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Politicians in Trouble or Disgrace

Politicians in Trouble or Disgrace: Murder and Mayhem
Murder, attempted murder, manslaughter, mayhem

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in chronological order

  Cuthbert Bullitt (1740-1791) — Born in Fauquier County, Va., 1740. Lawyer; planter; shot and killed John Baylis in a duel on September 24, 1765; later tried for the killing and acquitted; delegate to Virginia state constitutional convention, 1776. Anglican; later Episcopalian. Died in Prince William County, Va., August 27, 1791 (age about 51 years). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Benjamin Bullitt (1692-1766) and Sarah Elizabeth (Harrison) Bullitt (1700-1746); married, August 27, 1761, to Helen Scott; father of Alexander Scott Bullitt (1761-1816); second great-grandfather of William Christian Bullitt (1856-1914), William Marshall Bullitt and Alexander Scott Bullitt (1877-1932); second great-granduncle of Hugh Kennedy Bullitt; third great-grandfather of William Christian Bullitt (1891-1967).
  Political families: Lee-Randolph family of Maryland and Virginia; Marshall-Harrison-Randolph-Cabell family of Virginia; Bullitt-Fry-Henry family (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  David Mathews (d. 1800) — of New York, New York County, N.Y.; Nova Scotia. Lawyer; mayor of New York City, N.Y., 1776-83. In 1776, the New York Provincial Congress ordered his arrest over his involvement in a plot to poison Gen. George Washington; continued serving as mayor during British occupation of the city; in 1783, he fled to Nova Scotia with other Loyalists. Died near Sydney, Nova Scotia, 1800. Burial location unknown.
  See also Wikipedia article
  John Rowan (1773-1843) — of Louisville, Jefferson County, Ky. Born near York, York County, Pa., July 12, 1773. Democrat. Lawyer; delegate to Kentucky state constitutional convention, 1799; secretary of state of Kentucky, 1804-08; U.S. Representative from Kentucky 3rd District, 1807-09; member of Kentucky state house of representatives, 1813-17, 1822-24; Judge, Kentucky Court of Appeals, 1819-21; U.S. Senator from Kentucky, 1825-31. Built the mansion "Federal Hill", later made famous by his cousin, the songwriter Stephen Foster, in the song "My Old Kentucky Home." Fought a duel about 1801 with an acquaintance, James Chambers, in which the latter was killed; arrested and tried on murder charges, but acquitted. Died in Louisville, Jefferson County, Ky., July 13, 1843 (age 70 years, 1 days). Interment at Bardstown Cemetery, Bardstown, Ky.
  Relatives: Married to Agnes Anne Lytle; father of John Rowan, Jr. (1807-1855); uncle of Robert Todd Lytle.
  Political family: Rowan-Lytle family of Kentucky.
  Cross-reference: Joseph Hamilton Daviess
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Joseph Hamilton Daviess (1774-1811) — also known as Joe Daviess — of Danville, Boyle County, Ky.; Lexington, Fayette County, Ky. Born in Bedford County, Va., March 4, 1774. Lawyer; U.S. Attorney for Kentucky, 1800-06; major in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812. Welsh ancestry. Member, Freemasons. Around 1801, he served as a second to John Rowan in his duel with James Chambers; after Chambers was killed, he fled to avoid prosecution as accomplice to murder, and became a fugitive, but when Rowan was arrested, he returned to act as Rowan's legal counsel. Shot and killed in the Battle of Tippecanoe, in what is now Tippecanoe County, Ind., November 7, 1811 (age 37 years, 248 days). Interment at Tippecanoe Battlefield Park, Battle Ground, Ind.
  Relatives: Brother-in-law of John Marshall (1755-1835).
  Political families: Lee-Randolph family of Maryland and Virginia; Marshall-Harrison-Randolph-Cabell family of Virginia; Biddle-Randolph family of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Anderson-Marshall family of Ohio and West Virginia; Pendleton-Lee family (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Daviess counties in Ind., Ky. and Mo., and Jo Daviess County, Ill., are named for him.
  Henry Stuart Foote (1804-1880) — also known as "Hangman Foote" — Born in Fauquier County, Va., February 28, 1804. U.S. Senator from Mississippi, 1847-52; Governor of Mississippi, 1852-54; Representative from Tennessee in the Confederate Congress, 1862-65. Fought four duels; fled Alabama in 1830 to escape prosecution for dueling. Exchanged blows with Thomas Hart Benton on the floor of the U.S. Senate. Expelled from the Confederate Congress in early 1865 for going North on an unauthorized peace mission. Died in Nashville, Davidson County, Tenn., May 20, 1880 (age 76 years, 82 days). Interment at Mt. Olivet Cemetery, Nashville, Tenn.
  Relatives: Son of Richard Helm Foote (1772-1817) and Helen Gibbon (Stuart) Foote (1776-1815); married, March 22, 1827, to Elizabeth Winters (1810-1855); married, June 15, 1859, to Rachel Douglas Boyd (1831-1882).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Robert Potter (c.1800-1842) — of Oxford, Granville County, N.C. Born near Williamsboro, Vance County, N.C., about 1800. Member of North Carolina house of commons from Granville County, 1828, 1834; U.S. Representative from North Carolina 6th District, 1829-31; delegate to Texas Republic Republic constitutional convention from District of Nacogdoches, 1836; signer, Texas Declaration of Independence, 1836; Texas Republic Secretary of the Navy, 1836; member of Texas Republic Senate from District of Red River and Fannin, 1840-42; died in office 1842. Resigned from the U.S. Congress in 1831 after maiming two men in a jealous rage; convicted, and sentenced to six months in prison. Expelled in 1834 from the North Carolina House for cheating at cards. Shot and killed by members of an opposing faction who surrounded his home, in Harrison County (part now in Marion County), Tex., March 2, 1842 (age about 42 years). Original interment at a private or family graveyard, Marion County, Tex.; reinterment in 1928 at Texas State Cemetery, Austin, Tex.
  Potter County, Tex. is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
Cassius M. Clay Cassius Marcellus Clay (1810-1903) — also known as Cassius M. Clay; "The Lion of White Hall" — of Madison County, Ky. Born in Madison County, Ky., October 19, 1810. Probably the best-known Southern emancipationist; freed his own slaves in 1844 and edited the only Southern antislavery newspaper in 1845-47; member of Kentucky state house of representatives, 1835-37, 1840; delegate to Whig National Convention from Kentucky, 1839 (speaker); shot point-blank during a speech in 1843, he used a Bowie knife to cut off the attacker's ear and nose and cut out one eye; tried for mayhem and found not guilty; served in the U.S. Army during the Mexican War; candidate for Republican nomination for Vice President, 1860; U.S. Minister to Russia, 1861-62, 1863-69; general in the Union Army during the Civil War. Died, of kidney failure, in Madison County, Ky., July 22, 1903 (age 92 years, 276 days). Interment at Richmond Cemetery, Richmond, Ky.
  Relatives: Son of Green Clay and Sally (Lewis) Clay (1776-1867); brother of Brutus Junius Clay (1808-1878); married to Mary Jane Warfield; father of Brutus Junius Clay (1847-1932) and Laura Clay; nephew of Matthew Clay (1754-1815); uncle of William Cassius Goodloe (1841-1889); first cousin of Matthew Clay (1795?-1827); second cousin of Henry Clay (1777-1852) and Porter Clay; second cousin once removed of Thomas Hart Clay, Henry Clay, Jr. and James Brown Clay; second cousin twice removed of Henry Clay (1849-1884); second cousin thrice removed of Oliver Carroll Clay; second cousin four times removed of Archer Woodford; third cousin of Clement Comer Clay; third cousin once removed of Clement Claiborne Clay, Jr..
  Political families: Clay family of Kentucky; Wilson-Dunn-Goodloe family of Indiana (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Other politicians named for him: Cassius M. C. TwitchellCassius C. PillsburyCassius C. Dowell
  See also Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: The South in the Building of the Nation (1909)
  Louis P. Cooke (1811-1849) — of Texas. Born in Tennessee, 1811. Colonel in the Texas Army during the Texas War of Independence; member of Texas Republic House of Representatives, 1838-39, 1841-42; Texas Republic Secretary of the Navy, 1839-41. Charged in 1843 with the murder of Captain Mark Lewis; at trial, the jury deadlocked, and he escaped before a second trial could be held. Wounded in an Indian raid on Corpus Christi in 1844 and lost an eye. Died, of cholera, in Brownsville, Cameron County, Tex., 1849 (age about 38 years). Interment somewhere in New Orleans, La.
  Albert Lewis Stuart (1819-1876) — also known as Albert L. Stuart — Born in Connecticut, June 25, 1819. Lawyer; member of Arkansas state house of representatives, 1850-51. Methodist. During an election dispute in Gainsville, Ark., in the early 1850s, he shot and killed Riley Vaughn; charged with murder, tried, and acquitted. Died in Powell Township, Craighead County, Ark., March 16, 1876 (age 56 years, 265 days). Interment at Woods Chapel Methodist Church Cemetery, Paragould, Ark.
  Relatives: Great-grandson of Marlin Stuart (pro baseball player).
