PoliticalGraveyard.com
The Political Graveyard: A Database of American History
Assassination Survivors

List of Politicians Who Survived Assassination Attempts
Very incomplete!

in approximate chronological order
  John George Jackson (1777-1825) — also known as John G. Jackson — of Clarksburg, Harrison County, Va. (now W.Va.). Born in Buckhannon, Upshur County, Va. (now W.Va.), September 22, 1777. Democrat. Member of Virginia state house of delegates, 1798-1801, 1811-12; U.S. Representative from Virginia, 1803-10, 1813-17 (at-large 1803-07, 1st District 1807-10, 1813-17); U.S. District Judge for the Western District of Virginia, 1819-25; died in office 1825. In November, 1807, leaving the courthouse in Clarksburg, has was attacked and suffered a skull fracture. While in Congress, fought a duel with Joseph Pearson of North Carolina, and on the second fire was wounded in the hip. Died in Clarksburg, Harrison County, Va (now W.Va.), March 28, 1825 (age 47 years, 187 days). Interment at Old Jackson Cemetery, Clarksburg, W.Va.
  Relatives: Son of George Jackson; brother of Edward Brake Jackson; married 1800 to Mary Payne (1781-1808; sister-in-law of James Madison and Richard Cutts); married, July 19, 1810, to Mary Sophia Meigs (1793-1863; daughter of Return Jonathan Meigs, Jr.); father of John Jay Jackson (1800-1877) and Mary Jackson (who married John James Allen); grandfather of John Jay Jackson, Jr., James Monroe Jackson, Jacob Beeson Jackson and William Thomas Bland.
  Political family: Jackson-Lee family of Virginia (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — federal judicial profile
Andrew Jackson Andrew Jackson (1767-1845) — also known as "Old Hickory"; "The Farmer of Tennessee"; "King Andrew the First" — of Nashville, Davidson County, Tenn. Born, in a log cabin, in The Waxhaws, Lancaster County, S.C., March 15, 1767. Democrat. Lawyer; U.S. Attorney for Tennessee, 1790-97; U.S. Representative from Tennessee at-large, 1796-97; U.S. Senator from Tennessee, 1797-98, 1823-25; justice of Tennessee state supreme court, 1798; general in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812; Governor of Florida Territory, 1821; President of the United States, 1829-37; censured by the U.S. Senate in 1834 over his removal of federal deposits from the Bank of the United States; on January 30, 1835, while attending funeral services at the Capitol Building for Rep. Warren R. Davis of South Carolina, he was shot at with two guns -- which both misfired -- by Richard Lawrence, a house painter (later found not guilty by reason of insanity). Presbyterian. Scotch-Irish ancestry. Member, Freemasons. Killed Charles Dickinson in a pistol duel, May 30, 1806; also dueled with Thomas Hart Benton and Waightstill Avery. Elected in 1910 to the Hall of Fame for Great Americans. Died, of dropsy (congestive heart failure), in Nashville, Davidson County, Tenn., June 8, 1845 (age 78 years, 85 days). Interment at The Hermitage, Nashville, Tenn.; statue erected 1853 at Lafayette Park, Washington, D.C.; statue erected 1856 at Jackson Square, New Orleans, La.
  Relatives: Son of Andrew Jackson (1730-1767) and Elizabeth (Hutchinson) Jackson (1737-1781); married, January 17, 1794, to Rachel (Donelson) Robards (1767-1828; aunt of Andrew Jackson Donelson (1799-1871)).
  Political families: Marshall-Harrison-Randolph-Cabell family of Virginia; Caffery family of Louisiana (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Cross-reference: Francis P. Blair
  Jackson counties in Ala., Ark., Colo., Fla., Ill., Ind., Iowa, Kan., Ky., La., Mich., Miss., Mo., N.C., Ohio, Okla., Ore., Tenn., Tex., W.Va. and Wis., and Hickory County, Mo., are named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: Andrew J. DonelsonAndrew Jackson MillerAndrew J. FaulkAndrew Jackson TitusAndrew Jackson IsacksAndrew Jackson HamiltonAndrew J. HarlanAndrew J. KuykendallAndrew J. ThayerElam A. J. GreeleyAndrew Jackson IngleAndrew J. OgleAndrew Jackson CarrAndrew J. WatermanAndrew J. BentleyAndrew J. RogersWilliam A. J. SparksAndrew Jackson PoppletonAndrew J. HunterAndrew Jackson BryantAndrew J. BealeA. J. ClementsAndrew Jackson BakerAndrew J. FeltA. J. KingAndrew J. SawyerAndrew Jackson GreenfieldAndrew Jackson CaldwellAndrew Jackson GahaganAndrew Jackson BishipAndrew Jackson HoustonAndrew J. CobbAndrew J. MontagueAndrew J. BarchfeldAndrew J. BallietAndrew J. KirkAndrew J. LivingstonA. J. SherwoodAndrew Jackson StewartAndrew J. MayAndrew J. McConnicoAndrew J. SawyerAndrew J. BrewerAndrew BettwyAndrew J. TransueAndrew Jackson GravesAndrew Jackson GilbertAndrew J. GoodwinAndrew J. HinshawAndy YoungAndrew Jackson Kupper
  Coins and currency: His portrait appears on the U.S. $20 bill; from the 1860s until 1927, his portrait appeared on on U.S. notes and certificates of various denominations from $5 to $10,000. In 1861, his portrait appeared on Confederate States $1,000 notes.
  Campaign slogan: "Let the people rule."
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial — Tennessee Encyclopedia
  Books about Andrew Jackson: Robert Vincent Remini, The Life of Andrew Jackson — Robert Vincent Remini, Andrew Jackson : The Course of American Freedom, 1822-1832 — Robert Vincent Remini, Andrew Jackson : The Course of American Democracy, 1833-1845 — Robert Vincent Remini, Andrew Jackson : The Course of American Empire, 1767-1821 — Andrew Burstein, The Passions of Andrew Jackson — David S. Heidler & Jeanne T. Heidler, Old Hickory's War: Andrew Jackson and the Quest for Empire — Donald B. Cole, The Presidency of Andrew Jackson — H. W. Brands, Andrew Jackson : His Life and Times — Jon Meacham, American Lion: Andrew Jackson in the White House — Donald Barr Chidsey, Andrew Jackson, Hero
  Image source: Portrait & Biographical Album of Washtenaw County (1891)
Cassius M. Clay Cassius Marcellus Clay (1810-1903) — also known as Cassius M. Clay; "The Lion of White Hall" — of Madison County, Ky. Born in Madison County, Ky., October 19, 1810. Probably the best-known Southern emancipationist; freed his own slaves in 1844 and edited the only Southern antislavery newspaper in 1845-47; member of Kentucky state house of representatives, 1835-37, 1840; delegate to Whig National Convention from Kentucky, 1839 (speaker); shot point-blank during a speech in 1843, he used a Bowie knife to cut off the attacker's ear and nose and cut out one eye; tried for mayhem and found not guilty; served in the U.S. Army during the Mexican War; candidate for Republican nomination for Vice President, 1860; U.S. Minister to Russia, 1861-62, 1863-69; general in the Union Army during the Civil War. Died, of kidney failure, in Madison County, Ky., July 22, 1903 (age 92 years, 276 days). Interment at Richmond Cemetery, Richmond, Ky.
  Relatives: Son of Green Clay and Sally (Lewis) Clay (1776-1867); brother of Brutus Junius Clay (1808-1878); married to Mary Jane Warfield; father of Brutus Junius Clay (1847-1932) and Laura Clay; nephew of Matthew Clay (1754-1815); uncle of William Cassius Goodloe (1841-1889); first cousin of Matthew Clay (1795?-1827); second cousin of Henry Clay (1777-1852) and Porter Clay; second cousin once removed of Thomas Hart Clay, Henry Clay, Jr. and James Brown Clay; second cousin twice removed of Henry Clay (1849-1884); second cousin thrice removed of Oliver Carroll Clay; second cousin four times removed of Archer Woodford; third cousin of Clement Comer Clay; third cousin once removed of Clement Claiborne Clay, Jr..
  Political families: Clay family of Kentucky; Wilson-Dunn-Goodloe family of Indiana (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Other politicians named for him: Cassius M. C. TwitchellCassius C. PillsburyCassius C. Dowell
  See also Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: The South in the Building of the Nation (1909)
  Benjamin Franklin Terry (1821-1861) — also known as Frank Terry — Born in Russellville, Logan County, Ky., February 18, 1821. Planter; in 1844, he was attacked by two rebellious slaves with knives and axes; railroad builder; delegate to Texas secession convention, 1861; colonel in the Confederate Army during the Civil War. Shot and killed in action while leading Terry's Texas Rangers at the battle of Woodsonville (also called Rowlett's Station), in Hart County, Ky., December 17, 1861 (age 40 years, 302 days). Original interment at a private or family graveyard, Fort Bend County, Tex.; reinterment in 1880 at Glenwood Cemetery, Houston, Tex.
  Presumably named for: Benjamin Franklin
  Relatives: Son of Joseph Royal Terry (1792-1877) and Sarah David (Smith) Terry (1793-1837); brother of David Smith Terry (1823-1889); married, October 12, 1841, to Mary Bingham (1821-1876).
  Political family: Runnels-Terry family of Houston, Texas.
  Terry County, Tex. is named for him.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  William Minor — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Democrat. Member of New York state assembly from New York County 1st District, 1852, 1866; attacked by six men, in the bar-room at the Carlton Hotel, March 26, 1854, and suffered serious injuries; delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1860. Burial location unknown.
  John K. Lamerick (born c.1823) — of Jacksonville, Jackson County, Ore.; Shreveport, Caddo Parish, La. Born in Bedford County, Tenn., about 1823. Democrat. Delegate to Democratic National Convention from Oregon, 1860; shot in the face by W. J. Berry, during a quarrel, on February 5, 1860, but survived; served in the Confederate Army during the Civil War. Burial location unknown.
  John W. Dawson (1820-1877) — of Fort Wayne, Allen County, Ind. Born in Cambridge, Dearborn County, Ind., October 21, 1820. Farmer; lawyer; newspaper editor; candidate for Indiana state house of representatives, 1854; candidate for secretary of state of Indiana, 1856; candidate for U.S. Representative from Indiana, 1858; Governor of Utah Territory, 1861. In December, 1861, after less than a month as territorial governor, fled Utah amid controversy and scandal. Just east of Salt Lake City, he was attacked by three men and badly injured. Died in Indiana, September 10, 1877 (age 56 years, 324 days). Interment at Lindenwood Cemetery, Fort Wayne, Ind.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Frederick William Seward (1830-1915) — also known as Frederick W. Seward — of New York, New York County, N.Y.; Montrose, Westchester County, N.Y. Born in Auburn, Cayuga County, N.Y., July 8, 1830. Republican. Lawyer; U.S. Assistant Secretary of State, 1861-65, 1877-79; on April 14, 1865, the same evening that Abraham Lincoln was assassinated, Lewis Powell, a co-conspirator of John Wilkes Booth, came to the Seward home intending to kill his father, Secretary of State William H. Seward; Frederick, trying to block Powell, was attacked and suffered a skull fracture; member of New York state assembly from New York County 7th District, 1875; candidate for secretary of state of New York, 1875. Died April 25, 1915 (age 84 years, 291 days). Interment at Fort Hill Cemetery, Auburn, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of William Henry Seward and Frances Adeline (Miller) Seward (1805-1865); brother of William Henry Seward, Jr. (1839-1920); married to Anna H. Wharton (1836-1919); grandson of Samuel Swayze Seward; first cousin of George Frederick Seward; first cousin once removed of Frederick Whittlesey Seward, Jr..
