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The Political Graveyard: A Database of American History
Politicians in Trouble or Disgrace

Politicians in Trouble or Disgrace: Flight and Escape
Escape from incarceration or flight to avoid prosecution

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in chronological order

  Robert Alexander (c.1740-1805) — of Maryland. Born in Elkton, Cecil County, Md., about 1740. Planter; lawyer; Delegate to Continental Congress from Maryland, 1775-76. Episcopalian. When the Declaration of Independence was promulgated, fled from Maryland to the British Fleet; in 1780, he was adjudged guilty of high treason, and his property was confiscated. Died in London, England, November 20, 1805 (age about 65 years). Burial location unknown.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  Joseph Roffignac (1766-1846) — also known as Louis Philippe Joseph de Rouffignac — of New Orleans, Orleans Parish, La. Born in Angoulême, France, 1766. Fled France in 1789 to escape the guillotine, presumably over disloyalty to the revolutionary regime; mayor of New Orleans, La., 1820-28. French ancestry. Suffered a stroke, and dropped the gun he was holding, which accidentally discharged, shooting him in the head and killing him, in Périgueux, France, 1846 (age about 80 years). Burial location unknown.
  Joseph Hamilton Daviess (1774-1811) — also known as Joe Daviess — of Danville, Boyle County, Ky.; Lexington, Fayette County, Ky. Born in Bedford County, Va., March 4, 1774. Lawyer; U.S. Attorney for Kentucky, 1800-06; major in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812. Welsh ancestry. Member, Freemasons. Around 1801, he served as a second to John Rowan in his duel with James Chambers; after Chambers was killed, he fled to avoid prosecution as accomplice to murder, and became a fugitive, but when Rowan was arrested, he returned to act as Rowan's legal counsel. Shot and killed in the Battle of Tippecanoe, in what is now Tippecanoe County, Ind., November 7, 1811 (age 37 years, 248 days). Interment at Tippecanoe Battlefield Park, Battle Ground, Ind.
  Relatives: Brother-in-law of John Marshall (1755-1835).
  Political families: Lee-Randolph family of Maryland and Virginia; Marshall-Harrison-Randolph-Cabell family of Virginia; Biddle-Randolph family of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Anderson-Marshall family of Ohio and West Virginia; Pendleton-Lee family (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Daviess counties in Ind., Ky. and Mo., and Jo Daviess County, Ill., are named for him.
  Henry Stuart Foote (1804-1880) — also known as "Hangman Foote" — Born in Fauquier County, Va., February 28, 1804. U.S. Senator from Mississippi, 1847-52; Governor of Mississippi, 1852-54; Representative from Tennessee in the Confederate Congress, 1862-65. Fought four duels; fled Alabama in 1830 to escape prosecution for dueling. Exchanged blows with Thomas Hart Benton on the floor of the U.S. Senate. Expelled from the Confederate Congress in early 1865 for going North on an unauthorized peace mission. Died in Nashville, Davidson County, Tenn., May 20, 1880 (age 76 years, 82 days). Interment at Mt. Olivet Cemetery, Nashville, Tenn.
  Relatives: Son of Richard Helm Foote (1772-1817) and Helen Gibbon (Stuart) Foote (1776-1815); married, March 22, 1827, to Elizabeth Winters (1810-1855); married, June 15, 1859, to Rachel Douglas Boyd (1831-1882).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Samuel Swartwout (1783-1856) — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in Poughkeepsie, Dutchess County, N.Y., November 17, 1783. He was participant in Aaron Burr's "Western Conspiracy"; delivered a message from Burr to Gen. James Wilkinson in New Orleans; subsequently arrested in November 1806 for misprision of treason, but released a few months later; early promoter of railroads; openly supported the Texas Republic in its war for independence from Mexico; served in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812; U.S. Collector of Customs, 1829-38; in 1838, it was alleged that he had embezzled more than $1.2 million from the New York customs house, and fled to England; later investigation implicated a subordinate of his as having obtained most of that money; forfeited his property and returned to the U.S. in 1841. Died in New York, New York County, N.Y., November 21, 1856 (age 73 years, 4 days). Interment at Trinity Churchyard, Manhattan, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Abraham Swartwout and Maria (North) Swartwout; married 1814 to Alice Ann Cooper.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Louis P. Cooke (1811-1849) — of Texas. Born in Tennessee, 1811. Colonel in the Texas Army during the Texas War of Independence; member of Texas Republic House of Representatives, 1838-39, 1841-42; Texas Republic Secretary of the Navy, 1839-41. Charged in 1843 with the murder of Captain Mark Lewis; at trial, the jury deadlocked, and he escaped before a second trial could be held. Wounded in an Indian raid on Corpus Christi in 1844 and lost an eye. Died, of cholera, in Brownsville, Cameron County, Tex., 1849 (age about 38 years). Interment somewhere in New Orleans, La.
