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The Political Graveyard: A Database of American History
Politicians in Trouble or Disgrace

Politicians in Trouble or Disgrace: Contempt
Contempt of court or of Congress; probation or parole violations

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in chronological order

  John Winthrop Chanler (1826-1877) — also known as John W. Chanler — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in New York, New York County, N.Y., September 14, 1826. Democrat. Lawyer; member of New York state assembly from New York County 10th District, 1858-59; U.S. Representative from New York 7th District, 1863-69. On May 14, 1866, he offered a resolution defending President Andrew Johnson's veto of Reconstruction enactments, which he called "the wicked and revolutionary acts of a few malignant and mischievous men." On motion of Rep. Robert C. Schenck, he was censured for insulting the House of Representatives. Died in Barrytown, Dutchess County, N.Y., October 19, 1877 (age 51 years, 35 days). Interment at Trinity Cemetery, Manhattan, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of John White Chanler (1785-1853) and Elizabeth Sheriffe (Winthrop) Chanler (1791-1866); married, January 22, 1862, to Margaret Astor Ward (1838-1875; first cousin of William Waldorf Astor); father of William Astor Chanler and Lewis Stuyvesant Chanler (1869-1942).
  Political family: Livingston-Schuyler family of New York (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
  David Smith Terry (1823-1889) — also known as David S. Terry — of Galveston, Galveston County, Tex.; San Francisco, Calif.; Stockton, San Joaquin County, Calif. Born in Christian County (part now in Todd County), Ky., March 8, 1823. Lawyer; went to California for the 1849 Gold Rush; advocated the extension of slavery to California; justice of California state supreme court, 1855-59; chief justice of California state supreme court, 1857-59; killed U.S. Senator David C. Broderick in a duel near San Francisco in 1859; tried for murder, but acquitted; served in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; delegate to California state constitutional convention, 1878-79; candidate for Presidential Elector for California, 1880; his wife Sarah Althea Hill claimed to be the widow and heir of wealthy U.S. Senator William Sharon; in September, 1888, when her claim was finally rejected by U.S. Supreme Court Justice Stephen J. Field (acting as a Court of Appeals judge for California), she and Terry caused an altercation in the courtroom and were jailed six months for contempt of court. Five months after his release from jail, he encountered Justice Field and slapped him in the face; he was then shot through the heart and killed by U.S. Deputy Marshal David Neagle, the justice's bodyguard, in the train station dining room at Lathrop, San Joaquin County, Calif., August 14, 1889 (age 66 years, 159 days). Neagle was arrested by local authorities, but later released on the demand of the U.S. government. Interment at Stockton Rural Cemetery, Stockton, Calif.
  Relatives: Son of Joseph Royal Terry (1792-1877) and Sarah David (Smith) Terry (1793-1837); brother of Benjamin Franklin Terry (1821-1861); married, November 26, 1852, to Cornelia Runnels (1829-1884; niece of Hardin Richard Runnels); married, January 7, 1886, to Sarah Althea Hill (1857-1937).
  Political family: Runnels-Terry family of Houston, Texas.
  Cross-reference: Peter Singleton Wilkes
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
Eugene V. Debs Eugene Victor Debs (1855-1926) — also known as Eugene V. Debs — of Terre Haute, Vigo County, Ind. Born in Terre Haute, Vigo County, Ind., November 5, 1855. Socialist. Locomotive fireman on the Terre Haute and Indianapolis Railroad; secretary-treasurer of the Brotherhood of Locomotive Firemen in 1880-93; member of Indiana state house of representatives, 1885; founder in 1893 and president (1893-97) of the American Railway Union; arrested during a strike in 1894 and charged with conspiracy to commit murder; the charges were dropped, but he was jailed for six months for contempt of court; became a Socialist while incarcerated; candidate for President of the United States, 1900 (Social Democratic), 1904 (Socialist), 1908 (Socialist), 1912 (Socialist), 1920 (Socialist); in 1905, was a founder of the Industrial Workers of the World ("Wobblies"), which hoped to organize all workers in "One Big Union"; convicted under the Sedition and Espionage Act for an anti-war speech he made in 1918, and sentenced to ten years in federal prison; released in 1921. Member, Knights of Pythias; American Civil Liberties Union. Died in Lindlahr Sanitarium, Elmhurst, DuPage County, Ill., October 20, 1926 (age 70 years, 349 days). Interment at Highland Lawn Cemetery, Terre Haute, Ind.