  Political family: Seward family of New York (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
William H. Seward William Henry Seward (1801-1872) — also known as William H. Seward — of Auburn, Cayuga County, N.Y. Born in Florida, Orange County, N.Y., May 16, 1801. Lawyer; co-founded (with Thurlow Weed), the Albany Evening Journal newspaper in 1830; member of New York state senate 7th District, 1831-34; Governor of New York, 1839-43; defeated (Whig), 1834; U.S. Senator from New York, 1849-61; candidate for Republican nomination for President, 1856, 1860; U.S. Secretary of State, 1861-69; as Secretary of State in 1867, he made a treaty with Russia for the purchase of Alaska; critics dubbed the territory "Seward's Folly". Survived an assassination attempt on April 14, 1865 (the same night Abraham Lincoln was shot), when Lewis Payne, an associate of John Wilkes Booth, broke into his bedroom and stabbed him repeatedly. Payne was arrested, tried with the other conspirators, and hanged. Died in Auburn, Cayuga County, N.Y., October 16, 1872 (age 71 years, 153 days). Interment at Fort Hill Cemetery, Auburn, N.Y.; statue at Madison Square Park, Manhattan, N.Y.; statue at Volunteer Park, Seattle, Wash.
  Relatives: Son of Samuel Swayze Seward and Mary (Jennings) Seward (1769-1845); married to Frances Adeline Miller (1805-1865); father of Frederick William Seward and William Henry Seward, Jr.; uncle of Caroline Cornelia Canfield (1834-1922; who married John Lawrence Schoolcraft) and George Frederick Seward (1840-1910); granduncle of Frederick Whittlesey Seward, Jr..
  Political family: Seward family of New York (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Cross-reference: George W. Jones — Samuel J. Barrows — Frederick W. Seward — Elias P. Pellet
  Seward counties in Kan. and Neb. are named for him.
  Seward Mountain, in the Adirondack Mountains, Franklin County, New York, is named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: W. Seward WhittleseyW. H. Seward ThomsonWilliam S. Shanahan
  Coins and currency: His portrait appeared on the $50 U.S. Treasury note in the 1890s.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about William H. Seward: Doris Kearns Goodwin, Team of Rivals : The Political Genius of Abraham Lincoln — Walter Stahr, Seward: Lincoln's Indispensable Man — Walter Stahr, Seward: Lincoln's Indispensable Man — Michael Burgan, William Henry Seward : Senator and Statesman (for young readers)
  Image source: New York Public Library
  James Milton Turner (1840-1915) — also known as J. Milton Turner — of Kansas City, Jackson County, Mo.; St. Louis, Mo. Born in slavery in St. Louis, Mo., 1840. Served in the Union Army during the Civil War; U.S. Minister to Liberia, 1871-78; stabbed in the chest by George W. Medley, in St. Louis, October 9, 1872. African ancestry. First African-American to serve as a U.S. diplomat. Died, as the result of a railroad tank car explosion, in Ardmore, Carter County, Okla., November 1, 1915 (age about 75 years). Interment at Father Dickson's Cemetery, St. Louis, Mo.
  Turner School (opened 1924, renamed for Turner 1932, closed 1976), in Kirkwood, Missouri, was named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS James Turner (built 1942, scrapped 1970) was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary
  David S. Paige — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Proprietor of Paige's Hotel; owner, Fort Leo Line of steamboats; member of New York state assembly from New York County 5th District, 1872. Shot twice and injured on May 5, 1875, by Samuel Decker, an unemployed bartender. Burial location unknown.
  Thomas James Roberson Swafford (1849-1884) — also known as Thomas J. R. Swafford — Born December 27, 1849. Democrat. Member of Tennessee state senate, 1884; died in office 1884; shot through his arm by Jeff Dibrell, brother of George G. Dibrell; injured in several other gun and knife fights, in one of which he wounded two attackers and accidentally killed his father-in-law. Shot and killed during an armed confrontation with Monroe Hudson, shopkeeper, who had ordered him to leave his store, in Sparta, White County, Tenn., October 17, 1884 (age 34 years, 295 days). Interment at Old Sparta Cemetery, Sparta, Tenn.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Robert H. McKune (1823-1894) — of Scranton, Lackawanna County, Pa.; Wilkes-Barre, Luzerne County, Pa. Born in Newburgh, Orange County, N.Y., August 19, 1823. Democrat. Went to California for the 1849 Gold Rush; served in the Union Army during the Civil War; mayor of Scranton, Pa., 1875-78. Member, Freemasons. While attempting to quell a riot in 1877, he was attacked, and his skull was fractured. Died, of heart failure, in Newburgh, Orange County, N.Y., October 9, 1894 (age 71 years, 51 days). Interment at Forest Hill Cemetery, Dunmore, Pa.
  Relatives: Married 1844 to Elmira Smith.
  Isaac Smith Kalloch (1832-1887) — also known as Isaac S. Kalloch — of San Francisco, Calif. Born in Rockland, Knox County, Maine, July 10, 1832. Pastor; mayor of San Francisco, Calif., 1879-81. Baptist. Indicted for adultery, in East Cambridge, Mass., 1857; tried, but the jury was unable to agree on a verdict. Shot and wounded, on August 23, 1879, by newspaper editor Charles de Young. A few months later, before de Young was to be tried for the shooting, Kalloch's son, I. M. Kalloch, shot and killed DeYoung in his office. Died, of diabetes, in Whatcom (now part of Bellingham), Whatcom County, Wash., December 9, 1887 (age 55 years, 152 days). Interment at Bayview Cemetery, Bellingham, Wash.
  Cross-reference: M. H. de Young
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Frederick Cocheu — of Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y. Republican. Alternate delegate to Republican National Convention from New York, 1872; member of New York state assembly from Kings County 7th District, 1873; candidate for U.S. Representative from New York 3rd District, 1874. Shot while attempting to capture a thief, in New York, on November 2, 1880; the bullet passed through his coat sleeve but did not injure him; the thief escaped. Burial location unknown.
  Michael Henry de Young (1849-1925) — also known as M. H. de Young — of San Francisco, Calif. Born in St. Louis, Mo., September 30, 1849. Republican. Newspaper publisher; in 1879, his brother Charles de Young (1846-1880), then editor of the San Francisco Chronicle, shot and wounded San Francisco mayor Isaac S. Kalloch; a few months later, Charles was shot to death in his office by the mayor's son; on November 19, 1884, he was shot and seriously wounded by Adolph B. Spreckels, who had been angered by an article in the Chronicle; Spreckels, who pleaded temporary insanity, was tried and found not guilty; delegate to Republican National Convention from California, 1888, 1892, 1908, 1920. Catholic. Jewish ancestry. Died in San Francisco, Calif., February 15, 1925 (age 75 years, 138 days). Interment at Holy Cross Catholic Cemetery, Colma, Calif.
  The World War II Liberty ship SS M. H. De Young (built 1943, scrapped 1950) was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article
  Patrick McQuaid (c.1849-1892) — of Jacksonville, Duval County, Fla. Born in Ireland, about 1849. Wholesale grain and flour merchant; mayor of Jacksonville, Fla., 1886-87, 1888-91; active community leader during the 1888 yellow fever epidemic; on June 17, 1890, he was brutally assaulted by City Marshal Stephen Wiggins, who clubbed him repeatedly on the head until he lost consciousness. Died, of pneumonia, in Jacksonville, Duval County, Fla., February 21, 1892 (age about 43 years). Burial location unknown.
  Russell Sage (1816-1906) — also known as "The Sage of Troy"; "The Money King"; "Father of Puts and Calls"; "Old Straddle" — of Troy, Rensselaer County, N.Y.; New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in Verona, Oneida County, N.Y., August 4, 1816. Whig. Merchant; banker; Rensselaer County Treasurer; delegate to Whig National Convention from New York, 1848; U.S. Representative from New York 13th District, 1853-57; railroad builder; arrested in 1869 and charged with violation of New York usury laws by charging high interest rates on loans; fined and sentenced to five days in prison, which was later suspended. On December 4, 1891, Henry Norcross, a stockbroker, brought a bomb to Sage's office in New York City as part of an extortion scheme; when his demands were refused, he detonated the bomb, but Sage suffered only minor injuries. Died in Lawrence, Nassau County, Long Island, N.Y., July 22, 1906 (age 89 years, 352 days). Interment at Oakwood Cemetery, Troy, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Prudence (Risley) Sage (1778-1865) and Elisha Sage, Jr. (1779-1854); married, January 23, 1840, to Maria-Henrie Winne (died 1867); married, November 24, 1869, to Margarett Olivia Slocum (died 1918); fourth great-grandnephew of Robert Treat; second cousin once removed of Edgar Jared Doolittle; second cousin twice removed of Jonathan Brace; third cousin once removed of Thomas Kimberly Brace, Alvah Nash and Dwight May Sabin; third cousin twice removed of Josiah Cowles; fourth cousin once removed of Daniel Chapin, Orsamus Cook Merrill, Timothy Merrill (1781-1836), Daniel Upson, Greene Carrier Bronson, Daniel Kellogg, John Russell Kellogg, John Adams Taintor, John Calhoun Lewis, Millard Fillmore, Daniel Fiske Kellogg, Henry G. Taintor, Henry Gould Lewis and Daniel Frederick Webster.
  Political families: Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York; Woodruff-Hornblower-Seymour-Wadsworth family of Connecticut; Hoar-Sherman family of Massachusetts; Murphy-Merrill family of Harbor Beach, Michigan (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Champe Terrell Barksdale (1853-1933) — also known as Champ T. Barksdale — of Danville, Va. Born in Halifax County, Va., December 2, 1853. Republican. Attacked and seriously hurt, in August 1895, when Buford Wimbish struck him over the head with an iron bar; postmaster at Danville, Va., 1898-1908. Died, from coronary thrombosis and lung abscess, in Memorial Hospital, Danville, Va., February 12, 1933 (age 79 years, 72 days). Interment somewhere in Pittsylvania County, Va.
  Relatives: Son of Dr. Randolph Vaughn Barksdale (1817-1899) and Frances Clapton 'Fannie' (Wimbish) Barksdale (1830-1870); first cousin of William Randolph Barksdale; first cousin once removed of Alfred Dickinson Barksdale; second cousin of Howell Edmunds Jackson (1832-1895); second cousin once removed of William Barksdale, Ethelbert Barksdale and George Annesley Barksdale; fourth cousin once removed of Allen Arnold Barksdale and Randolph Hunter Barksdale.
  Political family: Barksdale family of Virginia.
  Isaiah Henry Lofton (c.1862-1931) — also known as Isaiah H. Lofton; Isaac Loftin — of Hogansville, Troup County, Ga. Born in Grantville, Coweta County, Ga., about 1862. Republican. Postmaster of Hogansville, Ga.; on September 15, 1897, he was ambushed, shot, and left for dead, by four unknown men, presumaly white residents who had objected to his appointment; no one was ever prosecuted for the crime; resigned as postmaster soon afterward, and assigned to a job in Washington. African ancestry. Died in Washington, D.C., July 8, 1931 (age about 69 years). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Married, September 21, 1893, to Ella M. Whitfield.
  Wilhelm Christian Magelssen (1873-1919) — also known as William C. Magelssen — of Bratsberg, Fillmore County, Minn. Born in Bratsberg, Fillmore County, Minn., October 19, 1873. U.S. Vice & Deputy Consul in Beirut, 1899-1905; in Beirut, in August 1903, he was shot at but not injured; press reports incorrectly reported that he was dead; U.S. Vice & Deputy Consul General in Beirut, 1905-06; U.S. Consul in Baghdad, 1906-09; Colombo, 1909-11; Melbourne, 1911-17. Lutheran. Norwegian ancestry. Member, Freemasons. Died, from heart disease, on board the steamship Sonoma, in the North Pacific Ocean, October 17, 1919 (age 45 years, 363 days). Interment at Highland Prairie Lutheran Church Cemetery, Near Peterson, Fillmore County, Minn.
  Relatives: Son of Kristian Magelssen (1839-1921) and Sarah (Stockfleth) Magelssen (1846-1916); brother of Dorothea Magelssen (1869-1945; who married Gabriel Bie Ravndal (1866-1950)).
  Political family: Ravndal-Magelssen family of Minnesota.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Curtis Guild, Jr. (1860-1915) — of Boston, Suffolk County, Mass. Born in Boston, Suffolk County, Mass., February 2, 1860. Republican. Newspaper editor and publisher; member of Massachusetts Republican State Committee, 1884; delegate to Republican National Convention from Massachusetts, 1896; colonel in the U.S. Army during the Spanish-American War; Lieutenant Governor of Massachusetts, 1903-06; Governor of Massachusetts, 1906-09; candidate for Republican nomination for Vice President, 1908; U.S. Ambassador to Russia, 1911-13. Member, Freemasons; Society of Colonial Wars; Sons of the American Revolution; American Forestry Association. In 1907, John A. Steele came to the State House with a revolver, and attempted to kill Gov. Guild; he was subdued and arrested after shooting two people. Died, of pneumonia, in Boston, Suffolk County, Mass., April 6, 1915 (age 55 years, 63 days). Interment at Forest Hills Cemetery, Jamaica Plain, Boston, Mass.