  Lorenzo Brentano (1813-1891) — also known as Lorenz Peter Carl Brentano — of Chicago, Cook County, Ill. Born in Mannheim, Germany, November 4, 1813. Republican. In Germany, he participated in the 1849 revolution; arrested and sentenced to life imprisonment; escaped to the United States; member of Illinois state house of representatives 61st District, 1863-65; delegate to Republican National Convention from Illinois, 1864; Presidential Elector for Illinois, 1868; U.S. Consul in Dresden, 1872-76; U.S. Representative from Illinois 3rd District, 1877-79. German ancestry. Died in Chicago, Cook County, Ill., September 18, 1891 (age 77 years, 318 days). Interment at Graceland Cemetery, Chicago, Ill.
  Relatives: Married to Caroline Brentano (1819-1893); father of Theodore Brentano (1854-1940).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
Isaac V. Fowler Isaac Vanderbeck Fowler (1818-1869) — also known as Isaac V. Fowler — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Born August 20, 1818. Democrat. Postmaster at New York City, N.Y., 1853-60; delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1860; charged in 1860 with embezzlement as Postmaster; fled to Mexico and Cuba. Member, Tammany Hall. Died in Chicago, Cook County, Ill., September 29, 1869 (age 51 years, 40 days). Interment at Old Town Cemetery, Newburgh, N.Y.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: Library of Congress
  John W. Dawson (1820-1877) — of Fort Wayne, Allen County, Ind. Born in Cambridge, Dearborn County, Ind., October 21, 1820. Farmer; lawyer; newspaper editor; candidate for Indiana state house of representatives, 1854; candidate for secretary of state of Indiana, 1856; candidate for U.S. Representative from Indiana, 1858; Governor of Utah Territory, 1861. In December, 1861, after less than a month as territorial governor, fled Utah amid controversy and scandal. Just east of Salt Lake City, he was attacked by three men and badly injured. Died in Indiana, September 10, 1877 (age 56 years, 324 days). Interment at Lindenwood Cemetery, Fort Wayne, Ind.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Judah Philip Benjamin (1811-1884) — also known as Judah P. Benjamin; Philippe Benjamin; "Poo Bah of the Confederacy" — of New Orleans, Orleans Parish, La.; London, England; Paris, France. Born in Christiansted, St. Croix, Virgin Islands, August 6, 1811. Lawyer; member of Louisiana state house of representatives, 1842-44; delegate to Louisiana state constitutional convention, 1845; Presidential Elector for Louisiana, 1848; U.S. Senator from Louisiana, 1853-61; Confederate Attorney General, 1861; Confederate Secretary of War, 1861-62; Confederate Secretary of State, 1862-65. Jewish. He fled to Europe in 1865 to avoid arrest by Union forces; he was suspected of involvement in the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln. Fell from a tram car about 1880, and suffered multiple injuries; also developed kidney and heart problems, and died in Paris, France, May 6, 1884 (age 72 years, 274 days). Interment at Père la Chaise Cemetery, Paris, France.
  Relatives: Son of Philip Benjamin and Rebecca (de Mendes) Benjamin; married 1833 to Natalie St. Martin; cousin *** of Henry Michael Hyams (1806-1875).
  Coins and currency: His portrait appeared on the Confederate States $2 note in 1861-64.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  Books about Judah P. Benjamin: Robert Douthat Meade, Judah P. Benjamin: Confederate Statesman — Eli N. Evans, Judah P. Benjamin : The Jewish Confederate
  John Cabell Breckinridge (1821-1875) — also known as John C. Breckinridge — of Lexington, Fayette County, Ky. Born near Lexington, Fayette County, Ky., January 16, 1821. Democrat. Lawyer; major in the U.S. Army during the Mexican War; member of Kentucky state house of representatives, 1849-51; U.S. Representative from Kentucky 8th District, 1851-55; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Kentucky, 1856; Vice President of the United States, 1857-61; Southern Democratic candidate for President of the United States, 1860; U.S. Senator from Kentucky, 1861; general in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; Confederate Secretary of War, 1865. Presbyterian. Member, Freemasons. Expelled from the U.S. Senate on December 4, 1861 for his participation in the Confederate military. Fled to Cuba at the end of the war, and lived in England and Canada until 1869. Died, from lung disease and liver cirrhosis, in Lexington, Fayette County, Ky., May 17, 1875 (age 54 years, 121 days). Interment at Lexington Cemetery, Lexington, Ky.
