PoliticalGraveyard.com
The Political Graveyard: A Database of American History
Politicians Who Were First
or who took part in famous firsts

in chronological order

  Robert Treat (1625-1710) — of Milford, New Haven County, Conn.; Newark, Essex County, N.J. Born in Pitminster, Somerset, England, 1625. Colonial Governor of Connecticut, 1683-98. Founder of Milford, Connecticut and Newark, New Jersey. Died in Milford, New Haven County, Conn., July 12, 1710 (age about 85 years). Interment at Milford Cemetery, Milford, Conn.
  Relatives: Great-grandfather of Robert Treat Paine; third great-grandfather of John Condit and Aurelius Buckingham; third great-granduncle of Gershom Birdsey and Benjamin Hard; fourth great-grandfather of Silas Condit, Philo Beecher Buckingham, Alanson B. Treat, Charles M. Hotchkiss and David Leroy Treat; fourth great-granduncle of Henry Leavitt Ellsworth, William Wolcott Ellsworth, Eli Coe Birdsey (1799-1843), Lorenzo Burrows, Nathan Belcher, Russell Sage, John Ransom Buck and Benjamin Baker Merrill; fifth great-grandfather of Albert Pierson Condit; fifth great-granduncle of Henry Brewster Stanton, Bushrod Ebenezer Hoppin, Eli Coe Birdsey (1843-1929), Edgar Jared Doolittle, Delos Fall, Caleb Seymour Pitkin, Clayton Harvey Deming, Harry Kear Wolcott, Franklin Warren Kellogg and Henry Merrill Wolcott; sixth great-grandfather of Simeon Harrison Rollinson and Joseph Clark Baldwin III; sixth great-granduncle of Roscoe D. Dix (1839-1912), John Alden Dix and Oliver Cromwell Jennings; seventh great-grandfather of Perry Amherst Carpenter.
  Political family: Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
Philip Schuyler Philip John Schuyler (1733-1804) — also known as Philip Schuyler — of New York. Born in Albany, Albany County, N.Y., November 20, 1733. Member of New York colonial assembly, 1768; Delegate to Continental Congress from New York, 1775, 1777, 1779-80; general in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; member of New York state senate Western District, 1780-84, 1785-89, 1791-97; member of New York council of appointment, 1786, 1788, 1790, 1794; U.S. Senator from New York, 1789-91, 1797-98. Built the first flax mill in America. Died in Albany, Albany County, N.Y., November 18, 1804 (age 70 years, 364 days). Original interment at a private or family graveyard, Albany County, N.Y.; reinterment at Albany Rural Cemetery, Menands, N.Y.; statue (now gone) at Albany City Hall Grounds, Albany, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Johannes Schuyler (1697-1746) and Cornelia (Van Cortlandt) Schuyler (1698-1762); brother of Stephen John Schuyler; married, September 17, 1755, to Catherine Van Rensselaer (1734-1803); father of Elizabeth Schuyler (1757-1854; who married Alexander Hamilton), Margarita Schuyler (who married Stephen Van Rensselaer) and Philip Jeremiah Schuyler; uncle of Pieter Schuyler (1746-1792); grandson of Stephanus Van Cortlandt and Johannes Schuyler (1668-1747); grandfather of Philip Schuyler, James Alexander Hamilton (1788-1878) and William Stephen Hamilton; grandnephew of Pieter Schuyler (1657-1724) and Jacobus Van Cortlandt; granduncle of Henry Walter Livingston; great-granduncle of Edward Livingston (1796-1840); second great-grandfather of Robert Ray Hamilton; third great-grandfather of John Eliot Thayer, Jr.; third great-granduncle of Charles Ludlow Livingston (1870-?) and Bronson Murray Cutting; fourth great-granduncle of Brockholst Livingston; first cousin of Stephanus Bayard; first cousin once removed of John Livingston, Robert Livingston (1688-1775), Gilbert Livingston and Nicholas Bayard; first cousin twice removed of David Davidse Schuyler, Myndert Davidtse Schuyler and Philip Schuyler Van Rensselaer; first cousin thrice removed of Henry Bell Van Rensselaer and James Adams Ekin; first cousin four times removed of Kiliaen Van Rensselaer and John Sluyter Wirt; second cousin of Robert Livingston (1708-1790), Peter Van Brugh Livingston, Robert Gilbert Livingston, Robert R. Livingston (1718-1775), William Livingston, James Jay, Philip P. Schuyler, John Jay and Frederick Jay; second cousin once removed of Volkert Petrus Douw, Peter Robert Livingston (1737-1794), Jeremiah Van Rensselaer, Robert Van Rensselaer, Walter Livingston, Philip Peter Livingston, Hendrick Kiliaen Van Rensselaer, Robert R. Livingston (1746-1813), James Livingston, Henry Brockholst Livingston, Peter Samuel Schuyler, Pierre Van Cortlandt, Jr., Killian Killian Van Rensselaer, Edward Livingston (1764-1836), Peter Augustus Jay (1776-1843) and William Jay; second cousin twice removed of Leonard Gansevoort, Leonard Gansevoort, Jr., Peter Robert Livingston (1766-1847), Jacob Rutsen Van Rensselaer, Maturin Livingston, Rensselaer Westerlo, Edward Philip Livingston, Charles Ludlow Livingston (1800-1873), Hamilton Fish, George Washington Schuyler, John Jay II and Philip N. Schuyler; second cousin thrice removed of Peter Gansevoort, Peter Robert Livingston (1789-1859), Gilbert Livingston Thompson, Gerrit Smith, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, John Jacob Astor III, Eugene Schuyler, Nicholas Fish and Hamilton Fish, Jr. (1849-1936); second cousin four times removed of William Waldorf Astor, John Kean, Cortlandt Schuyler Van Rensselaer, Hamilton Fish Kean, Jonathan Mayhew Wainwright, Karl Cortlandt Schuyler, Peter Augustus Jay (1877-1933) and Hamilton Fish, Jr. (1888-1991); second cousin five times removed of Guy Vernor Henry, Herbert Livingston Satterlee, William Astor Chanler, Lewis Stuyvesant Chanler, Montgomery Schuyler, Jr., Robert Reginald Livingston, Robert Winthrop Kean and Hamilton Fish, Jr. (1926-1996).
  Political families: Livingston-Schuyler family of New York; VanRensselaer family of Albany, New York (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Schuyler counties in Ill., Mo. and N.Y. are named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Image source: New York Public Library
  Felix Robertson (1781-1865) — of Nashville, Davidson County, Tenn. Born in Nashville, Davidson County, Tenn., January 11, 1781, the first white male child to be born in what is now the city of Nashville. Mayor of Nashville, Tenn., 1818-19, 1826-28. Died July 10, 1865 (age 84 years, 180 days). Interment at Nashville City Cemetery, Nashville, Tenn.
  Relatives: Son of James Robertson (1742-1814; founder of Nashville).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
George Washington George Washington (1732-1799) — also known as "Father of His Country"; "The American Fabius" — of Virginia. Born in Westmoreland County, Va., February 22, 1732. Delegate to Continental Congress from Virginia, 1774-75; general in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; member, U.S. Constitutional Convention, 1787; President of the United States, 1789-97. Episcopalian. English ancestry. Member, Freemasons; Society of the Cincinnati; American Academy of Arts and Sciences. As the leader of the Revolution, he could have been King; instead, he served as the first President and voluntarily stepped down after two terms. Elected to the Hall of Fame for Great Americans in 1900. Died, probably from acute bacterial epiglottitis, at Mt. Vernon, Fairfax County, Va., December 14, 1799 (age 67 years, 295 days). Entombed at Mt. Vernon, Mt. Vernon, Va.; memorial monument at National Mall, Washington, D.C.; statue erected 1860 at Washington Circle, Washington, D.C.; statue erected 1869 at Boston Public Garden, Boston, Mass.
  Relatives: Son of Augustine Washington (1694-1743) and Mary (Ball) Washington (c.1709-1789); married, January 6, 1759, to Martha (Dandridge) Custis (1731-1802; aunt of Burwell Bassett); uncle of Bushrod Washington; granduncle by marriage of Charles Magill Conrad; granduncle of John Thornton Augustine Washington and George Corbin Washington; first cousin six times removed of Archer Woodford; second cousin once removed of Meriwether Lewis (1774-1809); second cousin twice removed of Sulifand Sutherland Ross; second cousin five times removed of Thomas Henry Ball, Jr., William de Bruyn Kops, Horace Lee Washington, Edwin McPherson Holden, Claude C. Ball, Arthur Wesley Holden and Franklin Delano Roosevelt; third cousin thrice removed of Samuel Bullitt Churchill and Thomas Leonidas Crittenden.
  Political families: Pendleton-Lee family; Demarest-Meriwether family of New Jersey; Marshall-Harrison-Randolph-Cabell family of Virginia; Meriwether-Kellogg-Tyler family of Virginia and Connecticut; Washington family; Clay family of Kentucky (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Cross-reference: Henry Lee — Joshua Fry — Alexander Dimitry — Tobias Lear — David Mathews — Rufus Putnam
  Washington counties in Ala., Ark., Colo., Fla., Ga., Idaho, Ill., Ind., Iowa, Kan., Ky., La., Maine, Md., Minn., Miss., Mo., Neb., N.Y., N.C., Ohio, Okla., Ore., Pa., R.I., Tenn., Tex., Utah, Vt., Va. and Wis. are named for him.
  The city of Washington, D.C., is named for him.  — The state of Washington is named for him.  — Mount Washington (highest peak in the Northeast), in the White Mountains, Coos County, New Hampshire, is named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: George Washington Lent MarrGeorge Washington HeardGeorge Washington BarnettGeorge Washington DavisGeorge W. OwenGeorge W. TolandGeorge W. LayGeorge W. PattersonGeorge W. B. TownsGeorge Washington AdamsGeorge Washington HockleyGeorge W. SmythG. W. IngersollGeorge W. HopkinsGeorge Washington MontgomeryGeorge W. KittredgeGeorge W. JonesGeorge W. HarrisonGeorge Washington EwingGeorge Washington SeabrookGeorge W. MorrisonGeorge Washington WoodwardGeorge Washington WrightGeorge Washington TriplettGeorge Washington GlasscockGeorge W. SchuylerGeorge Washington HolmanGeorge W. GreeneGeorge W. WolcottGeorge W. PaschalGeorge Washington DunlapGeorge Washington WarrenGeorge Washington HillGeorge Washington LoganGeorge W. GetchellGeorge Washington WrightGeorge W. JulianGeorge Washington DyalGeorge W. LaddGeorge W. PeckGeorge Washington NesmithGeorge W. MorganGeorge Washington BrooksGeorge Washington CowlesGeorge W. GeddesGeorge Washington WhitmoreGeorge Washington BridgesGeorge W. CateGeorge W. HoukGeorge W. WebberGeorge W. BemisGeorge Washington FairbrotherGeorge Washington GlickGeorge W. JonesGeorge W. BakerGeorge W. ShellGeorge W. AndersonGeorge W. CrouseGeorge W. HulickGeorge W. AllenGeorge W. F. HarperGeorge Washington ClarkGeorge Washington McCraryGeorge W. GordonGeorge W. KingsburyGeorge W. CovingtonGeorge Washington FleegerGeorge W. SteeleGeorge W. WilsonGeorge Washington MartinGeorge W. E. DorseyGeorge W. PlunkittGeorge W. FurbushGeorge W. SuttonGeorge W. CurtinGeorge W. RayGeorge W. RooseveltGeorge W. SmithGeorge W. KippGeorge W. CampbellGeorge W. TaylorGeorge W. StoneGeorge W. BartchGeorge W. ShonkGeorge W. CookGeorge W. MurrayGeorge W. FarisGeorge W. FithianGeorge W. PrinceGeorge W. BucknerGeorge W. CromerGeorge W. DonagheyGeorge W. AldridgeGeorge Washington WagonerGeorge Washington GoethalsGeorge W. ArmstrongGeorge W. LovejoyGeorge W. OakesGeorge W. HaysGeorge W. EdmondsGeorge W. LindsayGeorge Washington JonesT. G. W. TarverGeorge W. DardenGeorge W. MeadGeorge W. GibbonsGeorge W. ListGeorge W. CalkinGeorge W. RauchGeorge W. MichellGeorge Washington JacksonGeorge W. BlanchardGeorge Washington HerzGeorge W. BristowGeorge Washington HardyGeorge W. BallardGeorge W. McKownGeorge Thomas WashingtonGeorge W. CollinsGeorge A. Washington
  Coins and currency: His portrait appears on the U.S. quarter (25 cent coin), and on the $1 bill. His portrait also appeared on various other denominations of U.S. currency, and on the Confederate States $50 note during the Civil War.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Books about George Washington: Richard Brookhiser, Founding Father: Rediscovering George Washington — James Thomas Flexner, Washington: The Indispensable Man — Willard Sterne Randall, George Washington : A Life — Richard Norton Smith, Patriarch : George Washington and the New American Nation — Henry Wiencek, An Imperfect God : George Washington, His Slaves, and the Creation of America — James MacGregor Burns, George Washington — Joseph J. Ellis, His Excellency, George Washington — Gore Vidal, Inventing A Nation: Washington, Adams, Jefferson — David Barton, The Bulletproof George Washington: An Account of God's Providential Care — Wendie C. Old, George Washington (for young readers)
  Image source: Portrait & Biographical Album of Washtenaw County (1891)
  David Rittenhouse (1732-1796) — of Pennsylvania. Born in Germantown (now part of Philadelphia), Philadelphia County, Pa., April 8, 1732. Pennsylvania state treasurer, 1777-89. Member, American Philosophical Society. Astronomer, mathematician, financier, clockmaker, surveyor, first director of the U.S. Mint. Died in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., June 26, 1796 (age 64 years, 79 days). Original interment in unknown location; reinterment at Laurel Hill Cemetery, Philadelphia, Pa.