  Relatives: Son of Daniel Debs and Marguerite (Betterich) Debs; married, June 9, 1885, to Katherine 'Kate' Metzel (step-sister-in-law of Bertha D. Baur (1870-1967)).
  Cross-reference: Victor L. Berger — William A. Cunnea
  See also NNDB dossier
  Books about Eugene V. Debs: James Chace, 1912 : Wilson, Roosevelt, Taft and Debs : The Election that Changed the Country — Charles W. Carey, Jr., Eugene V. Debs : Outspoken Labor Leader and Socialist (for young readers)
  Image source: American Monthly Review of Reviews, September 1908
  Robert Philo Anibal (1845-1908) — also known as Robert P. Anibal — of Northville, Fulton County, N.Y.; Johnstown, Fulton County, N.Y. Born in Benson, Hamilton County, N.Y., February 22, 1845. Democrat. School teacher; lawyer; Hamilton County Judge and Surrogate, 1872-77; delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1896; candidate for Justice of New York Supreme Court 4th District, 1901. In May 1901, the Herkimer County District Attorney accused him of offering a bribe to a witness in a criminal trial; Anibal denied this. Died in Northville, Fulton County, N.Y., December 14, 1908 (age 63 years, 296 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Philo Anibal (1817-1878) and Mary (Orcutt) Anibal; married, April 24, 1872, to Frances E. Van Arnam (1859-1929).
  William Warren Rose (1864-1931) — also known as William W. Rose — of Kansas City, Wyandotte County, Kan. Born in Oyster Bay, Nassau County, Long Island, N.Y., March 12, 1864. Architect; mayor of Kansas City, Kan., 1905-06, 1906; defeated, 1897 (Fusion), 1907 (Democratic); delegate to Democratic National Convention from Kansas, 1908, 1920. Member, Freemasons. An ouster lawsuit was filed against him in 1905 over his refusal to enforce the state's liquor prohibition law; fined $1,000 for contempt by the Kansas Supreme Court in 1907 for trying to hold office as mayor. Died May 4, 1931 (age 67 years, 53 days). Interment at Woodlawn Cemetery, Kansas City, Kan.
Frank S. Sidway Frank St. John Sidway (1869-1938) — also known as Frank S. Sidway — of Buffalo, Erie County, N.Y. Born December 15, 1869. Republican. Served in the U.S. Army during the Spanish-American War; lawyer; chair of Erie County Republican Party, 1910; in 1912, he was found guilty of civil contempt in connection with his brother's divorce case, and fined $900; later, an appellate court reversed this decision; candidate in primary for Lieutenant Governor of New York, 1914. Died, from a heart attack, in Buffalo, Erie County, N.Y., January 17, 1938 (age 68 years, 33 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Franklin Sidway and Charlotte (Spalding) Sidway; married to Amelia Roberts (died 1972).
  See also Wikipedia article
  Image source: Library of Congress
J. Edward Addicks John Edward Charles O'Sullivan Addicks (1841-1919) — also known as J. Edward Addicks; "Gas Addicks"; "Napoleon of Gas"; "Frenzied Financier" — of Claymont, New Castle County, Del. Born in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., November 21, 1841. Republican. Flour merchant; built and controlled the illuminating gas industry in Boston and other cities; tried for years without success to win a seat in the U.S. Senate; member of Republican National Committee from Delaware, 1904; delegate to Republican National Convention from Delaware, 1904; arrested in New York, 1913, over his refusal to acknowledge money judgements against him by creditors, and released on bond; jailed in 1915 for contempt of court. Died in Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., August 7, 1919 (age 77 years, 259 days). Interment at Laurel Hill Cemetery, Philadelphia, Pa.
  Relatives: Son of John E. C. O'Sullivan Addicks and Margaretta McLeod (Turner) Addicks; married 1864 to Laura Wattson Butcher; married to Rosalie Butcher; married, December 14, 1898, to Ida (Carr) Wilson.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: Library of Congress
  Hudson Snowden Marshall (1870-1931) — also known as H. Snowden Marshall — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born in Baltimore, Md., January 15, 1870. Lawyer; law partner of Bartow S. Weeks, George Gordon Battle, and James A. O'Gorman; U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York, 1913-17; in 1915-16, U.S. Rep. Frank Buchanan (who was at the time being indicted by a federal grand jury) introduced impeachment resolutions against Marshall; the charges, including malfeasance in the handling of past cases, were investigated by a House Judiciary subcommittee, which held hearings in New York, and inquired into the proceedings of the grand jury which had indicted Rep. Buchanan; Marshall wrote a critical letter to the subcommittee, impugning its motives; based on this letter, the full House voted to find him in contempt of Congress, and ordered his arrest; on appeal, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that the authority of the House to punish for contempt extended only to actions which directly interfered with its proceedings. Member, American Bar Association. Died in Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., May 29, 1931 (age 61 years, 134 days). Interment at Kensico Cemetery, Valhalla, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Charles Marshall and Rebecca (Snowden) Marshall; brother of Emily Rosalie Snowden Marshall (1858-1940; who married Somerville Pinkney Tuck); married 1900 to Isabel C. Stiles; uncle of Somerville Pinkney Tuck, Jr. (1891-1967); great-grandnephew of John Marshall.