  Relatives: Son of Curtis Guild (born 1827) and Sarah C. Guild; married, June 1, 1892, to Charlotte H. Johnson.
  See also U.S. State Dept career summary
  John Looney (1865-1942) — also known as Patrick John Looney — of Rock Island, Rock Island County, Ill. Born in Ottawa, La Salle County, Ill., October 5, 1865. Lawyer; newspaper publisher; indicted with others in 1897 over a scheme to defraud the city of Rock Island in connection with a storm drain construction project; convicted, but the verdict was overturned on appeal; candidate for Illinois state house of representatives, 1900; created and led a crime syndicate in northwest Illinois, with interests in gambling, prostitution, extortion, and eventually bootlegging and automobile theft; indicted in 1907 on 37 counts of bribery, extortion, and libel, but acquitted; shot and wounded by hidden snipers on two occasions in 1908; on February 22, 1909, he was shot and wounded in a gunfight with business rival W. W. Wilmerton; on March 22, 1912, after publishing personal attacks on Rock Island Mayor Henry M. Schriver, he was arrested, brought to the police station, and severely beaten by the mayor himself; subsequent rioting killed two men and injured nine others; resumed control of the Rock Island rackets in 1921; in 1922, he was indicted for the murder of saloon keeper William Gabel, who had provided evidence against Looney to federal agents; arrested in Belen, N.M., in 1924, and later convicted of conspiracy and murder; sentenced to 5 years in prison for conspiracy and 14 years for murder; served 8 1/2 years. Irish ancestry. Died, of tuberculosis, in a sanitarium at El Paso, El Paso County, Tex., 1942 (age about 76 years). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Patrick Looney and Margaret Looney; married 1892 to Nora O'Connor (died 1903); nephew of Maurice T. Maloney (1853?-?).
  See also Wikipedia article
  Edward M. Morgan (1857-1925) — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born in Marshall, Calhoun County, Mich., November 16, 1857. Republican. Postmaster at New York City, N.Y., 1907-17, 1921-25; delegate to Republican National Convention from New York, 1920. Member, Freemasons. On November 9, 1908, near his home on 146th Street, he was shot and wounded by Eric Mackay, an "eccentric stenographer", who then shot and killed himself. Died, following appendicitis surgery, in Lutheran Hospital, Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., January 9, 1925 (age 67 years, 54 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Married to Frances Paterson.
  William Bruce MacMaster, Jr. (1875-1912) — also known as William B. MacMaster, Jr. — of New York. Born, of American parents, in Colombia, June 28, 1875. Rancher; U.S. Vice Consul in Cartagena, 1904-08; U.S. Vice & Deputy Consul in Cartagena, 1908-12, died in office 1912; stabbed by two Colombians in the summer of 1909; pressed charges against his attackers, one of whom was an influential newspaper editor; arrested by Colombian authorities in June 1910 on charges that, years earlier, he shot a a Colombian citizen, in what he said was self-defense; initially acquitted, then found guilty, then exonerated by a higher court. While hunting alone, was shot multiple times and killed by an unknown assassin, near Cartagena, Colombia, August 11, 1912 (age 37 years, 44 days). Interment at Church and Convent of Santo Domingo, Cartagena, Colombia.
  Relatives: Son of William Bruce MacMaster (1838-1891).
William J. Gaynor William Jay Gaynor (1849-1913) — also known as William J. Gaynor; "Brother Adrian Denys" — of Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y. Born in Oriskany, Oneida County, N.Y., February 2, 1849. Democrat. Lawyer; Justice of New York Supreme Court 2nd District, 1894-1909; Justice of the Appellate Division of the New York Supreme Court 2nd Department, 1908-09; mayor of New York City, N.Y., 1910-13; died in office 1913; shot in the throat by James J. Gallagher, a former city employee, on August 9, 1910. Irish ancestry. Died, from a heart attack, on board the steamship Baltic, in the North Atlantic Ocean, September 10, 1913 (age 64 years, 220 days). Interment at Green-Wood Cemetery, Brooklyn, N.Y.; memorial monument at Cadman Plaza Park, Brooklyn, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Keiron Gaynor and Elizabeth (Handwright) Gaynor.
  Cross-reference: Edward M. Grout — James P. Kohler
  Gaynor Plaza, the triangle between Flatbush Avenue, St. John's Place, and Eighth Avenue, Brooklyn, New York, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: Library of Congress
  William Wesley Canada (1850-1921) — also known as William W. Canada — of Winchester, Randolph County, Ind. Born in Stony Creek Township, Randolph County, Ind., June 8, 1850. Republican. Lawyer; chair of Randolph County Republican Party, 1890-97; U.S. Consul in Veracruz, 1897-1918. Member, Odd Fellows. During the Felix Diaz uprising in 1912, he was shot in the leg while riding a horse near the consulate. Died, of heart disease, in Winchester, Randolph County, Ind., May 17, 1921 (age 70 years, 343 days). Interment at Fountain Park Cemetery, Winchester, Ind.
  Relatives: Son of David Canada and Mary Ann (Moore) Canada; married, December 9, 1875, to Carrie E. Moore.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Albert Cole Fach (1882-1972) — also known as Albert C. Fach — of West New Brighton, Staten Island, Richmond County, N.Y. Born in Stapleton, Staten Island, Richmond County, N.Y., January 14, 1882. Democrat. Lawyer; Richmond County District Attorney, 1910-19, 1924-31; Presidential Elector for New York, 1932; delegate to New York convention to ratify 21st amendment, 1933. German ancestry. Member, Freemasons; Elks. On the morning of August 19, 1912, in his office, he was shot three times and badly wounded, by Mrs. Elizabeth Edmunds, a disgruntled former client. Died June 3, 1972 (age 90 years, 141 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of John Fach.
  Harry M. Schriver — of Rock Island, Rock Island County, Ill. Mayor of Rock Island, Ill., 1911-15, 1919-23; on March 22, 1912, angry over personal attacks published by newspaper publisher and crime syndicate boss John Looney, he had Looney brought to the Rock Island police station and gave him a severe beating; during a riot on March 27, a sniper shot at the mayor in his office; convicted in 1923 on vice protection conspiracy charges. Burial location unknown.
Theodore Roosevelt Theodore Roosevelt (1858-1919) — also known as "T.R."; "Teddy"; "The Colonel"; "The Hero of San Juan Hill"; "The Rough Rider"; "Trust-Buster"; "The Happy Warrior"; "The Bull Moose" — of New York, New York County, N.Y.; Oyster Bay, Nassau County, Long Island, N.Y. Born in New York, New York County, N.Y., October 27, 1858. Member of New York state assembly from New York County 21st District, 1882-84; delegate to Republican National Convention from New York, 1884, 1900; candidate for mayor of New York City, N.Y., 1886; colonel in the U.S. Army during the Spanish-American War; Governor of New York, 1899-1901; Vice President of the United States, 1901; President of the United States, 1901-09; defeated (Progressive), 1912; candidate for Republican nomination for President, 1916. Christian Reformed. Dutch ancestry. Member, Freemasons; Phi Beta Kappa; Delta Kappa Epsilon; Alpha Delta Phi; Union League. Received the Medal of Honor for leading a charge up San Juan Hill during battle there, July 1, 1898. While campaigning for president in Milwaukee, Wis., on October 14, 1912, was shot in the chest by John F. Schrank; despite the injury, he continued his speech for another hour and a half before seeking medical attention. Awarded Nobel Peace Prize in 1906; elected to the Hall of Fame for Great Americans in 1950. Died in Oyster Bay, Nassau County, Long Island, N.Y., January 6, 1919 (age 60 years, 71 days). Interment at Youngs Memorial Cemetery, Oyster Bay, Long Island, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Theodore Roosevelt, Sr. (1831-1878) and Martha (Bulloch) Roosevelt (1835-1884); brother of Corinne Roosevelt Robinson and Anna L. Roosevelt (1855-1931; who married William Sheffield Cowles (1846-1923)); married, October 27, 1880, to Alice Hathaway Lee (1861-1884); married, December 2, 1886, to Edith Kermit Carow (1861-1948; first cousin once removed of Daniel Putnam Tyler); father of Alice Lee Roosevelt (who married Nicholas Longworth) and Theodore Roosevelt, Jr.; nephew of Robert Barnwell Roosevelt; uncle of Theodore Douglas Robinson (1883-1934), Eleanor Roosevelt (who married Franklin Delano Roosevelt (1882-1945)), Corinne Robinson Alsop and William Sheffield Cowles (1898-1986); grandnephew of James I. Roosevelt; granduncle of James Roosevelt, Elliott Roosevelt, Corinne A. Chubb, Franklin Delano Roosevelt, Jr. and John deKoven Alsop; great-grandfather-in-law of William Floyd Weld; great-grandnephew of William Bellinger Bulloch; second great-grandson of Archibald Bulloch; second cousin twice removed of Philip DePeyster; second cousin thrice removed of Nicholas Roosevelt, Jr.; third cousin twice removed of Martin Van Buren; fourth cousin once removed of Franklin Delano Roosevelt (1882-1945).
  Political families: Roosevelt family of New York City, New York; Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York; Monroe family of Virginia and Washington (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Cross-reference: Gifford Pinchot — David J. Leahy — William Barnes, Jr. — Oliver D. Burden — William J. Youngs — George B. Cortelyou — Mason Mitchell — Frederic MacMaster — John Goodnow — William Loeb, Jr.
  Roosevelt counties in Mont. and N.M. are named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: Theodore BassettTheodore R. McKeldinTheodore R. KupfermanTheodore Roosevelt Britton, Jr.
  Personal motto: "Speak softly and carry a big stick."
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about Theodore Roosevelt: James MacGregor Burns & Susan Dunn, The Three Roosevelts: Patrician Leaders Who Transformed America — H. W. Brands, T.R : The Last Romantic — Edmund Morris, Theodore Rex — Edmund Morris, The Rise of Theodore Roosevelt — John Morton Blum, The Republican Roosevelt — Richard D. White, Jr., Roosevelt the Reformer : Theodore Roosevelt as Civil Service Commissioner, 1889-1895 — Frederick W. Marks III, Velvet on Iron : The Diplomacy of Theodore Roosevelt — James Chace, 1912 : Wilson, Roosevelt, Taft and Debs : The Election that Changed the Country — Patricia O'Toole, When Trumpets Call : Theodore Roosevelt After the White House — Candice Millard, The River of Doubt : Theodore Roosevelt's Darkest Journey — Lewis Einstein, Roosevelt : His Mind in Action — Rick Marshall, Bully!: The Life and Times of Theodore Roosevelt: Illustrated with More Than 250 Vintage Political Cartoons
  Image source: American Monthly Review of Reviews, October 1901
  Louis DeWitt Gibbs (1880-1929) — also known as Louis D. Gibbs — of Bronx, Bronx County, N.Y.; Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born in Lodz, Poland, October 16, 1880. Democrat. Lawyer; member of New York state assembly from New York County 32nd District, 1913; survived an assassination attempt, when a bomb intended to kill him exploded at the Bronx Court House, October 31, 1914; county judge in New York, 1914-24; delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1924; Justice of New York Supreme Court 1st District, 1925-29; died in office 1929. Jewish. Member, American Bar Association; B'nai B'rith; Order Brith Abraham. Died, in the Glen Springs Sanitarium, Watkins Glen, Schuyler County, N.Y., March 1, 1929 (age 48 years, 136 days). Interment at Mt. Hebron Cemetery, Flushing, Queens, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Isadore Gibbs and Pauline (Greenbaum) Gibbs; married, October 14, 1906, to Anna White.