  Edward Allen Hannegan (1807-1859) — also known as Edward A. Hannegan — of Covington, Fountain County, Ind. Born in Hamilton County, Ohio, June 25, 1807. Democrat. Lawyer; member of Indiana state house of representatives, 1832-33, 1841-42; U.S. Representative from Indiana 7th District, 1833-37; U.S. Senator from Indiana, 1843-49; U.S. Minister to Prussia, 1849-50. Presbyterian. Member, Freemasons. In May, 1852, during a drunken argument, he stabbed his brother-in-law, Captain Duncan, who died the next day. Died from overdose of morphine (probably suicide), in St. Louis, Mo., February 25, 1859 (age 51 years, 245 days). Interment at Woodlawn Cemetery, Terre Haute, Ind.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  John Singleton Mosby (1833-1916) — also known as John S. Mosby; "The Gray Ghost" — of Bristol, Va.; Warrenton, Fauquier County, Va. Born in Powhatan County, Va., December 6, 1833. In 1852, he shot and wounded George R. Turpin, with whom he had quarreled; arrested and tried, ultimately convicted only of the misdemeanor charge of unlawful shooting and sentenced to one year in jail; pardoned by Gov. Joseph Johnson in 1853; colonel in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; U.S. Consul in Hong Kong, 1878-85. Scottish and Welsh ancestry. Died in Washington, D.C., May 30, 1916 (age 82 years, 176 days). Interment at Warrenton Cemetery, Warrenton, Va.
  Relatives: Son of Alfred Daniel Mosby and Virginia (McLaurine) Mosby; married, December 30, 1857, to Pauline Clarke (1837-1876; daughter of Beverly Leonidas Clarke (1809-1860)).
  See also Wikipedia article
  Preston Smith Brooks (1819-1857) — also known as Preston S. Brooks — of Ninety Six, Edgefield District (now Greenwood County), S.C. Born in Edgefield, Edgefield District (now Edgefield County), S.C., August 5, 1819. Lawyer; member of South Carolina state house of representatives, 1844; U.S. Representative from South Carolina 4th District, 1853-56, 1856-57; died in office 1857. Suffered a hip wound in a duel with Louis T. Wigfall, 1839, and could walk only with a cane for the rest of his life. In May, 1856, furious over an anti-slavery speech, he went to the Senate and beat Senator Charles Sumner with a cane, causing severe injuries; an attempt to expel him from Congress failed for lack of the necessary two-thirds vote, but he resigned; re-elected to his own vacancy. Died in Washington, D.C., January 27, 1857 (age 37 years, 175 days). Interment at Willow Brook Cemetery, Edgefield, S.C.; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery, Washington, D.C.
  Relatives: Son of Whitefield Brooks and Mary P. (Carroll) Brooks; married 1841 to Caroline Means (1820-1843); married 1843 to Martha Means; cousin *** of Milledge Luke Bonham (1813-1890).
  Political family: Bonham family of Edgefield, South Carolina.
  Cross-reference: L. M. Keitt
  Brooks County, Ga. is named for him.
  The city of Brooksville, Florida, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Laurence Massillon Keitt (1824-1864) — also known as L. M. Keitt — of Orangeburg, Orangeburg District (now Orangeburg County), S.C. Born in Orangeburg District (part now in Calhoun County), S.C., October 4, 1824. Democrat. Planter; lawyer; member of South Carolina state house of representatives, 1848; U.S. Representative from South Carolina 3rd District, 1853-55, 1855-56, 1856-60; censured by the House in 1856 for aiding Rep. Preston S. Brooks in his caning attack on Sen. Charles Sumner; resigned; re-elected to his seat within a month; delegate to South Carolina secession convention from Orange, 1860-62; Delegate from South Carolina to the Confederate Provisional Congress, 1861-62; colonel in the Confederate Army during the Civil War. Mortally wounded at the battle of Cold Harbor, and died the next day, near Richmond (unknown county), Va., June 4, 1864 (age 39 years, 244 days). Interment at West End Cemetery, St. Matthews, S.C.
  Relatives: Son of George Keitt (1794-1861) and Mary Magdaleine (Wannamaker) Keitt (1805-1848); nephew of John Jacob Wannamaker (1801-1864); first cousin once removed of William Whetstone Wannamaker, Jr.; first cousin twice removed of William Whetstone Wannamaker III.
  Political family: Wannamaker family of Orangeburg, South Carolina.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Philemon Thomas Herbert (1825-1864) — also known as Philemon T. Herbert — of Mariposa, Mariposa County, Calif.; El Paso, El Paso County, Tex. Born in Pine Apple, Wilcox County, Ala., November 1, 1825. Democrat. Lawyer; member of California state assembly, 1853-55 (10th District 1853-54, 6th District 1854-55); U.S. Representative from California at-large, 1855-57; in 1856, drunk at breakfast, he shot and killed Thomas Keating, a waiter at the Willard Hotel in Washington; charged with murder, twice tried, and eventually acquitted; colonel in the Confederate Army during the Civil War. Wounded at the Battle of Mansfield, April 8, 1864, and died in Kingston, DeSoto Parish, La., July 23, 1864 (age 38 years, 265 days). Interment at Evergreen Cemetery, Kingston, La.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
Daniel E. Sickles Daniel Edgar Sickles (1819-1914) — also known as Daniel E. Sickles; "Devil Dan" — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in New York, New York County, N.Y., October 20, 1819. Lawyer; member of New York state assembly from New York County, 1847; member of New York state senate 3rd District, 1856-57; U.S. Representative from New York, 1857-61, 1893-95 (3rd District 1857-61, 10th District 1893-95); defeated (Democratic), 1894; general in the Union Army during the Civil War; delegate to Republican National Convention from New York, 1868; U.S. Minister to Spain, 1869-74; delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1892. Member, Grand Army of the Republic. Shot and killed Philip Barton Key, his wife's lover and the son of the author of the national anthem, at Lafayette Park, Washington, D.C, 1859; charged with murder, but with the help of his attorney Edwin M. Stanton, was acquitted after the first successful plea of temporary insanity in U.S. legal history. Received the Medal of Honor in 1897 for action at the Battle of Gettysburg, July 2, 1863; lost a leg in that battle; his amputated leg was displayed at the Army Medical Museum, where he frequently visited it in later years. Died in New York, New York County, N.Y., May 3, 1914 (age 94 years, 195 days). Interment at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Va.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — U.S. State Dept career summary
  Books about Daniel E. Sickles: Thomas M. Keneally, American Scoundrel : The Life of the Notorious Civil War General Dan Sickles
  Image source: Official NY: from Cleveland to Hughes (1911)
  David Smith Terry (1823-1889) — also known as David S. Terry — of Galveston, Galveston County, Tex.; San Francisco, Calif.; Stockton, San Joaquin County, Calif. Born in Christian County (part now in Todd County), Ky., March 8, 1823. Lawyer; went to California for the 1849 Gold Rush; advocated the extension of slavery to California; justice of California state supreme court, 1855-59; chief justice of California state supreme court, 1857-59; killed U.S. Senator David C. Broderick in a duel near San Francisco in 1859; tried for murder, but acquitted; served in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; delegate to California state constitutional convention, 1878-79; candidate for Presidential Elector for California, 1880; his wife Sarah Althea Hill claimed to be the widow and heir of wealthy U.S. Senator William Sharon; in September, 1888, when her claim was finally rejected by U.S. Supreme Court Justice Stephen J. Field (acting as a Court of Appeals judge for California), she and Terry caused an altercation in the courtroom and were jailed six months for contempt of court. Five months after his release from jail, he encountered Justice Field and slapped him in the face; he was then shot through the heart and killed by U.S. Deputy Marshal David Neagle, the justice's bodyguard, in the train station dining room at Lathrop, San Joaquin County, Calif., August 14, 1889 (age 66 years, 159 days). Neagle was arrested by local authorities, but later released on the demand of the U.S. government. Interment at Stockton Rural Cemetery, Stockton, Calif.
  Relatives: Son of Joseph Royal Terry (1792-1877) and Sarah David (Smith) Terry (1793-1837); brother of Benjamin Franklin Terry (1821-1861); married, November 26, 1852, to Cornelia Runnels (1829-1884; niece of Hardin Richard Runnels); married, January 7, 1886, to Sarah Althea Hill (1857-1937).
  Political family: Runnels-Terry family of Houston, Texas.