  Political family: Marshall-Harrison-Randolph-Cabell family of Virginia (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Charles Edward Sebastian (1873-1929) — also known as Charles E. Sebastian — of Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, Calif. Born in Farmington, St. Francois County, Mo., March 30, 1873. Democrat. Police officer; Los Angeles Chief of Police, 1911-15; in 1915, he was accused of molesting several teenage girls in a rooming house next to the police station; indicted by the county grand jury for contributing to the delinquency of a minor; also indicted for criminal contempt of court for attempting to influence grand jurors; won election for mayor while these cases were pending; tried and acquitted on the molestation charge, but found guilty of contempt for interference with the grand jury; mayor of Los Angeles, Calif., 1915-16; resigned 1916; defeated, 1917. Died April 17, 1929 (age 56 years, 18 days). Interment at Glen Haven Memorial Park, Sylmar, Calif.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Bernard Ades (1903-1986) — of Baltimore, Md. Born in Maryland, July 3, 1903. Communist. Lawyer; accountant; defense attorney for Euel Lee (alias "Orphan Jones") in his 1932-33 trial for the murder of the Davis family; during the trial, Ades was attacked and injured by a mob in Snow Hill, Maryland; later, he was disbarred for casting aspersions on the judicial system; candidate for Governor of Maryland, 1934; fought in the Abraham Lincoln Brigade in the Spanish Civil War, 1937. Jewish. Died in New York, May 27, 1986 (age 82 years, 328 days). Interment at Cemetery of Baltimore Hebrew Congregation, Baltimore, Md.
  Relatives: Son of Harry Ades and Fannie Ades.
  Books about Bernard Ades: Joseph E. Moore, Murder on Maryland's Eastern Shore: Race, Politics and the Case of Orphan Jones
Corliss Lamont Corliss Lamont (1902-1995) — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born in Englewood, Bergen County, N.J., March 28, 1902. Socialist. Author; lecturer; arrested on June 27, 1934, while picketing in support of a labor union at a furniture plant in Jersey City, N.J.; president, National Council of American-Soviet Friendship; this organization and its leaders were investigated for subversion by the U.S. House Committee on Un-American Activities; charged in 1946 with contempt of Congress for his refusal to provide records demanded by the committee; in 1951, the U.S. State Department denied a passport to him, based on his membership in what were deemed "Communist-front organizations"; on August 17, 1954, the U.S. Senate cited him with contempt of Congress for refusing to testify before Sen. Joseph R. McCarthy's subcommittee; subsequently indicted; pleaded not guilty; the indictment was dismissed in 1955; the Court of Appeals upheld the dismissal in 1956; candidate for U.S. Senator from New York, 1952 (American Labor), 1958 (Independent Socialist). Member, American Civil Liberties Union; NAACP; Phi Beta Kappa; American Academy of Political and Social Science. Died, of heart failure, in Ossining, Westchester County, N.Y., April 26, 1995 (age 93 years, 29 days). Interment at Brookside Cemetery, Englewood, N.J.
  Relatives: Son of Thomas William Lamont (1870-1948) and Florence Haskell (Corliss) Lamont (died 1952); married, June 8, 1928, to Margaret Hayes Irish (c.1905-1977); married 1962 to Helen Lamb (died 1975); married 1986 to Beth Keehner; granduncle of Ned Lamont (1966?-).
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: The Militant, November 3, 1958
  Richard Morford (c.1903-1986) — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born in Onaway, Presque Isle County, Mich., about 1903. Presbyterian minister; vice-chair of New York American Labor Party, 1945-49; director, National Council of American-Soviet Friendship, 1946-80; this organization and its leaders were investigated for subversion by the U.S. House Committee on Un-American Activities; charged in 1946 with contempt of Congress for his refusal to provide records demanded by the committee; tried in federal court in Washington; convicted in March 1948; his conviction was overturned by the Supreme Court; convicted again on re-trial; sentenced to three months in prison and fined $250. Presbyterian. Died, from pneumonia, in Madison, Dane County, Wis., September 7, 1986 (age about 83 years). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Married to Aileen Hutson (died 1984).
