    William H. Hunt William Henry Hunt (1857-1949) — also known as William H. Hunt — of Helena, Lewis and Clark County, Mont. Born in New Orleans, Orleans Parish, La., November 5, 1857. Republican. Delegate to Montana state constitutional convention, 1884; Montana territory attorney general, 1885-87; member of Montana territorial legislature, 1888-89; district judge in Montana 1st District, 1889-94; justice of Montana state supreme court, 1894-1900; Puerto Rico secretary of state, 1900-01; Governor of Puerto Rico, 1901-04; U.S. District Judge for Montana, 1904-10; Associate Judge of U.S. Court of Customs Appeals, 1910-11; Judge of U.S. Commerce Court, 1911-13; Judge of U.S. Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit, 1913-28. Died in Charlottesville, Va., February 4, 1949 (age 91 years, 91 days). Interment at Oak Hill Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of William Henry Hunt (1823-1884); married, August 31, 1882, to Gertrude Upshur.
      See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
      Image source: American Monthly Review of Reviews, December 1901
      John Rhoderic McPherson (1833-1897) — also known as John R. McPherson — of Jersey City, Hudson County, N.J. Born in York, Livingston County, N.Y., May 9, 1833. Democrat. Stockyard business; member of New Jersey state senate from Hudson County, 1872-74; Presidential Elector for New Jersey, 1876; U.S. Senator from New Jersey, 1877-95. Died, from heart trouble, in his room at Taylor's Hotel, Jersey City, Hudson County, N.J., October 8, 1897 (age 64 years, 152 days). Interment at Oak Hill Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      John Jay Knox, Jr. (1828-1892) — Born in Knoxboro, Oneida County, N.Y., March 19, 1828. Banker; U.S. Comptroller of the Currency, 1872-84. Died in New York, New York County, N.Y., February 9, 1892 (age 63 years, 327 days). Interment at Oak Hill Cemetery.
      Presumably named for: John Jay
      Relatives: Son of John J. Knox (1791-1876) and Sarah Ann (Curtis) Knox (1794-1875); married to Caroline Elizabeth Todd (1847-1922).
      Coins and currency: His portrait appeared on the U.S. $100 National Bank Notes in 1902.
      See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial — Comptrollers of the Currency
      Wilkinson Call (1834-1910) — of Jacksonville, Duval County, Fla. Born in Russellville, Logan County, Ky., January 9, 1834. Democrat. Delegate to Democratic National Convention from Florida, 1868; U.S. Senator from Florida, 1879-97; member of Democratic National Committee from Florida, 1879-80. Died August 24, 1910 (age 76 years, 227 days). Interment at Oak Hill Cemetery.
      Relatives: Nephew of Richard Keith Call (1792-1862); cousin *** of James David Walker.
      Political family: Walker-Alston family of North Carolina.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
      Gale William McGee (1915-1992) — also known as Gale W. McGee — of Laramie, Albany County, Wyo. Born in Lincoln, Lancaster County, Neb., March 17, 1915. Democrat. U.S. Senator from Wyoming, 1959-77; defeated, 1976; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Wyoming, 1976. Died, of pneumonia, following surgery for a brain aneurysm, in Suburban Hospital, Bethesda, Montgomery County, Md., April 9, 1992 (age 77 years, 23 days). Interment at Oak Hill Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — NNDB dossier
      James Blackwood Pearson (1920-2009) — also known as James B. Pearson — of Shawnee Mission, Johnson County, Kan.; Prairie Village, Johnson County, Kan. Born in Nashville, Davidson County, Tenn., May 7, 1920. Republican. Served in the U.S. Navy during World War II; lawyer; probate judge in Kansas, 1954-56; member of Kansas state senate 10th District, 1956-60; Kansas Republican state chair, 1960; U.S. Senator from Kansas, 1962-78; resigned 1978. Died in Gloucester, Essex County, Mass., January 13, 2009 (age 88 years, 251 days). Interment at Oak Hill Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of John William Pearson and Lillian (Blackwood) Pearson; married to Martha Mitchell; married 1980 to Margaret Lynch.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
      Philip Wilson Bonsal (1903-1995) — also known as Philip W. Bonsal — of Washington, D.C. Born in New York, New York County, N.Y., May 22, 1903. Executive in overseas telephone companies; Foreign Service officer; U.S. Vice Consul in Havana, 1938; U.S. Consul in Madrid, as of 1947; Barcelona, as of 1947; U.S. Ambassador to Colombia, 1955-57; Bolivia, 1957-59; Cuba, 1959-60; Morocco, 1961-62. Died, while ill with pneumonia, in Washington, D.C., June 28, 1995 (age 92 years, 37 days). Interment at Oak Hill Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Stephen Bonsal and Henrietta (Morris) Bonsal; married, April 10, 1929, to Margaret Lockett; first cousin of Francis White (1892-1961).
      Political family: Bache-Dallas family of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      See also U.S. State Dept career summary — Find-A-Grave memorial
      Books by Philip W. Bonsal: Cuba, Castro, and the United States (1971)
      Samuel Sprigg (c.1783-1855) — of Maryland. Born in Washington County, Md., about 1783. Governor of Maryland, 1819-22; delegate to Maryland state constitutional convention, 1850. Episcopalian. Died in Prince George's County, Md., April 21, 1855 (age about 72 years). Original interment at St. Barnabas Church Cemetery, Upper Marlboro, Md.; reinterment at Oak Hill Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Joseph Sprigg; married to Violetta Lansdale.
      John Pool (1826-1884) — of North Carolina. Born in North Carolina, 1826. Member of North Carolina state legislature, 1860; U.S. Senator from North Carolina, 1868-73. Died in 1884 (age about 58 years). Interment at Oak Hill Cemetery.
      Relatives: Uncle of Walter Freshwater Pool (1850-1883).