  Cross-reference: Peter Singleton Wilkes
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Nathan Bedford Forrest (1821-1877) — also known as "Wizard of the Saddle" — of Memphis, Shelby County, Tenn. Born near Chapel Hill, Bedford County (now Marshall County), Tenn., July 13, 1821. Democrat. Cotton planter; slave trader; general in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; in April 1864, after the Battle of Fort Pillow, Tennessee, Confederate troops under his command massacred African-American Union soldiers, not accepting them as prisoners, since the Confederacy refused to recognize ex-slaves as legitimate combatants; this event, seen as a war crime, sparked outrage across the North, and a congressional inquiry; in 1867, he became involved in the Ku Klux Klan and was elected Grand Wizard; the organization used violent tactics to intimidate Black voters and suppress their votes; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Tennessee, 1868; in 1869, he had a change of heart, and issued a letter ordering that the Klan be dissolved and its costumes destroyed; he went on to denounce the group and its crimes; in 1875, he gave a "friendly speech" to a meeting of an African-American organization in Memphis, calling for peace, harmony, and economic advancement of former slaves; for this speech, he was vehemently denounced in the Southern press. English ancestry. Member, Ku Klux Klan. After his death, he became a folk hero among white Southerners, particularly during the imposition of Jim Crow segregation laws in the early 20th century, and later, in reaction to the Civil Rights movement in the 1950s and 1960s. Died, from complications of diabetes, in Memphis, Shelby County, Tenn., October 29, 1877 (age 56 years, 108 days). Original interment at Elmwood Cemetery, Memphis, Tenn.; reinterment in 1904 at Health Sciences Park, Memphis, Tenn.; memorial monument at Myrtle Hill Cemetery, Rome, Ga.; memorial monument at Live Oak Cemetery, Selma, Ala.
  Relatives: Son of William B. Forrest (1801-1837) and Miriam (Beck) Forrest (1802-1867); married 1845 to Mary Ann Montgomery (1826-1893).
  Forrest County, Miss. is named for him.
  The city of Forrest City, Arkansas, is named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS Nathan B. Forrest (built 1943, scrapped 1973) was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Judah Philip Benjamin (1811-1884) — also known as Judah P. Benjamin; Philippe Benjamin; "Poo Bah of the Confederacy" — of New Orleans, Orleans Parish, La.; London, England; Paris, France. Born in Christiansted, St. Croix, Virgin Islands, August 6, 1811. Lawyer; member of Louisiana state house of representatives, 1842-44; delegate to Louisiana state constitutional convention, 1845; Presidential Elector for Louisiana, 1848; U.S. Senator from Louisiana, 1853-61; Confederate Attorney General, 1861; Confederate Secretary of War, 1861-62; Confederate Secretary of State, 1862-65. Jewish. He fled to Europe in 1865 to avoid arrest by Union forces; he was suspected of involvement in the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln. Fell from a tram car about 1880, and suffered multiple injuries; also developed kidney and heart problems, and died in Paris, France, May 6, 1884 (age 72 years, 274 days). Interment at Père la Chaise Cemetery, Paris, France.
  Relatives: Son of Philip Benjamin and Rebecca (de Mendes) Benjamin; married 1833 to Natalie St. Martin; cousin *** of Henry Michael Hyams (1806-1875).
  Coins and currency: His portrait appeared on the Confederate States $2 note in 1861-64.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  Books about Judah P. Benjamin: Robert Douthat Meade, Judah P. Benjamin: Confederate Statesman — Eli N. Evans, Judah P. Benjamin : The Jewish Confederate
  Clement Claiborne Clay, Jr. (1816-1882) — of Huntsville, Madison County, Ala. Born in Huntsville, Madison County, Ala., December 13, 1816. Democrat. Member of Alabama state house of representatives, 1842; state court judge in Alabama, 1846; U.S. Senator from Alabama, 1853-61; Senator from Alabama in the Confederate Congress, 1862-64. Suspected of conspiring with other Confederates to assassinate President Abraham Lincoln, he was imprisoned for nearly a year after the war. Died near Gurley, Madison County, Ala., January 3, 1882 (age 65 years, 21 days). Interment at Maple Hill Cemetery, Huntsville, Ala.
  Relatives: Son of Clement Comer Clay; married, February 1, 1843, to Virginia Caroline Tunstall (1825-1915; who later married David Clopton (1820-1892)); second cousin twice removed of Matthew Clay (1754-1815) and Green Clay; third cousin once removed of Henry Clay (1777-1852), Porter Clay, Matthew Clay (1795?-1827), Brutus Junius Clay (1808-1878) and Cassius Marcellus Clay; fourth cousin of Thomas Hart Clay, James Brown Clay and Brutus Junius Clay (1847-1932); fourth cousin once removed of Henry Clay (1849-1884).
  Political families: Clay family of Kentucky; Ligon-Clay-Clopton family of Montgomery and Tuskegee, Alabama (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Coins and currency: His portrait appeared on Confederate States $1 notes in 1862-64.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  Robert Augustus Toombs (1810-1885) — also known as Robert Toombs; Bob Toombs — of Washington, Wilkes County, Ga. Born in Wilkes County, Ga., July 2, 1810. Lawyer; member of Georgia state house of representatives, 1837-43; U.S. Representative from Georgia 8th District, 1845-53; U.S. Senator from Georgia, 1853-61; delegate to Georgia secession convention, 1861; Delegate from Georgia to the Confederate Provisional Congress, 1861-62; Confederate Secretary of State, 1861; general in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; fled to Europe in 1865 to avoid arrest by Union forces; he was suspected of involvement in the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln; later returned to Georgia; delegate to Georgia state constitutional convention, 1877. One of the greatest orators of his time. Died in Washington, Wilkes County, Ga., December 15, 1885 (age 75 years, 166 days). Interment at Rest Haven Cemetery, Washington, Ga.
  Toombs County, Ga. is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  Books about Robert Toombs: William C. Davis, The Union That Shaped the Confederacy: Robert Toombs and Alexander H. Stephens
  John Harrison Surratt, Jr. (1844-1916) — also known as John H. Surratt, Jr. — of Surrattsville (now Clinton), Prince George's County, Md. Born in Washington, D.C., April 13, 1844. Postmaster at Surrattsville, Md., 1862-63; dismissed as postmaster in 1863 for alleged disloyalty to the Union; became a Confederate courier and spy; he and others attempted to kidnap President Abraham Lincoln; later, the plot to kill the President and other government officials was formulated at his mother's boarding house in Washington; he denied involvement in the assassination, but fled overseas; he was arrested in Alexandria, Egypt, and sent back to the U.S.; tried in a Maryland court in 1867 for his alleged involvement in the murder plot, but the jury couldn't reach a verdict, and a mistrial was declared; treasurer of a steamship company. Died, from pneumonia, in Baltimore, Md., April 21, 1916 (age 72 years, 8 days). Interment at New Cathedral Cemetery, Baltimore, Md.
  Relatives: Son of John Harrison Surratt (1813-1862) and Mary (Jenkins) Surratt (1823-1865; hanged for her part in the conspiracy to assassinate the President and other officials); married 1872 to Mary Victorine Hunter (1846-1926).
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  William Dudley Chipley (1840-1897) — also known as W. D. Chipley — of Pensacola, Escambia County, Fla. Born in Columbus, Muscogee County, Ga., June 6, 1840. Democrat. Colonel in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; fought against Reconstruction along with other members of the Ku Klux Klan; he was among those implicated in the murder of George W. Ashburn in in 1868; tried in a military court, but Georgia's re-admission to the Union ended military jurisdiction, so he and his co-defendants were released; general manager of the Pensacola Railroad; successfully promoted the construction of the Pensacola and Atlanta Railroad in 1881-83; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Florida, 1884, 1892; mayor of Pensacola, Fla., 1887-88; member of Florida state senate, 1895-97. Died in a hospital at Washington, D.C., December 1, 1897 (age 57 years, 178 days). Interment at Linwood Cemetery, Columbus, Ga.
  Relatives: Son of Dr. William Stout Chipley (1810-1880) and Elizabeth (Fannin) Chipley (1819-1873); brother of Stephen Fannin Chipley (1838-1898); married to Ann Elizabeth Billups (1848-1910).
  The city of Chipley, Florida, is named for him.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
Richard Croker Richard Welsted Croker (1841-1922) — also known as Richard Croker — of New York, New York County, N.Y.; County Dublin, Ireland. Born in Clonakilty, County Cork, Ireland, November 23, 1841. Democrat. Railroad mechanic; charged with the murder of a political enemy in 1874; tried and found not guilty; delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1888, 1892. Irish ancestry. Member, Tammany Hall. Leader of Tammany Hall from 1886 until 1901. Suffered exposure during a snowstorm, was ill for months, and subsequently died, in County Dublin, Ireland, April 29, 1922 (age 80 years, 157 days). Original interment at Glencairn House Grounds, County Dublin, Ireland; reinterment in 1939 at Kilgobbin Cemetery, County Dublin, Ireland.
  Relatives: Son of Eyre Coote Croker (1800-1881) and Frances Laura (Welsted) Croker (1807-1894); married, November 1, 1873, to Elizabeth Frazer (1853-1914); married, November 26, 1914, to Bula Benton Edmonson (1884-1957).
  Cross-reference: Henry Woltman
  See also Wikipedia article
  Image source: American Monthly Review of Reviews, February 1902
  John Doyle Lee (1812-1877) — also known as John D. Lee — Born in Kaskaskia, Randolph County, Ill., September 6, 1812. Member of Utah territorial House of Representatives, 1858. Mormon. Involved in the Mountain Meadows massacre on September 11, 1857, when a Mormon militia and Paiute Indian tribesmen slaughtered about 120 settlers who had been traveling through Utah by wagon train; indicted for murder almost twenty years later, and tried in 1875; the first trial ended in a hung jury; retried in 1876; convicted and sentenced to death; released for a time in order to settle his business affairs; executed by firing squad, at Mountain Meadows, Washington County, Utah, March 23, 1877 (age 64 years, 198 days). Interment at Panguitch Cemetery, Panguitch, Utah.