  Relatives: Son of Mary Clay (Smith) Breckinridge (1787-1864) and Joseph Cabell Breckinridge; married 1840 to Elizabeth Lucas (1825-1889); married, December 12, 1843, to Mary Cyrene Burch (1826-1907); father of Clifton Rodes Breckinridge; nephew of Robert Jefferson Breckinridge; grandson of John Breckinridge; great-grandson of John Witherspoon; great-grandnephew of William Preston and William Cabell; first cousin of Peter Augustus Porter (1827-1864), Robert Jefferson Breckinridge, Jr. and William Campbell Preston Breckinridge; first cousin once removed of James Douglas Breckinridge, Benjamin William Sheridan Cabell (1793-1862), Peter Augustus Porter (1853-1925), Levin Irving Handy, Desha Breckinridge and Henry Skillman Breckinridge; first cousin twice removed of William Cabell, Jr., Francis Smith Preston, William Henry Cabell and James Patton Preston; second cousin of Carter Henry Harrison, William Lewis Cabell and George Craighead Cabell; second cousin once removed of William Campbell Preston, James McDowell, John Buchanan Floyd, John Smith Preston, George Rogers Clark Floyd, Edward Carrington Cabell, Benjamin Earl Cabell and Carter Henry Harrison II; second cousin twice removed of Earle Cabell; third cousin of John William Leftwich.
  Political families: Marshall-Harrison-Randolph-Cabell family of Virginia; Breckinridge-Preston-Cabell-Henry family of Virginia; Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York; Walker-Bolling family of Huntsville, Alabama (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  The city of Breckenridge, Missouri, is named for him.  — The city of Breckenridge, Colorado, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial — BillionGraves burial record
  Books about John C. Breckinridge: William C. Davis, An Honorable Defeat: The Last Days of the Confederate Government — Frank Hopkins Heck, Proud Kentuckian, John C. Breckinridge, 1821-1875 — William C. Davis, Breckinridge : Statesman, Soldier, Symbol
  George Wythe Randolph (1818-1867) — also known as George W. Randolph — of Virginia. Born near Charlottesville, Albemarle County, Va., March 10, 1818. Lawyer; delegate to Virginia secession convention, 1861; general in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; Confederate Secretary of War, 1862; after the collapse of the Confederacy, fled to Europe to avoid capture; pardoned in 1866. Episcopalian. Died of pulmonary pneumonia, near Charlottesville, Albemarle County, Va., April 3, 1867 (age 49 years, 24 days). Interment at Monticello Graveyard, Near Charlottesville, Albemarle County, Va.
  Relatives: Son of Thomas Mann Randolph, Jr. and Martha (Jefferson) Randolph; brother of Benjamin Franklin Randolph, Meriwether Lewis Randolph and Virginia Jefferson Randolph (who married Nicholas Philip Trist); uncle of Thomas Jefferson Coolidge; grandson of Thomas Jefferson; granduncle of John Gardner Coolidge; great-grandson of Archibald Cary; second great-grandson of Richard Randolph; first cousin of Francis Wayles Eppes; first cousin once removed of Dabney Carr, John Wayles Eppes and Frederick Madison Roberts; first cousin twice removed of John Randolph of Roanoke; first cousin thrice removed of Richard Bland and Peyton Randolph (1721-1775); second cousin of Dabney Smith Carr; second cousin once removed of John Marshall, James Markham Marshall and Alexander Keith Marshall; second cousin twice removed of Theodorick Bland, Edmund Jenings Randolph and Beverley Randolph; third cousin of Thomas Marshall, John Jordan Crittenden, Thomas Turpin Crittenden, Robert Crittenden, James Keith Marshall and Carter Henry Harrison; third cousin once removed of Henry Lee, Charles Lee, Edmund Jennings Lee, Peyton Randolph (1779-1828), Henry St. George Tucker, Alexander Parker Crittenden, Thomas Leonidas Crittenden, Thomas Theodore Crittenden, John Augustine Marshall and Carter Henry Harrison II; third cousin twice removed of Thomas Theodore Crittenden, Jr., William Marshall Bullitt and Alexander Scott Bullitt; fourth cousin of Benjamin William Sheridan Cabell (1793-1862), Edmund Randolph and Nathaniel Beverly Tucker; fourth cousin once removed of Thomas Jones Hardeman, Bailey Hardeman, William Lewis Cabell, Fitzhugh Lee, George Craighead Cabell and William Henry Robertson.