  Relatives: Son of Matthias Rittenhouse (1702-1792) and Elizabeth (Williams) Rittenhouse (1705-1792); married to Eleanor Coulston and Hannah Jacobs (1735-1799); father of Elizabeth Rittenhouse (1767-1836; who married Jonathan Dickinson Sergeant (1746-1793)); second great-granduncle of Barton Myers; third great-granduncle of Robert Baldwin Myers.
  Political families: Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York; Wise-Sergeant family; Sergeant-Whitehill-Kunkel-Spencer family of Pennsylvania; Myers family of Norfolk, Virginia (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Rittenhouse Square (originally Southwest Square; renamed 1825) in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, is named for him.  — Rittenhouse, a crater on the Moon, about 26 km (16 miles) in diameter, is named for him.
  See also NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Franklin Gorin (1798-1877) — of Kentucky. Born in Barren County, Ky., May 3, 1798. Lawyer; candidate for U.S. Representative from Kentucky 3rd District, 1874. First white child born in Barren County; one-time owner of Mammoth Cave. Died December 10, 1877 (age 79 years, 221 days). Interment at Glasgow Cemetery, Glasgow, Ky.
James Kent James Kent (1763-1847) — of Poughkeepsie, Dutchess County, N.Y.; New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in Doansburg, Putnam County, N.Y., July 31, 1763. Lawyer; member of New York state assembly, 1790-91, 1792-93, 1796-97 (Dutchess County 1790-91, 1792-93, New York County 1796-97); candidate for U.S. Representative from New York, 1793; Justice of New York Supreme Court, 1798. Member, Phi Beta Kappa. Author of Commentaries on American Law, the first comprehensive treatment of the subject. Elected to the Hall of Fame for Great Americans in 1900. Died in New York, New York County, N.Y., December 12, 1847 (age 84 years, 134 days). Interment somewhere in Fishkill, N.Y.
  Relatives: Married to Elizabeth Bailey.
  Kent County, Mich. is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Image source: New York Public Library
  Humphrey Marshall (1760-1841) — of Kentucky. Born in Orlean, Fauquier County, Va., 1760. Served in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; lawyer; delegate to Virginia convention to ratify U.S. constitution from Fayette County, 1788; member of Kentucky state house of representatives, 1793-94, 1807-09; U.S. Senator from Kentucky, 1795-1801. In 1809, he opposed Henry Clay's proposal to require all Kentucky legislators to wear domestic homespun instead of British broadcloth; this clash resulted in a duel in which both men were wounded. Author of the first history of Kentucky, published in 1812. Died near Lexington, Fayette County, Ky., July 3, 1841 (age about 81 years). Interment in private or family graveyard.
  Relatives: Father of Thomas Alexander Marshall; grandfather of Humphrey Marshall (1812-1872); first cousin and brother-in-law of John Marshall, James Markham Marshall and Alexander Keith Marshall (1770-1825); first cousin once removed and uncle by marriage of Edward Colston, Thomas Francis Marshall, Alexander Keith Marshall (1808-1884), Charles Alexander Marshall and Edward Colston Marshall.
  Political families: Marshall-Harrison-Randolph-Cabell family of Virginia; Birney family of Danville, Kentucky (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  David Porter (1780-1843) — of Pennsylvania. Born in 1780. Served in the U.S. Navy during the War of 1812; captain of the United States frigate Essex, the the first U.S. war vessel to carry the Stars and Stripes in a naval battle, March 25, 1813; U.S. Consul General in Algiers, 1830-31; U.S. Charge d'Affaires to Turkey, 1831-39; U.S. Minister to Turkey, 1839-43, died in office 1843. Died in Constantinople (now Istanbul), Turkey, March 3, 1843 (age about 62 years). Interment at Woodlands Cemetery, Philadelphia, Pa.
  Relatives: Uncle of John Porter Brown and George A. Porter (1797?-?).
  Political family: Porter family of Ohio.
  See also U.S. State Dept career summary
  Martin Beaty (1784-1856) — of Kentucky. Born October 8, 1784. Whig. Member of Kentucky state senate, 1824-28; Presidential Elector for Kentucky, 1832, 1836; U.S. Representative from Kentucky 4th District, 1833-35; defeated, 1828, 1830, 1834; member of Kentucky state house of representatives, 1848. In Kentucky in 1818, he drilled the world's first oil well. Died in Belmont, Gonzales County, Tex., June 17, 1856 (age 71 years, 253 days). Interment at Belmont Cemetery, Belmont, Tex.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
  William Nesbit (c.1789-1863) — of Gwinnett County, Ga. Born about 1789. Served in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812; member of Georgia state senate, 1829, 1833. First sheriff of Gwinnett County, 1820. Died June 27, 1863 (age about 74 years). Interment at Nesbit Family Cemetery, Norcross, Ga.
  José Francisco Ruiz (1783-1840) — also known as Francisco Ruiz — of Texas. Born in San Antonio, Bexar County, Tex., January 29, 1783. Delegate to Texas Republic Republic constitutional convention from District of Bexar, 1836; signer, Texas Declaration of Independence, 1836; member of Texas Republic Senate from District of Bexar, 1836-37. Catholic. First schoolmaster in San Antonio, Texas. Died in San Antonio, Bexar County, Tex., January 19, 1840 (age 56 years, 355 days). Interment at San Fernando Cemetery #1, San Antonio, Tex.
  Relatives: Uncle of José Antonio Navarro (1795-1871).
  Political family: Navarro family of San Antonio, Texas.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
Stephen Van_Rensselaer Stephen Van Rensselaer (1764-1839) — of Albany, Albany County, N.Y. Born in New York, New York County, N.Y., November 1, 1764. Member of New York state assembly from Albany County, 1789-90, 1807-10, 1817-18; member of New York state senate Western District, 1790-95; member of New York council of appointment, 1792; Lieutenant Governor of New York, 1795-1801; general in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812; candidate for Governor of New York, 1813; delegate to New York state constitutional convention, 1821; U.S. Representative from New York, 1822-29 (9th District 1822-23, 10th District 1823-29). Dutch ancestry. Member, Freemasons. Albany's last Dutch Patroon; took the first train ride in U.S.; founded Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. Died in Albany, Albany County, N.Y., January 26, 1839 (age 74 years, 86 days). Original interment in private or family graveyard; reinterment at Albany Rural Cemetery, Menands, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Stephen Van Rensselaer (1742-1769) and Catharina (Livingston) Van Rensselaer (1745-1810); half-brother of Rensselaer Westerlo and Catherine Westerlo (1778-1846; who married John Woodworth (1768-1858)); brother of Philip Schuyler Van Rensselaer; married 1783 to Margarita Schuyler (1758-1801; daughter of Philip John Schuyler); married, May 17, 1802, to Cornelia Bell Paterson (1780-1844; daughter of William Paterson); father of Henry Bell Van Rensselaer; uncle of Philip Schuyler; grandson of Philip Livingston; grandfather of Kiliaen Van Rensselaer; grandnephew of Robert Livingston (1708-1790), Peter Van Brugh Livingston and William Livingston; great-grandson of Dirck Ten Broeck; great-grandnephew of John Livingston, Robert Livingston (1688-1775) and Gilbert Livingston; second great-grandson of Stephanus Van Cortlandt, Robert Livingston the Elder and Pieter Van Brugh; second great-grandfather of John Eliot Thayer, Jr.; second great-grandnephew of Pieter Schuyler (1657-1724), Jacobus Van Cortlandt and Johannes Cuyler; third great-grandson of Dirck Wesselse Ten Broeck; first cousin of Edward Philip Livingston; first cousin once removed of Philip P. Schuyler, Peter Robert Livingston (1737-1794), Walter Livingston, Philip Peter Livingston, James Livingston, Henry Brockholst Livingston and Edward Livingston (1796-1840); first cousin twice removed of Stephanus Bayard, Robert Gilbert Livingston, Robert R. Livingston (1718-1775) and Stephen John Schuyler; first cousin thrice removed of Cornelis Cuyler, John Cruger, Jr. and Robert Reginald Livingston; first cousin four times removed of David Davidse Schuyler and Myndert Davidtse Schuyler; second cousin of Pieter Schuyler (1746-1792), Peter Samuel Schuyler, Henry Walter Livingston, Peter Augustus Jay (1776-1843), William Jay and Charles Ludlow Livingston (1800-1873); second cousin once removed of Volkert Petrus Douw, Nicholas Bayard, Jeremiah Van Rensselaer, Robert Van Rensselaer, Hendrick Kiliaen Van Rensselaer, Robert R. Livingston (1746-1813), Pierre Van Cortlandt, Jr., Killian Killian Van Rensselaer, Edward Livingston (1764-1836), Philip Jeremiah Schuyler, Peter Robert Livingston (1789-1859), Gerrit Smith, Elizabeth Cady Stanton and John Jay II; second cousin twice removed of James Jay, Henry Cruger, John Jay, Frederick Jay, Nicholas Fish, Hamilton Fish, Jr. (1849-1936), John Kean, Hamilton Fish Kean and Charles Ludlow Livingston (1870-?); second cousin thrice removed of Herbert Livingston Satterlee, Peter Augustus Jay (1877-1933), Bronson Murray Cutting, Hamilton Fish, Jr. (1888-1991), Robert Winthrop Kean and Brockholst Livingston; second cousin four times removed of Hamilton Fish, Jr. (1926-1996) and Thomas Howard Kean; second cousin five times removed of Hamilton Fish (1951-), Alexa Fish Ward and Thomas Howard Kean, Jr.; third cousin of Leonard Gansevoort, Leonard Gansevoort, Jr., Jacob Rutsen Van Rensselaer, James Alexander Hamilton, Peter Gansevoort and Hamilton Fish (1808-1893); third cousin once removed of Gilbert Livingston Thompson, James Adams Ekin and John Jacob Astor III; third cousin twice removed of William Waldorf Astor, Robert Ray Hamilton, John Sluyter Wirt, Cortlandt Schuyler Van Rensselaer and Jonathan Mayhew Wainwright; third cousin thrice removed of Guy Vernor Henry, William Astor Chanler, Lewis Stuyvesant Chanler and Montgomery Schuyler, Jr.; fourth cousin of Peter Robert Livingston (1766-1847), Maturin Livingston, George Washington Schuyler and Philip N. Schuyler; fourth cousin once removed of Barent Van Buren, Martin Van Buren and Eugene Schuyler.
  Political family: Livingston-Schuyler family of New York (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: New York Public Library
  Lemuel Shaw (1781-1861) — of Massachusetts. Born in Barnstable, Barnstable County, Mass., January 9, 1781. Lawyer; member of Massachusetts state house of representatives, 1811-14, 1820, 1829; delegate to Massachusetts state constitutional convention, 1820; member of Massachusetts state senate, 1821-22; chief justice of Massachusetts supreme judicial court, 1830-60. Drew up the first charter of the city of Boston in 1822-23; wrote the decision in Commonwealth v. Hunt, 1842, which exempted labor unions from the criminal conspiracy law. Related by marriage to the author Herman Melville. Died in Boston, Suffolk County, Mass., March 30, 1861 (age 80 years, 80 days). Interment at Mt. Auburn Cemetery, Cambridge, Mass.
  Edward Kavanagh (1795-1844) — of Damariscotta Mills, Lincoln County, Maine. Born in Newcastle, Lincoln County, Maine, April 27, 1795. Democrat. Lawyer; member of Maine state house of representatives, 1826-28; U.S. Representative from Maine 3rd District, 1831-35; U.S. Charge d'Affaires to Portugal, 1835-41; member of Maine state senate, 1842; Governor of Maine, 1843-44. Catholic. First Catholic member of Congress from New England. Died January 22, 1844 (age 48 years, 270 days). Interment at St. Patrick's Catholic Cemetery, Damariscotta Mills, Damariscotta, Maine.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Roger Brooke Taney (1777-1864) — also known as Roger B. Taney — of Baltimore, Md. Born in Calvert County, Md., March 17, 1777. Lawyer; member of Maryland state house of delegates, 1799-1800; member of Maryland state senate, 1816-21; Maryland state attorney general, 1827-31; U.S. Attorney General, 1831-33; U.S. Secretary of the Treasury, 1833-34; Chief Justice of U.S. Supreme Court, 1836-64; died in office 1864. Catholic. First Catholic to hold a U.S. cabinet position. Died in Washington, D.C., October 12, 1864 (age 87 years, 209 days). Interment at St. John's Catholic Church Cemetery, Frederick, Md.; statue at State House Grounds, Annapolis, Md.
  Relatives: Son of Michael Taney and Monica (Brooke) Taney; married, January 7, 1806, to Anne Phoebe Charlton Key (1783-1855; sister of Francis Scott Key; niece of Philip Barton Key (1757-1815); aunt of Philip Barton Key (1818-1859)).
  Political families: Pendleton-Lee family; Key family of Maryland (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Taney County, Mo. is named for him.
  Epitaph: "He was a profound and able lawyer, an upright and fearless judge, a pious and exemplary Christian."
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books by Roger Taney: Memoir of Roger Brooke Taney : Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of the U. S.