  Relatives: Grandfather of Louise Lee (1893-1974; who married Levi Stewart Udall) and Lela Lee (1895-1976; who married Jesse Addison Udall); great-grandfather of Stewart Lee Udall, Morris King Udall, Lee Kenyon Udall and Rex E. Lee; second great-grandfather of Milan Dale Smith, Jr. (1942-), Thomas Stewart Udall, Mark E. Udall, Gordon Harold Smith and Mike Lee.
  Political family: Udall family of Arizona.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  John Henry Johnston — also known as John H. Johnston — of Danville, Va. Republican. Mayor of Danville, Va., 1882-84; defeated (Independent), 1884; shot and killed Chief of Police John E. Hatcher, during a disagreement over the use of collected fines, on September 9, 1882; indicted for murder but released on $5,000 bail; tried in December, and acquitted; postmaster at Danville, Va., 1890-94. Burial location unknown.
  Henry Reed Rathbone (1837-1911) — Born in Albany, Albany County, N.Y., July 1, 1837. Lawyer; major in the Union Army during the Civil War; on April 14, 1865, he was seated in the box at Ford's Theater with President Abraham Lincoln; when John Wilkes Booth shot the president, Rathbone attempted to apprehend Booth, and suffered knife wounds; subsequently his mental health deteriorated; U.S. Consul in Hanover, as of 1882-83. On December 23, 1883, he killed his wife, and stabbed himself in a suicide attempt; he was charged with murder, convicted, and found insane; he died more than 25 years later, in the Asylum for the Criminal Insane, Hildesheim, Germany, August 14, 1911 (age 74 years, 44 days). Original interment at Stadtfriedhof Engesohde, Hanover, Germany; reinterment 1952 to unknown location.
  Relatives: Step-son of Ira Harris (1802-1875); son of Jared Lewis Rathbone and Pauline (Pinney) Rathbone (1810-1894); brother of Jared Lawrence Rathbone; married, July 11, 1867, to Clara Hamilton Harris (1834-1883; daughter of Ira Harris (1802-1875)); father of Henry Riggs Rathbone (1870-1928); second cousin once removed of Daniel Burrows; second cousin thrice removed of Ezekiel Cornell; third cousin of Lorenzo Burrows; fourth cousin once removed of Ezra Cornell.
  Political families: Cornell family of New York; Pendleton family of Connecticut (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Adolph Bernard Spreckels (1857-1924) — also known as Adolph B. Spreckels — of San Francisco, Calif. Born in San Francisco, Calif., January 5, 1857. Republican. President, Spreckels Sugar Company; delegate to Republican National Convention from California, 1884; angered by an article in the San Francisco Chronicle, on November 19, 1884, he shot and badly wounded the paper's publisher, M. H. de Young; arrested and charged with attempted murder; pleaded temporary insanity; tried in 1885 and found not guilty; president, San Francisco and San Mateo Electric Railway; vice-president, Western Sugar Company; vice-president, Oceanic Steamship Company. German ancestry. Died, from pneumonia and syphilis, in San Francisco, Calif., June 28, 1924 (age 67 years, 175 days). Entombed at Cypress Lawn Memorial Park, Colma, Calif.
  Relatives: Son of Claus Spreckels and Anna Christina (Mangels) Spreckels (1830-1910); brother of John Diedrich Spreckels (1853-1926); married to Alma de Bretteville (1881-1968).
  Political family: Spreckels family of San Francisco, California.
  Spreckels Lake, in Golden Gate Park, San Francisco, California, is named for him.  — The Spreckels Organ Pavilion, an outdoor performance venue, in Balboa Park, San Diego, California, is named for him and his brother.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Beckford Mackey — U.S. Consul in Rio Grande do Sul, as of 1884-85; San Jose, as of 1892; on April 14, 1885, in Rio Grande do Sol, Brazil, he shot and wounded a newspaper editor who was assaulting him in a theater; arrested and imprisoned by Brazilian authorities; tried in June, and found not guilty. Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of J. T. Mackey.
  Theodore P. Rich (c.1848-1886) — of New York, New York County, N.Y.; Cobleskill, Schoharie County, N.Y. Born in New York, about 1848. Democrat. Candidate for New York state assembly from New York County 13th District, 1876. Pursued his estranged wife to Minnesota; killed her, and then, perhaps to avoid prosecution, killed himself, by gunshot, in the Astoria House hotel, St. Paul, Ramsey County, Minn., February 27, 1886 (age about 38 years). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Married 1876 to Fannie (Smith) Trimble (daughter of Henry Smith (1827?-?)).
  William Cassius Goodloe (1841-1889) — also known as W. Cassius Goodloe — of Lexington, Fayette County, Ky. Born in Madison County, Ky., June 27, 1841. Republican. Lawyer; newspaper publisher; delegate to Republican National Convention from Kentucky, 1868, 1872 (delegation chair), 1884, 1888; member of Kentucky state house of representatives, 1871; defeated, 1867; member of Republican National Committee from Kentucky, 1872-; member of Kentucky state senate, 1873; candidate for Kentucky state attorney general, 1875; U.S. Minister to Belgium, 1878-80. Episcopalian. Member, Loyal Legion. During a violent encounter in the lobby of the Lexington Post Office, he repeatedly stabbed and ultimately killed a political enemy, Col. Armistead Swope, who meanwhile shot and badly wounded him; before any prosecution could ensue, he died of his own wounds two days later, in the Phoenix Hotel, Lexington, Fayette County, Ky., November 8, 1889 (age 48 years, 134 days). Interment at Lexington Cemetery, Lexington, Ky.
  Relatives: Son of David Short Goodloe (1811-1881) and Sally Anne Lewis Clay (Smith) Goodloe (1818-1875); brother of Green Clay Goodloe (son-in-law of James Burnie Beck (1822-1890)); married 1865 to Mary Elizabeth Mann (1845-1920); nephew of Cassius Marcellus Clay; grandfather of William Cassius Goodloe III.
  Political family: Wilson-Dunn-Goodloe family of Indiana (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also U.S. State Dept career summary — Find-A-Grave memorial
Stephen J. Field Stephen Johnson Field (1816-1899) — also known as Stephen J. Field — of Yuba County, Calif. Born in Haddam, Middlesex County, Conn., November 4, 1816. Went to California for the 1849 Gold Rush; member of California state assembly 14th District, 1851-52; justice of California state supreme court, 1857-63; chief justice of California state supreme court, 1859-63; Associate Justice of U.S. Supreme Court, 1863-97; arrested in San Francisco, August 16, 1889, on charges of being party to the alleged murder of David S. Terry; released on bail; ultimately the killing was ruled to be justifiable homicide. Episcopalian. Member, Freemasons. Died in Washington, D.C., April 9, 1899 (age 82 years, 156 days). Interment at Rock Creek Cemetery, Washington, D.C.
  Relatives: Uncle of David Josiah Brewer and Charlotte Anita Whitney (1868?-1955).
  Political family: Whitney-Field-Brewer-Wells family of California.
  See also NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about Stephen J. Field: Paul Kens, Justice Stephen Field : Shaping Liberty from the Gold Rush to the Gilded Age
  Image source: American Monthly Review of Reviews, September 1897
  Darwin James Meserole (1868-1952) — also known as Darwin J. Meserole — of Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y.; Bellport, Suffolk County, Long Island, N.Y.; Waterbury, New Haven County, Conn. Born in Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y., May 29, 1868. Socialist. Stockbroker; in June 1891, he shot and killed Theodore W. Larbig, was arrested and tried for murder, but found not guilty on ground of self-defense; lawyer; candidate for New York state assembly from Kings County 11th District, 1915; candidate for New York state attorney general, 1920; candidate for New York state senate 1st District, 1922; candidate for Justice of New York Supreme Court 2nd District, 1922, 1923, 1924, 1925, 1927, 1931; candidate for chief judge of New York Court of Appeals, 1926; candidate for Presidential Elector for New York, 1928; candidate for judge of New York Court of Appeals, 1930, 1934, 1936; president, National Unemployment League, which advocated public works programs to relieve unemployment. Died, from a heart attack, as he was about to board the Staten Island ferry, in Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., May 21, 1952 (age 83 years, 358 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Jeremiah Vanderbilt Meserole (1833-1908) and Ann Sophia (Richardson) Meserole (1839-1922); married, June 24, 1899, to Katherine Louise Maltby.