John Purroy Mitchel John Purroy Mitchel (1879-1918) — of New York. Born in New York, New York County, N.Y., July 19, 1879. Republican. Lawyer; law partner of George V. Mullan, 1902-13; U.S. Collector of Customs, 1913; mayor of New York City, N.Y., 1914-17; defeated in primary, 1917; on April 17, 1914, at Park Row, New York, he was shot at by an Michael P. Mahoney, an unemployed carpenter; the bullet missed the mayor, but struck and wounded Frank L. Polk, the city's Corporation Counsel. Catholic. Irish ancestry. Killed in a plane crash during World War I military training, at Gerstner Field, near Holmwood, Calcasieu Parish, La., July 6, 1918 (age 38 years, 352 days). Interment at Woodlawn Cemetery, Bronx, N.Y.; memorial monument at Columbia University, Manhattan, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of James Mitchel and Mary (Purroy) Mitchel; married, April 5, 1909, to Olive Child; nephew of Henry D. Purroy (1848-1903).
  See also Wikipedia article
  Image source: Library of Congress
  Myron Timothy Herrick (1854-1929) — also known as Myron T. Herrick — of Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, Ohio; Cleveland Heights, Cuyahoga County, Ohio. Born in Huntington, Lorain County, Ohio, October 9, 1854. Republican. Lawyer; banker; secretary-treasurer and president, Society for Savings, Cleveland; director and board chairman of railroad; delegate to Republican National Convention from Ohio, 1888, 1892, 1896, 1904, 1908, 1920; Presidential Elector for Ohio, 1892; member of Republican National Committee from Ohio, 1901; Governor of Ohio, 1904-06; U.S. Ambassador to France, 1912-14, 1921-29, died in office 1929; candidate for U.S. Senator from Ohio, 1916; on October 19, 1921, a bomb, sent in a package to the Ambassador's residence, exploded when his valet opened it. Member, American Bankers Association. Died of a heart attack in Paris, France, March 31, 1929 (age 74 years, 173 days). Interment at Lake View Cemetery, Cleveland, Ohio.
  Relatives: Son of Timothy Robinson Herrick and Mary L. Herrick; married, June 30, 1880, to Carolyn M. Parmely (died 1918).
  See also Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Jerry B. Fenton (1889-1958) — of Springfield, Greene County, Mo. Born August 6, 1889. Republican. Lawyer; served in the U.S. Army during World War I; candidate for Missouri state house of representatives from Greene County 2nd District, 1922; on December 7, 1922, he was stabbed in the upper back by Tom J. Griffin, whose wife he was representing in a divorce case; Griffin was convicted of felonious assault and sentenced to two years in prison. Died March 15, 1958 (age 68 years, 221 days). Interment at Hazelwood Cemetery, Springfield, Mo.
  Relatives: Son of Jeremiah Fenton (1845-1936).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Frank Lester Greene (1870-1930) — also known as Frank L. Greene — of St. Albans, Franklin County, Vt. Born in St. Albans, Franklin County, Vt., February 10, 1870. Republican. General in the U.S. Army during the Spanish-American War; newspaper editor; delegate to Republican National Convention from Vermont, 1904 (alternate), 1908; U.S. Representative from Vermont 1st District, 1912-23; U.S. Senator from Vermont, 1923-30; died in office 1930; on February 15, 1924, while walking on Pennsylvania Avenue in Washington, D.C., he was shot in the head by a prohibition agent chasing bootleggers. Member, Sons of the American Revolution; United Spanish War Veterans; Freemasons; Knights Templar; Shriners; Elks; Grange; Rotary. Died in St. Albans, Franklin County, Vt., December 17, 1930 (age 60 years, 310 days). Interment at Greenwood Cemetery, St. Albans, Vt.
  Relatives: Son of Lester Bruce Greene and Mary Elizabeth (Hoadley) Greene; married, February 20, 1895, to Jessie Emma Richardson.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Michael Kinney (1875-1971) — of St. Louis, Mo. Born in St. Louis, Mo., January 13, 1875. Democrat. Lawyer; real estate business; member of Missouri state senate, 1913-68 (31st District 1913-48, 5th District 1949-68); delegate to Democratic National Convention from Missouri, 1924, 1928 (member, Committee on Permanent Organization), 1940, 1944, 1948, 1952, 1956, 1960. Shot and wounded by two unidentified men in a car, at Oakwood, Mo., June 3, 1924. Died February 19, 1971 (age 96 years, 37 days). Interment at Calvary Cemetery, St. Louis, Mo.
  Relatives: Brother-in-law of Willie Egan (gangster, killed 1921); married to Edith Holdich.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  David J. Leahy — of Raton, Colfax County, N.M.; East Las Vegas (now part of Las Vegas), San Miguel County, N.M. Republican. Served in the U.S. Army during the Spanish-American War; an officer in the Rough Riders under Theodore Roosevelt; alternate delegate to Republican National Convention from New Mexico Territory, 1900; U.S. Attorney for New Mexico, 1907-12; delegate to Republican National Convention from New Mexico, 1920; district judge in New Mexico, 1922-25. In August 1925, he assaulted Carl Magee, editor of the New Mexico State Tribune, knocking him down and kicking him; Magee, from the floor, shot him with a revolver, injuring Leahy and accidentally killing a bystander. Interment at Masonic Cemetery, Las Vegas, N.M.
  Relatives: Granduncle of Edward J. Heffernan (1952?-).
  R. E. Hawkins (born c.1885) — of Yazoo City, Yazoo County, Miss. Born about 1885. Dentist; candidate for mayor of Yazoo City, Miss., 1930; on April 1, 1930, he was shot at by Mayor J. O. Stricklin, his opponent in the previous mayoral election, but escaped injury; Frank Rider Birdsall, editor of the Yazoo City Sentinel, was shot and died the next day. Burial location unknown.
  Henry Herman Denhardt (1876-1937) — also known as Henry H. Denhardt — of Bowling Green, Warren County, Ky. Born in Bowling Green, Warren County, Ky., March 8, 1876. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army during the Spanish-American War; served in the U.S. Army during World War I; Lieutenant Governor of Kentucky, 1923-27; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Kentucky, 1924; shot and injured on Election Day 1931.; his girlfriend, Mrs. Verna Garr Taylor, was found shot to death in November 1936; he was charged with murder and tried in New Castle, Ky.; the jury could not reach a verdict. Before he could be tried a second time, he was shot and killed, at the Armstrong Hotel, Shelbyville, Shelby County, Ky., September 20, 1937 (age 61 years, 196 days). Interment at Fairview Cemetery, Bowling Green, Ky.
  Relatives: Son of Margaret (Geiger) Denhardt (1838-1901) and William Denhardt (1845-1900).
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Roy T. Yates (1895-1960) — of Passaic County, N.J.; Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born in Paterson, Passaic County, N.J., August 8, 1895. Republican. Banker; member of New Jersey Republican State Committee, 1925-27; member of New Jersey state senate from Passaic County, 1928-31; resigned 1931. Member, Freemasons; Junior Order; Patriotic Order Sons of America. Shot in the abdomen, on August 14, 1931, by Miss Ruth Cranmer, in her apartment in Manhattan, New York; this incident led to the discovery that Miss Cranmer, apparently his mistress, had also received checks from the State of New Jersey; the New Jersey State Senate Judiciary committee began an investigation into whether Sen. Yates should be impeached; but then he resigned. Died, of a heart ailment, in Doctors Hospital, Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., March 8, 1960 (age 64 years, 213 days). Interment somewhere in Easton, Conn.
  Relatives: Married to Elsie Southrope.
Culver B. Chamberlain Culver Bryant Chamberlain (1900-1972) — also known as Culver B. Chamberlain — of Kansas City, Jackson County, Mo.; Washington, D.C. Born in Princeton, Gibson County, Ind., July 12, 1900. Interpreter; Foreign Service officer; U.S. Vice Consul in Canton, 1923-25; Tientsin, 1925; Swatow, 1925-27; Shanghai, 1927-28; Yunnanfu, 1928-29; U.S. Consul in Yunnanfu, 1929-30; Harbin, 1931-32. Assaulted and beaten by Japanese soldiers in Mukden, China, January 1932. Died April 12, 1972 (age 71 years, 275 days). Interment at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Va.
  Relatives: Son of Norman H. Chamberlain (1867-1935) and Ida (Ensminger) Chamberlain (1874-1944).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: U.S. passport application
  Bernard Ades (1903-1986) — of Baltimore, Md. Born in Maryland, July 3, 1903. Communist. Lawyer; accountant; defense attorney for Euel Lee (alias "Orphan Jones") in his 1932-33 trial for the murder of the Davis family; during the trial, Ades was attacked and injured by a mob in Snow Hill, Maryland; later, he was disbarred for casting aspersions on the judicial system; candidate for Governor of Maryland, 1934; fought in the Abraham Lincoln Brigade in the Spanish Civil War, 1937. Jewish. Died in New York, May 27, 1986 (age 82 years, 328 days). Interment at Cemetery of Baltimore Hebrew Congregation, Baltimore, Md.
  Relatives: Son of Harry Ades and Fannie Ades.
  Books about Bernard Ades: Joseph E. Moore, Murder on Maryland's Eastern Shore: Race, Politics and the Case of Orphan Jones
Franklin D. Roosevelt Franklin Delano Roosevelt (1882-1945) — also known as Franklin D. Roosevelt; "F.D.R." — of Hyde Park, Dutchess County, N.Y. Born in Hyde Park, Dutchess County, N.Y., January 30, 1882. Democrat. Lawyer; member of New York state senate 26th District, 1911-13; resigned 1913; U.S. Assistant Secretary of the Navy, 1913-20; candidate for Vice President of the United States, 1920; delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1920, 1924, 1928; speaker, 1944; contracted polio in the early 1920s; as a result, his legs were paralyzed for the rest of his life; Governor of New York, 1929-33; President of the United States, 1933-45; died in office 1945; on February 15, 1933, in Miami, Fla., he and Chicago mayor Anton J. Cermak were shot at by Guiseppe Zangara; Cermak was hit and mortally wounded. Episcopalian. Member, Freemasons; Alpha Delta Phi; Phi Beta Kappa; Elks; Grange; Knights of Pythias. Led the nation through the Depression and World War II. Died of a cerebral hemorrhage, in Warm Springs, Meriwether County, Ga., April 12, 1945 (age 63 years, 72 days). Interment at Roosevelt Home, Hyde Park, N.Y.; memorial monument at Federal Triangle, Washington, D.C.; memorial monument at West Potomac Park, Washington, D.C.
  Relatives: Son of James Roosevelt (1828-1900) and Sara (Delano) Roosevelt (1854-1941); married, March 17, 1905, to Eleanor Roosevelt (niece of Theodore Roosevelt (1858-1919); first cousin of Corinne Douglas Robinson); father of James Roosevelt (1907-1991), Elliott Roosevelt and Franklin Delano Roosevelt, Jr.; half-uncle of Helen Roosevelt Robinson; second great-grandson of Edward Hutchinson Robbins; first cousin of Warren Delano Robbins (1885-1935) and Katharine Price Collier St. George; first cousin once removed of Helen Lloyd Aspinwall (1863-1929; who married Francis Emanuel Shober); first cousin four times removed of Ebenezer Huntington; first cousin six times removed of Benjamin Huntington; second cousin of Caroline Astor Drayton (who married William Phillips); second cousin thrice removed of Nicholas Roosevelt, Jr. and Jabez Williams Huntington; second cousin five times removed of Samuel Huntington, George Washington, Joshua Coit, Henry Huntington, Gurdon Huntington and Samuel Gager; third cousin twice removed of Philip DePeyster and James I. Roosevelt; third cousin thrice removed of Sulifand Sutherland Ross; fourth cousin once removed of Ulysses Simpson Grant, Robert Barnwell Roosevelt, Roger Wolcott and Theodore Roosevelt (1858-1919).
  Political families: Roosevelt family of New York City, New York; Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Cross-reference: Ross T. McIntire — Milton Lipson — W. W. Howes — Bruce Barton — Hamilton Fish, Jr. — Joseph W. Martin, Jr. — Samuel I. Rosenman — Rexford G. Tugwell — Raymond Moley — Adolf A. Berle — George E. Allen — Lorence E. Asman — Grenville T. Emmet — Eliot Janeway — Jonathan Daniels — Ralph Bellamy
  The Franklin Delano Roosevelt Bridge (opened 1962), over Lubec Narrows, between Lubec, Maine and Campobello Island, New Brunswick, Canada, is named for him.  — The borough of Roosevelt, New Jersey (originally Jersey Homesteads; renamed 1945), is named for him.