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Benjamin Franklin Rice (1828-1905) — of Little Rock, Pulaski County, Ark. Born in New York, 1828. Republican. Member of Arkansas state legislature, 1860; delegate to Republican National Convention from Arkansas, 1868; member of Republican National Committee from Arkansas, 1868-72; U.S. Senator from Arkansas, 1868-73. Died in 1905 (age about 77 years). Interment at Oak Hill Cemetery.
      Presumably named for: Benjamin Franklin
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
      George Radcliffe Colton (1865-1916) — of Nebraska. Born in Galesburg, Knox County, Ill., April 10, 1865. Member of Nebraska state house of representatives, 1889-90; served in the U.S. Army during the Spanish-American War; Governor of Puerto Rico, 1909-13. Died in Washington, D.C., April 6, 1916 (age 50 years, 362 days). Entombed at Oak Hill Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Francis Colton (1834-1913).
      See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
      Uriah Forrest (c.1746-1805) — of Maryland. Born near Leonardtown, St. Mary's County, Md., about 1746. Member of Maryland state house of delegates, 1781-83, 1786-90; Delegate to Continental Congress from Maryland, 1786-87; U.S. Representative from Maryland 3rd District, 1793-94; member of Maryland state senate, 1796-1800; state court judge in Maryland, 1799-1800. Episcopalian. Died in Georgetown, Washington, D.C., July 6, 1805 (age about 59 years). Original interment at Old Presbyterian Cemetery (which no longer exists); reinterment in 1883 at Oak Hill Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Henry David Cooke (1825-1881) — also known as Henry D. Cooke — of Washington, D.C. Born in Sandusky, Erie County, Ohio, November 23, 1825. Republican. Newspaper editor and publisher; banker; Governor of the District of Columbia, 1871-73; member of Republican National Committee from District of Columbia, 1872-. Died, from Bright's disease, in Washington, D.C. February 24, 1881 (age 55 years, 93 days). Interment at Oak Hill Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Eleutheros Cooke; brother of Jay Cooke (1821-1905; Civil War financier); great-granduncle of Jay Cooke (1897-1963).
      Political family: Cooke family of Ohio and Pennsylvania (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      See also Wikipedia article
      Noah Haynes Swayne (1804-1884) — also known as Noah H. Swayne — of Franklin County, Ohio. Born in Frederick County, Va., December 7, 1804. Republican. Member of Ohio state house of representatives, 1830; U.S. Attorney for Ohio, 1830-39; delegate to Republican National Convention from Ohio, 1856 (Convention Vice-President); Associate Justice of U.S. Supreme Court, 1862-81; retired 1881. Quaker. Member, Freemasons. Died in New York, New York County, N.Y., June 8, 1884 (age 79 years, 184 days). Interment at Oak Hill Cemetery.
      See also federal judicial profile — NNDB dossier
      Clarence A. Boonstra (1914-2006) — of Michigan; Gainesville, Alachua County, Fla. Born in Grand Rapids, Kent County, Mich., January 5, 1914. Economist; Foreign Service officer; U.S. Ambassador to Costa Rica, 1967-69; U.S. Consul General in Rio de Janeiro, 1970-74. Died, from pneumonia, in Gainesville, Alachua County, Fla., March 20, 2006 (age 92 years, 74 days). Interment at Oak Hill Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of James Boonstra and Jennie (Brouwer) Boonstra; married, October 27, 1944, to Mildred Sharp Fereira (1918-1960); married, August 13, 1966, to Margaret Ellen Beshore.
      See also U.S. State Dept career summary — Find-A-Grave memorial
      William Jones (1790-1867) — of Washington, D.C. Born near Rockville, Montgomery County, Md., April 12, 1790. Democrat. Physician; postmaster at Washington, D.C., 1829-39, 1841-45, 1858-61. Episcopalian. Welsh ancestry. Died in Washington, D.C., June 25, 1867 (age 77 years, 74 days). Interment at Oak Hill Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Evan Jones and Mary (O'Neale) Jones; married, December 21, 1821, to Sarah L. Corcoran (1797-1843).
      See also Find-A-Grave memorial
      Samuel Hooper (1808-1875) — of Boston, Suffolk County, Mass. Born in Marblehead, Essex County, Mass., February 3, 1808. Republican. Importing business; member of Massachusetts state house of representatives, 1851-53; member of Massachusetts state senate, 1858; delegate to Republican National Convention from Massachusetts, 1860; U.S. Representative from Massachusetts, 1861-75 (5th District 1861-63, 4th District 1863-75); died in office 1875. Died in Washington, D.C., February 14, 1875 (age 67 years, 11 days). Interment at Oak Hill Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      George Washington Roosevelt (1844-1907) — also known as George W. Roosevelt — of Pennsylvania. Born in Chester, Delaware County, Pa., February 14, 1844. Served in the Union Army during the Civil War; U.S. Consular Agent in Sydney, as of 1877; U.S. Consul in Auckland, 1877-79; SAINT Helena, 1879-80; Matanzas, 1880-81; Bordeaux, 1881-89; Brussels, 1889-1905; U.S. Consul General in Brussels, as of 1906. Received the Medal of Honor in 1887 for action at Bull Run, Va., August 30, 1862, and at Gettysburg, Pa., July 2, 1863; severely wounded and lost a leg. Died in Brussels, Belgium, April 14, 1907 (age 63 years, 59 days). Interment at Oak Hill Cemetery.
      Presumably named for: George Washington
      Relatives: Son of Solomon Roosevelt (1807-1900) and Elizabeth (Morris) Roosevelt (1811-1859); great-grandson of Nicholas Roosevelt, Jr.; third cousin twice removed of Philip DePeyster and James I. Roosevelt; fourth cousin once removed of Robert Barnwell Roosevelt (1829-1906).