  Political families: Marshall-Harrison-Randolph-Cabell family of Virginia; Breckinridge-Preston-Cabell-Henry family of Virginia; Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York; Walker-Bolling family of Huntsville, Alabama (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Coins and currency: His portrait appeared on Confederate States $100 notes in 1862-64.
  George Davis (1820-1896) — of Wilmington, New Hanover County, N.C. Born in Porter's Neck, Pender County, N.C., March 1, 1820. Lawyer; Delegate from North Carolina to the Confederate Provisional Congress, 1861-62; Senator from North Carolina in the Confederate Congress, 1862-64; Confederate Attorney General, 1864-65. Episcopalian. At the end of the Civil War, with other Confederate officials, attempted to flee overseas, but turned himself in at Key West, Fla.; spent several months in prison at Fort Hamilton; pardoned in 1866. Died in Wilmington, New Hanover County, N.C., February 23, 1896 (age 75 years, 359 days). Interment at Oakdale Cemetery, Wilmington, N.C.; statue erected 1911 at Third and Market Streets, Wilmington, N.C.
  Relatives: Son of Thomas Frederick Davis (1778-1846) and Sarah Isabella (Eagles) Davis (1784-1829); half-brother and fourth cousin of Horatio Davis; married, November 17, 1842, to Mary Adelaide Polk (1817-1863; first cousin once removed of Frank Lyon Polk (1871-1943); second cousin once removed of James Knox Polk and William Hawkins Polk; third cousin of Marshall Tate Polk); married, May 9, 1866, to Monimia Fairfax (1837-1889); great-grandnephew of Samuel Ashe; cousin four different ways of John Baptista Ashe (1748-1802), John Baptista Ashe (1810-1857), Thomas Samuel Ashe and William Shepperd Ashe; cousin three different ways of Alfred Moore Waddell; second cousin twice removed of William Henry Hill.
  Political families: Ashe-Polk family of North Carolina; Polk family; Manly-Haywood-Polk family of Raleigh, North Carolina (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Robert Augustus Toombs (1810-1885) — also known as Robert Toombs; Bob Toombs — of Washington, Wilkes County, Ga. Born in Wilkes County, Ga., July 2, 1810. Lawyer; member of Georgia state house of representatives, 1837-43; U.S. Representative from Georgia 8th District, 1845-53; U.S. Senator from Georgia, 1853-61; delegate to Georgia secession convention, 1861; Delegate from Georgia to the Confederate Provisional Congress, 1861-62; Confederate Secretary of State, 1861; general in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; fled to Europe in 1865 to avoid arrest by Union forces; he was suspected of involvement in the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln; later returned to Georgia; delegate to Georgia state constitutional convention, 1877. One of the greatest orators of his time. Died in Washington, Wilkes County, Ga., December 15, 1885 (age 75 years, 166 days). Interment at Rest Haven Cemetery, Washington, Ga.
  Toombs County, Ga. is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  Books about Robert Toombs: William C. Davis, The Union That Shaped the Confederacy: Robert Toombs and Alexander H. Stephens
  Thomas Overton Moore (1804-1876) — of Louisiana. Born in Sampson County, N.C., April 10, 1804. Democrat. Planter; member of Louisiana state house of representatives, 1848; member of Louisiana state senate, 1856; Governor of Louisiana, 1860-64; delegate to Louisiana secession convention, 1861. Presbyterian. At the end of the Civil War, the military governor of Louisiana ordered his arrest as a Confederate leader; he fled to Mexico and settled in Havana, Cuba. Pardoned by President Andrew Johnson. Died near Alexandria, Rapides Parish, La., June 25, 1876 (age 72 years, 76 days). Interment at Mt. Olivet Episcopal Cemetery, Pineville, La.