  James Lustig (b. 1902) — of Bronx, Bronx County, N.Y.; Newark, Essex County, N.J. Born in Budapest, Hungary, 1902. Communist. Naturalized U.S. citizen; agent, United Electrical Workers; candidate for New York state senate 22nd District, 1932; member, Joint Anti-Fascist Refugee Committee; the group was investigated for subversion by the U.S. House Committee on Un-American Activities; indicted in 1947, along with other members, for contempt of Congress over their refusal to provide records demanded by the House committee; convicted in 1947; sentenced to three months in jail, and fined $500. Hungarian ancestry. Burial location unknown.
  George William Crockett, Jr. (1909-1997) — also known as George W. Crockett, Jr. — of Detroit, Wayne County, Mich. Born in Jacksonville, Duval County, Fla., August 10, 1909. Democrat. Recorder's court judge in Michigan, 1966-78; U.S. Representative from Michigan 13th District, 1980-91; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Michigan, 1984, 1988; arrested during an anti-apartheid protest outside the South African Embassy in Washington, 1984. Baptist. African ancestry. Member, Kappa Alpha Psi; National Lawyers Guild. Served four months in federal prison for contempt of court in 1950, following his defense of a Communist leader on trial in New York for advocating the overthrow of the government. Among the founders of the nation's first interracial law firm. Ill with bone cancer in 1997, he suffered a stroke and died five days later, in Washington Home and Hospice, Washington, D.C., September 7, 1997 (age 88 years, 28 days). Cremated.
  Relatives: Father of George W. Crockett III (1926?-).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  Howard Melvin Fast (1914-2003) — also known as Howard Fast; "E. V. Cunningham"; "Walter Ericson" — of Teaneck, Bergen County, N.J. Born in New York City (unknown county), N.Y., November 11, 1914. Communist. Novelist; in 1950, suspected of sedition, he was called before the House Un-American Activities Committee, where he refused to name fellow members of the Communist Party; convicted of contempt of Congress and sentenced to three months in prison; awarded the Stalin Peace Prize in 1953; American Labor candidate for U.S. Representative from New York 23rd District, 1952. Jewish. Died in Old Greenwich, Greenwich, Fairfield County, Conn., March 12, 2003 (age 88 years, 121 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Barney Fast and Ida (Miller) Fast; married, June 6, 1937, to Bette Cohen; married 1999 to Mercedes O'Connor.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
Vincent Hallinan Vincent Hallinan (1896-1992) — of San Francisco, Calif. Born in San Francisco, Calif., December 16, 1896. Progressive. Served in the U.S. Navy during World War I; lawyer; innovator in courtroom tactics; defense attorney for longshoreman union leader Harry Bridges, who had been accused of being a Communist; jailed six months for contempt of court in 1952; candidate for President of the United States, 1952; indicted in 1953 on income tax evasion charges; convicted and sentenced to 18 months in prison. Irish ancestry. Died in San Francisco, Calif., October 2, 1992 (age 95 years, 291 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Married 1932 to Vivian Moore (1910-1999).
  See also Wikipedia article
  Image source: The Militant, December 8, 1958
  Arthur Asher Miller (1915-2005) — also known as Arthur Miller — of Roxbury, Litchfield County, Conn. Born in Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., October 17, 1915. Democrat. Playwright; author of such plays as "Death of a Salesman" and "The Crucible"; received the Pulitzer Prize for Drama in 1949; because he was suspected of ties to Communist organizations, his passport was denied in 1954; compelled to testify before the House Un-American Activities Committee in 1956; he refused to name his political colleagues, and was found guilty of contempt of Congress in 1957; the conviction was overturned on appeal; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Connecticut, 1968. Agnostic. Jewish ancestry. Died in Roxbury, Litchfield County, Conn., February 10, 2005 (age 89 years, 116 days). Interment at Great Oak Cemetery, Roxbury, Conn.
  Relatives: Son of Isidore Miller and Augusta (Barnett) Miller; brother of Joan Copeland (actress); married, August 5, 1940, to Mary Grace Slattery (divorced 1956); married, January 29, 1956, to Marilyn Monroe (1926-1962; actress; divorced 1961); married, February 17, 1962, to Inge Morath (1923-2002).