      Political families: Roosevelt family of New York City, New York; Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      See also Find-A-Grave memorial
    Alexander Burton Hagner Alexander Burton Hagner (1826-1915) — of Washington, D.C. Born in Washington, D.C., July 13, 1826. Lawyer; member of Maryland state house of delegates, 1854; candidate for U.S. Representative from Maryland 5th District, 1859 (American), 1874 (Republican); Constitutional Union candidate for Presidential Elector for Maryland, 1860; Associate Justice, U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia, 1879-1903; retired 1903. Episcopalian. Member, American Historical Association; Sons of the American Revolution. Died in Washington, D.C., June 30, 1915 (age 88 years, 352 days). Interment at Oak Hill Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Peter Hagner (1772-1850) and Frances (Randall) Hagner (1787-1863); married 1854 to Louisa Harrison (1829-1905); grandson of John Randall (1773?-?).
      See also federal judicial profile — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
      Image source: Men of Mark in America (1906)
      George Horton (1859-1942) — of Chicago, Cook County, Ill.; Washington, D.C. Born in Fairville, Wayne County, N.Y., October 11, 1859. U.S. Consul in Athens, 1893-98, 1905-06; Salonika, 1910-11; literary editor, Chicago Times-Herald newspaper, 1899-1901; editor, literary supplement, Chicago American newspaper, 1901-03; U.S. Consul General in Athens, 1906-10; Smyrna, 1911-17, 1919-22; Budapest, 1923-24. Member, Phi Beta Kappa. Died in Staten Island, Richmond County, N.Y., June 5, 1942 (age 82 years, 237 days). Interment at Oak Hill Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Peter Davis Horton and Mary Sophia (Aiken) Horton; married, February 4, 1909, to Catherine Sacopoulo.
      Epitaph: "Author - Poet - Humanitarian."
      See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
      Richard Cutts (1771-1845) — of Pepperell, Middlesex County, Mass. Born in Saco, York County, Maine, June 28, 1771. Democrat. Member of Massachusetts state legislature, 1790; U.S. Representative from Massachusetts, 1801-13 (at-large 1801-05, 14th District 1805-13); imprisoned for debt, 1828. Died in Washington, D.C., April 7, 1845 (age 73 years, 283 days). Original interment at St. John's Church Cemetery; reinterment in 1857 at Oak Hill Cemetery.
      Relatives: Married, March 31, 1804, to Anna Payne (1779-1832; sister-in-law of James Madison and John George Jackson (1777-1825)).
      Political families: Jackson-Lee family of Virginia; Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York; Pendleton-Lee family (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
      George Corbin Washington (1789-1854) — also known as George C. Washington — of Rockville, Montgomery County, Md. Born near Oak Grove, Westmoreland County, Va., August 20, 1789. Member of Maryland state house of delegates, 1816-19; U.S. Representative from Maryland, 1827-33, 1835-37 (3rd District 1827-33, 5th District 1835-37); member of Maryland state executive council, 1834-35. Died in Georgetown, Washington, D.C., July 17, 1854 (age 64 years, 331 days). Interment at Oak Hill Cemetery.
      Relatives: Grandnephew of George Washington (1732-1799).
      Political families: Roosevelt family of New York City, New York; Lee-Randolph family of Maryland and Virginia; Meriwether-Kellogg-Tyler family of Virginia and Connecticut; Washington family; Clay family of Kentucky; DeBruyn-Washington family of Savannah, Georgia; Marshall-Harrison-Randolph-Cabell family of Virginia (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Joseph Casey (1814-1879) — of New Berlin, Union County, Pa. Born in Ringgold Manor, Washington County, Md., December 17, 1814. Whig. Lawyer; U.S. Representative from Pennsylvania 13th District, 1849-51; Judge of U.S. Court of Claims, 1861-70. Died February 10, 1879 (age 64 years, 55 days). Interment at Oak Hill Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
      Philip Barton Key (1818-1859) — of Washington, D.C. Born in Georgetown, Washington, D.C., April 5, 1818. U.S. Attorney for the District of Columbia, 1853-59; died in office 1859. Shot and killed by Daniel E. Sickles, in retaliation for Key's affair with his wife Teresa, at Lafayette Park, Washington, D.C., February 27, 1859 (age 40 years, 328 days). Interment at Oak Hill Cemetery; cenotaph at Westminster Burying Ground, Baltimore, Md.
      Relatives: Son of Francis Scott Key and Mary Tayloe (Lloyd) Key (1784-1859); brother of Mary Alicia 'Alice' Key (1824-1886; who married George Hunt Pendleton (1825-1889)); married, November 18, 1845, to Ellen Swan; nephew of Anne Phoebe Charlton Key (who married Roger Brooke Taney); uncle of Francis Key Pendleton; grandnephew of Philip Barton Key; first cousin twice removed of Philip Key; fourth cousin once removed of Vinson Martlow Whitley.
      Political families: Pendleton-Lee family; Key family of Maryland (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
      George Peter (1779-1861) — of Darnestown, Montgomery County, Md. Born in Washington, D.C., September 28, 1779. Democrat. Major in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812; U.S. Representative from Maryland 3rd District, 1816-19, 1825-27; member of Maryland state house of delegates from Montgomery County, 1819, 1823. Episcopalian. Died near Darnestown, Montgomery County, Md., June 22, 1861 (age 81 years, 267 days). Interment at Oak Hill Cemetery.
      Relatives: Father of George Peter (1823-1893); grandfather of Arthur Peter.
      Political family: Peter family of Maryland.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Thomas James Duncan Fuller (1808-1876) — also known as Thomas J. D. Fuller — of Calais, Washington County, Maine. Born in Hardwick, Caledonia County, Vt., March 17, 1808. Democrat. Lawyer; U.S. Representative from Maine, 1849-57 (7th District 1849-53, 6th District 1853-57). Died near Upperville, Fauquier County, Va., February 13, 1876 (age 67 years, 333 days). Interment at Oak Hill Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Philip Barton Key (1757-1815) — of Annapolis, Anne Arundel County, Md.; Rockville, Montgomery County, Md. Born near Charlestown, Cecil County, Md., April 12, 1757. Lawyer; member of Maryland state house of delegates, 1794-99; circuit judge in Maryland, 1804; U.S. Representative from Maryland 3rd District, 1807-13. Died in Georgetown, Washington, D.C., July 28, 1815 (age 58 years, 107 days). Original interment at a private or family graveyard; reinterment at Oak Hill Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Anne Arnold (Ross) Key (1727-1811) and Francis Key (1731-1770); married, July 4, 1790, to Ann Plater (1772-1834; daughter of George Plater; sister of Thomas Plater (1769-1830)); uncle of Francis Scott Key and Anne Phoebe Charlton Key (who married Roger Brooke Taney); granduncle of Philip Barton Key; great-granduncle of Francis Key Pendleton; first cousin of Philip Key; second cousin thrice removed of Vinson Martlow Whitley.