  John Harrison Surratt, Jr. (1844-1916) — also known as John H. Surratt, Jr. — of Surrattsville (now Clinton), Prince George's County, Md. Born in Washington, D.C., April 13, 1844. Postmaster at Surrattsville, Md., 1862-63; dismissed as postmaster in 1863 for alleged disloyalty to the Union; became a Confederate courier and spy; he and others attempted to kidnap President Abraham Lincoln; later, the plot to kill the President and other government officials was formulated at his mother's boarding house in Washington; he denied involvement in the assassination, but fled overseas; he was arrested in Alexandria, Egypt, and sent back to the U.S.; tried in a Maryland court in 1867 for his alleged involvement in the murder plot, but the jury couldn't reach a verdict, and a mistrial was declared; treasurer of a steamship company. Died, from pneumonia, in Baltimore, Md., April 21, 1916 (age 72 years, 8 days). Interment at New Cathedral Cemetery, Baltimore, Md.
  Relatives: Son of John Harrison Surratt (1813-1862) and Mary (Jenkins) Surratt (1823-1865; hanged for her part in the conspiracy to assassinate the President and other officials); married 1872 to Mary Victorine Hunter (1846-1926).
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  William Magear Tweed (1823-1878) — also known as William M. Tweed; William Marcy Tweed; "Boss Tweed" — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in New York, New York County, N.Y., April 3, 1823. Democrat. Chairmaker; fire fighter; U.S. Representative from New York 5th District, 1853-55; member of New York state senate 4th District, 1868-73. Scotch-Irish ancestry. Member, Odd Fellows; Freemasons. Convicted of embezzlement and sentenced to twelve years in prison; escaped; captured in Spain and brought back to New York. Died in prison, in New York, New York County, N.Y., April 12, 1878 (age 55 years, 9 days). Interment at Green-Wood Cemetery, Brooklyn, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Richard Tweed and Eliza (Magear) Tweed; married, September 18, 1844, to Mary Jane C. Skaden.
  Cross-reference: Charles O'Conor — Thomas Nast — George G. Barnard — Albert Cardozo
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — NNDB dossier
  Books about William M. Tweed: Seymour J. Mandelbaum, Boss Tweed's New York — Leo Hershkowitz, Tweed's New York : another look — Kenneth D. Ackerman, Boss Tweed: The Rise and Fall of the Corrupt Pol Who Conceived the Soul of Modern New York
  Corliss P. Stone (1838-1906) — of Seattle, King County, Wash. Born in Franklin County, Vt., March 20, 1838. Mayor of Seattle, Wash., 1872-73. Caused a scandal in 1873, when he suddenly vacated his mayoralty; he fled to San Francisco with a married woman and $15,000 he had embezzled from his firm. Later returned to Seattle. Died in Seattle, King County, Wash., September 14, 1906 (age 68 years, 178 days). Interment at Lake View Cemetery, Seattle, Wash.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Thomas J. Navin — of Adrian, Lenawee County, Mich. Mayor of Adrian, Mich., 1881-82. Absconded after forging city bonds; arrested in El Paso, Texas. Burial location unknown.
  Marshall Tate Polk (1831-1884) — also known as M. T. Polk — of Bolivar, Hardeman County, Tenn. Born in Charlotte, Mecklenburg County, N.C., May 15, 1831. Democrat. Colonel in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Tennessee, 1876; Tennessee state treasurer, 1877-83. Wounded at the Battle of Shiloh, during the Civil War, and lost a leg. In 1883, a $400,000 shortfall was was discovered in the state treasury. Polk fled to Texas, was arrested there, and brought back to Nashville for trial. Charged with embezzlement, he pleaded not guilty -- his lawyer argued he was only guilty of "default of pay" -- but was convicted, sentenced to twenty years in prison, and fined. Imprisonment was delayed pending his appeal, and he died in the meantime. Died in Bolivar, Hardeman County, Tenn., February 20, 1884 (age 52 years, 281 days). Interment at Polk Cemetery, Bolivar, Tenn.
  Relatives: Son of Marshall Tate Polk (1805-1831) and Laura Theresa (Wilson) Polk (1808-1848); married to Evelina McNeal Bills (1836-1926); nephew of James Knox Polk and William Hawkins Polk; first cousin of Tasker Polk; second cousin of Edwin Fitzhugh Polk; third cousin of Mary Adelaide Polk (1817-1863; who married George Davis) and Richard Tyler Polk; third cousin once removed of Rufus King Polk and Frank Lyon Polk (1871-1943); third cousin twice removed of Charles Polk and Elizabeth Polk Guest; third cousin thrice removed of Raymond R. Guest; fourth cousin of Augustus Caesar Dodge; fourth cousin once removed of Trusten Polk.