Eugene V. Debs Eugene Victor Debs (1855-1926) — also known as Eugene V. Debs — of Terre Haute, Vigo County, Ind. Born in Terre Haute, Vigo County, Ind., November 5, 1855. Socialist. Locomotive fireman on the Terre Haute and Indianapolis Railroad; secretary-treasurer of the Brotherhood of Locomotive Firemen in 1880-93; member of Indiana state house of representatives, 1885; founder in 1893 and president (1893-97) of the American Railway Union; arrested during a strike in 1894 and charged with conspiracy to commit murder; the charges were dropped, but he was jailed for six months for contempt of court; became a Socialist while incarcerated; candidate for President of the United States, 1900 (Social Democratic), 1904 (Socialist), 1908 (Socialist), 1912 (Socialist), 1920 (Socialist); in 1905, was a founder of the Industrial Workers of the World ("Wobblies"), which hoped to organize all workers in "One Big Union"; convicted under the Sedition and Espionage Act for an anti-war speech he made in 1918, and sentenced to ten years in federal prison; released in 1921. Member, Knights of Pythias; American Civil Liberties Union. Died in Lindlahr Sanitarium, Elmhurst, DuPage County, Ill., October 20, 1926 (age 70 years, 349 days). Interment at Highland Lawn Cemetery, Terre Haute, Ind.
  Relatives: Son of Daniel Debs and Marguerite (Betterich) Debs; married, June 9, 1885, to Katherine 'Kate' Metzel (step-sister-in-law of Bertha D. Baur (1870-1967)).
  Cross-reference: Victor L. Berger — William A. Cunnea
  See also NNDB dossier
  Books about Eugene V. Debs: James Chace, 1912 : Wilson, Roosevelt, Taft and Debs : The Election that Changed the Country — Charles W. Carey, Jr., Eugene V. Debs : Outspoken Labor Leader and Socialist (for young readers)
  Image source: American Monthly Review of Reviews, September 1908
  William Stanley Hollis (1866-1930) — also known as W. Stanley Hollis — of Massachusetts; Chevy Chase, Montgomery County, Md. Born in Chelsea, Suffolk County, Mass., April 4, 1866. U.S. Consul in Mozambique Island, as of 1894; Lourenco Marques, 1898-1909; Dundee, 1909-10; U.S. Consul General in Beirut, 1911-17; London, 1919-20; Lisbon, 1920-27. In September, 1894, in Mozambique, he shot and wounded a local resident who he thought was a burglar; arrested and tried by Portugese authorities, convicted of homicide, and sentenced to six months in prison. Died, following a stroke, in Chevy Chase, Montgomery County, Md., June 8, 1930 (age 64 years, 65 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Capt. George Fearing Hollis and Eliza A. (Simmons) Hollis; married 1898 to Lena Cogswell Hobbs; married 1918 to Alice Davidson.
  Bert McMullin — of Yell County, Ark. Member of Arkansas state senate, 1897. Arrested on May 15, 1897, after he shot at and barely missed J. N. Smithee, editor of the Arkansas Gazette, who refused to apologize for critical editorials. Burial location unknown.
  Frederick John Mills (1865-1953) — also known as F. J. Mills — of Pocatello, Bannock County, Idaho; Pasadena, Los Angeles County, Calif. Born in Topsham, Orange County, Vt., April 29, 1865. Republican. Engineer; Lieutenant Governor of Idaho, 1895-97; served in the U.S. Army during the Spanish-American War. Scottish ancestry. On October 3, 1899, in Salt Lake City, he shot and killed John C. O'Melveny, chief engineer of the Oregon Short Line Railroad; was arrested immediately and charged with first-degree murder; at trial, he claimed the homicide was justified by the "criminal intimacy" between O'Melveny and his wife, while he was away in military service; the jury acquitted him in only 15 minutes. Died in Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, Calif., September 28, 1953 (age 88 years, 152 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Samuel Mills and Elizabeth (Laird) Mills; married, April 19, 1893, to Laura Eliza Hopf (1874-1964).
  See also Wikipedia article
  William Sylvester Taylor (1853-1928) — also known as William S. Taylor; W. S. Taylor; "Hogjaw" — of Morgantown, Butler County, Ky. Born in Butler County, Ky., October 10, 1853. Republican. Lawyer; state court judge in Kentucky, 1886; delegate to Republican National Convention from Kentucky, 1888, 1900; Kentucky state attorney general, 1896-99; Governor of Kentucky, 1899-1900. Indicted in 1900 as a conspirator in the assassination of William J. Goebel; fled to Indiana; never extradited; pardoned in 1909 by Gov. Augustus E. Willson. Died August 2, 1928 (age 74 years, 297 days). Interment at Crown Hill Cemetery, Indianapolis, Ind.
  Cross-reference: Charles E. Sapp
  Charles Finley (1865-1941) — of Williamsburg, Whitley County, Ky. Born in Williamsburg, Whitley County, Ky., March 26, 1865. Republican. Member of Kentucky state house of representatives, 1894; secretary of state of Kentucky, 1896-1900; U.S. Representative from Kentucky 11th District, 1930-33. Member, Junior Order; Rotary; Freemasons; Shriners. Among those charged in 1900 with the murder of Gov. William J. Goebel; pardoned in 1909. Died in Williamsburg, Whitley County, Ky., March 18, 1941 (age 75 years, 357 days). Interment at Highland Cemetery, Williamsburg, Ky.
  Relatives: Son of Hugh Franklin Finley (1833-1909) and Jennie Renfro (Moss) Finley.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
David G. Colson David Grant Colson (1861-1904) — also known as David G. Colson — of Pineville, Bell County, Ky.; Middlesboro, Bell County, Ky. Born in Yellow Creek, Knox County (now Middlesboro, Bell County), Ky., April 1, 1861. Republican. Member of Kentucky state house of representatives, 1887-88; alternate delegate to Republican National Convention from Kentucky, 1888; candidate for Kentucky state treasurer, 1889; mayor of Middlesboro, Ky., 1893; U.S. Representative from Kentucky 11th District, 1895-99; served in the U.S. Army during the Spanish-American War; in January, 1900, he shot and killed a political rival, Ethelbert Scott, and two bystanders, in the lobby of the Capitol Hotel, Frankfort, Ky.; indicted for murder, and tried in April 1900; the jury returned a verdict of "not guilty" in 18 minutes. Died in Middlesboro, Bell County, Ky., September 27, 1904 (age 43 years, 179 days). Interment at Colson Cemetery, Middlesboro, Ky.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Image source: Detroit Free Press, January 18, 1900
  Caleb Powers (1869-1932) — of Barbourville, Knox County, Ky. Born in Whitley County, Ky., February 1, 1869. Republican. Lawyer; secretary of state of Kentucky, 1900; U.S. Representative from Kentucky 11th District, 1911-19; delegate to Republican National Convention from Kentucky, 1916. Prosecuted and thrice convicted for the murder of Gov. William J. Goebel and spent eight years in prison; pardoned in 1908 by Gov. Augustus E. Willson. Died July 25, 1932 (age 63 years, 175 days). Interment at City Cemetery, Barbourville, Ky.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  James Henderson Hargis (1862-1908) — also known as James H. Hargis; "Big Jim" — of Jackson, Breathitt County, Ky. Born in Jackson, Breathitt County, Ky., October 13, 1862. Democrat. County judge in Kentucky, 1890; member of Kentucky Democratic State Central Committee, 1899-1907. Tried and acquitted for the 1902-03 murders of J. B. Marcum and two others, but found liable for plotting the killings in a 1904 civil suit for money damages by surviving family members. Shot and killed by his son, Beech Hargis, in the Hargis Brothers general store, Jackson, Breathitt County, Ky., February 6, 1908 (age 45 years, 116 days). Interment at Hargis Family Cemetery, Jackson, Ky.
  Relatives: Son of John Seldon Hargis; brother of Alexander Hamilton Hargis (1859-1943); grandnephew of John Louis Hargis; first cousin of Thomas Frazier Hargis.
  Political family: Cockrell-South family of Kentucky.
  Eugene S. Blease (1877-1963) — of Newberry, Newberry County, S.C. Born in Newberry County, S.C., January 28, 1877. Democrat. Lawyer; member of South Carolina state house of representatives, 1901-02, 1922-24; member of South Carolina state senate, 1905-06; mayor of Newberry, S.C., 1920-21; justice of South Carolina state supreme court, 1927-31; chief justice of South Carolina state supreme court, 1931-34; resigned 1934; candidate in primary for U.S. Senator from South Carolina, 1942; delegate to Democratic National Convention from South Carolina, 1944. Methodist. On September 8, 1905, he shot and killed his brother-in-law, Joe Ben Coleman, in Saluda, S.C.; charged with murder, he pleaded self-defense and was found not guilty. Died December 27, 1963 (age 86 years, 333 days). Interment at Rosemont Cemetery, Newberry, S.C.