  Politician named for him: Frank Garrison
  Coins and currency: His portrait appears on the U.S. dime (ten cent coin).
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about Franklin D. Roosevelt: James MacGregor Burns & Susan Dunn, The Three Roosevelts: Patrician Leaders Who Transformed America — Doris Kearns Goodwin, No Ordinary Time : Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt: The Home Front in World War II — Joseph Alsop & Roland Gelatt, FDR : 1882-1945 — Bernard Bellush, Franklin Roosevelt as Governor of New York — Robert H. Jackson, That Man : An Insider's Portrait of Franklin D. Roosevelt — Jonas Klein, Beloved Island : Franklin & Eleanor and the Legacy of Campobello — Conrad Black, Franklin Delano Roosevelt : Champion of Freedom — Charles Peters, Five Days in Philadelphia: The Amazing "We Want Willkie!" Convention of 1940 and How It Freed FDR to Save the Western World — Steven Neal, Happy Days Are Here Again : The 1932 Democratic Convention, the Emergence of FDR--and How America Was Changed Forever — H. W. Brands, Traitor to His Class: The Privileged Life and Radical Presidency of Franklin Delano Roosevelt — Hazel Rowley, Franklin and Eleanor: An Extraordinary Marriage — Alan Brinkley, Franklin Delano Roosevelt — Stanley Weintraub, Young Mr. Roosevelt: FDR's Introduction to War, Politics, and Life — Karen Bornemann Spies, Franklin D. Roosevelt (for young readers)
  Critical books about Franklin D. Roosevelt: Jim Powell, FDR's Folly: How Roosevelt and His New Deal Prolonged the Great Depression — John T. Flynn, The Roosevelt Myth — Burton W. Folsom, New Deal or Raw Deal?: How FDR's Economic Legacy Has Damaged America
  Fiction about Franklin D. Roosevelt: Philip Roth, The Plot Against America: A Novel
  Image source: New York Red Book 1936
  Willis Gaylord Clark Bagley (1873-1943) — also known as Willis G. C. Bagley; W. G. C. Bagley — of Mason City, Cerro Gordo County, Iowa. Born in Magnolia, Rock County, Wis., October 29, 1873. Republican. Banker; in 1934, during a bank robbery, John Dillinger shot at him and missed; Iowa state treasurer, 1939-43; died in office 1943. Methodist. Member, Freemasons; Shriners; Elks; Odd Fellows; Woodmen; Moose; Maccabees; American Bankers Association; Lions. Died in Des Moines, Polk County, Iowa, October 20, 1943 (age 69 years, 356 days). Interment at Elmwood-St. Joseph Cemetery, Mason City, Iowa.
  Relatives: Son of Shepherd Stephen Bagley and Louisa (Cain) Bagley; married, May 15, 1895, to Winifred Bogardus (1874-1967).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
Robert F. Wagner Robert Ferdinand Wagner (1877-1953) — also known as Robert F. Wagner — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born in Nastatten, Hessen-Nassau, Germany, June 8, 1877. Democrat. Lawyer; member of New York state assembly, 1905, 1907-08 (New York County 30th District 1905, New York County 22nd District 1907-08); member of New York state senate 16th District, 1909-18; delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1912 (alternate), 1916, 1928 (alternate), 1936, 1940, 1944; Lieutenant Governor of New York, 1913-14; delegate to New York state constitutional convention 16th District, 1915; Justice of New York Supreme Court 1st District, 1919-26; Justice of the Appellate Division of the New York Supreme Court, 1924-26; U.S. Senator from New York, 1927-49; delegate to New York state constitutional convention at-large, 1938. Catholic. German ancestry. Member, Elks; Phi Sigma Kappa. Introduced Social Security Act, National Labor Relations Act, Railway Pension Law, and other social and economic legislation in the U.S. Senate. On July 18, 1934, he while touring port facilities in Oregon during a labor dispute, he and his party were fired on (ten shots) by guards. Died in Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., May 4, 1953 (age 75 years, 330 days). Interment at Calvary Cemetery, Woodside, Queens, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Maria Magdalena Friederike (Schmidt) Wagner (1837-1906) and Reinhard Karl William Wagner; married, August 11, 1908, to Margaret Marie McTague (1883-1918); father of Robert Ferdinand Wagner, Jr. (1910-1991); grandfather of Robert Ferdinand Wagner III.
  Political family: Wagner family of Woodside and New York City, New York.
  Cross-reference: Joseph F. Crater — Maurice Bloch
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: New York Red Book 1936
  Bernard Joseph Boyle (1894-1978) — also known as Bernard J. Boyle; Bernie Boyle — of Omaha, Douglas County, Neb. Born in Darlington, Lafayette County, Wis., October 29, 1894. Democrat. School teacher; lawyer; an unknown person put nitroglycerin in his car's gasoline tank in an attempt to kill him; the engine exploded on November 17, 1936, but no one was hurt; member of Nebraska Democratic State Executive Committee, 1940; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Nebraska, 1952 (member, Committee on Rules and Order of Business), 1956 (delegation chair), 1964 (alternate); member of Democratic National Committee from Nebraska, 1952-64. Catholic. Irish ancestry. Died, in a nursing home in Omaha, Douglas County, Neb., March 19, 1978 (age 83 years, 141 days). Interment at Calvary Cemetery, Omaha, Neb.
  Relatives: Son of John Joseph Boyle (1855-1932) and Rosa Anna (Gallagher) Boyle (1860-1918); married to Maude Mae Boyle (1894-1985).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  William W. Voisine (1897-1959) — also known as Wilfred William Voisine — of Ecorse, Wayne County, Mich. Born in Michigan, November 20, 1897. Steel executive; village president of Ecorse, Michigan, 1936-37; members of a steelworker terrorist group, the Black Legion, repeatedly attempted to kill him in 1936; Jesse Pettijohn and Lawrence Madden were later convicted of conspiracy to commit murder; mayor of Ecorse, Mich., 1948-49, 1954-57. French Canadian ancestry. Convicted in April, 1950, of falsely testifying to a Congressional committee in 1948 that he had received only the regular price for steel; sentenced to two years in federal prison. In October, 1956, a warrant was issued for his arrest, along with several members of the city council, for knowingly permitting illegal gambling in Ecorse, in return for bribes and gratuities; Gov. G. Mennen Williams initiated removal proceedings against the officials. Died in 1959 (age about 61 years). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Abel Voisine (1859-1930) and Eugenia Jennie (Blais) Voisine (1870-1909); married, August 1, 1918, to Helen Pearl O'Brien.
Abdul Hamid Sufi Abdul Hamid (1903-1938) — also known as Abdul Hamid; Eugene Brown; "The Black Hitler"; "The Harlem Hitler"; "Bishop Amiru-Al-Mu-Minim Sufi Abdul Hamid" — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born in Lowell, Middlesex County, Mass., January 6, 1903. Self-styled cleric; labor leader; claimed to be from Egypt or Sudan; wore a turban and a green velvet cloak with gold braid; led picketing of stores in Harlem whose proprietors refused to hire African-American employees; conducted street rallies in Harlem where he denounced Jews; said he was "the only one fit to carry on the war against the Jews"; Americo-Spanish candidate for New York state assembly from New York County 17th District, 1933; arrested in october 1934; tried and found guilty on misdemeanor charges of making a public speech without a permit, and selling books without a license, and sentenced to ten days in jail; later suspected of inciting the 1935 riot in Harlem, which led to injunctions against his activities; in January 1938, his estranged wife, Stephanie St. Clair, ambushed him outside his house, and shot at him five times, but he was not seriously hurt; founded the Buddhist Universal Holy Temple of Tranquility. Buddhist or Muslim. African ancestry. Killed, along with his pilot, when his Cessna J-5 airplane ran out of fuel and crashed near Wantagh, Nassau County, Long Island, N.Y., July 30, 1938 (age 35 years, 205 days). Burial location unknown.
  See also Wikipedia article — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Image source: New York Times, August 1, 1938
Jason E. Payne Jason Elihu Payne (1874-1941) — also known as Jason E. Payne — of Vermillion, Clay County, S.Dak. Born in Clay County, S.Dak., January 22, 1874. Republican. Lost his right arm as a youth, in an accident with a runaway team of horses; college instructor; lawyer; law professor; member of South Dakota state senate 2nd District, 1903-06. Episcopalian. Member, Phi Delta Theta; Delta Theta Phi; American Bar Association. An enraged litigant, Ozzie Kirby, tried to kill him in in 1940; Kirby also shot and killed Payne's law partner. Injured in an automobile accident, and died several weeks later as a result, in a hospital at Vermillion, Clay County, S.Dak., September 11, 1941 (age 67 years, 232 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Byron Spencer Payne (1839-1925) and Charlotte Elizabeth (Woodworth) Payne (1846-1926); brother of Byron Samuel Payne (1876-?); married, July 20, 1905, to Iwae E. Sheppard.
  Image source: South Dakota Legislative Manual, 1903
  William E. Wallace (d. 1998) — U.S. Vice Consul in Vladivostok, as of 1943; Moscow, as of 1944; Shanghai, as of 1946; Chungking, as of 1947; Addis Ababa, as of 1948. Captured by the Japanese during World War II; released in a diplomatic prisoner exchange; survived two assassination attempts in Russia; his Russian wife was taken prisoner by the Soviets. Died in 1998. Interment somewhere in Philadelphia, Pa.
  Joseph Flack (1894-1955) — of Grenoble, Bucks County, Pa.; Doylestown, Bucks County, Pa. Born in Grenoble, Bucks County, Pa., December 5, 1894. U.S. Vice Consul in Liverpool, 1917-19; U.S. Ambassador to Bolivia, 1946-49; Costa Rica, 1949-50; Poland, 1950-55; shot at, and nearly hit, at the U.S. Embassy in La Paz, Bolivia, during the 1946 revolution. Died, from a coronary thrombosis, aboard the ocean liner United States, in the North Atlantic Ocean, May 8, 1955 (age 60 years, 154 days). Interment at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Va.
  Relatives: Married to Aloisia Schmid.
  See also U.S. State Dept career summary — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Anthony Tony Tarracino (1916-2008) — also known as Tony Tarracino; "Captain Tony"; "The Conscience of Key West" — of Key West, Monroe County, Fla. Born in Elizabeth, Union County, N.J., August 10, 1916. Beaten and left for dead by Mafia colleagues in New Jersey in the 1940s; charter boat captain; saloon keeper; mayor of Key West, Fla., 1989-91; defeated, 1991. Italian ancestry. Died, from a heart and lung condition, in Lower Keys Medical Center, Key West, Monroe County, Fla., November 1, 2008 (age 92 years, 83 days). Cremated.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Ellsworth Brewer Buck (1892-1970) — also known as Ellsworth B. Buck — of Staten Island, Richmond County, N.Y. Born in Chicago, Cook County, Ill., July 3, 1892. Republican. Served in the U.S. Navy during World War I; business executive; U.S. Representative from New York, 1944-49 (11th District 1944-45, 16th District 1945-49); shot and seriously wounded, by Charles Van Newkirk, at the Richmond Borough Hall, April 5, 1949; District Attorney Herman Methfessel witnessed the shooting from his office; chair of Richmond County Republican Party, 1951-52; delegate to Republican National Convention from New York, 1952. Member, Delta Tau Delta; Elks; American Legion. Died in Stephenson town, Marinette County, Wis., August 14, 1970 (age 78 years, 42 days). Cremated; ashes interred at Thunder Mountain Ranch Cemetery, Stephenson town, Marinette County, Wis.
  Relatives: Son of Orlando Jacob Buck and Lillian Louisa (Brewer) Buck; married, April 12, 1919, to Constance Tyler.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Harry S. Truman (1884-1972) — also known as "Give 'Em Hell Harry" — of Independence, Jackson County, Mo. Born in Lamar, Barton County, Mo., May 8, 1884. Democrat. Major in the U.S. Army during World War I; county judge in Missouri, 1922-24, 1926-34; U.S. Senator from Missouri, 1935-45; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Missouri, 1940, 1944 (member, Platform and Resolutions Committee), 1952, 1960; Vice President of the United States, 1945; President of the United States, 1945-53; candidate for Democratic nomination for President, 1952. Baptist. Member, Freemasons; Scottish Rite Masons; Knights Templar; American Legion; Eagles; Elks; Lambda Chi Alpha; Phi Alpha Delta. Two members of a Puerto Rican nationalist group, Griselio Torresola and Oscar Collazo, tried to shoot their way into Blair House, temporary residence of the President, as part of an attempted assassination, November 1, 1950. Torresola and a guard, Leslie Coffelt, were killed. Collazo, wounded, was arrested, tried, and convicted of murder. Died at Research Hospital and Medical Center, Kansas City, Jackson County, Mo., December 26, 1972 (age 88 years, 232 days). Interment at Truman Presidential Library and Museum, Independence, Mo.; statue at Independence Square, Independence, Mo.