  Books about Roger Taney: Bernard Christian Steiner, Life of Roger Brooke Taney, Chief Justice of the United States Supreme Court — Charles Smith, Roger B. Taney : Jacksonian Jurist — Suzanne Freedman, Roger Taney : The Dred Scott Legacy (for young readers)
  James Appleton (1785-1862) — also known as "Father of Prohibition" — of Gloucester, Essex County, Mass.; Portland, Cumberland County, Maine; Ipswich, Essex County, Mass. Born in Ipswich, Essex County, Mass., February 14, 1785. General in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812; member of Massachusetts state house of representatives, 1813-14; first to propose state prohibition on the manufacture and sale of liquor, 1832; member of Maine state house of representatives, 1836-37; Liberty candidate for Governor of Maine, 1842, 1843, 1844. Died in Ipswich, Essex County, Mass., August 25, 1862 (age 77 years, 192 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Mary (White) Appleton (1749-1834) and Samuel Appleton (c.1739-1819); brother of Nathan Dane Appleton; married, November 19, 1807, to Sarah Fuller (1787-1872); uncle of John Appleton (1815-1864); second great-grandfather of Randolph Appleton Kidder; first cousin of Nathan Appleton and William Appleton; first cousin once removed of John Appleton (1804-1891); first cousin thrice removed of Arthur Taggard Appleton; first cousin four times removed of Leverett Saltonstall and Richard Saltonstall; first cousin five times removed of William Lawrence Saltonstall; fourth cousin of John Appleton (1758-1829) and Thomas Appleton; fourth cousin once removed of John James Appleton and John Larkin Payson.
  Political families: Kidder family of Connecticut; Sprague family of Providence, Rhode Island; Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York; Biddle-Randolph family of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Saltonstall-Davis-Frelinghuysen-Appleton family of Massachusetts; Appleton family of Massachusetts; Beakes-Greene-Jennings family of Michigan; Shippen-Middleton family of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  John Messinger (1771-1846) — of St. Clair County, Ill. Born in 1771. Delegate to Illinois state constitutional convention from St. Clair County, 1818. Land surveyor; in 1835, he produced the first map of Illinois based on the official U.S. survey. Died in 1846 (age about 75 years). Interment at Unnamed Cemetery, Near Belleville, St. Clair County, Ill.
  Peter Cooper (1791-1883) — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in New York, New York County, N.Y., February 12, 1791. Manufacturer, inventor, philanthropist, creator of first U.S. steam locomotive; founder of Cooper Union; Greenback candidate for President of the United States, 1876. Unitarian. Elected to the Hall of Fame for Great Americans in 1900. Died in New York, New York County, N.Y., April 4, 1883 (age 92 years, 51 days). Interment at Green-Wood Cemetery, Brooklyn, N.Y.
  Relatives: Father of Sarah Amelia Cooper (who married Abram Stevens Hewitt) and Edward Cooper; uncle of Martha Clowes (who married Daniel Fawcett Tiemann (1805-1899)).
  Political family: Cooper-Ashley family of New York City, New York.
  See also Wikipedia article
  John Plaster Richmond (1811-1895) — also known as John P. Richmond — of Schuyler County, Ill. Born in Middletown, Frederick County, Md., August 11, 1811. Democrat. Physician; minister; in 1840, he officiated at the first Protestant wedding in what is now the state of Washington; in 1841, he delivered the first Fourth of July oration on the Pacific coast; member of Illinois state senate, 1849-52, 1859-60; member of Illinois state house of representatives, 1855-56; Presidential Elector for Illinois, 1856; delegate to Illinois state constitutional convention from Schuyler County, 1862; postmaster. Methodist. Scottish ancestry. Member, Freemasons. Died in South Dakota, August 28, 1895 (age 84 years, 17 days). Interment at Tyndall Cemetery, Tyndall, S.Dak.
  Relatives: Son of Francis Preston Richmond and Susanna (Stottlemeyer) Richmond; married 1835 to America Walker; married 1859 to Kitty Gristy.
Austin Blair Austin Blair (1818-1894) — also known as "The War Governor" — of Jackson, Jackson County, Mich. Born in Caroline, Tompkins County, N.Y., February 8, 1818. Lawyer; member of Michigan state house of representatives from Jackson County, 1846; instrumental in the 1846 abolition of capital punishment in Michigan, the first English-speaking jurisdiction to do so; Jackson County Prosecuting Attorney, 1853-54, 1885-86; member of Michigan state senate 12th District, 1855-56; Governor of Michigan, 1861-65; defeated (Liberty), 1872; delegate to Republican National Convention from Michigan, 1860; U.S. Representative from Michigan 3rd District, 1867-73; member of University of Michigan board of regents, 1881-89; appointed 1881. Unitarian. Died in Jackson, Jackson County, Mich., August 6, 1894 (age 76 years, 179 days). Interment at Mt. Evergreen Cemetery, Jackson, Mich.; statue at State Capitol Grounds, Lansing, Mich.
  Relatives: Son of Rhoda (Blackman) Mann Blair and George Blair (1796-1869); married, February 18, 1841, to Persis Lyman (c.1820-1844); married, May 25, 1846, to Elizabeth Pratt (c.1823-1847); married, February 16, 1849, to Sarah Louesa (Horton) Ford (1824-1897); father of Charles Austin Blair (1854-1912); third cousin of Bernard Blair.
  Political family: Blair family of Jackson, Michigan.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: Portrait & Biographical Album of Washtenaw County (1891)
  Samuel Brannan (1819-1889) — of San Francisco, Calif. Born in Saco, York County, Maine, March 2, 1819. Republican. Printer; founded the California Star, the first newspaper in San Francisco, 1847; member of California state senate, 1853; Presidential Elector for California, 1864. Mormon. Died in Escondido, San Diego County, Calif., May 5, 1889 (age 70 years, 64 days). Interment at Mt. Hope Cemetery, San Diego, Calif.
  Relatives: Son of Thomas Brannan and Sarah (Emery) Brannan.
  See also Wikipedia article
  Elihu Anthony (1818-1905) — of Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz County, Calif. Born in Greenfield, Saratoga County, N.Y., November 30, 1818. Served in the Union Army during the Civil War; Methodist minister; member of California state assembly 6th District, 1880-81. Methodist. Came overland to California in 1847. First postmaster of Santa Cruz; started the first foundry there; built the first wharf; founded the first Protestant church. Died in Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz County, Calif., August 15, 1905 (age 86 years, 258 days). Interment at Oddfellows Cemetery, Santa Cruz, Calif.
  John Porter Brown (d. 1872) — of Ohio. Born in Ohio. U.S. Consul in Constantinople, 1835-36; U.S. Consul General in Constantinople, 1857-59. Spoke Turkish, Arabic, and Farsi, and is considered the first Orientalist in the U.S. Foreign Service. Died in Constantinople (now Istanbul), Turkey, 1872. Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Nephew of David Porter (1780-1843).
  Political family: Porter family of Ohio.
  Alexander Faribault (1806-1882) — of Mendota, Dakota County, Minn. Born in Prairie du Chien, Crawford County, Wis., June 22, 1806. Fur trader; Founder of the city of Faribault, Minnesota; member of Minnesota territorial House of Representatives 7th District, 1851. French and Dakota Indian ancestry. Died in Faribault, Rice County, Minn., 1882 (age about 76 years). Interment at Calvary Cemetery, Faribault, Minn.
  Relatives: Son of Jean Baptiste Faribault (1773-1860) and Elizabeth (Piligle) Faribault (1783-1847); brother of Lucy Faribault (1808-1855; who married Alexis C. Bailly); married to Mary Elizabeth Graham (1804-1875); uncle of Alexis Phillip Bailly and Henry G. Bailly (1828-1865).
  Political family: Bailly-Faribault family of Mendota, Minnesota.
  See also Minnesota Legislator record
  Isaac M. Jordan (1835-1890) — of Ohio. Born in Mifflinburg, Union County, Pa., May 5, 1835. Democrat. One of the founders of Sigma Chi fraternity in 1855; U.S. Representative from Ohio 2nd District, 1883-85. Member, Sigma Chi. Died from injuries received in an elevator accident in Cincinnati, Hamilton County, Ohio, December 3, 1890 (age 55 years, 212 days). Interment at Spring Grove Cemetery, Cincinnati, Ohio.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — NNDB dossier
Daniel E. Sickles Daniel Edgar Sickles (1819-1914) — also known as Daniel E. Sickles; "Devil Dan" — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in New York, New York County, N.Y., October 20, 1819. Lawyer; member of New York state assembly from New York County, 1847; member of New York state senate 3rd District, 1856-57; U.S. Representative from New York, 1857-61, 1893-95 (3rd District 1857-61, 10th District 1893-95); defeated (Democratic), 1894; general in the Union Army during the Civil War; delegate to Republican National Convention from New York, 1868; U.S. Minister to Spain, 1869-74; delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1892. Member, Grand Army of the Republic. Shot and killed Philip Barton Key, his wife's lover and the son of the author of the national anthem, at Lafayette Park, Washington, D.C, 1859; charged with murder, but with the help of his attorney Edwin M. Stanton, was acquitted after the first successful plea of temporary insanity in U.S. legal history. Received the Medal of Honor in 1897 for action at the Battle of Gettysburg, July 2, 1863; lost a leg in that battle; his amputated leg was displayed at the Army Medical Museum, where he frequently visited it in later years. Died in New York, New York County, N.Y., May 3, 1914 (age 94 years, 195 days). Interment at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Va.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — U.S. State Dept career summary
  Books about Daniel E. Sickles: Thomas M. Keneally, American Scoundrel : The Life of the Notorious Civil War General Dan Sickles
  Image source: Official NY: from Cleveland to Hughes (1911)
  George Sewall Boutwell (1818-1905) — also known as George S. Boutwell — of Groton, Middlesex County, Mass. Born in Brookline, Norfolk County, Mass., January 28, 1818. Member of Massachusetts state house of representatives, 1842-50; Governor of Massachusetts, 1851-53; delegate to Massachusetts state constitutional convention, 1853; delegate to Republican National Convention from Massachusetts, 1860, 1864 (alternate); first U.S. Commissioner of Internal Revenue, 1862; U.S. Representative from Massachusetts, 1863-69 (7th District 1863-69, 9th District 1869); U.S. Secretary of the Treasury, 1869-73; U.S. Senator from Massachusetts, 1873-77. Died, from pneumonia, in Groton, Middlesex County, Mass., February 27, 1905 (age 87 years, 30 days). Interment at Groton Cemetery, Groton, Mass.
  Cross-reference: Daniel Needham
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  William Pickering (1798-1873) — Born in Yorkshire, England, March 15, 1798. Republican. Member of Illinois state legislature, 1842-52; delegate to Republican National Convention from Illinois, 1860; Governor of Washington Territory, 1862-66. On September 4, 1864, he sent the first message over a transcontinental telegraph line. Died in Albion, Edwards County, Ill., April 22, 1873 (age 75 years, 38 days). Interment at Albion Cemetery, Albion, Ill.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Henry Highland Garnet (1815-1882) — Born in slavery in New Market, Frederick County, Md., December 23, 1815. Minister; U.S. Minister to Liberia, 1881-82, died in office 1882. Presbyterian. African ancestry. Member, American Anti-Slavery Society. On February 12, 1865, was the first Black person to make a speech to the U.S. House of Representatives. Died in Liberia, February 13, 1882 (age 66 years, 52 days). Interment at Palm Grove Cemetery, Monrovia, Liberia.
  Relatives: Married 1841 to Julia Williams (1811-1870); married to Sarah Smith Tompkins.
  See also Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — Find-A-Grave memorial
  John Stough Bobbs (1809-1870) — also known as John S. Bobbs — of Indianapolis, Marion County, Ind. Born in Green Village, Franklin County, Pa., December 22, 1809. Republican. Member of Indiana state senate, 1857-59; delegate to Republican National Convention from Indiana, 1860; served in the Union Army during the Civil War. Performed the first gall-bladder surgery in the nation, 1867. Died in Indianapolis, Marion County, Ind., May 1, 1870 (age 60 years, 130 days). Interment at Crown Hill Cemetery, Indianapolis, Ind.
  Agnes Mason Giddings (1867-1927) — also known as Agnes Giddings; Agnes Eurelia Mason; Mrs. E. C. Giddings; "Famous Feminist" — of Fort Collins, Larimer County, Colo. Born in a log cabin, in Fort Collins, Larimer County, Colo., October 31, 1867; she was the first pioneer child born at Fort Collins, and the cabin is preserved at the Fort Collins Historical Museum. Republican. Alternate delegate to Republican National Convention from Colorado, 1924; Presidential Elector for Colorado, 1924. Female. Member, Order of the Eastern Star. Died, from a paralytic stroke, in Fort Collins, Larimer County, Colo., June 18, 1927 (age 59 years, 230 days). Interment at Grandview Cemetery, Fort Collins, Colo.
  Relatives: Daughter of Augustine Mason and Charlotte Mason; married, December 25, 1888, to Edwin Chester 'Chet' Giddings.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Oakes Ames (1804-1873) — of North Easton, Easton, Bristol County, Mass. Born in Easton, Bristol County, Mass., January 10, 1804. Republican. U.S. Representative from Massachusetts 2nd District, 1863-73. He and his brother Oliver Ames, president of the Union Pacific Railroad, prime movers in construction of the first transcontinental railroad line, completed in 1869; he was as censured by the House of Representatives in 1873 for his role in the Credit Mobilier bribery scandal. Died in Easton, Bristol County, Mass., May 8, 1873 (age 69 years, 118 days). Interment at Village Cemetery, North Easton, Easton, Mass.; memorial monument at Oliver and Oakes Ames Monument, Sherman, Wyo.