  Relatives: Son of Henry Horatio Blease and Elizabeth (Satterwhite) Blease; half-brother of Coleman Livingston Blease (1868-1942).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  George Kent Favrot (1868-1934) — also known as George K. Favrot — of Baton Rouge, East Baton Rouge Parish, La. Born in Baton Rouge, East Baton Rouge Parish, La., November 26, 1868. Democrat. Lawyer; district attorney, 22nd District, 1892-96, 1900-04; delegate to Louisiana state constitutional convention, 1898; district judge in Louisiana, 1904-06, 1926-34 (22nd District 1904-06, 19th District 1926-34); died in office 1934; on November 6, 1906, he shot and killed Dr. Robert H. Aldrich, because the latter had insulted his wife; arrested and imprisoned for five months awaiting indictment and trial; however, the grand jury refused to indict him, and he was released in April, 1907.; U.S. Representative from Louisiana 6th District, 1907-09, 1921-25; member of Louisiana state house of representatives, 1912-16. Died in Baton Rouge, East Baton Rouge Parish, La., December 26, 1934 (age 66 years, 30 days). Interment at Roselawn Memorial Park, Baton Rouge, La.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Constantine Fernow Brunn (1858-1909) — also known as Constantine F. Brunn — of Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y.; South Woodstock, Woodstock, Windham County, Conn. Born in Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y., October 24, 1858. Vice-Consul for Portugal in New York, N.Y., 1893-96. German and Irish ancestry. According to published reports, in a sudden fit of rage, perhaps angered because he wasn't able to reach his wife by telephone, he shot and killed his sister, Freda Brunn, and his brother, Dr. Armin Brunn, and then shot himself, in South Woodstock, Woodstock, Windham County, Conn., September 29, 1909 (age 50 years, 340 days). Interment a private or family graveyard, Windham County, Conn.
  Relatives: Son of Julius William Brunn (1833-1907) and Charlotte Elizabeth (Going) Brunn; brother of Armin Ernest Brunn (1860-1909).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  William Bruce MacMaster, Jr. (1875-1912) — also known as William B. MacMaster, Jr. — of New York. Born, of American parents, in Colombia, June 28, 1875. Rancher; U.S. Vice Consul in Cartagena, 1904-08; U.S. Vice & Deputy Consul in Cartagena, 1908-12, died in office 1912; stabbed by two Colombians in the summer of 1909; pressed charges against his attackers, one of whom was an influential newspaper editor; arrested by Colombian authorities in June 1910 on charges that, years earlier, he shot a a Colombian citizen, in what he said was self-defense; initially acquitted, then found guilty, then exonerated by a higher court. While hunting alone, was shot multiple times and killed by an unknown assassin, near Cartagena, Colombia, August 11, 1912 (age 37 years, 44 days). Interment at Church and Convent of Santo Domingo, Cartagena, Colombia.
  Relatives: Son of William Bruce MacMaster (1838-1891).
  Blaine Jackson Brickwood (1888-1949) — also known as Blaine J. Brickwood — of Chicago, Cook County, Ill. Born in Chicago, Cook County, Ill., February 5, 1888. Lawyer; Honorary Consul for Venezuela in Chicago, Ill., 1915-20; on November 18, 1917, while driving, he struck and killed Walter Israel; censured by the coroner's jury which investigated the death; indicted on a charge of manslaughter; following a trial in June 1920, he was found not guilty by a jury; meanwhile, he was arrested on a charge of embezzlement. Died in Cook County, Ill., March 13, 1949 (age 61 years, 36 days). Interment at Forest Home Cemetery, Forest Park, Ill.
  Relatives: Son of Genevieve (Jackson) Brickwood (1851-1938) and Albert William Brickwood (1854-1915); brother of Albert William Brickwood, Jr. (1879-1941); married, November 16, 1912, to Bertie H. Meloy; nephew of John Thomas Brickwood.
  Political family: Brickwood family of Chicago and Forest Park, Illinois.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  John Looney (1865-1942) — also known as Patrick John Looney — of Rock Island, Rock Island County, Ill. Born in Ottawa, La Salle County, Ill., October 5, 1865. Lawyer; newspaper publisher; indicted with others in 1897 over a scheme to defraud the city of Rock Island in connection with a storm drain construction project; convicted, but the verdict was overturned on appeal; candidate for Illinois state house of representatives, 1900; created and led a crime syndicate in northwest Illinois, with interests in gambling, prostitution, extortion, and eventually bootlegging and automobile theft; indicted in 1907 on 37 counts of bribery, extortion, and libel, but acquitted; shot and wounded by hidden snipers on two occasions in 1908; on February 22, 1909, he was shot and wounded in a gunfight with business rival W. W. Wilmerton; on March 22, 1912, after publishing personal attacks on Rock Island Mayor Henry M. Schriver, he was arrested, brought to the police station, and severely beaten by the mayor himself; subsequent rioting killed two men and injured nine others; resumed control of the Rock Island rackets in 1921; in 1922, he was indicted for the murder of saloon keeper William Gabel, who had provided evidence against Looney to federal agents; arrested in Belen, N.M., in 1924, and later convicted of conspiracy and murder; sentenced to 5 years in prison for conspiracy and 14 years for murder; served 8 1/2 years. Irish ancestry. Died, of tuberculosis, in a sanitarium at El Paso, El Paso County, Tex., 1942 (age about 76 years). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Patrick Looney and Margaret Looney; married 1892 to Nora O'Connor (died 1903); nephew of Maurice T. Maloney (1853?-?).
  See also Wikipedia article
  J. O. Stricklin (1872-1930) — of Yazoo City, Yazoo County, Miss. Born July 9, 1872. Mayor of Yazoo City, Miss., 1929-30; died in office 1930. Indicted by a Yazoo County grand jury in 1929 for stealing a cow; details of the case were printed in the Yazoo Sentinel newspaper, leading to a feud between Stricklin and the Sentinel's editor, Frank R. Birdsall; a year later, on Main Street in front of the Sentinel office, Stricklin was talking with Dr. R. E. Hawkins, his opponent in the last election, when Birdsall approached; Stricklin pulled out a pistol, shot Birdsall three times (he died the next day), and shot at, but missed, Dr. Hawkins; he then went to his son's funeral parlor, where he died by a self-inflicted gunshot, in Yazoo City, Yazoo County, Miss., April 1, 1930 (age 57 years, 266 days). Interment at Glenwood Cemetery, Yazoo City, Miss.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  William Montross Inglis (1875-1932) — also known as William M. Inglis — of Seattle, King County, Wash. Born in Clyde Township, St. Clair County, Mich., January 7, 1875. Republican. Colonel in the U.S. Army during World War I; delegate to Republican National Convention from Washington, 1924, 1928 (alternate). Killed by a single gunshot behind his ear, under mysterious circumstances, and posthumously accused of attempted murder, in Seattle, King County, Wash., October 22, 1932 (age 57 years, 289 days). The only witness, Mary Nash, who shared the apartment, said that he had been despondent and drinking heavily; that she had hidden his pistol, but he had found it; that without warning, he shot her twice (she was badly injured but survived), and then immediately killed himself; investigators questioned her story, and thought he might have been murdered, but she was not charged. Interment at Lake View Cemetery, Seattle, Wash.
  Relatives: Son of John Jacob Inglis (1848-1908) and Martha Ann (Montross) Inglis (1850-1927); married to Anne Hughes (died 1919).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Henry Herman Denhardt (1876-1937) — also known as Henry H. Denhardt — of Bowling Green, Warren County, Ky. Born in Bowling Green, Warren County, Ky., March 8, 1876. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army during the Spanish-American War; served in the U.S. Army during World War I; Lieutenant Governor of Kentucky, 1923-27; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Kentucky, 1924; shot and injured on Election Day 1931.; his girlfriend, Mrs. Verna Garr Taylor, was found shot to death in November 1936; he was charged with murder and tried in New Castle, Ky.; the jury could not reach a verdict. Before he could be tried a second time, he was shot and killed, at the Armstrong Hotel, Shelbyville, Shelby County, Ky., September 20, 1937 (age 61 years, 196 days). Interment at Fairview Cemetery, Bowling Green, Ky.
  Relatives: Son of Margaret (Geiger) Denhardt (1838-1901) and William Denhardt (1845-1900).
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
Frank L. Shaw Frank L. Shaw (1877-1958) — of Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, Calif. Born near Warwick, Ontario, February 1, 1877. Republican. Mayor of Los Angeles, Calif., 1933-38; recalled 1938; defeated, 1941; a recall campaign against him in 1938 charged that he was associated with unspecified "racketeers" and "underworld characters", and that his administration tolerated vice in the city; meanwhile, Harry J. Raymond, a private investigator nearly killed in a January 1938 bombing, charged, in a civil lawsuit for damages, that the mayor had been part of a plot by gambling and vice interests to murder him. Died, from cancer, in California Hospital, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, Calif., January 24, 1958 (age 80 years, 357 days). Interment at Inglewood Park Cemetery, Inglewood, Calif.
  Relatives: Son of John D. Shaw.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Image source: Los Angeles Times, April 4, 1937
  Coleman W. Avery (1880-1938) — of Cincinnati, Hamilton County, Ohio. Born in Cincinnati, Hamilton County, Ohio, February 22, 1880. Democrat. Lawyer; justice of Ohio state supreme court, 1920; appointed 1920; defeated, 1920. According to published reports, he murdered his wife, Sara, by shooting her in the head, and then shot himself; he was found and taken to General Hospital, where he died without regaining consciousness, in Cincinnati, Hamilton County, Ohio, March 14, 1938 (age 58 years, 20 days). Interment at Spring Grove Cemetery, Cincinnati, Ohio.
  Relatives: Son of William Ledyard Avery (1833-1898) and Johanna (Ummethun) Avery (1843-1909); married 1904 to Elinor Coates Baer (1882-1929); married 1934 to Sara Loving (1893-1938).