  Relatives: Son of John Anderson Truman (1851-1914) and Martha Ellen (Young) Truman (1852-1947); married, June 28, 1919, to Elizabeth Virginia "Bess" Wallace; grandnephew of James Chiles (1802-1883).
  Cross-reference: Andrew J. May — Milton Lipson — Samuel I. Rosenman — Stephen J. Spingarn — James M. Curley — George E. Allen — George E. Allen — Jonathan Daniels
  Truman State University, Kirksville, Missouri, is named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: H. Truman ChafinHarry Truman Moore
  Personal motto: "The Buck Stops Here."
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books by Harry S. Truman: The Autobiography of Harry S. Truman
  Books about Harry S. Truman: David McCullough, Truman — Alonzo L. Hamby, Man of the People : A Life of Harry S. Truman — Sean J. Savage, Truman and the Democratic Party — Ken Hechler, Working With Truman : A Personal Memoir of the White House Years — Alan Axelrod, When the Buck Stops With You: Harry S. Truman on Leadership — Ralph Keyes, The Wit and Wisdom of Harry S. Truman — William Lee Miller, Two Americans: Truman, Eisenhower, and a Dangerous World — Matthew Algeo, Harry Truman's Excellent Adventure: The True Story of a Great American Road Trip — David Pietrusza, 1948: Harry Truman's Improbable Victory and the Year that Transformed America
  Kenneth Allison Roberts (1912-1989) — also known as Kenneth A. Roberts — of Anniston, Calhoun County, Ala. Born in Piedmont, Calhoun County, Ala., November 1, 1912. Democrat. Lawyer; member of Alabama state senate; elected 1942; served in the U.S. Navy during World War II; U.S. Representative from Alabama, 1951-65 (4th District 1951-63, at-large 1963-65); defeated, 1964; shot and wounded in an attack on the U.S. House by Puerto Rican nationalists, 1954. Baptist. Member, Lions; Freemasons; Order of the Eastern Star; Woodmen; American Legion; Forty and Eight; Veterans of Foreign Wars; Elks; Alpha Tau Omega; Phi Alpha Delta. Died in Potomac, Montgomery County, Md., May 9, 1989 (age 76 years, 189 days). Interment at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Va.
  Relatives: Married, September 22, 1953, to Margaret Hamilton McMillan.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
Alvin M. Bentley Alvin Morell Bentley (1918-1969) — also known as Alvin M. Bentley — of Owosso, Shiawassee County, Mich. Born in Portland, Cumberland County, Maine, August 30, 1918. Republican. Foreign Service officer; U.S. Representative from Michigan 8th District, 1953-61; defeated, 1962; wounded in an attack by Puerto Rican nationalists on the floor of the House of Representatives, March 1, 1954; candidate for U.S. Senator from Michigan, 1960; delegate to Michigan state constitutional convention from 15th Senatorial District, 1961-62; candidate for Michigan state board of education, 1964; member of University of Michigan board of regents, 1966-69; appointed 1966; died in office 1969. Congregationalist. Member, Elks; Freemasons; Knights Templar; Exchange Club; Theta Delta Chi; Optimist Club; Rotary; Kiwanis. Died in Tucson, Pima County, Ariz., April 10, 1969 (age 50 years, 223 days). Entombed at Oak Hill Cemetery, Owosso, Mich.
  Relatives: Son of Alvin Morell Bentley and Helen (Patterson) Bentley; married to Arvella Ann Duescher; father of Alvin M. Bentley, Jr. (1941-).
  Cross-reference: Robert L. Richardson, Jr.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: Michigan Manual 1957-58
  James F. Reynolds (born c.1899) — of Everett, Middlesex County, Mass. Born about 1899. Mayor of Everett, Mass., 1948; attacked and brutally beaten in his office, by an unknown assailant, in November 1955; hospitalized for head injuries. Burial location unknown.
  James Tierney (1905-1981) — of Garden City, Wayne County, Mich. Born in Jackson, Jackson County, Mich., November 24, 1905. Democrat. Employee, Ford Motor Company; mayor of Garden City, Mich., 1956-60; member of Michigan state house of representatives 36th District, 1965-72. Baptist. Member, Optimist Club. On July 25, 1957, following a Planning Commission meeting, he was shot six times by building contractor Lester Ellerhorst, who was angered by city officials' criticism of his work on the Garden City police station. Died in 1981 (age about 75 years). Burial location unknown.
  Joseph Echols Lowery (b. 1921) — also known as Joseph E. Lowery — of Atlanta, Fulton County, Ga. Born in Huntsville, Madison County, Ala., October 6, 1921. Democrat. Pastor; leader in the civil rights movement; co-founder of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference; escaped death in 1963 when his hotel room in Birmingham, Ala., was bombed, and in 1979 when Klansmen in Decatur, Ala., opened fire on Lowery and other protesters; arrested while demonstrating in support of a garbage workers' strike in Atlanta, 1968; arrested during protests in Cullman, Ala., 1978; arrested while protesting apartheid at the South African Embassy in Washington, D.C., 1984; offered prayer, Democratic National Convention, 1988 ; delivered eulogies at the funerals of Rosa Parks and Coretta Scott King; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Georgia, 2008. Methodist. African ancestry. Still living as of 2014.
  Relatives: Married 1950 to Evelyn Gibson.
  Joseph E. Lowery Boulevard, in Atlanta, Georgia, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  John Bowden Connally, Jr. (1917-1993) — also known as John B. Connally — of Fort Worth, Tarrant County, Tex. Born near Floresville, Wilson County, Tex., February 27, 1917. Lawyer; served in the U.S. Navy during World War II; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Texas, 1956, 1964; Governor of Texas, 1963-69; U.S. Secretary of the Treasury, 1971-72; candidate for Republican nomination for President, 1980. Methodist. Shot and wounded in Dallas, Tex., November 22, 1963, in the same volley of gunfire that killed President John F. Kennedy. Prosecuted for bribery conspiracy in connection with milk price supports; acquitted. Died of pulmonary fibrosis, in Methodist Hospital, Houston, Harris County, Tex., June 15, 1993 (age 76 years, 108 days). Interment at Texas State Cemetery, Austin, Tex.; statue at Sam Houston Park, Houston, Tex.
  Relatives: Son of John Bowden Connally, Sr. and Lela (Wright) Connally.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Allison Temple Wanamaker, Jr. (1918-2004) — also known as Temple Wanamaker, Jr. — of Seattle, King County, Wash. Born in Seattle, King County, Wash., July 16, 1918. Foreign Service officer; U.S. Vice Consul in Barcelona, 1941-42; Bilbao, 1942-44; Lisbon, 1944-45; Ciudad Trujillo, 1946-47; Cebu, 1948; Manila, 1949-50; U.S. Consul in Tel Aviv, 1953-56; Nassau, 1956-58; shot and wounded from a passing car, in Cordoba, Argentina, June 7, 1965. Died in Costa Rica, November 17, 2004 (age 86 years, 124 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Allison Temple Wanamaker (1881-1944) and Mary Helen (Allmond) Wanamaker; married 1953 to Sophia Petrovna Wolkonsky (1925-1968; granddaughter of composer Sergei Rachmaninoff).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Jan Garrett (born c.1944) — of Detroit, Wayne County, Mich. Born about 1944. Socialist. Socialist Workers candidate for secretary of state of Michigan, 1964; shot and injured (along with Leo Bernard, who was killed) by Edward Waniolek, a former taxicab driver, who came to the Detroit offices of the Socialist Labor Party to "kill some Communists". Still living as of 1966.
  John T. Gregorio (1928-2013) — also known as "The Lion of Linden" — of Linden, Union County, N.J. Born in Staten Island, Richmond County, N.Y., February 6, 1928. Democrat. Florist; mayor of Linden, N.J., 1968-83, 1991-2006; defeated, 2006; shot at in his car, in March 1968; two days later, his house was firebombed; member of New Jersey state house of assembly 21st District, 1974-77; indicted in April 1975 on perjury and fraud charges, over his purchase of a vacant lot from Elizabethtown Gas Company, while conspiring to falsify documents to conceal his involvement as buyer; later charged with extorting a $25,000 kickback from a building contractor on a high school project; following jury selection, the charges were dismissed in February 1976; member of New Jersey state senate, 1978-83 (21st District 1978-81, 20th District 1982-83); indicted in September 1981 on charges of income tax evasion, concealing his interest in two "go-go bars", and for failing to enforce state alcohol laws; convicted in December 1982 of conspiracy to commit official misconduct, but found not guilty on other charges. Died, from leukemia, in Trinitas Hospital, Elizabeth, Union County, N.J., October 23, 2013 (age 85 years, 259 days). Burial location unknown.
  See also Wikipedia article — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Paul Schrade (b. 1924) — of Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, Calif.; Newhall (now part of Santa Clarita), Los Angeles County, Calif. Born in Saratoga Springs, Saratoga County, N.Y., December 17, 1924. Democrat. Aerospace manufacturing worker; president, United Auto Workers local representing workers at North American Aviation; later, western regional director, United Auto Workers; early supporter of Cesar Chavez's efforts to unionize farm workers; delegate to Democratic National Convention from California, 1956, 1968, 1972; supported and worked for Robert F. Kennedy's presidential campaign, and on June 5, 1968, when Kennedy was shot, Schrade was one of five others who were also shot and wounded. German ancestry. Still living as of 2018.
  Relatives: Son of Florence Anna (Keil) Schrade and William Theodore Schrade (1900-1986); nephew of Henry Gottlieb Schrade (1897-1953).
  A. Frederick Meyerson (1918-2009) — of Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y. Born February 2, 1918. Lawyer; member of New York state senate, 1969-76 (15th District 1969-72, 16th District 1973-76); on July 17, 1969, he was stabbed twice in the back by members of a street gang; criminal court judge in New York, 1976-82. Died June 29, 2009 (age 91 years, 147 days). Burial location unknown.
  See also Wikipedia article — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Ural Alexis Johnson (1908-1997) — also known as U. Alexis Johnson — of Washington, D.C.; California. Born in Falun, Saline County, Kan., October 17, 1908. Foreign Service officer; U.S. Vice Consul in Seoul, as of 1938; Rio de Janeiro, as of 1943; U.S. Consul in Yokohama, as of 1947; U.S. Consul General in Yokohama, as of 1949; U.S. Ambassador to Czechoslovakia, 1953-58; Thailand, 1958-61; Japan, 1966-69; , 1973-77. Survived a car bombing at the U.S. Embassy in Vietnam. Died, of pneumonia, in Rex Convalescent Center, Raleigh, Wake County, N.C., March 24, 1997 (age 88 years, 158 days). Interment at Rock Creek Cemetery, Washington, D.C.
  Relatives: Son of Carl Theodore Johnson and Ellen (Forsse) Johnson; married, March 21, 1932, to Patricia Ann Tillman.
  See also U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile
  John P. Quimby (1935-2012) — of San Bernardino, San Bernardino County, Calif.; Rialto, San Bernardino County, Calif. Born in Prescott, Yavapai County, Ariz., February 12, 1935. Democrat. Radio announcer; disabled by polio, and used steel braces or a wheelchair; member of California state assembly 72nd District, 1963-74; delegate to Democratic National Convention from California, 1968; on August 23, 1970, he was shot in the chest with a pellet gun by his 15-year-old son, following an argument. Died, from complications of pneumonia, in a hospital near Sacramento, Sacramento County, Calif., December 23, 2012 (age 77 years, 315 days). Burial location unknown.