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Jack Paul Faustin Gremillion (1914-2001) — also known as Jack P. F. Gremillion — of Baton Rouge, East Baton Rouge Parish, La. Born in Donaldsonville, Ascension Parish, La., June 15, 1914. Democrat. Lawyer; served in the U.S. Army during World War II; Louisiana state attorney general, 1956-72; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Louisiana, 1960. Catholic. Member, American Legion; Disabled American Veterans; Knights of Columbus; Order of Alhambra; Elks; Lions; American Bar Association. While opposing New Orleans school desegregation in federal court in 1960, walked out of the courtroom, calling the court a "den of iniquity"; convicted of contempt of court; sentence was suspended. Indicted in 1969 for fraud and conspiracy over his dealings with the bankrupt Louisiana Loan and Thrift Corp.; tried in 1971 and acquitted. Convicted later that year on federal perjury charges in a related case; sentenced to three years in prison; served 15 months. Pardoned in 1976 by Gov. Edwin Edwards. Died in Our Lady of the Lake Regional Medical Center, Baton Rouge, East Baton Rouge Parish, La., March 2, 2001 (age 86 years, 260 days). Interment at Greenoaks Memorial Park, Baton Rouge, La.
  James Patton Sutton (1915-2005) — also known as Pat Sutton — of Lawrenceburg, Lawrence County, Tenn. Born near Wartrace, Bedford County, Tenn., October 31, 1915. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Navy during World War II; U.S. Representative from Tennessee, 1949-55 (7th District 1949-53, 6th District 1953-55); candidate in primary for U.S. Senator from Tennessee, 1954; Lawrence County Sheriff; pleaded no contest in 1964 to charges related to his involvement in a counterfeiting ring; imprisoned for 10 months for violating a federal probation order. Died, in the Lakeland Specialty Hospital, Berrien Center, Berrien County, Mich., February 3, 2005 (age 89 years, 95 days). Cremated; ashes interred at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Va.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Adam Clayton Powell, Jr. (1908-1972) — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born in New Haven, New Haven County, Conn., November 29, 1908. Democrat. Baptist minister; U.S. Representative from New York, 1945-71 (22nd District 1945-53, 16th District 1953-63, 18th District 1963-71); delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1952, 1960, 1964; cited for contempt of court in 1966 for refusing to pay damages in a lawsuit against him; on February 28, 1967, he was expelled from the House of Representatives on charges of unbecoming conduct and misusing public funds; the Supreme Court overturned the expulsion in 1969. Baptist. African ancestry. Member, Alpha Phi Alpha; Elks. Died, of prostate cancer, in Jackson Memorial Hospital, Miami, Dade County (now Miami-Dade County), Fla., April 4, 1972 (age 63 years, 127 days). Cremated; ashes scattered in a private or family graveyard, Bahamas.
  Relatives: Son of Adam Clayton Powell, Sr. (1865-1953; minister) and Mattie (Fletcher) Powell; married, March 8, 1933, to Isabel Washington (divorced 1945); married, August 1, 1945, to Hazel Scott (divorced 1960); married, December 15, 1960, to Yvette Marjorie Diago (Flores) Powell; father of Adam Clayton Powell IV (1962-).
  Adam Clayton Powell Jr. Boulevard (formerly part of Seventh Avenue), in Manhattan, New York, is named for him.  — The Adam Clayton Powell State Office Building (opened 1974 as the Harlem State Office Building; renamed 1983), in Manhattan, New York, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Books by Powell,Adam Clayton,Jr.: Adam by Adam: The Autobiography of Adam Clayton Powell, Jr.
  Books about Powell,Adam Clayton,Jr.: Tisha Hamilton, Adam Clayton Powell, Jr.: The Political Biography of an American Dilemma — Wil Haygood, King of the Cats: The Life and Times of Adam Clayton Powell, Jr.
  Mortimer Thomas Furay (1910-1972) — also known as Mort Furay — of Detroit, Wayne County, Mich. Born in Detroit, Wayne County, Mich., July 23, 1910. Democrat. President, Local 705, Hotel and Restaurant Employees Union; vice-president, AFL-CIO Union Label Trade Department; candidate in primary for Michigan state house of representatives from Wayne County 1st District, 1944; candidate in primary for mayor of Detroit, Mich., 1949; in 1967, at an intersection in Highland Park, Mich., he witnessed a woman being beaten by her husband, and summoned police; when the police officers decided not to arrest the man, he protested, and was arrested for interfering with police; he pleaded not guilty, and a trial date was set, but apparently the case was dropped. Died, probably from a heart attack, in Detroit, Wayne County, Mich., March 12, 1972 (age 61 years, 233 days); body was donated to Wayne State University Medical School.