      Political family: Key family of Maryland (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
      George Emrick Harris (1827-1911) — of Mississippi. Born in Orange County, N.C., January 6, 1827. Republican. Colonel in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; U.S. Representative from Mississippi 1st District, 1870-73; Mississippi state attorney general, 1873-77; Lieutenant Governor of Mississippi, 1877-79. Died in Washington, D.C., March 19, 1911 (age 84 years, 72 days). Interment at Oak Hill Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      John James Hemphill (1849-1912) — also known as John J. Hemphill — of Chester, Chester County, S.C. Born in Chester, Chester County, S.C., August 25, 1849. Democrat. Member of South Carolina state house of representatives, 1876; U.S. Representative from South Carolina 5th District, 1883-93. Died May 11, 1912 (age 62 years, 260 days). Interment at Oak Hill Cemetery.
      Relatives: Nephew of John Hemphill (1803-1862); granduncle of Robert Witherspoon Hemphill; cousin *** of William Huggins Brawley.
      Political family: Hemphill family of Chester, South Carolina.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Hestor Lockhart Stevens (1803-1864) — also known as Hestor L. Stevens — of Pontiac, Oakland County, Mich. Born in Lima, Livingston County, N.Y., October 1, 1803. Democrat. U.S. Representative from Michigan 4th District, 1853-55. Died in Washington, D.C., May 7, 1864 (age 60 years, 219 days). Interment at Oak Hill Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Ebon Clarke Ingersoll (1831-1879) — also known as Ebon C. Ingersoll; Clark Ingersoll — of Peoria, Peoria County, Ill. Born in Marshall, Oneida County, N.Y., December 12, 1831. Republican. Lawyer; member of Illinois state house of representatives, 1857; U.S. Representative from Illinois 5th District, 1864-71; defeated, 1862. Died in Washington, D.C., May 31, 1879 (age 47 years, 170 days). Interment at Oak Hill Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of John Ingersoll (1792-1859) and Mary (Livingston) Ingersoll (1799-1835); brother of Robert Green Ingersoll (1833-1899); married, November 27, 1857, to Mary Carter; father of John Carter Ingersoll; second cousin thrice removed of Jonathan Ingersoll and Jared Ingersoll; third cousin twice removed of Charles Jared Ingersoll, Joseph Reed Ingersoll, Ralph Isaacs Ingersoll and Charles Anthony Ingersoll; fourth cousin once removed of Laman Ingersoll, Colin Macrae Ingersoll and Charles Roberts Ingersoll.
      Political family: Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      James Herron Hopkins (1832-1904) — of Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, Pa. Born in Washington, Washington County, Pa., November 3, 1832. Democrat. Lawyer; banker; manufacturer; mining business; U.S. Representative from Pennsylvania 22nd District, 1875-77, 1883-85. Died in North Hatley, Quebec, June 17, 1904 (age 71 years, 227 days). Interment at Oak Hill Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      George Eustis, Jr. (1828-1872) — of Louisiana. Born in New Orleans, Orleans Parish, La., September 28, 1828. U.S. Representative from Louisiana 1st District, 1855-59. Died in Cannes, France, March 15, 1872 (age 43 years, 169 days). Interment at Oak Hill Cemetery.
      Relatives: Brother of James Biddle Eustis (1834-1899).
      Political families: Emmet-Morton family of New York City, New York; Bohlen-Eustis-Thayer family of Bryn Mawr and Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Henry W. Barry (1840-1875) — of Mississippi. Born in Schoharie County, N.Y., 1840. Republican. General in the Union Army during the Civil War; delegate to Mississippi state constitutional convention, 1867; member of Mississippi state senate, 1868; U.S. Representative from Mississippi 3rd District, 1870-75. Died in Washington, D.C., June 7, 1875 (age about 34 years). Interment at Oak Hill Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      William McKee Dunn (1814-1887) — of Madison, Jefferson County, Ind. Born in Hanover, Jefferson County, Ind., December 12, 1814. Republican. Member of Indiana state house of representatives, 1848-49; delegate to Indiana state constitutional convention, 1850-51; U.S. Representative from Indiana 3rd District, 1859-63; colonel in the Union Army during the Civil War. Died in Dunn Loring, Fairfax County, Va., July 24, 1887 (age 72 years, 224 days). Interment at Oak Hill Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Williamson Dunn; brother of Samuel Campbell Dunn and David Maxwell Dunn; nephew of David Hervey Maxwell, Edward Russell Maxwell and John Wilson (1796-1864).
      Political family: Wilson-Dunn-Goodloe family of Indiana (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      John Watkinson Douglass (1827-1909) — also known as John W. Douglass — of Erie, Erie County, Pa.; Washington, D.C. Born in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., October 25, 1827. Republican. Lawyer; U.S. Collector of Internal Revenue for the 19th Pennsylvania District, 1862-69; U.S. Commissioner of Internal Revenue, 1871-75; member District of Columbia board of commissioners, 1889-93; President of the District of Columbia Board of Commissioners, 1889-93. Died in Kent, Litchfield County, Conn., August 21, 1909 (age 81 years, 300 days). Interment at Oak Hill Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Martha (Watkinson) Douglass and Joseph Mullen Douglass (1834-1905); married to Margaret Lyon (1830-1910).
      See also Find-A-Grave memorial
      James Paul Heath (1777-1854) — also known as James P. Heath — of Annapolis, Anne Arundel County, Md. Born in Delaware, December 21, 1777. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812; U.S. Representative from Maryland 3rd District, 1833-35. Died in Georgetown (now part of Washington), D.C., June 12, 1854 (age 76 years, 173 days). Interment at Oak Hill Cemetery.