  Relatives: Son of Oliver Ames (1779-1863) and Susannah (Angier) Ames (1783-1847); brother of Oliver Ames, Jr.; married to Eveline Gilmore (1809-1882); father of Oliver Ames (1831-1895); third cousin thrice removed of John Adams; fourth cousin of Alfred Elisha Ames; fourth cousin once removed of Albert Alonzo Ames (1842-1911).
  Political family: Ames family of North Easton, Massachusetts (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  The city of Ames, Iowa, is named for him.  — The community of Ames, Nebraska, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Ebenezer Don Carlos Bassett (1833-1908) — also known as Ebenezer D. Bassett — of Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa.; Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y. Born in Litchfield, Litchfield County, Conn., October 16, 1833. School teacher; U.S. Minister to Haiti, 1869-77; U.S. Consul General in Port-au-Prince, as of 1874; Vice-Consul for Haiti in New York, N.Y., 1898-1908. African and Pequot Indian ancestry. First Black American to be appointed a diplomat to a foreign country. Died in Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y., November 14, 1908 (age 75 years, 29 days). Interment at Grove Street Cemetery, New Haven, Conn.
  Relatives: Married to Eliza Park (1836-1895).
  See also Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about Ebenezer Bassett: Christopher Teal, Hero of Hispaniola: America's First Black Diplomat, Ebenezer D. Bassett
  George Lewis Ruffin (1834-1886) — of Boston, Suffolk County, Mass. Born in Richmond, Va., December 16, 1834. Lawyer; member of Massachusetts state house of representatives, 1869-71; Labor Reform candidate for Massachusetts state attorney general, 1871; municipal judge in Massachusetts, 1883. African ancestry. First Black graduate of Harvard Law School, 1869. Died in Boston, Suffolk County, Mass., November 19, 1886 (age 51 years, 338 days). Interment at Mt. Auburn Cemetery, Cambridge, Mass.
  Relatives: Married 1858 to Josephine St. Pierre (1842-1924).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Richard Theodore Greener (b. 1844) — also known as Richard T. Greener; R. T. Greener — of Washington, D.C.; New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., January 30, 1844. University professor; lawyer; U.S. Consul in Bombay, 1898; U.S. Commercial Agent (Consul) in Vladivostok, 1898-1905. African ancestry. First Black graduate of Harvard, 1870. Burial location unknown.
Joseph H. Rainey Joseph Hayne Rainey (1832-1887) — also known as Joseph H. Rainey — of Georgetown, Georgetown County, S.C. Born in slavery in Georgetown, Georgetown County, S.C., June 21, 1832. Republican. Barber; delegate to South Carolina state constitutional convention from Georgetown County, 1868; member of South Carolina state senate, 1869; U.S. Representative from South Carolina 1st District, 1870-79. African ancestry. First Black member of the U.S. House of Representatives. Died in Georgetown, Georgetown County, S.C., August 2, 1887 (age 55 years, 42 days). Interment at Baptist Cemetery, Georgetown, S.C.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Image source: James G. Blaine, Twenty Years of Congress, vol. 2 (1886)
Hiram Rhodes Revels Hiram Rhodes Revels (1827-1901) — of Natchez, Adams County, Miss. Born in Fayetteville, Cumberland County, N.C., September 27, 1827. Republican. Minister; served in the Union Army during the Civil War; member of Mississippi state senate, 1870; U.S. Senator from Mississippi, 1870-71; secretary of state of Mississippi, 1873. African Methodist Episcopal. African and Lumbee Indian ancestry. First Black member of the U.S. Senate. Died, from a stroke, while attending a church conference, in Aberdeen, Monroe County, Miss., January 16, 1901 (age 73 years, 111 days). Interment at Hillcrest Cemetery, Holly Springs, Miss.
  Relatives: Son of Elijah Revels; married to Phoebe Bass (1833-1901).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: James G. Blaine, Twenty Years of Congress, vol. 2 (1886)
  Henry Sterling Magoon (1832-1889) — of Wisconsin. Born in Monticello, Green County, Wis., January 31, 1832. Republican. Member of Wisconsin state senate, 1871-72; U.S. Representative from Wisconsin 3rd District, 1875-77. First Wisconsin native to serve in that state's legislature. Died in Darlington, Lafayette County, Wis., March 3, 1889 (age 57 years, 31 days). Interment at Union Grove Cemetery, Darlington, Wis.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  James Milton Turner (1840-1915) — also known as J. Milton Turner — of Kansas City, Jackson County, Mo.; St. Louis, Mo. Born in slavery in St. Louis, Mo., 1840. Served in the Union Army during the Civil War; U.S. Minister to Liberia, 1871-78; stabbed in the chest by George W. Medley, in St. Louis, October 9, 1872. African ancestry. First African-American to serve as a U.S. diplomat. Died, as the result of a railroad tank car explosion, in Ardmore, Carter County, Okla., November 1, 1915 (age about 75 years). Interment at Father Dickson's Cemetery, St. Louis, Mo.
  Turner School (opened 1924, renamed for Turner 1932, closed 1976), in Kirkwood, Missouri, was named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS James Turner (built 1942, scrapped 1970) was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary
  Andrew Haswell Green (1820-1903) — also known as Andrew H. Green; "Father of Greater New York"; "Handy Andy" — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Born near Worcester, Worcester County, Mass., October 6, 1820. Democrat. Delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1880; delegate to New York state constitutional convention 13th District, 1894. Protestant. Guided creation of Central Park in New York, and Niagara State Preserve (first state park in the U.S.); led crusade to consolidate the five boroughs into today's New York City; helped create the New York Public Library, the Bronx Zoo, and other cultural institutions. Shot and killed, by a murderer who mistook him for someone else, in front of his home, on Park Avenue, Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., November 13, 1903 (age 83 years, 38 days). Interment at Worcester Rural Cemetery, Worcester, Mass.
  Green Island, in the Niagara River, at Niagara Falls, New York, is named for him.
  Morgan Gardner Bulkeley (1837-1922) — also known as Morgan G. Bulkeley — of Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y.; Hartford, Hartford County, Conn. Born in East Haddam, Middlesex County, Conn., December 26, 1837. Republican. Served in the Union Army during the Civil War; president, Aetna Life Insurance Company, 1870-1922; mayor of Hartford, Conn., 1880-88; defeated, 1878; delegate to Republican National Convention from Connecticut, 1884 (alternate), 1896; Governor of Connecticut, 1889-93; candidate for Republican nomination for Vice President, 1896; U.S. Senator from Connecticut, 1905-11. Congregationalist. Member, Freemasons; Loyal Legion; Grand Army of the Republic; Sons of the Revolution; Society of the Cincinnati; Society of the War of 1812. First president of the National League of Professional Base Ball Clubs in 1876. Died in Hartford, Hartford County, Conn., November 6, 1922 (age 84 years, 315 days). Interment at Cedar Hill Cemetery, Hartford, Conn.
  Relatives: Son of Eliphalet Adams Bulkeley and Lydia Smith (Morgan) Bulkeley (1806-1895); brother of William Henry Bulkeley (1840-1902) and Mary Jerusha Bulkeley (1843-1921; who married Leveret Brainard); married, February 11, 1885, to Fannie Briggs Houghton (1860-1898); first cousin once removed of Edwin Denison Morgan; second cousin of William Frederick Morgan Rowland; second cousin once removed of Edwin Barber Morgan and Christopher Morgan; second cousin twice removed of John Taintor, Roger Taintor and Solomon Taintor; second cousin thrice removed of Waightstill Avery; third cousin once removed of John Adams Taintor, Henry G. Taintor and Alfred Avery Burnham; third cousin twice removed of Timothy Pitkin; fourth cousin once removed of Henry Meigs, William Whiting Boardman, Lorenzo Burrows and William Waigstill Avery.
  Political families: Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York; Pendleton family of Connecticut (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about Morgan G. Bulkeley: Kevin Murphy, Crowbar Governor: The Life and Times of Morgan Gardner Bulkeley
  Elbridge Thomas Gerry (1837-1927) — of Newport, Newport County, R.I.; Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born in New York, New York County, N.Y., December 25, 1837. Lawyer; delegate to New York state constitutional convention, 1867; founder and president, New York Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children (said to be the "parent of all child protective organizations in the world"); governor of New York Hospital, 1878-1912; chairman, New York State Commission on Capital Punishment (replaced hanging with the electric chair), 1886-88; trustee, New York Life Insurance Co.; chairman, New York City Commission on Insanity, 1892. Member, Sons of the Revolution. Broke his hip in a fall, and died two weeks later, in Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., February 18, 1927 (age 89 years, 55 days). Entombed at St. James' Churchyard, Hyde Park, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Thomas Russell Gerry (1794-1845) and Hannah Green (Goelet) Gerry (1804-1845); married 1867 to Louisa Matilda Livingston (1836-1920; great-granddaughter of Morgan Lewis); father of Peter Goelet Gerry (1879-1957); grandson of Elbridge Gerry; first cousin once removed of Robert Walton Goelet.
  Political family: Gerry family (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  James Sidney Hinton (1834-1892) — of Indianapolis, Marion County, Ind. Born near Raleigh, Wake County, N.C., December 25, 1834. Republican. Delegate to Republican National Convention from Indiana, 1872; member of Indiana state house of representatives, 1881. African ancestry. Member, Freemasons; Odd Fellows. First Black member of the Indiana legislature. Died of a heart attack while making a speech, in Brazil, Clay County, Ind., November 6, 1892 (age 57 years, 317 days). Interment at Crown Hill Cemetery, Indianapolis, Ind.
  Charles Henrotin (1843-1914) — of Chicago, Cook County, Ill. Born in Brussels, Belgium, April 15, 1843. Banker; Consul for Belgium in Chicago, Ill., 1876-1910; Consul for Turkey in Chicago, Ill., 1877-82; first president of the Chicago stock exchange in 1882; Consul-General for Turkey in Chicago, Ill., 1893-1907. Belgian ancestry. Died in Chicago, Cook County, Ill., July 25, 1914 (age 71 years, 101 days). Interment at Rosehill Cemetery, Chicago, Ill.
  Relatives: Married, September 4, 1869, to Ellen Martin (1847-1922).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Edward Rawles — also known as Ned Rawles — of North Carolina. Born in Garysburg, Northampton County, N.C. Member of North Carolina state house of representatives, 1884, 1897. African ancestry. One of the first Black members of the North Carolina legislature. Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son-in-law of Matt Whitaker Ransom (1826-1904).
  Political family: Walker-Alston family of North Carolina.
  Benjamin William Arnett (1838-1906) — also known as Benjamin W. Arnett — of Wilberforce, Greene County, Ohio. Born in Brownsville, Fayette County, Pa., March 16, 1838. Republican. School teacher and principal; ordained minister; member of Ohio state house of representatives from Greene County, 1886-87; first Black state legislator elected to represent a majority white constituency; bishop; offered prayer, Republican National Convention, 1896. African Methodist Episcopal. African, Scottish, American Indian, and Irish ancestry. Lost a leg due to a tumor in 1858. Died, of uremia, in Wilberforce, Greene County, Ohio, October 7, 1906 (age 68 years, 205 days). Interment at Wilberforce Cemetery, Wilberforce, Ohio.
  Relatives: Son of Samuel G. Arnett and Mary Louisa Arnett; married, May 25, 1858, to Mary Louisa Gordon.
  Arnett Hall, at Wilberforce University, Wilberforce, Ohio, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Hugh O'Brien (1827-1895) — of Boston, Suffolk County, Mass. Born in Ireland, July 13, 1827. Democrat. Mayor of Boston, Mass., 1885-89; defeated, 1888. Catholic. Irish ancestry. First Irish Catholic mayor of Boston. Died August 1, 1895 (age 68 years, 19 days). Interment at Holyhood Cemetery, Brookline, Mass.
  Josiah Cohen (1840-1930) — of Allegheny County, Pa. Born in Plymouth, Cornwall, England, November 29, 1840. Republican. Lawyer; chair of Allegheny County Republican Party, 1882; Presidential Elector for Pennsylvania, 1884; orphan's court judge in Pennsylvania, 1901-07; common pleas court judge in Pennsylvania 5th District, 1907-29. Jewish. Member, B'nai B'rith. Among the founders of the Union of American Hebrew Hebrew Congregations (denominational body, now the Union for Reform Judaism); also a founder, in 1875, of Hebrew Union College in Cincinnati. Died June 11, 1930 (age 89 years, 194 days). Interment at West View Jewish Cemetery, Squirrel Hill, Pittsburgh, Pa.
  Relatives: Son of Henry Cohen and Rose Cohen; married, January 28, 1868, to Carrie Naumberg.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Charles Francis Craver (1842-1925) — of Grinnell, Poweshiek County, Iowa; Harvey, Cook County, Ill.; Tulsa, Tulsa County, Okla. Born in Franklinville, Gloucester County, N.J., September 3, 1842. Served in the Union Army during the Civil War; member of Iowa state house of representatives, 1876. Methodist. One of the founders of Craver & Steele, farm equipment manufacturers; invented the first successful twelve-foot binder for cutting and binding small grain; later, he was an oil producer based in Oklahoma. Died, of heart trouble, in Tulsa, Tulsa County, Okla., May 12, 1925 (age 82 years, 251 days). Interment at Rose Hill Memorial Park, Tulsa, Okla.