  Relatives: Son of Mortimer John Furay (1884-1944) and Florence Bell (Kratz) Furay (1885-1959); married 1932 to Corinne Kelly (1911-1975).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Bobby Seale (b. 1936) — also known as Robert George Seale — of Oakland, Alameda County, Calif. Born in Dallas, Dallas County, Tex., October 22, 1936. Joined U.S. Air Force in 1955; charged with insubordination and being AWOL, and dishonorably discharged; sheet metal worker; co-founder, with Huey Newton, of the Black Panther Party, 1966; one of eight defendants charged in 1969 with crossing state lines to incite a riot at the 1968 Democratic National Convention in Chicago; the judge ordered him bound and gagged during the trial, and sentenced him to four years in prison for contempt of court; Peace and Freedom candidate for California state assembly 17th District, 1968; in 1970, he was charged in New Haven, Conn., with ordering the murder of Alex Rackley, a Black Panther who had confessed to being a police informant; the jury was unable to reach a verdict, and the charges were eventually dropped; candidate for mayor of Oakland, Calif., 1973. African ancestry. Still living as of 2014.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Richard Milhous Nixon (1913-1994) — also known as Richard M. Nixon; "Tricky Dick"; "Searchlight" — of Whittier, Los Angeles County, Calif. Born in Yorba Linda, Orange County, Calif., January 9, 1913. Republican. Lawyer; served in the U.S. Navy during World War II; U.S. Representative from California 12th District, 1947-50; U.S. Senator from California, 1950-53; appointed 1950; resigned 1953; delegate to Republican National Convention from California, 1952 (member, Resolutions Committee), 1956; Vice President of the United States, 1953-61; President of the United States, 1969-74; defeated, 1960; candidate for Governor of California, 1962; candidate for Republican nomination for President, 1964. Quaker. Member, American Legion. Discredited by the Watergate scandal, as many of his subordinates were charged with crimes; in July 1974, the U.S. House Judiciary Committee voted three articles of impeachment against him, over obstruction of justice, abuse of power, and contempt of Congress; soon after, a tape recording emerged which directly implicated him in the Watergate break-in; with impeachment certain, he resigned; pardoned in 1974 by President Gerald R. Ford. Died, from a stroke, at New York Hospital/Cornell Medical Center, Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., April 22, 1994 (age 81 years, 103 days). Interment at Richard Nixon Library and Birthplace, Yorba Linda, Calif.
  Relatives: Son of Francis Anthony 'Frank' Nixon (1878-1956) and Hannah (Milhous) Nixon (1885-1967); married, June 21, 1940, to Thelma Catherine Ryan; father of Julie Nixon (daughter-in-law of John Sheldon Doud Eisenhower; granddaughter-in-law of Dwight David Eisenhower); second cousin of John Duffy Alderson (1896-1975).
  Political families: Lee-Randolph family of Maryland and Virginia; Carroll-Hanson family of Maryland; Eisenhower-Nixon family (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Cross-reference: Maurice H. Stans — John H. Holdridge — Clark MacGregor — Harry L. Sears — Harry S. Dent — Christian A. Herter, Jr. — John N. Mitchell — G. Bradford Cook — Raymond Moley — Patrick J. Buchanan — Nils A. Boe — Murray M. Chotiner — Richard Blumenthal — G. Gordon Liddy — Robert D. Sack — Edward G. Latch — William O. Mills
  Campaign slogan (1968): "Nixon's the One!"
  Epitaph: "The greatest honor history can bestow is the title of peacemaker."