      Relatives: Married to Jane Mann (1783-1856).
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
      Peter Parker (1804-1888) — of Massachusetts. Born in Framingham, Middlesex County, Mass., June 18, 1804. Physician; minister; U.S. Diplomatic Commissioner to China, 1855-57. Died in Washington, D.C., January 10, 1888 (age 83 years, 206 days). Interment at Oak Hill Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Nathan Parker (1764-1826) and Catherine (Murdock) Parker (1765-1836); married to Harriet Colby Webster (1818-1896).
      See also Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — Find-A-Grave memorial
      Charles Pomeroy (1825-1891) — of Iowa. Born in Connecticut, 1825. Republican. U.S. Representative from Iowa 6th District, 1869-71. Died in 1891 (age about 66 years). Interment at Oak Hill Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      William Slosson Lincoln (1813-1893) — of New York. Born in Berkshire (now Newark Valley), Tioga County, N.Y., August 13, 1813. Republican. U.S. Representative from New York 26th District, 1867-69. Died April 21, 1893 (age 79 years, 251 days). Interment at Oak Hill Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      James Lawson Norris (1845-1910) — also known as James L. Norris — of Washington, D.C. Born in Washington, D.C., October 15, 1845. Democrat. Lawyer; delegate to Democratic National Convention from District of Columbia, 1892, 1900, 1904; member of Democratic National Committee from District of Columbia, 1892-96; Treasurer of Democratic National Committee, 1898-1900. Member, Phi Kappa Psi; Freemasons; Royal Arch Masons; Knights Templar. Died in Washington, D.C., March 5, 1910 (age 64 years, 141 days). Interment at Oak Hill Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of John Edmund Norris (1816-1887) and Eliza Tidings (Phillips) Norris (1820-1873); married 1867 to Annie Virginia Robinson (1846-1895); father of Grace James Norris (1874-1974; who married Arthur Pue Gorman, Jr. (1873-1919)).
      Political family: Gorman-Norris family of Laurel, Maryland.
      See also Find-A-Grave memorial
      Arthur Pue Gorman, Jr. (1873-1919) — also known as Arthur P. Gorman, Jr. — of Laurel, Prince George's County, Md. Born in Howard County, Md., March 27, 1873. Democrat. Lawyer; member of Maryland state senate, 1904-10; candidate for Governor of Maryland, 1911; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Maryland, 1912 (speaker). Presbyterian. Died, in Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, Md., September 3, 1919 (age 46 years, 160 days). Interment at Oak Hill Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Hannah (Donnegan) Gorman (1836-1910) and Arthur Pue Gorman (1839-1906); married, November 27, 1900, to Grace James Norris (1874-1974; daughter of James Lawson Norris).
      Political family: Gorman-Norris family of Laurel, Maryland.
      See also Find-A-Grave memorial
      Return Jonathan Meigs III (1801-1891) — also known as Return J. Meigs III — of Nashville, Davidson County, Tenn.; Washington, D.C. Born in Winchester, Clark County, Ky., April 14, 1801. Lawyer; U.S. Indian Agent to Creek and Cherokee Nations, 1834; U.S. Attorney for the Middle District of Tennessee, 1841-42; member of Tennessee state senate, 1850; clerk of the District of Columbia Supreme Court, 1863-91. Died in Washington, D.C., October 19, 1891 (age 90 years, 188 days). Interment at Oak Hill Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of John Meigs (1771-1808) and Parthenia (Clendenin) Meigs (1779-1839); married, November 1, 1825, to Sarah Keys 'Sally' Love (1804-1858); nephew of Return Jonathan Meigs, Jr. (1764-1825); grandson of Return Jonathan Meigs, Sr.; first cousin once removed of Henry Meigs; second cousin of Henry Meigs, Jr.; second cousin thrice removed of Raymond Lee Beuhring.
      Political families: Jackson-Lee family of Virginia; Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      See also Find-A-Grave memorial
    Henry Litchfield West Henry Litchfield West (1859-1940) — of Washington, D.C. Born in Factoryville, Staten Island, Richmond County, N.Y., August 20, 1859. Democrat. Newspaper editor; member District of Columbia board of commissioners, 1902-10. Methodist; later Congregationalist. English ancestry. Died in West Haven, Dorchester County, Md., September 3, 1940 (age 81 years, 14 days). Interment at Oak Hill Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Robert Athow West (1808-1865) and Elizabeth (Cook) West (1832-1904); married, July 25, 1882, to Mary Hope White (1861-1941).
      See also Find-A-Grave memorial
      Image source: Men of Mark in America (1906)
      William Henry Philip (1824-1881) — also known as William H. Philip — of New York. Born September 6, 1824. Democrat. Candidate for U.S. Representative from New York 12th District, 1870. Died May 7, 1881 (age 56 years, 243 days). Interment at Oak Hill Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Henry G. Philip (1793-1829) and Catherine Douw (Hoffman) Philip (1797-1866); married to Eliza Worthington (1842-1896); father of Hoffman Philip (1872-1951).
      See also Find-A-Grave memorial
      William Washington Howes (1887-1962) — also known as W. W. Howes — of Wolsey, Beadle County, S.Dak.; Huron, Beadle County, S.Dak. Born in Tomah, Monroe County, Wis., February 16, 1887. Democrat. Lawyer; member of South Dakota state senate 22nd District, 1917-18; candidate for Governor of South Dakota, 1920; South Dakota Democratic state chair, 1923; member of Democratic National Committee from South Dakota, 1924-40; delegate to Democratic National Convention from South Dakota, 1924 (member, Committee on Rules and Order of Business), 1940; First Assistant U.S. Postmaster General; resigned in protest in 1940 when President Franklin D. Roosevelt sought an unprecedented third term. Died in Washington, D.C., January 15, 1962 (age 74 years, 333 days). Interment at Oak Hill Cemetery.