  Political families: Ashe-Polk family of North Carolina; Polk family; Manly-Haywood-Polk family of Raleigh, North Carolina (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Epitaph: "Every one that loveth is born of God."
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Thomas Johnson Tiffany (1834-1906) — also known as Thomas J. Tiffany; "Henry Fullerton" — of Bennington, Bennington County, Vt.; Rutland, Rutland County, Vt. Born in Pittsford, Rutland County, Vt., March 6, 1834. Republican. Postmaster at Bennington, Vt., 1872-84; in March, 1884, he was confronted by a postal inspector about a shortage in the post office accounts, he fled, also taking $2,000 in Bennington school funds; in October, 1885, he was arrested near Greeley, Colorado, where he was living under the alias "Henry Fullerton", and brought back to Vermont, where he plead guilty to federal charges, and was sentenced to five years' imprisonment. Episcopalian. Member, Freemasons. Died in Rutland, Rutland County, Vt., June 26, 1906 (age 72 years, 112 days). Interment at Bennington Village Cemetery, Bennington, Vt.
  Relatives: Son of Arnold Johnson Tiffany (1803-1877) and Abigail (Drury) Tiffany (1805-1844); married, October 6, 1858, to Mary Frances Cook.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  James W. Tate (b. 1831) — also known as "Honest Dick" — of Frankfort, Franklin County, Ky. Born in Franklin County, Ky., January 2, 1831. Kentucky state treasurer, 1868-. Absconded from the state treasurer's office in March, 1888; Gov. Simon Buckner said Tate had embezzled almost $250,000 from the state. Impeached in absentia by the Kentucky House; convicted and removed from office by the Senate. He never returned, and his fate is unknown.
  Charles A. Binder (1857-1891) — also known as John Roth — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in New York, New York County, N.Y., November 2, 1857. Lawyer; member of New York state assembly from New York County 10th District, 1884, 1886; accused in 1891 of embezzling $20,000 from the estate of Barbara Hausman; fled and became a fugitive, traveling under the alias "John Roth". German ancestry. Wounded by self-inflicted gunshot, in his room at the Sheridan House Hotel, and died there early the next morning, in Elizabeth, Union County, N.J., May 17, 1891 (age 33 years, 196 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Margaret Binder.
  See also Wikipedia article
  Joseph Andrew Iasigi (1848-1917) — also known as Joseph A. Iasigi — of Boston, Suffolk County, Mass. Born in Massachusetts, January 15, 1848. Consular Agent for France in Boston, Mass., 1873-77; Consul-General for Turkey in Boston, Mass., 1889-97; he failed to account for a trust fund, refused to answer questions, and fled to New York City; arrested there in February 1897 and extradited to Boston; charged with embezzlement of about $220,000; pleaded not guilty; tried and convicted in November 1897; sentenced to 14-18 years in prison; pardoned in 1909. Armenian and French ancestry. Died in Brookline, Norfolk County, Mass., January 24, 1917 (age 69 years, 9 days). Interment at Mt. Auburn Cemetery, Cambridge, Mass.
  Relatives: Son of Joseph Iasigi (1800-1877) and Eulalie (Loir) Iasigi (1821-1883); brother of Oscar Anthony Iasigi; married 1881 to Marie P. Homer; uncle of Nora Iasigi (who married William Marshall Bullitt).
  Political family: Marshall-Harrison-Randolph-Cabell family of Virginia (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  William Sylvester Taylor (1853-1928) — also known as William S. Taylor; W. S. Taylor; "Hogjaw" — of Morgantown, Butler County, Ky. Born in Butler County, Ky., October 10, 1853. Republican. Lawyer; state court judge in Kentucky, 1886; delegate to Republican National Convention from Kentucky, 1888, 1900; Kentucky state attorney general, 1896-99; Governor of Kentucky, 1899-1900. Indicted in 1900 as a conspirator in the assassination of William J. Goebel; fled to Indiana; never extradited; pardoned in 1909 by Gov. Augustus E. Willson. Died August 2, 1928 (age 74 years, 297 days). Interment at Crown Hill Cemetery, Indianapolis, Ind.