  George E. Macomber (b. 1853) — of Augusta, Kennebec County, Maine. Born in Augusta, Kennebec County, Maine, June 6, 1853. Republican. Banker; mayor of Augusta, Maine, 1886-89; built first electric railway in Maine, 1890; member of Maine state house of representatives, 1900; member of Maine state senate, 1900; delegate to Republican National Convention from Maine, 1928 (Convention Vice-President). Baptist. Member, Freemasons. Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of George W. Macomber and Hannah L. (Kalloch) Macomber; married, January 24, 1878, to Sarah V. Johnson; married, June 16, 1916, to Laura L. Cony; father of Anne Johnson Macomber (1883?-1951) (who married Guy Patterson Gannett).
  William Henry Lewis (1868-1949) — also known as William H. Lewis; Bill Lewis — of Cambridge, Middlesex County, Mass.; Dedham, Norfolk County, Mass. Born in Berkley, Norfolk County (now part of Norfolk), Va., November 28, 1868. Republican. As a student at Harvard, was the first Black All-American football player (1892-93); lawyer; served in the U.S. Army during the Spanish-American War; member of Massachusetts state house of representatives, 1902. Baptist; later Catholic. African ancestry. Died, of heart failure, in Boston, Suffolk County, Mass., January 1, 1949 (age 80 years, 34 days). Interment at Mt. Auburn Cemetery, Cambridge, Mass.
  Relatives: Son of Ashley Lewis and Josephine (Baker) Lewis; married, September 26, 1896, to Elizabeth Baker.
  William Webb Ferguson (1857-1910) — also known as William W. Ferguson — of Detroit, Wayne County, Mich. Born in Detroit, Wayne County, Mich., May 22, 1857. Republican. Printing business; member of Michigan state house of representatives from Wayne County 1st District, 1893-96. African ancestry. He was the first African-American member of the Michigan legislature. Died in Detroit, Wayne County, Mich., March 30, 1910 (age 52 years, 312 days). Interment at Elmwood Cemetery, Detroit, Mich.
  Relatives: Married, August 20, 1878, to Emma V. Pelham.
  See also Wikipedia article
  Caroline Clyde Holt Holly (d. 1943) — also known as Carrie Holly — of Colorado. Member of Colorado state legislature, 1894. Female. One of the first three women state legislators in the U.S. Died in Castle Rock, Cowlitz County, Wash., July 16, 1943. Cremated.
  Relatives: Married to Charles Frederick Holly (1825?-1901).
  William Edward Burghardt Du Bois (1868-1963) — also known as W. E. B. Du Bois — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y.; Accra, Ghana. Born in Great Barrington, Berkshire County, Mass., February 23, 1868. College professor; sociologist; historian; civil rights leader; Pan-Africanist; one of the founders of the NAACP; received the Spingarn Medal in 1920; member of New York American Labor Party Executive Committee, 1949; American Labor candidate for U.S. Senator from New York, 1950; in 1951, he and four other leaders of the Peace Information Center, which was alleged to be acting on behalf of the Soviet Union, were indicted for their failure to register as foreign agents; the case was dismissed in 1952, but his passport was withheld until 1958; awarded the Lenin Peace Prize in 1959. African ancestry. Member, NAACP. In 1895, he was the first African-American to receive a Ph.D. from Harvard University. Died in Accra, Ghana, August 27, 1963 (age 95 years, 185 days). Entombed at Du Bois Memorial Centre, Accra, Ghana.
  Relatives: Son of Alfred Du Bois and Mary Silvina (Burghardt) Du Bois; married, May 12, 1896, to Nina Gomer (1871-1950); married 1951 to Shirley Graham (1896-1977).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books by W. E. B. Du Bois: The Souls of Black Folk
  Lodian W. Lodian (b. 1866) — of San Francisco, Calif.; Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born in Hartford County, Conn., July 15, 1866. Civil engineer; metallurgist; world traveler; inventor; claimed to be first American to cross the Himalayan mountains, 1895; secretary, international antisemitic convention, Paris, 1900; candidate for New York state assembly from New York County 1st District, 1918 (Prohibition), 1921 (Prohibition), 1933 (Law Preservation); Prohibition candidate for New York state senate 12th District, 1922; Law Preservation candidate for U.S. Representative from New York 12th District, 1932. Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Kalos I. Lodian and Anita (Mana) Lodian.
  See also OurCampaigns candidate detail
  John Howard McLean (1860-1933) — also known as John H. McLean — of Iron Mountain, Dickinson County, Mich.; Ironwood, Gogebic County, Mich. Born in Neenah, Winnebago County, Wis., June 6, 1860. Republican. Mining and railroad executive; founder of Iron Mountain Press newspaper; Dickinson County Treasurer, 1897-98; delegate to Republican National Convention from Michigan, 1904. Catholic; later Protestant. Member, Freemasons; Shriners. Died, of a stroke, in Hollywood, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, Calif., May 6, 1933 (age 72 years, 334 days). Interment at Fort Howard Memorial Park, Green Bay, Wis.
  Relatives: Nephew by marriage of Nelson W. Fisk (1854-1923).
  Martha Maria Hughes Cannon (1857-1932) — also known as Martha Hughes Cannon; Mattie Cannon; Martha Maria Hughes — of Utah; Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, Calif. Born near Llandudno, Wales, July 1, 1857. Physician; member of Utah state senate, 1897-1905. Female. Mormon. First woman state senator in the U.S. Died in Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, Calif., July 10, 1932 (age 75 years, 9 days). Interment at Salt Lake City Cemetery, Salt Lake City, Utah.
  Relatives: Daughter of Peter Hughes (1824-1861) and Elizabeth (Evans) Hughes (1833-1923); married, October 6, 1884, to Angus Munn Cannon (1834-1915; brother of George Quayle Cannon (1827-1901)).
  Political family: Cannon family of Salt Lake City, Utah.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Charles Albert Reynolds (1848-1936) — also known as Charles A. Reynolds — of Winston-Salem, Forsyth County, N.C. Born in Rockingham County, N.C., November 10, 1848. Republican. Civil engineer; helped build North Carolina's first hydroelectric plant, on the Yadkin River, 1897; Lieutenant Governor of North Carolina, 1897-1901; postmaster at Winston-Salem, N.C., 1901-05; candidate for U.S. Representative from North Carolina 5th District, 1904, 1906. Died in Colfax, Guilford County, N.C., July 2, 1936 (age 87 years, 235 days). Interment at Episcopal Church Cemetery, Eden, N.C.
  See also Wikipedia article — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Ransom Eli Olds (1864-1950) — also known as Ransom E. Olds — of Lansing, Ingham County, Mich. Born in Geneva, Ashtabula County, Ohio, June 3, 1864. Republican. Founder in 1897 of Olds Motor Vehicle Company, maker of the first commercially successful American-made automobile; founder in 1905 of the REO Motor Car Company (later, the Olds company became the Oldsmobile division of General Motors, and Reo became part of truck manufacturer Diamond Reo); owner of several hotels; banker; delegate to Republican National Convention from Michigan, 1908. Baptist. Member, Freemasons; Knights Templar; Shriners. Died in Lansing, Ingham County, Mich., August 26, 1950 (age 86 years, 84 days). Entombed at Mt. Hope Cemetery, Lansing, Mich.
  Relatives: Son of Pliny Fisk Olds (1828-1908) and Sarah (Whipple) Olds (1834-1910); married, June 5, 1889, to Metta Ursula Woodward (1864-1950); second cousin thrice removed of Martin Olds (1798-1872).
  Political families: Greene family of Providence, Rhode Island; Baldwin-Greene-Upson-Hoar family of Connecticut; Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Olds Hall (built 1917 for the College of Engineering, now used as offices), Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Lucy Louisa Flower (1837-1921) — also known as Lucy L. Flower; Lucy Louisa Coues; "The Mother of the Juvenile Court" — of Chicago, Cook County, Ill. Born in Boston, Suffolk County, Mass., May 10, 1837. Republican. School teacher; social reformer; founder of nursing school; advocate for the creation of a "parental court" to handle cases of delinquent children; her efforts led to the world's first juvenile court legislation, which created the Chicago Juvenile Court in 1899; University of Illinois trustee; elected 1894. Female. Died in Coronado, San Diego County, Calif., April 27, 1921 (age 83 years, 352 days). Interment at Graceland Cemetery, Chicago, Ill.
  Relatives: Married, September 4, 1862, to James Monroe Flower (1835-1909); mother of Harriet Flower (daughter-in-law of John Villiers Farwell (1825-1908)) and Elliott Flower (1863-1920; author).
  Political family: Farwell family of Chicago, Illinois.
  Lucy Flower Park, on West Moffat Street, and Lucy Flower Technical High School (opened, 1911; moved to new building, 1927; renamed Flower Vocational High School, 1956; renamed Lucy Flower Career Academy High School, 1995; closed, 2003), both in Chicago, Illinois, were named for her.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
Back Hin % Moy Moy Back Hin (1848-1935) — also known as Charley Twin Wo — of Portland, Multnomah County, Ore. Born in China, February 8, 1848. Merchant; importer and exporter; Honorary Consul for China in Portland, Ore., 1906-35. Chinese ancestry. One of the first Asian millionaires in the United States. Died in Portland, Multnomah County, Ore., December 15, 1935 (age 87 years, 310 days). Interment at River View Cemetery, Portland, Ore.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: Western Washington University
  Nils Nyquist (b. 1846) — of Blue Earth County, Minn. Born in Värmland, Sweden, 1846. Republican. Farmer; merchant; member of Minnesota state house of representatives, 1897-1904 (District 10 1897-98, District 11 1899-1904). Owned the first automobile in Blue Earth County. Burial location unknown.
  See also Minnesota Legislator record
  William Loeb, Jr. (1866-1937) — also known as "Stonewall Loeb" — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y.; Oyster Bay, Nassau County, Long Island, N.Y. Born in Albany, Albany County, N.Y., October 9, 1866. Secretary to President Theodore Roosevelt, 1903-09, and as such, the first presidential press secretary; U.S. Collector of Customs, 1909-13; vice-president, American Smelting and Refining Co., owner of copper mines and processing plants. Jewish ancestry. Died in Glen Cove, Nassau County, Long Island, N.Y., September 19, 1937 (age 70 years, 345 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of William Loeb and Louisa (Meyer) Loeb; married 1902 to Katharine W. Dorr (1876-1968); father of William Loeb III (1905-1981; publisher of the Manchester, N.H. Union-Leader newspaper).
  See also Wikipedia article
  Henry Mason Wheeler (1854-1930) — of Grand Forks, Grand Forks County, N.Dak. Born in 1854. Physician; mayor of Grand Forks, N.Dak., 1917-18. Member, Freemasons. He helped stop a bank robbery by the Jesse James gang, in Northfield, Minnesota, September 7, 1876. He owned the first automobile in Grand Forks. Died April 13, 1930 (age about 75 years). Interment somewhere in Northfield, Minn.
  Francis Patrick Corrigan (1881-1968) — also known as Frank P. Corrigan — of Ohio. Born in Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, Ohio, July 14, 1881. Physician; surgeon; U.S. Minister to El Salvador, 1934-37; Panama, 1937-39; U.S. Ambassador to Venezuela, 1939-47. Catholic. Irish ancestry. Member, American Medical Association; Rotary. Assisted with the first modern blood transfusion, in 1906 at the Cleveland Clinic. Died, in St. Joseph's Manor home for the aged, Trumbull, Fairfield County, Conn., January 21, 1968 (age 86 years, 191 days). Interment at Calvary Cemetery, Cleveland, Ohio.
  Relatives: Son of Margaret (Regan) Corrigan (1848-1929) and Edward Corrigan (1850-1926); married to Ethel Foster (1886-1947); father of Robert Foster Corrigan (1914-2005).
  See also U.S. State Dept career summary — Find-A-Grave memorial
Oscar S. Straus Oscar Solomon Straus (1850-1926) — also known as Oscar S. Straus — of New York. Born in Germany, December 23, 1850. Progressive. Lawyer; U.S. Minister to Turkey, 1887-89, 1898-99; U.S. Secretary of Commerce and Labor, 1906-09; U.S. Ambassador to Turkey, 1909-10; candidate for Governor of New York, 1912; candidate for delegate to New York state constitutional convention at-large, 1914. Jewish. Member, Phi Beta Kappa. First Jewish U.S. cabinet member. Died in New York City (unknown county), N.Y., May 3, 1926 (age 75 years, 131 days). Interment at Beth El Cemetery, Glendale, Queens, N.Y.; memorial monument at Federal Triangle, Washington, D.C.
  Relatives: Son of Lazarus Straus (1809-1898) and Sara (Straus) Straus (1823-1876); brother of Isidor Straus; uncle of Jesse Isidor Straus and Nathan Straus, Jr.; granduncle of Stuart Scheftel (1911?-1994) and Ronald Peter Straus.
  Political family: Straus family of New York City, New York (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: Empire State Notables (1914)
Thomas P. Gore Thomas Pryor Gore (1870-1949) — also known as Thomas P. Gore — of Texas; Lawton, Comanche County, Okla.; Oklahoma City, Oklahoma County, Okla. Born near Embry, Webster County, Miss., December 10, 1870. Democrat. Lawyer; candidate for U.S. Representative from Texas, 1898; member Oklahoma territorial council, 1903-05; U.S. Senator from Oklahoma, 1907-21, 1931-37; defeated, 1920, 1936; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Oklahoma, 1912 (speaker), 1928; member of Democratic National Committee from Oklahoma, 1912-16. Member, Knights of Pythias; Moose; Woodmen; Elks. Blind due to an accident suffered when he was a boy; first blind member of the U.S. Senate. Died March 16, 1949 (age 78 years, 96 days). Originally entombed at Rose Hill Burial Park, Oklahoma City, Okla.; later interred in 1949 at Fairlawn Cemetery, Oklahoma City, Okla.