      W. W. Howes Airport (now Huron Regional Airport), in Huron, South Dakota, was named for him.
      William Tyler Page (b. 1868) — of Chevy Chase, Montgomery County, Md. Born in Frederick, Frederick County, Md., October 19, 1868. Republican. Candidate for U.S. Representative from Maryland 2nd District, 1902; clerk of the U.S. House of Representatives, 1919. Episcopalian. Interment at Oak Hill Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Walker Yates Page and Nannie (Tyler) Page; married 1895 to Mary Anna Weigandt (1865-1929); descendant *** of Carter Braxton; relative *** of John Tyler (1747-1813).
      Political families: Pendleton-Lee family; Meriwether-Kellogg-Tyler family of Virginia and Connecticut; Brockenbrough-Stevenson-Braxton-Tyler family of Virginia; Livingston-Schuyler family of New York (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      See also Find-A-Grave memorial
      John Howard Payne (1791-1852) — also known as John H. Payne — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in New York, New York County, N.Y., June 9, 1791. Actor; playwright; author of the lines which were later adapted as the song "Home Sweet Home"; U.S. Consul in Tunis, 1842-45, 1851-52, died in office 1852. Inducted into the Songwriters Hall of Fame, 1970. Died in Tunis, Tunisia, April 10, 1852 (age 60 years, 306 days). Original interment at St. George's Protestant Cemetery, Tunis, Tunisia; reinterment in 1883 at Oak Hill Cemetery; memorial monument at Prospect Park, Brooklyn, N.Y.
      See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
      William Coppinger (1828-1892) — of Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa.; Washington, D.C. Born in England, 1828. Secretary, American Colonization Society (advocating Black American emigration to Liberia, Africa); Consul-General for Liberia in Washington, D.C., 1874-92. Died in Washington, D.C., February, 1892 (age about 63 years). Interment at Oak Hill Cemetery.
      See also Find-A-Grave memorial
      Southard Parker Warner (1881-1914) — also known as Southard P. Warner — of Washington, D.C. Born in Washington, D.C., October 29, 1881. U.S. Consular Agent in Gera, 1904; U.S. Consul in Leipzig, 1904-09; Bahia, 1909-11; Harbin, as of 1914. Died in Harbin, China, May 9, 1914 (age 32 years, 192 days). Interment at Oak Hill Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Mary Jacob (Parker) Warner (1846-1885) and Brainard Henry Warner (1847-1916); grandson of Andrew Parker (1805-1864).
      See also Find-A-Grave memorial
      George Washington Montgomery (1804-1841) — Born in Spain, 1804. U.S. Consul in San Juan, 1835-38; Tampico, 1840-41. Died in Washington, D.C., June 5, 1841 (age about 36 years). Entombed at Oak Hill Cemetery.
      Presumably named for: George Washington
      See also Find-A-Grave memorial
      Edward Young (1811-1909) — Born in Wolfville, Nova Scotia, December 11, 1811. U.S. Consul in Windsor, as of 1889-97. Died in Washington, D.C., April 9, 1909 (age 97 years, 119 days). Interment at Oak Hill Cemetery.
      Relatives: Married to Augusta Maria Bishop (1815-1905).
      See also Find-A-Grave memorial
      William Dulany Hunter (1866-1923) — also known as William D. Hunter — of Washington, D.C. Born in Washington, D.C., August 29, 1866. U.S. Deputy Consul General in Cairo, as of 1898-99; U.S. Vice & Deputy Consul General in Cairo, as of 1902; U.S. Consul in Nice, as of 1914-20. Died in Washington, D.C., December 11, 1923 (age 57 years, 104 days). Interment at Oak Hill Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of John Chapman Hunter (1839-1882) and Emma (Biscoe) Hunter (1841-1895); married to Alice Baltazzi (1873-1927).
      See also Find-A-Grave memorial
      John George Nicolay (1832-1901) — also known as John G. Nicolay; Johann Georg — Born in Essingen, Germany, February 26, 1832. Newspaper editor; private secretary to President Abraham Lincoln, 1861-65; U.S. Consul in Paris, as of 1865-69. Died in Washington, D.C., September 26, 1901 (age 69 years, 212 days). Interment at Oak Hill Cemetery.
      See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
      Books about John G. Nicolay: Michael Burlingame, ed., Abraham Lincoln: The Observations of John G. Nicolay and John Hay
      John Carter Ingersoll (1860-1903) — also known as John C. Ingersoll — of Washington, D.C. Born in Peoria, Peoria County, Ill., March 20, 1860. U.S. Consul in Copenhagen, as of 1898-99; Cartagena, as of 1902. Died in Colón, Colombia (now Panama), June 6, 1903 (age 43 years, 78 days). Interment at Oak Hill Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Ebon Clarke Ingersoll and Mary (Carter) Ingersoll; married, November 16, 1884, to Lalla Burrows; nephew of Robert Green Ingersoll; second cousin four times removed of Jonathan Ingersoll (1747-1823) and Jared Ingersoll; third cousin thrice removed of Charles Jared Ingersoll, Joseph Reed Ingersoll, Ralph Isaacs Ingersoll and Charles Anthony Ingersoll.
      Political families: Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York; Morris-Ingersoll family of New York and Connecticut; Fessenden family (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      See also Find-A-Grave memorial
      Francis Colton (1834-1913) — Born in Maine, May 22, 1834. U.S. Consul in Venice, 1870. Died in Washington, D.C., March 9, 1913 (age 78 years, 291 days). Entombed at Oak Hill Cemetery.
      Relatives: Father of George Radcliffe Colton (1865-1916).