  Cross-reference: Charles E. Sapp
  Eugene Dennis (1905-1961) — also known as Francis Xavier Waldron; Tim Ryan — Born in Seattle, King County, Wash., August 10, 1905. Communist. Union organizer; fled to the Soviet Union in 1929 to avoid prosecution; returned to the U.S. in 1935; General Secretary, Communist Party, 1946-59, and Chairman, 1959-61; arrested in 1948, along with other party leaders, and charged with advocating the violent overthrow of the United States; convicted in 1949, and sentenced to five years in prison. Died, from cancer, in Mount Sinai Hospital, Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., January 31, 1961 (age 55 years, 174 days). Interment at Forest Home Cemetery, Forest Park, Ill.
  See also Wikipedia article
Samuel Insull Samuel Insull (1859-1938) — of Chicago, Cook County, Ill.; Kenilworth, Cook County, Ill.; near Libertyville, Lake County, Ill. Born in London, England, November 11, 1859. Republican. Associate of Thomas Edison and executive of electric utilities; one of the founders of the company that became General Electric; also had major holdings in railroads; alternate delegate to Republican National Convention from Illinois, 1904; when his utility holding company collapsed, wiping out the stockholders, he fled the country; indicted in 1932 on fraud and embezzlement charges; ultimately extradited from Turkey in 1934; tried in Chicago and found not guilty. Congregationalist. Member, Union League. Died from a heart attack, in the Place de la Concorde station on the Paris Métro subway system, Paris, France, July 16, 1938 (age 78 years, 247 days). Interment at Putney Vale Cemetery, London, England.
  Relatives: Son of Samuel Insull and Emma (Short) Insull; married, May 24, 1899, to Margaret A. Bird (1875-1953; actress, stage name 'Gladys Wallis').
  Cross-reference: Forest A. Harness
  See also Wikipedia article
  Image source: Time Magazine, November 29, 1926
  Charles Fitch Hemans (1896-1971) — also known as Charles F. Hemans; "Baron of the Bathroom"; "Knight of the Doublecross" — of Eaton Rapids, Eaton County, Mich.; Howell, Livingston County, Mich.; Lansing, Ingham County, Mich. Born in Mason, Ingham County, Mich., April 12, 1896. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army during World War I; lawyer; alternate delegate to Democratic National Convention from Michigan, 1924; candidate in primary for Michigan state house of representatives from Wayne County 1st District, 1926, 1928; member of University of Michigan board of regents, 1934-41; defeated, 1931, 1941; candidate in primary for U.S. Representative from Michigan 15th District, 1934; candidate for circuit judge in Michigan 30th Circuit, 1935; candidate in primary for Lieutenant Governor of Michigan, 1936. Implicated in the Michigan legislative bribery scandal in 1944; granted immunity from prosecution and testified that he had bribed many legislators in his hotel bathroom; later, another bribery case against legislators fell apart when he refused to testify and fled to Washington; arrested by FBI agents and arraigned on a federal fugitive witness charge; tried and convicted, and sentenced to four years in prison; pleaded guilty to bribery in 1950 and sentenced to five years probation and a $1,000 fine. Died January 29, 1971 (age 74 years, 292 days). Interment at Maple Grove Cemetery, Mason, Mich.
  Relatives: Son of Lawton Thomas Hemans (1864-1916) and Minnie P. Hemans.
  Cross-reference: Carl F. DeLano — Gilbert H. Isbister — Robert B. McLaughlin — Charles S. Blondy — James B. Stanley — William C. Stenson — Earl W. McEwen, Sr. — Byron L. Ballard — Ernest G. Nagel — Charles C. Diggs, Sr. — James A. Burns — Earl C. Gallagher — Edward J. Walsh — Walter N. Stockfish — Adam Sumeracki — Joseph J. Kowalski
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Gus Hall (1910-2000) — also known as Arvo Kustaa Halberg — of Youngstown, Mahoning County, Ohio; Yonkers, Westchester County, N.Y. Born in Virginia, St. Louis County, Minn., October 8, 1910. Communist. Steelworker; union organizer and one of the leaders of the steelworkers' strike in 1937; candidate for mayor of Youngstown, Ohio, 1937; served in the U.S. Navy during World War II; indicted in 1948, and convicted in 1949, under the Smith Act, of conspiring to teach the violent overthrow of the U.S. government; fled to Mexico; arrested in 1951 and sent back; spent eight years in prison; candidate for President of the United States, 1972, 1976, 1980, 1984. Finnish ancestry. Died, of complications from diabetes, in Lenox Hill Hospital, Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., October 13, 2000 (age 90 years, 5 days). Interment at Forest Home Cemetery, Forest Park, Ill.