  See also Wikipedia article
  Robert Strange McNamara (1916-2009) — also known as Robert S. McNamara — of Ann Arbor, Washtenaw County, Mich. Born in Oakland, Alameda County, Calif., June 9, 1916. Served in the U.S. Army Air Force in World War II; president, Ford Motor Company, 1960-61; U.S. Secretary of Defense, 1961-68; received the Presidential Medal of Freedom, 1968; president, World Bank, 1968-81; on September 29, 1972, an attacker tried to throw him overboard from a ferry to Martha's Vineyard, Mass. Member, Phi Beta Kappa; Council on Foreign Relations. Died July 6, 2009 (age 93 years, 27 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Married, August 13, 1940, to Margaret Craig (died 1981); married 2004 to Diana (Masieri) Byfield.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile
  George Corley Wallace, Jr. (1919-1998) — also known as George C. Wallace — of Clayton, Barbour County, Ala.; Montgomery, Montgomery County, Ala. Born in Clio, Barbour County, Ala., August 25, 1919. Served in the U.S. Army Air Force in World War II; lawyer; member of Alabama state house of representatives, 1947-53; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Alabama, 1948 (alternate), 1956; circuit judge in Alabama, 1953-58; Governor of Alabama, 1963-67, 1971-72, 1972-79, 1983-87; defeated in Democratic primary, 1958; candidate for Democratic nomination for President, 1964, 1972, 1976; American Independent candidate for President of the United States, 1968. Methodist. Member, Freemasons; Knights Templar; Order of the Eastern Star; Shriners; Moose; Elks; Woodmen; Civitan; American Legion; Veterans of Foreign Wars; Disabled American Veterans. Worked as a professional boxer in the late 1930s. While campaigning in Maryland on May 15, 1972, was shot by Arthur Bremer; the injury paralyzed both legs. Along with Ohio's James A. Rhodes, he was the longest serving state governor in U.S. history. Died in Jackson Hospital, Montgomery, Montgomery County, Ala., September 13, 1998 (age 79 years, 19 days). Interment at Greenwood Cemetery, Montgomery, Ala.
  Relatives: Son of George C. Wallace and Mozell (Smith) Wallace; married, May 21, 1943, to Lurleen Brigham Burns; married, June 4, 1971, to Cornelia Ellis Snively (divorced 1978; niece of James Elisha Folsom; first cousin of James Elisha Folsom, Jr.); married 1981 to Lisa Taylor (divorced 1987); father of George C. Wallace, Jr. (1946?-).
  Political family: Wallace-Folsom family of Montgomery, Alabama.
  Cross-reference: Seybourn H. Lynne
  See also NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile
  Books about George C. Wallace: Stephan Lesher, George Wallace : American Populist — Dan T. Carter, The Politics of Rage : George Wallace, the Origins of the New Conservatism, and the Transformation of American Politics — Lloyd Rohler, George Wallace : Conservative Populist — Jeff Frederick, Stand Up for Alabama: Governor George C. Wallace
  Arthur Christ Agnos (b. 1938) — also known as Art Agnos — of San Francisco, Calif. Born in Springfield, Hampden County, Mass., September 1, 1938. Democrat. Member of California state assembly, 1976-87; mayor of San Francisco, Calif., 1988-92; delegate to Democratic National Convention from California, 1988. Greek Orthodox. Greek ancestry. Shot twice on December 13, 1973, by one of the "Death Angels", perpetrators of racially motivated killings in San Francisco during 1973-74. Still living as of 2014.
  Relatives: Son of Christ Agnos and Mary A. Agnos; married 1975 to Cheryl Hankins.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
Gerald R. Ford Gerald Rudolph Ford, Jr. (1913-2006) — also known as Gerald R. Ford; Jerry Ford; Leslie Lynch King, Jr.; "Passkey" — of Grand Rapids, Kent County, Mich.; Rancho Mirage, Riverside County, Calif. Born in Omaha, Douglas County, Neb., July 14, 1913. Republican. Lawyer; served in the U.S. Navy during World War II; delegate to Republican National Convention from Michigan, 1948, 1960, 1964; U.S. Representative from Michigan 5th District, 1949-73; resigned 1973; member, President's Commission on the Assassination of President KNDY, 1963-64; Vice President of the United States, 1973-74; President of the United States, 1974-77; defeated, 1976. Episcopalian. English and Scottish ancestry. Member, Freemasons; Scottish Rite Masons; Shriners; American Legion; Veterans of Foreign Wars; Amvets; Sons of the American Revolution; Forty and Eight; Jaycees; Delta Kappa Epsilon; Phi Delta Phi; Humane Society; Elks; American Bar Association. Shot at in two separate incidents in San Francisco in September 1975. On September 5, Lynette 'Squeaky' Fromme, follower of murderous cult leader Charles Manson, got close to the President with a loaded pistol, and squeezed the trigger at close range; the gun misfired. On September 22, Sara Jane Moore fired a shot at him, but a bystander deflected her aim. Both women were convicted and sentenced to life in prison. Received the Medal of Freedom in 1999. Died in Rancho Mirage, Riverside County, Calif., December 26, 2006 (age 93 years, 165 days). Interment at Gerald R. Ford Museum, Grand Rapids, Mich.
  Relatives: Step-son of Gerald Rudolph Ford, Sr. (1890-1962); son of Leslie Lynch King, Sr. (1884-1941) and Dorothy Ayer (Gardner) King Ford (1892-1967); half-brother of Thomas G. Ford, Sr. (1918-1995); married, October 15, 1948, to Elizabeth Ann 'Betty' (Bloomer) Warren (1918-2011).
  Cross-reference: Richard M. Nixon — L. William Seidman
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile
  Books by Gerald R. Ford: A Time to Heal: The Autobiography of Gerald R. Ford (1983)
  Books about Gerald R. Ford: John Robert Greene, The Presidency of Gerald R. Ford — Edward L. Schapsmeier, Gerald R. Ford's Date With Destiny: A Political Biography — James Cannon, Time and Chance : Gerald Ford's Appointment With History — Douglas Brinkley, Gerald R. Ford
  Image source: Michigan Manual 1957-58
  Larry Flynt (b. 1942) — also known as "The King of Smut" — of California. Born in Salyersville, Magoffin County, Ky., November 1, 1942. Democrat. Owner of night clubs; publisher of Hustler, a pornographic magazine; convicted in Cincinnati, Ohio, 1977 on obscenity and organized crime charges, and sentenced to 25 years in prison, but the verdict was overturned on appeal; shot by a sniper in Lawrenceville, Georgia, 1978, and paralyzed from the waist down; candidate for Governor of California, 2003. Atheist. Still living as of 2014.
  Relatives: Married 1976 to Althea Leasure (1953-1987).
  Campaign slogan (2003): "Vote For a Smut-Peddler Who Cares."
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile
  Karen Lorraine Jacqueline Speier (b. 1950) — also known as Jackie Speier — of Washington, D.C. Born in San Francisco, Calif., May 14, 1950. Democrat. Lawyer; staff member for U.S. Rep. Leo J. Ryan, 1973-78; traveled on a mission to Guyana in 1978, to investigate allegations of abuse and coercion in the People's Temple settlement there; shot five times by security guards, who also shot and killed Congressman Ryan and four others; member of California state assembly 19th District, 1986-98; member of California state senate 8th District, 1998-2006; candidate in primary for Lieutenant Governor of California, 2006; U.S. Representative from California 12th District, 2008-; delegate to Democratic National Convention from California, 2008. Female. Armenian and Jewish ancestry. Still living as of 2014.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Alexander Meigs Haig, Jr. (1924-2010) — also known as Alexander M. Haig, Jr. — Born in Bala Cynwyd, Montgomery County, Pa., December 2, 1924. Republican. Served in the U.S. Army during the Korean conflict; served in the U.S. Army during the Vietnam war; target of an assassination attempt in Belgium, June 25, 1979; U.S. Secretary of State, 1981-82; candidate for Republican nomination for President, 1988; host, World Business Review television news show. Catholic. Member, Council on Foreign Relations. Died, from an infection, at John Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, Md., February 20, 2010 (age 85 years, 80 days). Interment at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Va.
  Relatives: Son of Alexander Meigs Haig, Sr. and Regina Anne (Murphy) Haig; married 1950 to Patricia Fox.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books by Alexander M. Haig: Inner Circles : How America Changed the World (1994) — Caveat (1984)
  John Gunther Dean (b. 1926) — also known as Johann Gunther Dienstfertig — of New York. Born in Breslau, Prussia (now Wroclaw, Poland), February 24, 1926. Naturalized U.S. citizen; served in the U.S. Army during World War II; U.S. Ambassador to Cambodia, 1974-75; Denmark, 1975-78; Lebanon, 1978-81; Thailand, 1981-85; India, 1985-88. Jewish ancestry. On August 27, 1980, in Beirut, his car was fired on, but he and his family and guards were unhurt. Still living as of 2018.
  Relatives: Married to Martine Duphenieux.
  See also Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier
  Ronald Wilson Reagan (1911-2004) — also known as Ronald Reagan; "Dutch"; "The Gipper"; "The Great Communicator"; "The Teflon President"; "Rawhide" — of Pacific Palisades, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, Calif.; Bel Air, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, Calif. Born in Tampico, Whiteside County, Ill., February 6, 1911. Republican. Worked as a sports broadcaster in Iowa in the 1930s, doing local radio broadcast of Chicago Cubs baseball games; served in the U.S. Army during World War II; professional actor in 1937-64; appeared in dozens of films including Kings Row, Dark Victory, Santa Fe Trail, Knute Rockne, All American, and The Winning Team; president of the Screen Actors Guild, 1947-52, 1959-60; member of California Republican State Central Committee, 1964-66; delegate to Republican National Convention from California, 1964 (alternate), 1972 (delegation chair); Governor of California, 1967-75; candidate for Republican nomination for President, 1968, 1976; Presidential Elector for California, 1968; President of the United States, 1981-89; on March 30, 1981, outside the Washington Hilton hotel, he and three others were shot and wounded by John Hinkley, Jr.; received the Presidential Medal of Freedom, 1993. Disciples of Christ. Member, Screen Actors Guild; Lions; American Legion; Tau Kappa Epsilon. Died, from pneumonia and Alzheimer's disease, in Bel Air, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, Calif., June 5, 2004 (age 93 years, 120 days). Interment at Ronald Reagan Presidential Library, Simi Valley, Calif.
  Relatives: Son of John Reagan and Nellie (Wilson) Reagan; married, January 25, 1940, to Jane Wyman (actress; divorced 1948); married, March 4, 1952, to Nancy Davis (born 1923; actress); father of Maureen Elizabeth Reagan (1941-2001).
  Cross-reference: Katherine Hoffman Haley — Dana Rohrabacher — Donald T. Regan — Henry Salvatori — L. William Seidman — Christopher Cox — Patrick J. Buchanan — Bay Buchanan — Edwin Meese III
  Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport (opened 1941; renamed 1998), in Arlington, Virginia, is named for him.  — Mount Reagan (officially known as Mount Clay), in the White Mountains, Coos County, New Hampshire, is named for him.  — The Ronald Reagan Building and International Trade Center, in the Federal Triangle, Washington, D.C., is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books by Ronald Reagan: Ronald Reagan : An American Life
  Books about Ronald Reagan: Lou Cannon, President Reagan : The Role of a Lifetime — Lou Cannon, Governor Reagan : His Rise to Power — Peter Schweizer, Reagan's War : The Epic Story of His Forty-Year Struggle and Final Triumph Over Communism — Lee Edwards, Ronald Reagan: A Political Biography — Paul Kengor, God and Ronald Reagan : A Spiritual Life — Mary Beth Brown, Hand of Providence: The Strong and Quiet Faith of Ronald Reagan — Edmund Morris, Dutch: A Memoir of Ronald Reagan — Peggy Noonan, When Character Was King: A Story of Ronald Reagan — Peter J. Wallison, Ronald Reagan: The Power of Conviction and the Success of His Presidency — Dinesh D'Souza, Ronald Reagan : How an Ordinary Man Became an Extraordinary Leader — William F. Buckley, Jr., Ronald Reagan: An American Hero — Craig Shirley, Reagan's Revolution : The Untold Story of the Campaign That Started It All — Richard Reeves, President Reagan : The Triumph of Imagination — Ron Reagan, My Father at 100 — Newt & Callista Gingrich & David N. Bossie, Ronald Reagan: Rendezvous with Destiny — William F. Buckley, The Reagan I Knew — Chris Matthews, Tip and the Gipper: When Politics Worked
  Critical books about Ronald Reagan: Haynes Johnson, Sleepwalking Through History: America in the Reagan Years — William Kleinknecht, The Man Who Sold the World: Ronald Reagan and the Betrayal of Main Street America
  Rudolph M. Clay (1935-2013) — also known as Rudy Clay — of Gary, Lake County, Ind. Born in Courtland, Lawrence County, Ala., July 16, 1935. Democrat. Insurance agent; member of Indiana state senate 3rd District, 1972-76; Lake County Recorder, 1984; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Indiana, 2004, 2008; chair of Lake County Democratic Party, 2005-09; mayor of Gary, Ind., 2006-11; defeated in primary, 2011. African ancestry. Survived an assassination attempt in 1986. Died in Gary, Lake County, Ind., June 4, 2013 (age 77 years, 323 days). Interment at Ridgelawn Cemetery, Gary, Ind.