      See also Find-A-Grave memorial
      Hosea Jefferson Dean (1806-1855) — also known as H. J. Dean — of Spartanburg, Spartanburg District (now Spartanburg County), S.C. Born in Spartanburg District (now Spartanburg County), S.C., July 11, 1806. Lawyer; Spartanburg District Commissioner in Equity, 1832-44; member of South Carolina state house of representatives, 1850-52; Clerk, South Carolina House of Representatives, 1853. Baptist. Died, of heart disease, in White Sulphur Springs, Greenbrier County, Va (now W.Va.), August 3, 1855 (age 49 years, 23 days). Interment at Oak Hill Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of John Dean (1776-1852) and Mary (Farrow) Dean (1780-1830); married, October 14, 1834, to Elizabeth Ellen Mills (1810-1838); married, August 9, 1840, to Mary Stewart Owen (1822-1886); grandnephew of Samuel Farrow (1759-1824).
      Arthur Peter (d. 1943) — of Rockville, Montgomery County, Md. Democrat. Lawyer; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Maryland, 1904, 1912 (Honorary Vice-President; speaker). Died October 25, 1943. Interment at Oak Hill Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of George Peter (1823-1893); grandson of George Peter (1779-1861).
      Political family: Peter family of Maryland.
    Politicians formerly buried here:
    Salmon P. Chase Salmon Portland Chase (1808-1873) — also known as Salmon P. Chase; "Old Mr. Greenbacks" — of Cincinnati, Hamilton County, Ohio. Born in Cornish, Sullivan County, N.H., January 13, 1808. Republican. Liberty candidate for U.S. Representative from Ohio 1st District, 1846; U.S. Senator from Ohio, 1849-55, 1861; Governor of Ohio, 1856-60; candidate for Republican nomination for President, 1856, 1860; U.S. Secretary of the Treasury, 1861-64; Chief Justice of U.S. Supreme Court, 1864-73; died in office 1873. Episcopalian. Died in New York, New York County, N.Y., May 7, 1873 (age 65 years, 114 days). Original interment at Oak Hill Cemetery; reinterment at Spring Grove Cemetery, Cincinnati, Ohio.
      Relatives: Son of Ithamar Chase (1762-1817) and Janette Chase (1777-1832); married to Eliza Ann Smith (1821-1845); father of Katherine Jane 'Kate' Chase (1840-1899; who married William Sprague (1830-1915)); nephew of Dudley Chase; cousin *** of Dudley Chase Denison.
      Political families: Sprague family of Providence, Rhode Island; Chase family of Vermont (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      Chase County, Kan. is named for him.
      Chase Hall (dormitory, built 1926), at Harvard University Business School, Boston, Massachusetts, is named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS Salmon P. Chase (built 1942, scrapped 1960) was named for him.
      Politician named for him: Chase S. Osborn
      Coins and currency: His portrait appeared on various U.S. currency, including $1 and $10 notes in the 1860s, and the $10,000 bill from 1918 to 1946.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
      Books about Salmon P. Chase: Frederick J. Blue, Salmon P. Chase : A Life in Politics — John Niven, Salmon P. Chase : A Biography — Albert B. Hart, Salmon P. Chase — Doris Kearns Goodwin, Team of Rivals : The Political Genius of Abraham Lincoln
      Image source: Life and Work of James G. Blaine (1893)
    James G. Blaine James Gillespie Blaine (1830-1893) — also known as James G. Blaine; "The Plumed Knight"; "Belshazzar Blaine"; "Magnetic Man" — of Augusta, Kennebec County, Maine. Born in West Brownsville, Washington County, Pa., January 31, 1830. Republican. Delegate to Republican National Convention from Maine, 1856 (Honorary Secretary); member of Maine state house of representatives, 1859-62; Speaker of the Maine State House of Representatives, 1861-62; U.S. Representative from Maine 3rd District, 1863-76; Speaker of the U.S. House, 1869-75; candidate for Republican nomination for President, 1876, 1880; U.S. Senator from Maine, 1876-81; U.S. Secretary of State, 1881, 1889-92; candidate for President of the United States, 1884. Congregationalist. Scotch-Irish ancestry. Died in Washington, D.C., January 27, 1893 (age 62 years, 362 days). Original interment at Oak Hill Cemetery; reinterment in 1920 at Blaine Memorial Park, Augusta, Maine.
      Relatives: Son of Ephraim Lyon Blaine (1796-1850) and Maria (Gillespie) Blaine (1801-1871); married, June 30, 1850, to Harriet Stanwood (1827-1903); father of Harriet Blaine (1871-1958; who married Truxtun Beale); nephew of Ellen Blaine (who married John Hoge Ewing (1796-1887)); grandfather of James Gillespie Blaine III.
      Political family: Dewey-Blaine-Coit-Huntington family of Connecticut (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      Cross-reference: Robert G. Ingersoll
      Blaine counties in Idaho, Mont., Neb. and Okla. are named for him.
      Mount Blaine, in Park County, Colorado, is named for him.  — The city of Blaine, Washington, is named for him.
      Politician named for him: J. B. McLaughlin
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
      Books about James G. Blaine: Mark Wahlgren Summers, Rum, Romanism, & Rebellion : The Making of a President, 1884 — Edward P. Crapol, James G. Blaine : Architect of Empire — Richard B. Cheney & Lynne V. Cheney, Kings Of The Hill : How Nine Powerful Men Changed The Course of American History
      Image source: William C. Roberts, Leading Orators (1884)
      Abel Parker Upshur (1790-1844) — of Virginia. Born in Northampton County, Va., June 17, 1790. Member of Virginia state house of delegates, 1812-13, 1824-27; state court judge in Virginia, 1826-41; delegate to Virginia state constitutional convention, 1829-30; U.S. Secretary of the Navy, 1841-43; U.S. Secretary of State, 1843-44; died in office 1844. Episcopalian. Among those killed in the explosion when a cannon accidentally burst on board the U.S.S. Princeton, on the Potomac River near Fort Washington, Prince George's County, Md., February 28, 1844 (age 53 years, 256 days). Originally entombed at Congressional Cemetery; later interred in 1874 at Oak Hill Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Littleton Upshur (1760?-?).
      Upshur counties in Tex. and W.Va. are named for him.
      The World War II Liberty ship SS Abel Parker Upshur (built 1942, scrapped 1966) was named for him.