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Books by Richard M. Nixon: RN : The Memoirs of Richard Nixon (1978) — Beyond Peace (1994) — 1999: Victory Without War (1988) — Leaders (1982) — Memoirs — Six Crises (1962) — The Challenges We Face (1960) — In the Arena: A Memoir of Victory, Defeat and Renewal (1990) — No More Vietnams (1985) — The Poetry of Richard Milhous Nixon (1974) — Real Peace (1984) — The Real War (1980) — Seize The Moment: America's Challenge in a One-Superpower World (1992)
  Books about Richard M. Nixon: Melvin Small, The Presidency of Richard Nixon — Joan Hoff, Nixon Reconsidered — Jonathan Aitken, Nixon : A Life — Garry Wills, Nixon Agonistes : The Crisis of the Self-Made Man — Thomas Monsell, Nixon on Stage and Screen : The Thirty-Seventh President As Depicted in Films, Television, Plays and Opera — Stephen E. Ambrose, Nixon : Education of a Politician, 1913-1962 — Richard Reeves, President Nixon: Alone in the White House — Roger Morris, Richard Milhous Nixon: The Rise of an American Politician — Robert Mason, Richard Nixon and the Quest for a New Majority — Jules Witcover, Very Strange Bedfellows : The Short and Unhappy Marriage of Richard Nixon & Spiro Agnew
  Critical books about Richard M. Nixon: Nathan Miller, Star-Spangled Men : America's Ten Worst Presidents — Lance Morrow, The Best Year of Their Lives: Kennedy, Johnson, and Nixon in 1948: Learning the Secrets of Power — Don Fulsom, Nixon's Darkest Secrets: The Inside Story of America's Most Troubled President
  John Linebaugh Knuppel (1923-1986) — also known as John L. Knuppel — of Petersburg, Menard County, Ill. Born in Easton, Mason County, Ill., August 15, 1923. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army during World War II; delegate to Illinois state constitutional convention, 1969-70; member of Illinois state senate, 1971-81 (42nd District 1971-73, 48th District 1973-81); candidate for U.S. Representative from Illinois 18th District, 1980. Lutheran. German ancestry. Member, Veterans of Foreign Wars; American Legion. Jailed for contempt of court for refusing to wear a tie. Died, of heart disease, in a hospital at Springfield, Sangamon County, Ill., November 15, 1986 (age 63 years, 92 days). Interment somewhere in Havana, Ill.
  S. Samuel DiFalco (1906-1978) — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born in Italy, July 26, 1906. Democrat. Lawyer; candidate in primary for New York state assembly, 1935; Justice of New York Supreme Court 1st District, 1949-56; New York County Surrogate, 1957-76. Italian ancestry. Member, Tammany Hall. Indicted in May 1976, along with Justice Irving Saypol, on official misconduct charges, in connection with an alleged scheme to obtain appraisal and auction commissions for Saypol's son; the charges were later dismissed. Indicted in February 1978 for criminal contempt, in connection with his statements to a grand jury, but died before trial. Died, from a heart attack, while dining with friends at the Columbus Club, Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., June 28, 1978 (age 71 years, 337 days). Interment at Gate of Heaven Cemetery, Hawthorne, N.Y.
  J. William Petro (c.1940-2002) — of Ohio. Born about 1940. U.S. Attorney for the Northern District of Ohio, 1982-84. Fired as U.S. attorney amid charges that he leaked confidential information; found guilty of criminal contempt of court in 1985. Died, of a cerebral hemorrhage, May 23, 2002 (age about 62 years). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Brother of James M. Petro (1948-).
  Frazier Glenn Miller, Jr. (b. 1940) — also known as Glenn Miller; "Frazier Glenn Cross"; "Rounder" — of North Carolina; Aurora, Lawrence County, Mo. Born in Springfield, Greene County, Mo., 1940. Served in the U.S. Army during the Vietnam war; candidate in Democratic primary for Governor of North Carolina, 1984; candidate in Republican primary for North Carolina state senate, 1986; convicted on federal contempt of court charges in 1986; sentenced to one year in prison, but disappeared while out on bond; later captured in Missouri, along with four other Klansmen and a cache of weapons; indicted in 1987 for plotting robberies and an assassination; in a deal with prosecutors, he pleaded guilty to a weapons charge and to making threats through the mail; served three years in prison; candidate for U.S. Representative from Missouri 7th District, 2006; candidate for U.S. Senator from Missouri, 2010; on April 13, 2014, in an apparent hate crime he shot and killed three people at a Jewish community center and retirement complex in Overland Park, Kansas. Member, Ku Klux Klan. Still living as of 2014.
  Matthew Eduardo Gonzalez (b. 1965) — also known as Matt Gonzalez — of San Francisco, Calif. Born in McAllen, Hidalgo County, Tex., June 4, 1965. Lawyer; as trial attorney for San Francisco Office of Public Defender, was twice jailed for contempt of court; the contempt findings were overturned on appeal; candidate for mayor of San Francisco, Calif., 2003; Independent candidate for Vice President of the United States, 2008. Mexican ancestry. Still living as of 2014.