  Relatives: Married, November 30, 1957, to Christine Swan.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
George P. Shultz George Pratt Shultz (b. 1920) — also known as George P. Shultz — of Chicago, Cook County, Ill. Born in New York, New York County, N.Y., December 13, 1920. Served in the U.S. Marine Corps during World War II; economist; university professor; U.S. Secretary of Labor, 1969-70; U.S. Secretary of the Treasury, 1972-74; U.S. Secretary of State, 1982-89. Episcopalian. Member, Council on Foreign Relations; American Economic Association. Survived an assassination attempt in South America, August 1988; received the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1989. Still living as of 2020.
  Relatives: Son of Birl E. Shultz and Margaret Lennox (Pratt) Shultz; married, February 16, 1946, to Helena M. O'Brien.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Books by George P. Shultz: Turmoil and Triumph: My Years As Secretary of State (1993)
  Image source: Nixon Presidential Library and Museum
  Willye F. Clayton Dennis (1926-2012) — also known as Willye Dennis — of Jacksonville, Duval County, Fla. Born in Jacksonville, Duval County, Fla., March 14, 1926. Democrat. Librarian; civil rights leader; in December, 1989, she was the target of attempted murder when a mail bomb was sent to her office; she did not open the package, and the bomb was defused; member of Florida state house of representatives 15th District, 1993-99; resigned 1999; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Florida, 1996. Female. Baptist. African ancestry. Member, NAACP; Delta Sigma Theta. Died March 9, 2012 (age 85 years, 361 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Daughter of Eli Clayton and Claudia Clayton; married, February 7, 1954, to Leo Dennis.
  See also Wikipedia article
  Helen Vance (1934-2010) — also known as Helen Hauk Rainey; Mrs. Bob Vance — of Birmingham, Jefferson County, Ala.; Mountain Brook, Jefferson County, Ala. Born in Birmingham, Jefferson County, Ala., February 7, 1934. Democrat. Alternate delegate to Democratic National Convention from Alabama, 1968; in December 1989, she was seriously injured by the explosion of a mail bomb which killed her husband. Female. Died in Birmingham, Jefferson County, Ala., October 18, 2010 (age 76 years, 253 days). Cremated; ashes interred at St. Lukes Episcopal Columbarium, Mountain Brook, Ala.
  Relatives: Married to Robert Smith Vance (1931-1989).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Alfred Charles Sharpton, Jr. (b. 1954) — also known as Al Sharpton — Born in Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y., October 3, 1954. Democrat. Minister; civil rights activist; radio talk show host; candidate in primary for U.S. Senator from New York, 1988, 1992, 1994; stabbed in the chest as he was about to lead a protest march in the Bensonhurst neighborhood of Brooklyn, N.Y., January 12, 1991; candidate in primary for mayor of New York City, N.Y., 1997; candidate for Democratic nomination for President, 2004. Pentecostal; later Baptist. African and Cherokee Indian ancestry. Still living as of 2014.
  Relatives: Son of Alfred Charles Sharpton, Sr. and Ada Sharpton; married, October 31, 1980, to Kathy Jordan.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile
  Books by Al Sharpton: The Rejected Stone: Al Sharpton and the Path to American Leadership
  Critical books about Al Sharpton: Bernard Goldberg, 100 People Who Are Screwing Up America (And Al Franken Is #37)
  William Jefferson Clinton (b. 1946) — also known as Bill Clinton; William Jefferson Blythe IV; "Slick Willie"; "Bubba"; "Elvis"; "Eagle"; "The Big Dog" — of Arkansas; Chappaqua, Westchester County, N.Y. Born in Hope, Hempstead County, Ark., August 19, 1946. Democrat. Rhodes scholar; candidate for U.S. Representative from Arkansas 3rd District, 1974; Arkansas state attorney general, 1977-79; Governor of Arkansas, 1979-81, 1983-92; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Arkansas, 1996, 2000; speaker, 1984, 1988; President of the United States, 1993-2001; delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 2004, 2008. Baptist. Member, Trilateral Commission; Council on Foreign Relations; Phi Beta Kappa; Pi Sigma Alpha; Phi Alpha Delta; American Bar Association. On October 29, 1994, Francisco Duran fired 27 shots from the sidewalk at the White House in an apparent assassination attempt against President Clinton. Impeached by the House of Representatives in December 1998 over allegations of perjury and obstruction of justice in connection with his sexual contact with a White House intern, Monica Lewinsky, but acquitted by the Senate. Still living as of 2020.
  Relatives: Step-son of Roger Clinton; son of William Jefferson Blythe II and Virginia (Cassidy) Clinton (1923-1994); married, October 11, 1975, to Hillary Diane Rodham (sister of Hugh Edwin Rodham); father of Chelsea Clinton (daughter-in-law of Edward Maurice Mezvinsky and Marjorie Margolies-Mezvinsky); third cousin twice removed of James Alexander Lockhart (1850-1905).
  Political families: Clinton family of Wadesboro, North Carolina; Ashe-Polk family of North Carolina (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Cross-reference: Abraham J. Hirschfeld — Kenneth W. Starr — Rahm Emanuel — Henry G. Cisneros — Maria Echaveste — Thurgood Marshall, Jr. — Walter S. Orlinsky — Charles F. C. Ruff — Sean Patrick Maloney — Lanny J. Davis
  The William Jefferson Clinton Federal Building (built 1934; renamed for Clinton 2012) in Washington, D.C., is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Books by Bill Clinton: Between Hope and History : Meeting America's Challenges for the 21st Century (1996) — My Life (2004)
  Books about Bill Clinton: David Maraniss, First in His Class : The Biography of Bill Clinton — Joe Conason, The Hunting of the President : The Ten-Year Campaign to Destroy Bill and Hillary Clinton — Gene Lyons, Fools for Scandal : How the Media Invented Whitewater — Sidney Blumenthal, The Clinton Wars — Dewayne Wickham, Bill Clinton and Black America — Joe Klein, The Natural : The Misunderstood Presidency of Bill Clinton — Nigel Hamilton, Bill Clinton: An American Journey — Bob Woodward, The Agenda: Inside the Clinton White House — George Stephanopolous, All Too Human — John F. Harris, The Survivor : Bill Clinton in the White House — Mark Katz, Clinton & Me: A Real Life Political Comedy — Michael Takiff, A Complicated Man: The Life of Bill Clinton as Told by Those Who Know Him — Tim O'Shei, Bill Clinton (for young readers)
  Critical books about Bill Clinton: Barbara Olson, The Final Days : The Last, Desperate Abuses of Power by the Clinton White House — Meredith L. Oakley, On the Make : The Rise of Bill Clinton — Robert Patterson, Dereliction of Duty: The Eyewitness Account of How Bill Clinton Endangered America's Long-Term National Security — Ambrose Evans-Pritchard, The Secret Life of Bill Clinton: The Unreported Stories — Ann Coulter, High Crimes and Misdemeanors: The Case Against Bill Clinton — Dick Morris & Eileen McGann, Because He Could — Jack Cashill, Ron Brown's Body : How One Man's Death Saved the Clinton Presidency and Hillary's Future — Christopher Hitchens, No One Left To Lie To: The Values of the Worst Family — Rich Lowry, Legacy: Paying the Price for the Clinton Years — Richard Miniter, Losing Bin Laden : How Bill Clinton's Failures Unleashed Global Terror
  Jello Biafra (b. 1958) — also known as Eric Reed Boucher; "Occupant"; "Count Ringworm" — of San Francisco, Calif. Born in Boulder, Boulder County, Colo., June 17, 1958. Co-founder, lead singer, and songwriter for the punk rock band Dead Kennedys (1978-86); founder of the Alternative Tentacles record label; candidate for mayor of San Francisco, Calif., 1979; charged, in Los Angeles in 1986, with distributing obscene "harmful matter" in the form of a sexually explicit print distributed with a Dead Kennedys record album; following a trial, the jury deadlocked, a mistrial was declared, and charges were dismissed; Biafra went on to become a spoken word performer; on May 7, 1994, he was assaulted and injured at a music club in Berkeley, Calif., by five or six attackers who called him a "sellout". Atheist. Still living as of 2014.
  Relatives: Son of Stanley Boucher and Virginia Boucher; married, October 31, 1981, to Therese Soder.
  Campaign slogan: "There's always room for Jello."
  Personal motto: "Don't hate the media, become the media."
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Robert Charles Krueger (b. 1935) — also known as Bob Krueger — of New Braunfels, Comal County, Tex. Born in New Braunfels, Comal County, Tex., September 19, 1935. Democrat. University professor; U.S. Representative from Texas 21st District, 1975-79; U.S. Ambassador to , 1979-81; Burundi, 1994-95; Botswana, 1996; Texas railroad commissioner, 1991-93; U.S. Senator from Texas, 1993; defeated, 1978; appointed 1993; defeated, 1993. On June 14, 1995, he survived an assassination attempt in Burundi. Still living as of 2014.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — votes in Congress from the Washington Post — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier
  Mary Rose Wilcox (b. 1949) — also known as Mary Rose Garrido — of Phoenix, Maricopa County, Ariz. Born in Superior, Pinal County, Ariz., November 21, 1949. Democrat. Special assistant to U.S. Sen. Dennis DeConcini, 1977-83; member Phoenix City Council, 1983-93; Maricopa County Commissioner, 1993-; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Arizona, 1996, 2000, 2004 (alternate), 2008; shot and wounded on August 13, 1997, by Larry Marvin Naman, who was angry over her support for a quarter-cent sales tax to fund a sports stadium; newspaper publisher; restaurant owner. Female. Catholic. Mexican ancestry. Still living as of 2009.
  Relatives: Daughter of John Garrido and Betty (Nunez) Garrido; married 1971 to Earl V. Wilcox.
  Robert Creigh Deeds (b. 1958) — also known as R. Creigh Deeds — of Millboro, Bath County, Va. Born in Richmond, Va., January 4, 1958. Democrat. Lawyer; member of Virginia state house of delegates, 1992-2001; member of Virginia state senate 25th District, 2001-; candidate for Virginia state attorney general, 2005; candidate for Governor of Virginia, 2009; on November 19, 2013, he was stabbed multiple times by his mentally ill son Gus, who then killed himself. Presbyterian. Still living as of 2014.
  Relatives: Son of Robert Deeds and Emma Lewis (Tyree) Deeds; married, February 10, 1981, to Pamela Kay Miller; married 2012 to Siobhan Gilbride Lomax; grandson of Austin Creigh Tyree (1901-1972).
  See also Wikipedia article
  Stephen Joseph Scalise (b. 1965) — also known as Steve Scalise — Born in New Orleans, Orleans Parish, La., October 6, 1965. Republican. Software engineer; member of Louisiana state house of representatives, 1995-2007; member of Louisiana state senate, 2008; U.S. Representative from Louisiana 1st District, 2008-; on June 14, 2017, while practicing for a congressional baseball game, he and three others were shot by James Hodgkinson, a left-wing activist. Still living as of 2020.
  See also congressional biography — Wikipedia article — Encyclopedia of American Loons
"Enjoy the hospitable entertainment of a political graveyard."
Henry L. Clinton, Apollo Hall, New York City, February 3, 1872
The Political Graveyard

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