      See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
      George Purnell Fisher (1817-1899) — also known as George P. Fisher — of Dover, Kent County, Del.; Washington, D.C. Born in Milford, Sussex County, Del., October 13, 1817. Republican. Member of Delaware state house of representatives, 1843-44; secretary of state of Delaware, 1846; Delaware state attorney general, 1855-60; U.S. Representative from Delaware at-large, 1861-63; defeated, 1862; justice of District of Columbia supreme court, 1863-70; U.S. Attorney for the District of Columbia, 1870-76; alternate delegate to Republican National Convention from Delaware, 1880. Died in Washington, D.C., February 10, 1899 (age 81 years, 120 days). Original interment at Oak Hill Cemetery; reinterment at Methodist Cemetery, Dover, Del.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Henry Baldwin (1780-1844) — of Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, Pa. Born in New Haven, New Haven County, Conn., January 14, 1780. Lawyer; U.S. Representative from Pennsylvania 14th District, 1817-22; Associate Justice of U.S. Supreme Court, 1830-44; died in office 1844. Episcopalian. Member, Freemasons. Died in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., April 21, 1844 (age 64 years, 98 days). Original interment at Oak Hill Cemetery; reinterment at Greendale Cemetery, Meadville, Pa.
      Relatives: Son of Henry Baldwin and Theodora (Wolcott) Baldwin; half-brother of Abraham Baldwin (1754-1807).
      Political family: Baldwin family of Connecticut.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — federal judicial profile — Wikipedia article — Ballotpedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
    Other politicians who have monuments here:
      Harold Sheffield Van Buren (1855-1907) — also known as Harold S. Van Buren — of New Jersey. Born in New York, New York County, N.Y., October 6, 1855. U.S. Consular Marshal in Kanagawa, 1880-85; U.S. Consul in Nice, 1897-1907, died in office 1907. Died in Nice, France, February 11, 1907 (age 51 years, 128 days). Interment at Ste. Marguerite Anglo-American Church, Nice, France; cenotaph at Oak Hill Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Thomas Brodhead Van Buren and Harriet (Sheffield) Van Buren (1830-1901); married, October 18, 1888, to Anne Moore Thorburn; nephew of Ellen Maria Sheffield (1838-1920; who married William Walter Phelps); great-grandson of Barent Van Buren; first cousin of Mabel Thorp Boardman and Sheffield Phelps; first cousin once removed of Phelps Phelps; second cousin thrice removed of Martin Van Buren; second cousin five times removed of Dirck Ten Broeck and Cornelis Cuyler; third cousin twice removed of Jesse Hoyt and John Van Buren (1810-1866).
      Political family: Livingston-Schuyler family of New York (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      Cross-reference: Frederic MacMaster
      See also Find-A-Grave memorial


    Rawlins Park
    Washington, District of Columbia

    Politicians who have monuments here:
      John Aaron Rawlins (1831-1869) — Born in Galena, Jo Daviess County, Ill., February 13, 1831. General in the Union Army during the Civil War; U.S. Secretary of War, 1869; died in office 1869. Died, of consumption (tuberculosis), in Washington, D.C., September 6, 1869 (age 38 years, 205 days). Original interment at Congressional Cemetery; reinterment at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Va.; statue erected 1874 at Rawlins Park.
      See also Wikipedia article


    Rock Creek Cemetery
    Webster Street and Rock Creek Church Road N.W.
    Washington, District of Columbia
    Founded 1719
    Listed in National Register of Historic Places, 1977
    See also Findagrave page for this location.
    Politicians buried here:
      William Windom (1827-1891) — of Winona, Winona County, Minn. Born in Belmont County, Ohio, May 10, 1827. Republican. U.S. Representative from Minnesota, 1859-69 (at-large 1859-63, 1st District 1863-69); member of Republican National Committee from Minnesota, 1866-68; U.S. Senator from Minnesota, 1870-71, 1871-81, 1881-83; candidate for Republican nomination for President, 1880; U.S. Secretary of the Treasury, 1881, 1889-91; died in office 1891. Quaker. Fell dead, from heart disease, at the annual banquet of the New York Board of Trade and Transportation, just after finishing a speech, in New York, New York County, N.Y., January 29, 1891 (age 63 years, 264 days). Interment at Rock Creek Cemetery.
      The city of Windom, Minnesota, is named for him.
      Coins and currency: His portrait appeared on the U.S. $2 silver certificate in the 1890s.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
    Hugh McCulloch Hugh McCulloch (1808-1895) — of Indiana. Born in Kennebunk, York County, Maine, December 7, 1808. Republican. Lawyer; banker; U.S. Comptroller of the Currency, 1863-65; U.S. Secretary of the Treasury, 1865-69, 1884-85. Died in Holly Hill, Prince George's County, Md., May 24, 1895 (age 86 years, 168 days). Interment at Rock Creek Cemetery.
      McCulloch Hall (dormitory, built 1926), at Harvard University Business School, Boston, Massachusetts, is named for him.
      See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial — Comptrollers of the Currency
      Image source: Life and Work of James G. Blaine (1893)
      Harlan Fiske Stone (1872-1946) — also known as Harlan F. Stone — Born in Chesterfield, Cheshire County, N.H., October 11, 1872. Lawyer; Dean of Columbia University Law School; U.S. Attorney General, 1924-25; Associate Justice of U.S. Supreme Court, 1925-41; Chief Justice of U.S. Supreme Court, 1941-46; died in office 1946. Episcopalian. Suffered a cerebral hemorrhage, in court, while reading his dissent in the case of Girouard v. United States, and died later that day, in Washington, D.C., April 22, 1946 (age 73 years, 193 days). Interment at Rock Creek Cemetery.
      Relatives: Married 1899 to Agnes E. Harvey.
      Cross-reference: Eugene H. Nickerson
      See also federal judicial profile — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
      Books about Harlan Fiske Stone: Melvin I. Urofsky, Division and Discord : The Supreme Court Under Stone and Vinson, 1941-1953