  Relatives: Son of Mateo Gonzalez and Oralia Gonzalez.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile
  Carl Christopher Perkins (b. 1954) — also known as Carl C. Perkins; Chris Perkins — of Leburn, Knott County, Ky. Born in Washington, D.C., August 6, 1954. Democrat. Member of Kentucky state house of representatives, 1981-84; U.S. Representative from Kentucky 7th District, 1985-93; minister. Baptist; later Presbyterian. Pleaded guilty in 1994 to bank fraud in connection with the House banking scandal; he wrote overdrafts totaling about $300,000 (covered by the House bank) and made false statements to obtain loans from commercial banks; also pleaded guilty to charges of filing false statements with the Federal Election Commission and false financial disclosure reports. Sentenced to 21 months in prison. In March 2000, pleaded guilty to criminal contempt of court for lying to a federal probation officer about his income. Still living as of 2014.
  Relatives: Son of Carl Dewey Perkins (1912-1984).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — votes in Congress from the Washington Post — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Abraham Jacob Hirschfeld (1919-2005) — also known as Abraham J. Hirschfeld; Abe Hirschfeld; "Honest Abe" — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y.; Miami Beach, Dade County (now Miami-Dade County), Fla. Born in Tarnow, Poland, December 12, 1919. Real estate developer; hotel owner; candidate for U.S. Senator from New York, 1974 (Democratic primary), 1976 (Democratic primary), 2004 (Builders); candidate for U.S. Representative from New York 14th District, 1992 (Independent Fusion), 1994 (Democratic primary); Republican candidate for borough president of Manhattan, New York, 1997; Independence candidate for New York state comptroller, 1998. In 1998, offered Paula Jones $1 million to drop her sexual harassment lawsuit against President Bill Clinton; later sued by Jones when he tried to back out of the offer. Indicted in 2000 of trying to hire a hit man to kill his former business partner Stanley Stahl; also charged with tax evasion; briefly jailed for violating a court order against discussing the trial with the media; ultimately convicted, and served two years in prison. Died, from complications of cancer, in St. Barnabas Hospital, Bronx, Bronx County, N.Y., August 9, 2005 (age 85 years, 240 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Married 1943 to Zipora Teicher.
  See also Wikipedia article
  Addison Graves Wilson (b. 1947) — also known as Joe Wilson — of West Columbia, Lexington County, S.C.; Springdale, Lexington County, S.C. Born in Charleston, Charleston County, S.C., July 31, 1947. Republican. Staff for U.S. Sen. Strom Thurmond, and for U.S. Rep. Floyd Spence; lawyer; delegate to Republican National Convention from South Carolina, 1972, 2008; member of South Carolina state senate, 1984-2001; U.S. Representative from South Carolina 2nd District, 2001-; rebuked by the House of Representatives in September, 2009, for a breach of decorum; he had shouted "You Lie!" during an address by President Barack Obama. Presbyterian. Still living as of 2018.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — votes in Congress from the Washington Post — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Phill Kline (b. 1959) — of Overland Park, Johnson County, Kan. Born in Kansas City, Wyandotte County, Kan., December 31, 1959. Republican. Lawyer; radio show host; candidate for U.S. Representative from Kansas, 1986 (2nd District), 2000 (3rd District); member of Kansas state house of representatives 18th District, 1993-2000; Kansas state attorney general, 2003-07; defeated, 2006; Johnson County District Attorney, 2007-08. Nazarene. In October, 2011, the Kansas Supreme Court indefinitely suspended his license to practice law, citing misconduct while investigating abortion clinics, including perjury and deliberately deceiving judges, state officials, a grand jury, and the investigating panel of the Board for Discipline of Attorneys. Still living as of 2014.
  See also Wikipedia article — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Joseph Michael Joe Arpaio (b. 1932) — also known as Joe Arpaio; "America's Toughest Sheriff" — of Fountain Hills, Maricopa County, Ariz. Born in Springfield, Hampden County, Mass., June 14, 1932. Republican. Police officer; Maricopa County Sheriff, 1993-2016; Presidential Elector for Arizona, 2000; convicted in July 2017 on federal contempt charges, over his violation of court orders regarding racial profiling; pardoned in August 2017 by President Donald Trump. Italian ancestry. Still living as of 2018.
  See also Wikipedia article — Encyclopedia of American Loons
"Enjoy the hospitable entertainment of a political graveyard."
Henry L. Clinton, Apollo Hall, New York City, February 3, 1872
The Political Graveyard

The Political Graveyard is a web site about U.S. political history and cemeteries. Founded in 1996, it is the Internet's most comprehensive free source for American political biography, listing 312,576 politicians, living and dead.
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