  Relatives: Married 1935 to Elizabeth Turner.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Angela Yvonne Davis (b. 1944) — also known as Angela Davis — Born in Birmingham, Jefferson County, Ala., January 26, 1944. Communist. Following a violent escape attempt at the Marin County (California) Hall of Justice, August 7, 1970, in which several people were killed, she was implicated as an accomplice and fled; later arrested in New York, tried, and acquitted in 1972; awarded the Lenin Peace Prize in 1979; candidate for Vice President of the United States, 1980, 1984; during the Communist coup against Mikhail Gorbachev in 1991, she supported Gorbachev, and subsequently left the Communist Party; university professor. Female. African ancestry. Still living as of 2014.
  Relatives: Daughter of Sallye E. Davis; brother of Ben Davis (professional football player).
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Leonard Peltier (b. 1944) — Born in Grand Forks, Grand Forks County, N.Dak., September 12, 1944. American Indian activist and member of the American Indian Movement; alleged to have been involved in a shoot-out at the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota, June 26, 1975, in which three died, including two FBI agents; fled South Dakota, was arrested in Canada, and extradited to the U.S.; tried and convicted of murder in 1977, and sentenced to two life terms in prison; Peace and Freedom candidate for President of the United States, 2004; Socialism and Liberation candidate for Vice President of the United States, 2020. American Indian ancestry. Still living as of 2020.
  Relatives: Son of Leo Peltier and Alvina (Robideau) Peltier.
  Cross-reference: Ramsey Clark
  See also Wikipedia article — Ballotpedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Bernard Hugo Goetz (b. 1947) — also known as Bernard H. Goetz; Bernhard Goetz; "Subway Vigilante" — of New York City (unknown county), N.Y. Born in Queens, Queens County, N.Y., November 7, 1947. Fusion candidate for mayor of New York City, N.Y., 2001. German and Jewish ancestry. On December 22, 1984, he shot and wounded four young men who were about to rob him, and subsequently fled to New England, until he turned himself in at Concord, N.H.; arraigned on attempted murder, assault, and weapons charges; convicted only for carrying an unlicensed gun; sentenced to one year in jail; served eight months. Still living as of 2014.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile
  Frazier Glenn Miller, Jr. (b. 1940) — also known as Glenn Miller; "Frazier Glenn Cross"; "Rounder" — of North Carolina; Aurora, Lawrence County, Mo. Born in Springfield, Greene County, Mo., 1940. Served in the U.S. Army during the Vietnam war; candidate in Democratic primary for Governor of North Carolina, 1984; candidate in Republican primary for North Carolina state senate, 1986; convicted on federal contempt of court charges in 1986; sentenced to one year in prison, but disappeared while out on bond; later captured in Missouri, along with four other Klansmen and a cache of weapons; indicted in 1987 for plotting robberies and an assassination; in a deal with prosecutors, he pleaded guilty to a weapons charge and to making threats through the mail; served three years in prison; candidate for U.S. Representative from Missouri 7th District, 2006; candidate for U.S. Senator from Missouri, 2010; on April 13, 2014, in an apparent hate crime he shot and killed three people at a Jewish community center and retirement complex in Overland Park, Kansas. Member, Ku Klux Klan. Still living as of 2014.
  Robert W. Levy (b. 1947) — also known as Bob Levy — of Atlantic City, Atlantic County, N.J. Born in Atlantic City, Atlantic County, N.J., May 16, 1947. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army during the Vietnam war; mayor of Atlantic City, N.J., 2005-07; resigned 2007. Falsely claimed to have served in the U.S. Army U.S. Army Special Forces (Green Berets); admitted that he used false information in his service record to obtain benefits; disappeared on September 26, 2007; his lawyer announced on October 10 that he had resigned; pleaded guilty in November to defrauding the Department of Veterans Affairs, sentenced to three years probation, fined, and ordered to pay restitution. Still living as of 2008.
  Relatives: Married 1964 to Hazel Washington.
  See also Wikipedia article
"Enjoy the hospitable entertainment of a political graveyard."
Henry L. Clinton, Apollo Hall, New York City, February 3, 1872
The Political Graveyard

The Political Graveyard is a web site about U.S. political history and cemeteries. Founded in 1996, it is the Internet's most comprehensive free source for American political biography, listing 312,576 politicians, living and dead.
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