  Relatives: Son of Tom M. Gore and Carrie E. (Wingo) Gore; married, December 27, 1900, to Nina Kay; father of Nina Gore Auchincloss (who married Hugh Dudley Auchincloss); grandfather of Eugene Luther Gore Vidal, Jr. (1925-2012).
  Political family: Kennedy family.
  The town of Gore, Oklahoma, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: Library of Congress
  George Lawson Sheldon (1870-1960) — also known as George L. Sheldon — of Nehawka, Cass County, Neb. Born in Nehawka, Cass County, Neb., May 31, 1870. Republican. Served in the U.S. Army during the Spanish-American War; farmer; Governor of Nebraska, 1907-09; candidate for Republican nomination for Vice President, 1908; delegate to Republican National Convention from Nebraska, 1908; U.S. Collector of Internal Revenue for Mississippi, 1932; candidate for Presidential Elector for Mississippi, 1956. Member, Freemasons. First native of Nebraska to serve as Governor. Died in Mississippi, April 4, 1960 (age 89 years, 309 days). Interment at Greenville Cemetery, Greenville, Miss.
  Relatives: Son of Lawson Sheldon (1827-1905) and Julia A. (Pallord) Lawson; married 1895 to Rose Higgins; father of George Lawson Sheldon, Jr. (1897-1918; died in pneumonia epidemic) and Anson Hoisington Sheldon.
  Political family: Sheldon family of Nehawka, Nebraska.
  Edmond Favor Noel (1856-1927) — of Lexington, Holmes County, Miss. Born near Lexington, Holmes County, Miss., March 4, 1856. Democrat. Lawyer; member of Mississippi state house of representatives, 1881-82; member of Mississippi state senate, 1895-1903, 1920-27; served in the U.S. Army during the Spanish-American War; Governor of Mississippi, 1908-12; first chairman of first conference of governors, 1908. Baptist. Member, Freemasons. Died July 30, 1927 (age 71 years, 148 days). Interment at Odd Fellows Cemetery, Lexington, Miss.
  Relatives: Son of Leland Noel and Margaret A. (Sanders) Noel; married, June 4, 1890, to Loula Hoskins (died 1891); married, September 12, 1905, to Alice (Tye) Neilson.
  Walter Perry Johnson (1887-1946) — also known as Walter P. Johnson — of Germantown, Montgomery County, Md. Born near Humboldt, Allen County, Kan., November 6, 1887. Republican. Candidate for U.S. Representative from Maryland 6th District, 1940. Professional baseball pitcher with Washington Senators, 1907-27; won 417 games, second only to Cy Young; held major league record in career strikeouts (3508) from 1921 until 1983; holds record for career shutouts (110) and other records; was pitcher at the 1910 baseball game at which William H. Taft became the first President to attend Opening Day; also was manager of the Washington Senators and the Cleveland Indians; elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1936. Died, of a brain tumor in Georgetown Hospital, Washington, D.C., December 10, 1946 (age 59 years, 34 days). Interment at Union Cemetery, Rockville, Md.
  Relatives: Son-in-law of Edwin Ewing Roberts (1870-1933).
  See also NNDB dossier
  Mary Bellamy (1861-1955) — also known as Marie Godat; Mrs. Charles Bellamy — of Laramie, Albany County, Wyo. Born in Richwoods, Washington County, Mo., December 13, 1861. Democrat. School teacher; member of Wyoming state house of representatives, 1911; alternate delegate to Democratic National Convention from Wyoming, 1916. Female. Swiss, Dutch, and English ancestry. First woman legislator in Wyoming. Died in Laramie, Albany County, Wyo., January 28, 1955 (age 93 years, 46 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Daughter of Charles Augustus Godat (1808-1860) and Catherine (Horine) Godat (1822-1908); married 1886 to Charles Bellamy (1851-1934).
Bainbridge Colby Bainbridge Colby (1869-1950) — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y.; Washington, D.C. Born in St. Louis, Mo., December 22, 1869. Lawyer; attorney for author Samuel L. Clemens ("Mark Twain"); member of New York state assembly from New York County 29th District, 1902; among the founders of the Progressive ("Bull Moose") Party in 1912; Progressive candidate for U.S. Senator from New York, 1914, 1916; delegate to Democratic National Convention from District of Columbia, 1920; U.S. Secretary of State, 1920-21; law partner of Woodrow Wilson 1921-23; delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1924. Member, American Bar Association; Phi Beta Kappa. Died in Bemus Point, Chautauqua County, N.Y., April 11, 1950 (age 80 years, 110 days). Interment at Bemus Point Cemetery, Bemus Point, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of John Peck Colby and Frances (Bainbridge) Colby; married 1929 to Ann (Ahlstrand) Ely (1889-1963); third cousin of Oliver Carroll Clay (1849-1929); third cousin twice removed of John P. Colby; fourth cousin once removed of Frederick Myron Colby.
  Political families: Clay family of Kentucky; Colby family of Warner, New Hampshire (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Epitaph: "Faithful Public Servant."
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: Library of Congress
Martin H. Glynn Martin Henry Glynn (1871-1924) — also known as Martin H. Glynn — of Albany, Albany County, N.Y. Born in Valatie, Columbia County, N.Y., September 27, 1871. Democrat. Lawyer; postmaster; owner and editor of Albany Times-Union newspaper; U.S. Representative from New York 20th District, 1899-1901; defeated, 1900; New York state comptroller, 1907-08; defeated, 1908; Lieutenant Governor of New York, 1913; Governor of New York, 1913-15; defeated, 1914; delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1916 (Temporary Chair; speaker), 1924. Catholic. Irish ancestry. First Catholic governor of New York State; brokered peace and independence for Ireland in 1921. Killed himself, in Albany, Albany County, N.Y., December 14, 1924 (age 53 years, 78 days). Entombed at St. Agnes Cemetery, Menands, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Martin Glynn and Ann Glynn; married 1901 to Mary C. E. Magrane (1878-1948).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: Empire State Notables (1914)
  Francis Preston Blair Lee (1857-1944) — also known as Blair Lee — of Silver Spring, Montgomery County, Md. Born in Silver Spring, Montgomery County, Md., August 9, 1857. Democrat. Member of Maryland state senate, 1906-12; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Maryland, 1908, 1916; candidate for nomination for Governor of Maryland, 1911; U.S. Senator from Maryland, 1914-17. Episcopalian. First U.S. Senator elected by the direct vote of the people, under the 17th Amendment to the Constitution. Died in Norwood, Montgomery County, Md., December 25, 1944 (age 87 years, 138 days). Interment at Rock Creek Cemetery, Washington, D.C.
  Relatives: Son of Samuel Phillips Lee (1812-1897) and Elizabeth (Blair) Lee (1818-1906); married, October 1, 1891, to Anne Clymer Brooke (1870-1903); father of Edward Brooke Lee; nephew of Montgomery Blair and Francis Preston Blair, Jr.; grandson of Francis Preston Blair; grandfather of Blair Lee III, Edward Brooke Lee, Jr. and Elizabeth Lee (1924-1981; who married David Scull); great-grandson of Richard Henry Lee and James Blair; great-grandnephew of Francis Lightfoot Lee and Arthur Lee; first cousin of James Lawrence Blair and Gist Blair; second cousin twice removed of Thomas Sim Lee, Henry Lee, Charles Lee and Edmund Jennings Lee; second cousin thrice removed of John Eager Howard; third cousin once removed of John Lee, William Julian Albert and Joseph Wingate Folk; third cousin twice removed of Zachary Taylor, George Howard, Benjamin Chew Howard and Carey Estes Kefauver; third cousin thrice removed of George Nicholas, Wilson Cary Nicholas and John Nicholas; fourth cousin of Fitzhugh Lee, Talbot Jones Albert and Ethel Gist Cantrill (1876-1954); fourth cousin once removed of Samuel Bullitt Churchill, Thomas Leonidas Crittenden and John Lee Carroll.
  Political family: Lee-Randolph family of Maryland and Virginia (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Helen Ring Robinson (1860-1923) — also known as Helen Ring — of Denver, Colo. Born in Eastport, Washington County, Maine, February 21, 1860. Democrat. Writer; member of Colorado state senate, 1913-16. Female. Episcopalian. First woman elected to Colorado Senate; second woman state senator in the United States. Author of a minimum wage law for women; also introduced a bill allowing women to serve as jurors. Died in Denver, Colo., July 10, 1923 (age 63 years, 139 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Daughter of Thomas Warren Ring and Mary Margaret (Thompson) Ring; married, February 13, 1902, to Ewing Robinson.
  See also Wikipedia article
  Robert R. Church — of Memphis, Shelby County, Tenn. Republican. Delegate to Republican National Convention from Tennessee, 1900, 1912, 1916, 1924, 1928, 1932, 1936, 1940; speaker, 1920; member, Committee to Notify Presidential Nominee, 1928. African ancestry. One of the founders, in 1916, of the Lincoln League, an African-American political organization in western Tennessee. Burial location unknown.
  Annie Webb Blanton (1870-1945) — of Austin, Travis County, Tex. Born in Houston, Harris County, Tex., August 19, 1870. Democrat. College professor; Texas superintendent of public instruction, 1919-23. Female. Methodist. Member, American Association of University Women; Daughters of the American Revolution; United Daughters of the Confederacy; Phi Beta Kappa; Kappa Delta Pi; Pi Lambda Theta; Pi Gamma Mu; Delta Kappa Gamma; Order of the Eastern Star; Maccabees. First woman to be elected to statewide office in Texas. Died October 2, 1945 (age 75 years, 44 days). Interment at Oakwood Cemetery, Austin, Tex.
  Relatives: Daughter of Thomas Lindsay Blanton and Eugenia (Webb) Blanton; sister of Thomas Lindsay Blanton (1872-1957).
  Minnie J. Grinstead (1869-1925) — also known as Mineola Tamar Johnson — of Liberal, Seward County, Kan. Born in Crawford County, Kan., September 30, 1869. Republican. School teacher and principal; lecturer; member of Kansas state house of representatives, 1919-24; delegate to Republican National Convention from Kansas, 1920 (alternate), 1924; Seward County Probate Judge, 1925. Female. Member, Women's Christian Temperance Union. First woman state legislator in Kansas. Died in Liberal, Seward County, Kan., December 24, 1925 (age 56 years, 85 days). Interment at Liberal Cemetery, Liberal, Kan.
  Relatives: Daughter of Rev. Jonas Milton Johnson (1839-1916) and Martha (Emerich) Johnson (1847-1931); married, October 31, 1901, to Virgil H. Grinstead (1848-1924).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Frederick Madison Roberts (1879-1952) — also known as Frederick M. Roberts; Fred Roberts — of Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, Calif. Born in Chillicothe, Ross County, Ohio, September 14, 1879. Republican. Mortician; member of California state assembly, 1919-34; defeated, 1934; alternate delegate to Republican National Convention from California, 1932, 1940, 1944, 1948; candidate for U.S. Representative from California 14th District, 1946. African Methodist Episcopal. African ancestry. Member, NAACP; Urban League. First African-American state legislator in California; descendancy from Thomas Jefferson confirmed by DNA evidence in 1998. Died, from injuries received in an automobile accident the day before, in Los Angeles County General Hospital, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, Calif., July 19, 1952 (age 72 years, 309 days). Interment at Evergreen Cemetery, Los Angeles, Calif.
  Relatives: Son of Andrew Jackson Roberts (1852-1927) and Ellen Wayles (Hemings) Roberts (1856-1940); married, November 30, 1921, to Pearl W. Hinds (1892-1984); great-grandson of Thomas Jefferson; third great-grandnephew of Richard Randolph; first cousin once removed of Francis Wayles Eppes (1801-1881), Benjamin Franklin Randolph, Meriwether Lewis Randolph and George Wythe Randolph; first cousin twice removed of Dabney Carr; first cousin four times removed of Richard Bland and Peyton Randolph (1721-1775); second cousin of Thomas Jefferson Coolidge; second cousin once removed of Dabney Smith Carr and John Gardner Coolidge; second cousin thrice removed of Theodorick Bland, Edmund Jenings Randolph, Beverley Randolph and John Randolph of Roanoke; third cousin once removed of John Jordan Crittenden, Thomas Turpin Crittenden, Robert Crittenden and Carter Henry Harrison; third cousin twice removed of John Marshall, Henry Lee, Charles Lee, James Markham Marshall, Thomas Mann Randolph, Jr., Alexander Keith Marshall, Edmund Jennings Lee, Peyton Randolph (1779-1828) and Henry St. George Tucker; fourth cousin of Alexander Parker Crittenden, Thomas Leonidas Crittenden, Thomas Theodore Crittenden and Carter Henry Harrison II; fourth cousin once removed of Thomas Marshall, James Keith Marshall, Nathaniel Beverly Tucker, Edmund Randolph and Thomas Theodore Crittenden, Jr..
  Political families: Lee-Randolph family of Maryland and Virginia; Marshall-Harrison-Randolph-Cabell family of Virginia; Walker-Bolling family of Huntsville, Alabama (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Eva McCall Hamilton (1871-1948) — also known as Eva M. Hamilton — of Grand Rapids, Kent County, Mich. Born in Memphis, St. Clair County, Mich., December 13, 1871. Republican. Member of Michigan state senate 16th District, 1921-22; defeated in primary, 1922. Female. First woman elected to Michigan Senate. Died, of heart failure, in Grand Rapids, Kent County, Mich., January 28, 1948 (age 76 years, 46 days). Cremated.
  Relatives: Niece of Thomas W. McCall (1849-?).