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
Frank D. McKay Frank D. McKay (1883-1965) — of Grand Rapids, Kent County, Mich. Born in Grand Rapids, Kent County, Mich., November 4, 1883. Republican. Financier; political boss who dominated Republican politics in Michigan for years; delegate to Republican National Convention from Michigan, 1920, 1928, 1932 (alternate), 1936, 1940, 1944; Michigan state treasurer, 1925-30; investigated by a grand jury in 1931 over his handling of state funds while Treasurer; member of Republican National Committee from Michigan, 1940-44; subject of three federal grand jury investigations in 1940 over alleged fraud, extortion and kickbacks; indicted in 1944 for bribery of state legislators; hired a Purple Gang figure to murder the star witness, State Sen. Warren G. Hooper, and the case collapsed; charged in 1945, along with William McKeighan, with conspiracy to violate state liquor laws; tried in 1946; the judge directed a verdict of not guilty. Died in Miami Beach, Dade County (now Miami-Dade County), Fla., January 12, 1965 (age 81 years, 69 days). Burial location unknown.
  Cross-reference: Edward N. Barnard — William Green
  Image source: Michigan Manual 1927
  Charles J. Anderson, Jr. — of Chicago, Cook County, Ill. Republican. Candidate for U.S. Representative from Illinois 6th District, 1944; delegate to the openly anti-Semitic America First Party convention in 1944, which nominated Gerald L. K. Smith for president. Pleaded guilty in Chicago, 1946 to a charge of assault with intent to kill. Presumed deceased. Burial location unknown.
  Norman Kingsley Mailer (1923-2007) — also known as Norman Mailer — of Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y. Born in Long Branch, Monmouth County, N.J., January 31, 1923. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army during World War II; novelist, essayist, magazine editor, Hollywood screenwriter, director, and actor; among the founders of the Village Voice newspaper newspaper in New York City; in November, 1960, while drunk at a party, he stabbed and wounded his wife, Adele; he was arrested and held for psychiatric evaluation, and eventually pleaded guilty to third-degree assault; arrested and jailed in 1967 in connection with an antiwar protest; candidate in primary for mayor of New York City, N.Y., 1969. Jewish ancestry. Won the Pulitzer Prize for nonfiction in 1969 and for fiction in 1980. Died, from acute renal failure, in Mount Sinai Hospital, Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., November 10, 2007 (age 84 years, 283 days). Interment at Provincetown Cemetery, Provincetown, Mass.
  Relatives: Son of Isaac Barnett 'Barney' Mailer and Fanny (Schneider) Mailer; married 1944 to Beatrice 'Bea' Silverman (divorced 1952); married 1954 to Adele Morales (divorced 1962); married 1962 to Jeanne Campbell (divorced 1963); married 1963 to Beverly Bentley (divorced 1980); married 1980 to Carol Stevens (divorced 1980); married 1981 to Norris Church (1949-2010); father of Michael Mailer (film producer).
  See also NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Books by Norman Mailer: The Executioner's Song — The Fight
  Fiction by Norman Mailer: The Deer Park — The Naked and the Dead — An American Dream — The Gospel According to the Son
  Books about Norman Mailer: Mary V. Dearborn, Mailer : A Biography — Barry H. Leeds, The Enduring Vision of Norman Mailer — Carl Rollyson, The Lives of Norman Mailer : A Biography — Jennifer Bailey, Norman Mailer: Quick Change Artist
  Critical books about Norman Mailer: Bernard Goldberg, 100 People Who Are Screwing Up America (And Al Franken Is #37)
  Edward Moore Kennedy (1932-2009) — also known as Edward M. Kennedy; Ted Kennedy; "Lion of the Senate" — of Boston, Suffolk County, Mass. Born, in St. Margaret's Hospital, Dorchester, Boston, Suffolk County, Mass., February 22, 1932. Democrat. Lawyer; U.S. Senator from Massachusetts, 1962-2009; died in office 2009; candidate for Democratic nomination for President, 1980; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Massachusetts, 1996, 2000, 2004, 2008. Catholic. Irish ancestry. Pleaded guilty to leaving the scene of an accident after his car plunged off the Dike Bridge, on Chappaquiddick Island, Massachusetts, killing passenger Mary Jo Kopechne, on July 18, 1969. Died, from brain cancer, in Hyannis Port, Barnstable, Barnstable County, Mass., August 25, 2009 (age 77 years, 184 days). Interment at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Va.
  Relatives: Son of Joseph Patrick Kennedy, Sr. and Rose (Fitzgerald) Kennedy (1890-1995); brother of Joseph Patrick Kennedy, Jr., John Fitzgerald Kennedy, Eunice Mary Kennedy (1921-2009; who married Robert Sargent Shriver, Jr.), Patricia Kennedy Lawford (who married Peter Lawford), Robert Francis Kennedy and Jean Kennedy Smith; married, November 29, 1958, to Virginia Joan Bennett (1936-); married, November 30, 1958, to Virginia Joan Bennett (divorced 1982); married, July 3, 1992, to Victoria Anne Reggie (daughter of Edmund M. Reggie); father of Patrick Joseph Kennedy (1967-); uncle of Kathleen Kennedy Townsend, Joseph Patrick Kennedy II, John Fitzgerald Kennedy, Jr. and Mark Kennedy Shriver (1964-); grandson of Patrick Joseph Kennedy (1858-1929) and John Francis Fitzgerald.
  Political family: Kennedy family.
  Cross-reference: Murray M. Chotiner
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — votes in Congress from the Washington Post — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Books by Edward M. Kennedy: True Compass: A Memoir (2009)
  Books about Edward M. Kennedy: Adam Clymer, Edward M. Kennedy: A Biography — Richard E. Burke, The Senator : My Ten Years With Ted Kennedy — Peter S. Canellos, Last Lion: The Fall and Rise of Ted Kennedy
  Critical books about Edward M. Kennedy: Bernard Goldberg, 100 People Who Are Screwing Up America (And Al Franken Is #37) — Darwin Porter & Danforth Prince, The Kennedys: All the Gossip Unfit for Print
  Lloyd Davis (c.1915-2001) — of South Pasadena, Los Angeles County, Calif. Born in Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, Calif., about 1915. Republican. Served in the U.S. Navy during World War II; lawyer; superior court judge in California, 1967-70. Catholic. Member, Sierra Club. On October 26, 1969, he stabbed his wife, Mary Troja Davis, with a 9-inch butcher knife; she recovered. Charged with felony assault to commit murder; tried in 1970 and found not guilty by reason of insanity. Years later, he attributed the incident to a skin cancer drug. Died in South Pasadena, Los Angeles County, Calif., December 22, 2001 (age about 86 years). Burial location unknown.
  Angela Yvonne Davis (b. 1944) — also known as Angela Davis — Born in Birmingham, Jefferson County, Ala., January 26, 1944. Communist. Following a violent escape attempt at the Marin County (California) Hall of Justice, August 7, 1970, in which several people were killed, she was implicated as an accomplice and fled; later arrested in New York, tried, and acquitted in 1972; awarded the Lenin Peace Prize in 1979; candidate for Vice President of the United States, 1980, 1984; during the Communist coup against Mikhail Gorbachev in 1991, she supported Gorbachev, and subsequently left the Communist Party; university professor. Female. African ancestry. Still living as of 2014.
  Relatives: Daughter of Sallye E. Davis; brother of Ben Davis (professional football player).
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Bobby Seale (b. 1936) — also known as Robert George Seale — of Oakland, Alameda County, Calif. Born in Dallas, Dallas County, Tex., October 22, 1936. Joined U.S. Air Force in 1955; charged with insubordination and being AWOL, and dishonorably discharged; sheet metal worker; co-founder, with Huey Newton, of the Black Panther Party, 1966; one of eight defendants charged in 1969 with crossing state lines to incite a riot at the 1968 Democratic National Convention in Chicago; the judge ordered him bound and gagged during the trial, and sentenced him to four years in prison for contempt of court; Peace and Freedom candidate for California state assembly 17th District, 1968; in 1970, he was charged in New Haven, Conn., with ordering the murder of Alex Rackley, a Black Panther who had confessed to being a police informant; the jury was unable to reach a verdict, and the charges were eventually dropped; candidate for mayor of Oakland, Calif., 1973. African ancestry. Still living as of 2014.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Leonard Peltier (b. 1944) — Born in Grand Forks, Grand Forks County, N.Dak., September 12, 1944. American Indian activist and member of the American Indian Movement; alleged to have been involved in a shoot-out at the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota, June 26, 1975, in which three died, including two FBI agents; fled South Dakota, was arrested in Canada, and extradited to the U.S.; tried and convicted of murder in 1977, and sentenced to two life terms in prison; Peace and Freedom candidate for President of the United States, 2004; Socialism and Liberation candidate for Vice President of the United States, 2020. American Indian ancestry. Still living as of 2020.
  Relatives: Son of Leo Peltier and Alvina (Robideau) Peltier.