  Joseph R. Pollard (c.1879-1937) — also known as J. R. Pollard — of Richmond, Va. Born in Richmond, Va., about 1879. Republican. Lawyer; alternate delegate to Republican National Convention from Virginia, 1904; candidate for U.S. Senator from Virginia, 1920. African ancestry. First African-American candidate for U.S. Senate in Virginia. Died in Richmond, Va., February 16, 1937 (age about 58 years). Interment at Evergreen Cemetery, Richmond, Va.
  Relatives: Son of William H. Pollard and Martha (Harris) Pollard; married to Leah Morgan (c.1889-1962).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
Dora H. Stockman Dora Hall Stockman (1872-1948) — also known as Dora H. Stockman; Dora Hall; Dora Weinkauf — of Lansing, Ingham County, Mich.; East Lansing, Ingham County, Mich. Born in a log cabin at Marilla, Manistee County, Mich., August 4, 1872. Republican. School teacher; Lecturer of the Michigan State Grange, and editor of the Grange paper, the Michigan Patron; songwriter; member of Michigan state board of agriculture, 1920-31; Dry candidate for delegate to Michigan convention to ratify 21st amendment from Ingham County 2nd District, 1933; member of Michigan state house of representatives from Ingham County 2nd District, 1939-46. Female. Member, Grange; Women's Christian Temperance Union. First woman to hold statewide elective office in Michigan. Died in California, 1948 (age about 75 years). Interment at Hurd Cemetery, DeWitt Township, Clinton County, Mich.
  Relatives: Daughter of Leander Hall and Lucy Jane (Bennet) Hall; married, August 8, 1889, to Francis M. Stockman (died 1932); married 1947 to Gustof Weinkauf.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: Michigan Manual 1927
  Edna Louisa Beard (1877-1928) — also known as Edna L. Beard — of Orange, Orange County, Vt. Born in Chenoa, McLean County, Ill., July 25, 1877. School teacher; superintendent of schools; member of Vermont state house of representatives, 1921-22; member of Vermont state senate from Orange County, 1923-24. Female. Congregationalist. First woman member of the Vermont legislature. Died in Orange, Orange County, Vt., September 18, 1928 (age 51 years, 55 days). Interment at Orange Center Cemetery, Orange, Vt.
  Relatives: Daughter of Royal Edson Beard (1845-1912) and Flora (Curtiss) Beard (1849-1920).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Lillien Cox Gault — also known as Lillien M. Cox — of St. Peter, Nicollet County, Minn. Democrat. Mayor of St. Peter, Minn., 1921-22; candidate for U.S. Representative from Minnesota 3rd District, 1922; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Minnesota, 1924. Female. First woman mayor in Minnesota. Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Daughter of Eugene St. Julien Cox (1835?-1898).
  Mary Mather Hooker (1864-1939) — also known as Mary M. Hooker; Mary Mather Turner — of Hartford, Hartford County, Conn. Born in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., February 26, 1864. Republican. Member of Connecticut state house of representatives from Hartford, 1921-22, 1925-26; candidate for Presidential Elector for Connecticut, 1936. Female. Member, Colonial Dames; Daughters of the American Revolution; Order of the Eastern Star. First woman to serve in the Connecticut legislature. Died, in Hartford Hospital, Hartford, Hartford County, Conn., May 13, 1939 (age 75 years, 76 days). Entombed at Cedar Hill Cemetery, Hartford, Conn.
  Relatives: Daughter of Charles Peaslee Turner (1826-1910) and Julia Francis (Mather) Turner (1839-1924); married, November 12, 1889, to Edward Williams Hooker; second cousin thrice removed of Smith Thompson; third cousin twice removed of Jacob Livingston Sutherland, Gilbert Livingston Thompson and Israel Dodd Condit (1802-1897).
  Political families: Pike family of Lubec, Maine; Condit family of Orange, New Jersey; Livingston-Schuyler family of New York; Appleton family of Massachusetts; DeCamp-Hinchman family of New Jersey (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Rebecca Latimer Felton (1835-1930) — also known as Rebecca Ann Latimer — of Cartersville, Bartow County, Ga. Born near Decatur, DeKalb County, Ga., June 10, 1835. Democrat. U.S. Senator from Georgia, 1922. Female. First woman in the U.S. Senate. Died in Atlanta, Fulton County, Ga., January 24, 1930 (age 94 years, 228 days). Interment at Oak Hill Cemetery, Cartersville, Ga.
  Relatives: Daughter of Charles Latimer and Eleanor Ann (Swift) Latimer; married, October 11, 1853, to William Harrell Felton (1823-1909).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Elizabeth Gurley Flynn (1890-1964) — also known as "Rebel Girl" — of New York. Born in Concord, Merrimack County, N.H., August 7, 1890. Communist. Speaker and organizer for the Industrial Workers of the World ("Wobblies") in 1906-16; one of the founders of the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU), which later expelled her for being a Communist; candidate for U.S. Representative from New York, 1942 (Communist, at-large), 1954 (Peoples' Rights, 24th District); convicted under the anti-Communist Smith Act, and sentenced to three years in prison; released in 1957; became National Chair of the Communist Party U.S.A. in 1961. Female. Irish ancestry. Member, American Civil Liberties Union; Industrial Workers of the World. Died in Russia, September 5, 1964 (age 74 years, 29 days). Interment at Forest Home Cemetery, Forest Park, Ill.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
Warren G. Harding Warren Gamaliel Harding (1865-1923) — also known as Warren G. Harding — of Marion, Marion County, Ohio. Born in Blooming Grove, Morrow County, Ohio, November 2, 1865. Republican. Newspaper publisher; member of Ohio state senate 13th District, 1901-03; Lieutenant Governor of Ohio, 1904-06; delegate to Republican National Convention from Ohio, 1904 (alternate), 1912, 1916 (Temporary Chair; Permanent Chair; speaker); candidate for Governor of Ohio, 1910; U.S. Senator from Ohio, 1915-21; President of the United States, 1921-23; died in office 1923. Baptist. English ancestry. Member, Freemasons; Knights Templar; Shriners; Elks; Knights of Pythias; Phi Alpha Delta. First president ever to have his voice broadcast on the radio, June 14, 1922. Died, probably from a heart attack, in a room at the Palace Hotel, San Francisco, Calif., August 2, 1923 (age 57 years, 273 days). The claim that he was poisoned by his wife is not accepted by historians. Original interment at Marion Cemetery, Marion, Ohio; reinterment in 1927 at Harding Memorial Tomb, Marion, Ohio.
  Relatives: Son of Phoebe Elizabeth (Dickerson) Harding (1843-1910) and George Tryon Harding (1844-1928); married, July 8, 1891, to Florence Mabel Kling (1860-1924).
  Harding County, N.M. is named for him.
  Harding High School, in Bridgeport, Connecticut, is named for him.  — Warren G. Harding High School, in Warren, Ohio, is named for him.  — Warren G. Harding Middle School, in Frankford, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, is named for him.
  Personal motto: "Remember there are two sides to every question. Get both."
  Campaign slogan (1920): "Back to normalcy with Harding."
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile
  Books about Warren G. Harding: Francis Russell, The Shadow of Blooming Grove : Warren G. Harding In His Times — Robert K. Murray, The Harding Era : Warren G. Harding and His Administration — Eugene P. Trani & David L. Wilson, The Presidency of Warren G. Harding — Harry M. Daugherty, Inside Story of the Harding Tragedy — Charles L. Mee, The Ohio Gang : The World of Warren G. Harding — John W. Dean, Warren G. Harding — Robert H. Ferrell, The Strange Deaths of President Harding — Russell Roberts, Warren G. Harding (for young readers)
  Critical books about Warren G. Harding: Nathan Miller, Star-Spangled Men : America's Ten Worst Presidents
  Image source: Library of Congress
  Lottie Holman O'Neill (1878-1967) — of Downers Grove, DuPage County, Ill. Born November 17, 1878. Republican. Member of Illinois state house of representatives, 1923-31, 1933-51; Independent Republican candidate for U.S. Senator from Illinois, 1930; delegate to Republican National Convention from Illinois, 1944 (alternate), 1956; member of Illinois state senate, 1951-64. Female. First woman elected to Illinois General Assembly. Died in Downers Grove, DuPage County, Ill., February 17, 1967 (age 88 years, 92 days). Interment at Oak Crest Cemetery, Downers Grove, Ill.
  Edith Eunice Therrel Wilmans (1882-1966) — also known as Edith Wilmans — of Grand Prairie, Dallas County, Tex. Born December 21, 1882. Democrat. Member of Texas state house of representatives, 1922; candidate in primary for Governor of Texas, 1926, 1928; Democratic candidate for U.S. Representative from Texas 13th District, 1948 (primary), 1950 (primary), 1951. Female. First woman to serve in the Texas legislature. Died March 21, 1966 (age 83 years, 90 days). Interment at Sparkman Hillcrest Memorial Park, Dallas, Tex.
  See also OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Mary C. Booze (1878-1955) — also known as Mary Cordelia Montgomery — of Mound Bayou, Bolivar County, Miss. Born in Warren County, Miss., March, 1878. Republican. Bookkeeper; school teacher; member of Republican National Committee from Mississippi, 1924-55; alternate delegate to Republican National Convention from Mississippi, 1928, 1932, 1936, 1940, 1944. Female. First African-American woman to be on the Republican National Committee. Died in Hampton, Va., May 17, 1955 (age 77 years, 0 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Daughter of Isaiah T. Montgomery (1847-1924); married 1901 to Eugene P. Booze.
  Political family: Booze family of Mound Bayou, Mississippi.
  See also Wikipedia article
Rhoda Fox Graves Rhoda Fox Graves (1877-1950) — of Gouverneur, St. Lawrence County, N.Y. Born in Fowler town, St. Lawrence County, N.Y., 1877. Republican. Farmer; school teacher; member of New York state assembly from St. Lawrence County 1st District, 1925-32; delegate to Republican National Convention from New York, 1928 (alternate), 1932; member of New York state senate, 1935-48 (34th District 1935-44, 39th District 1945-48). Female. Member, Daughters of the American Revolution; Order of the Eastern Star. First woman elected to the New York State Senate. Died in Hollywood, Broward County, Fla., January 25, 1950 (age about 72 years). Interment at Riverside Cemetery, Gouverneur, N.Y.
  Relatives: Married to Perle A. Graves (1869-1954; first cousin by marriage of Frank L. Seaker); mother of Paul D. Graves (1907-1972).
  Political family: Graves family of Gouverneur, New York.
  Image source: New York Red Book 1936
Mary Teresa Norton Mary Teresa Norton (1875-1959) — also known as Mary T. Norton; Mary Teresa Hopkins — of Jersey City, Hudson County, N.J. Born in Jersey City, Hudson County, N.J., March 7, 1875. Democrat. Member of New Jersey Democratic State Committee, 1920-35; vice-chair of New Jersey Democratic Party, 1921-32; delegate to Democratic National Convention from New Jersey, 1924, 1928 (member, Credentials Committee), 1932, 1936, 1940, 1944 (co-chair, Platform and Resolutions Committee; speaker), 1948 (chair, Credentials Committee); U.S. Representative from New Jersey, 1925-51 (12th District 1925-33, 13th District 1933-51); New Jersey Democratic state chair, 1932-35, 1940-44; delegate to New Jersey convention to ratify 21st amendment at-large; elected 1933. Female. Catholic. Irish ancestry. First woman elected to Congress from the eastern U.S.; first Democratic woman ever to serve. Died in Greenwich, Fairfield County, Conn., August 2, 1959 (age 84 years, 148 days). Interment at Holy Name Cemetery, Jersey City, N.J.
  Relatives: Daughter of Thomas Hopkins and Marie Hopkins; married 1909 to Robert Francis Norton.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: U.S. House of Representatives
  Flora Morris Vare — also known as Flora M. Vare — of Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa. Born in New London, New London County, Conn. Republican. Member of Pennsylvania state senate 1st District, 1925-28; defeated, 1928; elected first woman member of the Pennsylvania state senate, 1924. Female. Burial location unknown.
  Florence Fifer Bohrer — also known as Florence Fifer — of Bloomington, McLean County, Ill. Member of Illinois state senate, 1925-27. Female. First woman ever elected to the Illinois State Senate. Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Daughter of Joseph Wilson Fifer (1840-1938).
  William Rowland Hopkins (1869-1961) — also known as W. R. Hopkins; "Chautauqua Bill" — of Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, Ohio. Born in Johnstown, Cambria County, Pa., July 26, 1869. Republican. Lawyer; industrial real estate developer; promoter of Cleveland Short Line Railroad; delegate to Republican National Convention from Ohio, 1916; city manager of Cleveland, Ohio, 1924-30; he was fascinated by aviation, in 1925, he successfully advocated purchase of land for an airport, the first municipal airport in the United States. Died in Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, Ohio, February 9, 1961 (age 91 years, 198 days). Interment at Lake View Cemetery, Cleveland, Ohio.
  Relatives: Son of David J. Hopkins and Mary (Jeffreys) Hopkins; married 1903 to Ellen Louise Cozad (divorced 1923).
  Cleveland Hopkins International Airport, in Cleveland, Ohio, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article
  Florence Prag Kahn (1866-1948) — also known as Florence P. Kahn; Florence Prag — of San Francisco, Calif. Born in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Utah, November 9, 1866. Republican. U.S. Representative from California 4th District, 1925-37. Female. Jewish. First Jewish woman to serve in the U.S. Congress. Died in San Francisco, Calif., November 16, 1948 (age 82 years, 7 days). Interment at Home of Peace Cemetery, Colma, Calif.