  Cross-reference: Ramsey Clark
  See also Wikipedia article — Ballotpedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Vincent Albert Cianci (1941-2016) — also known as Buddy Cianci — of Providence, Providence County, R.I. Born in Providence, Providence County, R.I., April 30, 1941. Republican. Lawyer; mayor of Providence, R.I., 1975-84, 1991-2002; speaker, Republican National Convention, 1976 ; candidate for Governor of Rhode Island, 1980; talk show host. Italian ancestry. Pleaded no contest in 1984 to charges that he beat his estranged wife's lover with a fireplace log. Charged with twelve federal counts of bribery, conspiracy and racketeering; convicted in June, 2002 on two counts. Died in Providence, Providence County, R.I., January 28, 2016 (age 74 years, 273 days). Interment at St. Ann's Cemetery, Cranston, R.I.
  Campaign slogan (1991): "He never stopped caring about Providence."
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books by Vincent Cianci: Politics and Pasta: How I Prosecuted Mobsters, Rebuilt a Dying City, Dined with Sinatra, Spent Five Years in a Federally Funded Gated Community, and Lived to Tell the Tale (2011)
  Books about Buddy Cianci: Mike Stanton, The Prince of Providence : The True Story of Buddy Cianci, America's Most Notorious Mayor, Some Wiseguys, and the Feds
  Bernard Hugo Goetz (b. 1947) — also known as Bernard H. Goetz; Bernhard Goetz; "Subway Vigilante" — of New York City (unknown county), N.Y. Born in Queens, Queens County, N.Y., November 7, 1947. Fusion candidate for mayor of New York City, N.Y., 2001. German and Jewish ancestry. On December 22, 1984, he shot and wounded four young men who were about to rob him, and subsequently fled to New England, until he turned himself in at Concord, N.H.; arraigned on attempted murder, assault, and weapons charges; convicted only for carrying an unlicensed gun; sentenced to one year in jail; served eight months. Still living as of 2014.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile
  Frazier Glenn Miller, Jr. (b. 1940) — also known as Glenn Miller; "Frazier Glenn Cross"; "Rounder" — of North Carolina; Aurora, Lawrence County, Mo. Born in Springfield, Greene County, Mo., 1940. Served in the U.S. Army during the Vietnam war; candidate in Democratic primary for Governor of North Carolina, 1984; candidate in Republican primary for North Carolina state senate, 1986; convicted on federal contempt of court charges in 1986; sentenced to one year in prison, but disappeared while out on bond; later captured in Missouri, along with four other Klansmen and a cache of weapons; indicted in 1987 for plotting robberies and an assassination; in a deal with prosecutors, he pleaded guilty to a weapons charge and to making threats through the mail; served three years in prison; candidate for U.S. Representative from Missouri 7th District, 2006; candidate for U.S. Senator from Missouri, 2010; on April 13, 2014, in an apparent hate crime he shot and killed three people at a Jewish community center and retirement complex in Overland Park, Kansas. Member, Ku Klux Klan. Still living as of 2014.
  Carl Thomas Rowan (1925-2000) — also known as Carl T. Rowan — of Washington, D.C. Born in Ravenscroft, White County, Tenn., August 11, 1925. Served in the U.S. Navy during World War II; syndicated newspaper columnist, author, biographer, television and radio commentator; U.S. Ambassador to Finland, 1963-64; in 1988, he shot and wounded an intruder in his backyard in Washington, D.C.; he was arrested, charged with a weapons violation, and tried; the jury was unable to reach a verdict, and a mistrial was declared; received the Spingarn Medal in 1997. African ancestry. Member, Americans for Democratic Action. Died, of heart and kidney ailments and diabetes, at the Washington Hospital Center, Washington, D.C., September 23, 2000 (age 75 years, 43 days). Burial location unknown.
  See also Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier
  Jack Kevorkian (1928-2011) — also known as "Dr. Death" — Born in Pontiac, Oakland County, Mich., May 26, 1928. Physician; euthanasia advocate whose campaign of assisted suicides of terminally ill patients in 1989-99 brought him national publicity; his medical license was revoked in 1990; he faced numerous murder charges starting in 1993; acquitted by juries several times; convicted in 1999 and sentenced to 10 to 25 years in prison; released in 2007; Independent candidate for U.S. Representative from Michigan 9th District, 2008. Atheist. Armenian ancestry. Died, from kidney and heart problems, in Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, Oakland County, Mich., June 3, 2011 (age 83 years, 8 days). Interment at White Chapel Memorial Park Cemetery, Troy, Mich.
  Relatives: Son of Levon Kevorkian.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile
  Scott Winfield Davis — also known as Scott W. Davis — of Palo Alto, Santa Clara County, Calif. Arrested in 1996, in Atlanta, Georgia, and charged with killing David Coffin and setting fire to his home; the charges were later dropped for lack of evidence; Independent candidate for Governor of California, 2003. Still living as of 2003.
  Byron Low Tax Looper (b. 1964) — also known as Byron Anthony Looper — of Cookeville, Putnam County, Tenn. Born in Putnam County, Tenn., September 15, 1964. Democratic candidate for Georgia state house of representatives, 1987; Republican candidate for Tennessee state house of representatives, 1992; Republican candidate for Tennessee state senate, 1998. Changed his middle name from Anthony to Low Tax. He was indicted in March, 1998, on 14 counts of official misconduct as Putnam County Tax Assessor. On October 19, 1998, he shot and killed Tommy Burks, his opponent for a state senate seat; he was arrested soon after and charged with murder. He lost the November 1998 senate election to Burks' widow, who ran as a write-in candidate with the support of both parties. In August, 2000, he was tried for murder, convicted, and sentenced to life in prison without parole. Still living as of 2008.
  Cross-reference: McCracken Poston
  Abraham Jacob Hirschfeld (1919-2005) — also known as Abraham J. Hirschfeld; Abe Hirschfeld; "Honest Abe" — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y.; Miami Beach, Dade County (now Miami-Dade County), Fla. Born in Tarnow, Poland, December 12, 1919. Real estate developer; hotel owner; candidate for U.S. Senator from New York, 1974 (Democratic primary), 1976 (Democratic primary), 2004 (Builders); candidate for U.S. Representative from New York 14th District, 1992 (Independent Fusion), 1994 (Democratic primary); Republican candidate for borough president of Manhattan, New York, 1997; Independence candidate for New York state comptroller, 1998. In 1998, offered Paula Jones $1 million to drop her sexual harassment lawsuit against President Bill Clinton; later sued by Jones when he tried to back out of the offer. Indicted in 2000 of trying to hire a hit man to kill his former business partner Stanley Stahl; also charged with tax evasion; briefly jailed for violating a court order against discussing the trial with the media; ultimately convicted, and served two years in prison. Died, from complications of cancer, in St. Barnabas Hospital, Bronx, Bronx County, N.Y., August 9, 2005 (age 85 years, 240 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Married 1943 to Zipora Teicher.
  See also Wikipedia article
  William John Janklow (1939-2012) — also known as William J. Janklow; Bill Janklow — of South Dakota. Born in Chicago, Cook County, Ill., September 13, 1939. Republican. South Dakota state attorney general, 1975-79; Governor of South Dakota, 1979-87, 1995-2002; Presidential Elector for South Dakota, 1996, 2000; U.S. Representative from South Dakota at-large, 2003-04; resigned 2004. Lutheran. Involved in a traffic accident in 2003 when he ran a stop sign and hit a motorcyclist; convicted of second-degree manslaughter; sentenced to 100 days in jail and three years probation. Died January 12, 2012 (age 72 years, 121 days). Burial location unknown.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — votes in Congress from the Washington Post — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile
  John Stozich (c.1927-2004) — of Findlay, Hancock County, Ohio. Born in Mingo Junction, Jefferson County, Ohio, about 1927. Republican. Member of Ohio state house of representatives, 1983-91; director, Ohio Department of Industrial Relations, 1991-95; mayor of Findlay, Ohio, 1996-2000; convicted of vehicular manslaughter in May, 2004 for a traffic accident in which a woman died; sentenced to three years probation; a jail term was suspended. Catholic. Died, in Blanchard Valley Regional Health Center, Findlay, Hancock County, Ohio, July 5, 2004 (age about 77 years). Burial location unknown.
  Harold Charles Turner (b. 1962) — also known as Hal Turner — of North Bergen, Hudson County, N.J. Born in Jersey City, Hudson County, N.J., March 15, 1962. Republican. Radio talk show host; candidate in primary for U.S. Representative from New Jersey 13th District, 2000; in June 2009, he posted threats against three U.S. Court of Appeals judges, calling for them to be murdered over a ruling in a gun rights case; pleaded not guilty; tried in 2009-10; the first two ended in mistrials; convicted at the third trial and sentenced to 33 months in prison; released in 2012. Still living as of 2015.
  See also Wikipedia article — Encyclopedia of American Loons
"Enjoy the hospitable entertainment of a political graveyard."
Henry L. Clinton, Apollo Hall, New York City, February 3, 1872
The Political Graveyard

The Political Graveyard is a web site about U.S. political history and cemeteries. Founded in 1996, it is the Internet's most comprehensive free source for American political biography, listing 312,576 politicians, living and dead.
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