  Relatives: Daughter of Conrad Prag and Mary (Goldsmith) Prag; married, March 19, 1899, to Julius Kahn (1861-1924).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Nellie Tayloe Ross (1876-1977) — also known as Nellie Davis Tayloe — of Cheyenne, Laramie County, Wyo. Born in St. Joseph, Buchanan County, Mo., November 29, 1876. Democrat. Governor of Wyoming, 1925-27; defeated, 1926; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Wyoming, 1928, 1940, 1944 (member, Platform and Resolutions Committee), 1948 (alternate); Vice-Chair of Democratic National Committee, 1929; director, U.S. Bureau of the Mint. Female. Episcopalian. First woman governor in the U.S. Died December 19, 1977 (age 101 years, 20 days). Interment at Lakeview Cemetery, Cheyenne, Wyo.
  Relatives: Daughter of James Wynns Tayloe and Elizabeth Blair (Green) Tayloe; married, September 11, 1902, to William Bradford Ross (1873-1924).
  See also NNDB dossier
  Nellie Nugent Somerville — of Greenville, Washington County, Miss. Democrat. Delegate to Democratic National Convention from Mississippi, 1924 (member, Committee on Permanent Organization); member of Mississippi state house of representatives, 1920. Female. Member, American Association of University Women. First woman to serve in Mississippi legislature. Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Mother of Lucy Somerville Howorth (1895?-1997).
  Bertha Knight Landes (1868-1943) — also known as Bertha Knight — of Seattle, King County, Wash. Born in Ware, Hampshire County, Mass., October 19, 1868. Republican. Lecturer; writer; mayor of Seattle, Wash., 1926-28; defeated, 1928. Female. Congregationalist. Member, Soroptimists; League of Women Voters. First woman mayor of a large American city. Died in Ann Arbor, Washtenaw County, Mich., November 29, 1943 (age 75 years, 41 days). Interment at Evergreen-Washelli Memorial Park, Seattle, Wash.
  Relatives: Daughter of Charles Sanford Knight and Cordelia (Cutter) Knight; married, January 2, 1894, to Henry Landes (1862-1936; geologist).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about Bertha Knight Landes: Sandra Haarsager, Bertha Knight Landes of Seattle : Big-City Mayor
Harold Lloyd Harold Clayton Lloyd (1893-1971) — also known as Harold Lloyd — of Beverly Hills, Los Angeles County, Calif. Born in Burchard, Pawnee County, Neb., April 20, 1893. Republican. Actor, comedian, film producer; appeared in over 200 motion pictures; one of the founders, in 1927, of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences; alternate delegate to Republican National Convention from California, 1948, 1952. Member, Freemasons; Shriners. Lost two fingers in a 1919 accident. Died, of prostate cancer, in Beverly Hills, Los Angeles County, Calif., March 8, 1971 (age 77 years, 322 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of James Darsie Lloyd and Sarah Elizabeth (Fraser) Lloyd; married 1923 to Mildred Davis.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile
  Image source: Time Magazine, July 25, 1949
  Ruth Bryan Owen (1885-1954) — also known as Ruth Bryan; Ruth Bryan Rohde; Mrs. Borge Rohde — of Miami, Miami-Dade County, Fla.; Ossining, Westchester County, N.Y. Born in Jacksonville, Morgan County, Ill., October 2, 1885. Democrat. Lecturer; U.S. Representative from Florida 4th District, 1929-33; U.S. Minister to Denmark, 1933-36. Female. Episcopalian. Member, Daughters of the American Revolution; Delta Gamma. first woman to be elected to Congress from the South; inducted 1992 into the Florida Women's Hall of Fame. Died in Copenhagen, Denmark, July 26, 1954 (age 68 years, 297 days). Cremated; ashes interred at Ordrup Cemetery, Copenhagen, Denmark.
  Relatives: Daughter of William Jennings Bryan (1860-1925) and Mary Elizabeth (Baird) Bryan (1861-1930); married, May 3, 1910, to Reginald Owen (died 1927); married, July 11, 1936, to Borge Rohde; mother of Helen Rudd Brown; niece of Charles Wayland Bryan; granddaughter of Silas Lillard Bryan.
  Political family: Bryan-Jennings family of Illinois.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier
  Thomas Stephen Hogan (1869-1957) — also known as Thomas S. Hogan — of Montana. Born in Chippewa Falls, Chippewa County, Wis., December 23, 1869. Candidate for Montana state house of representatives, 1894; secretary of state of Montana, 1897-1901; Silver Republican candidate for U.S. Representative from Montana at-large, 1898; Independent Democratic candidate for Governor of Montana, 1900; member of Montana state senate, 1910-14. In 1929, built the first "skyscaper" (12 stories) in Midland, Texas. Died in Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, Calif., September 25, 1957 (age 87 years, 276 days). Interment at Evergreen Alameda Cemetery, El Paso, Tex.
  See also OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Paul Revere Williams (1894-1980) — also known as Paul R. Williams — of Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, Calif. Born in Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, Calif., February 18, 1894. Republican. Architect; first African-American architect west of the Mississippi, and first to be member of the American Institute of Architects; designed many Southern California landmarks, including the homes of Hollywood celebrities; received the Spingarn Medal in 1953; delegate to Republican National Convention from California, 1952, 1960; member, California Housing Commission and California Civil Rights Commission. African ancestry. Member, American Institute of Architects; Freemasons. Died, from diabetes, in California Hospital, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, Calif., January 23, 1980 (age 85 years, 339 days). Interment at Inglewood Park Cemetery, Inglewood, Calif.
  Presumably named for: Paul Revere
  Relatives: Son of C. S. Williams and Lila A. (Wright) Williams; married, June 27, 1917, to Della Mae Givens (1895-1996).
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
Frances Perkins Frances Perkins (1882-1965) — also known as Mrs. Paul Caldwell Wilson — of Newcastle, Lincoln County, Maine. Born in Boston, Suffolk County, Mass., April 10, 1882. Democrat. Sociologist; New York State Industrial Commissioner, 1929-33; U.S. Secretary of Labor, 1933-45; speaker, Democratic National Convention, 1948. Female. Episcopalian. Member, American Civil Liberties Union. First woman to serve in the Cabinet; inducted, National Women's Hall of Fame, 1982. Died in New York City (unknown county), N.Y., May 14, 1965 (age 83 years, 34 days). Interment at Cemetery on River Road, Newcastle, Maine.
  Relatives: Daughter of Frederick W. Perkins and Susan Perkins; married, September 26, 1913, to Paul Caldwell Wilson.
  See also NNDB dossier
  Books about Frances Perkins: Kirstin Downey, The Woman Behind the New Deal: The Life of Frances Perkins, FDR'S Secretary of Labor and His Moral Conscience
  Image source: Social Security Administration
  Arthur Wergs Mitchell (1883-1968) — also known as Arthur W. Mitchell — of Chicago, Cook County, Ill. Born near Lafayette, Chambers County, Ala., December 22, 1883. Democrat. U.S. Representative from Illinois 1st District, 1935-43; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Illinois, 1940. African ancestry. While a student at Tuskegee Institute, he served as office boy for Booker T. Washington. First African-American Democrat ever elected to the U.S. Congress. Died near Petersburg, Dinwiddie County, Va., May 9, 1968 (age 84 years, 139 days). Interment a private or family graveyard, Dinwiddie County, Va.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Fleming Adolphus Jones, Jr. (b. 1895) — also known as Fleming A. Jones, Jr. — of Welch, McDowell County, W.Va. Born in Gaffney, Cherokee County, S.C., October 10, 1895. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army during World War I; lawyer; member of West Virginia state house of delegates from McDowell County, 1935-42, 1945-48; alternate delegate to Democratic National Convention from West Virginia, 1952. Baptist. African ancestry. Member, Freemasons; Shriners; Odd Fellows; Elks; Phi Beta Sigma; American Legion. First Black Democratic member of West Virginia House of Delegates. Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Felix Jones and Emeline (Young) Jones; married, June 15, 1921, to H. Preston Mills.
  Hollis Monroe Peavey (b. 1897) — also known as Hollis M. Peavey — of Huntington Park, Los Angeles County, Calif. Born in Riceville, Mitchell County, Iowa, March 27, 1897. Republican. Mayor of Huntington Park, Calif., 1942-44, 1947-48; delegate to Republican National Convention from California, 1948. Methodist. Member, Freemasons; Knights Templar; Shriners; Elks. Musician and leader of Peavy's Jazz Bandits, one of the first jazz bands. Burial location unknown.
  Charles W. Anderson, Jr. (1907-1960) — of Louisville, Jefferson County, Ky. Born in Louisville, Jefferson County, Ky., May 26, 1907. Republican. Member of Kentucky state house of representatives 58th District, 1936-47; alternate delegate to Republican National Convention from Kentucky, 1940. Methodist. African ancestry. First African-American to be elected to a Southern state legislature in the 20th century. Killed in a car-train accident, in Shelbyville, Shelby County, Ky., June 14, 1960 (age 53 years, 19 days). Interment at Eastern Cemetery, Louisville, Ky.
  Relatives: Married, November 25, 1948, to Victoria McCall.
  Epitaph: "Champion of Rights and Justice. Lawyer and Civic Leader."
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
David Dubinsky David Dubinsky (1892-1982) — also known as David Dobnievski — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born in Brest-Litovsk, Poland (now Brest, Belarus), February 22, 1892. President of International Ladies' Garment Workers Union, from 1932; one of the founders of the American Labor Party in New York, 1936; Presidential Elector for New York, 1936; vice-chair of New York Liberal Party, 1944, 1958; delegate to New York state constitutional convention at-large, 1967. Jewish. Member, Americans for Democratic Action. Received the Presidential Medal of Freedom on January 20, 1969. Died, in St. Vincent's Hospital, Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., September 17, 1982 (age 90 years, 207 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Zallel Dubinsky and Shaine (Wishingrad) Dubinsky; married 1915 to Emma Goldberg (died 1974).
  See also Wikipedia article
  Image source: Time Magazine, August 29, 1949
  Myles Anderson Paige (c.1898-1983) — also known as Myles A. Paige — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y.; Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y.; Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, Calif. Born in Montgomery, Montgomery County, Ala., about 1898. Served in the U.S. Army during World War I; Pullman car porter; lawyer; Republican candidate for New York state senate 19th District, 1926; American Labor candidate for delegate to New York state constitutional convention at-large, 1937; justice, New York City Court of Special Sessions, 1940-58; judge, Court of Domestic Relations (later Family Court). Catholic. African ancestry. Member, Knights of Columbus; Urban League; Alpha Phi Alpha; American Legion; Catholic Lawyers Guild. New York City's first Black magistrate, 1936, and first Black judge, 1940. Died in Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, Calif., March 30, 1983 (age about 85 years). Burial location unknown.
  Milton Lipson (1913-2003) — also known as Mitch Lipson — of Sea Cliff, Nassau County, Long Island, N.Y. Born in New York, New York County, N.Y., 1913. Secret Service agent; One of the first Jews in the U.S. Secret Service; worked as bodyguard for Presidents Franklin D. Roosevelt and Harry S. Truman; lawyer. Jewish. Died in Sea Cliff, Nassau County, Long Island, N.Y., January 22, 2003 (age about 89 years). Cremated.
  Gladys Pyle (1890-1989) — also known as Mrs. John L. Pyle — of Huron, Beadle County, S.Dak. Born in Huron, Beadle County, S.Dak., October 1, 1890. Republican. Insurance business; Presidential Elector for South Dakota, 1920; member of South Dakota state house of representatives 24th District, 1923-26; secretary of state of South Dakota, 1927-31; nominated in primary for Governor of South Dakota 1930, inconclusive primary; U.S. Senator from South Dakota, 1938-39; delegate to Republican National Convention from South Dakota, 1940. Female. Presbyterian. Member, League of Women Voters. She was the first woman to be elected U.S. Senator. Died in Huron, Beadle County, S.Dak., March 14, 1989 (age 98 years, 164 days). Interment at Riverside Cemetery, Huron, S.Dak.
  Relatives: Daughter of John Levis Pyle (1860-1902) and Mary Isabelle (Shields) Pyle (1866-1949).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Alice D. Burke — of Westfield, Hampden County, Mass. School teacher; mayor of Westfield, Mass., 1940, 1954-55; defeated, 1937. Female. First woman mayor in Massachusetts history. Presumed deceased. Burial location unknown.
  Roy Claxton Acuff (1903-1992) — also known as Roy Acuff; "The King of Country Music" — of Clarksville, Montgomery County, Tenn. Born in Maynardville, Union County, Tenn., September 15, 1903. Republican. Country musician; co-founder of Acuff-Rose Publication Company, the first country music publishing house; appeared in seven Hollywood movies in the 1940s; owner and operator of Dunbar Cave Hotel near Nashville; candidate for Governor of Tennessee, 1948; delegate to Republican National Convention from Tennessee, 1960. Elected to Country Music Hall of Fame, 1962. Died, of congestive heart failure, in Nashville, Davidson County, Tenn., November 23, 1992 (age 89 years, 69 days). Interment at Spring Hill Cemetery, Nashville, Tenn.
  Relatives: Son of Simon E. Neill Acuff and Ida (Carr) Acuff; grandson of Coram Acuff (1846-1931); second cousin once removed of Juddson Thomas Acuff.
  Political family: Acuff family of Maynardville, Tennessee.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about Roy Acuff: Elizabeth Schlappi, Roy Acuff: The Smoky Mountain Boy
  Roscoe Conkling Simmons (d. 1951) — of Chicago, Cook County, Ill. Born in Mississippi. Republican. Orator, writer, columnist for the Chicago Tribune; first African-American columnist for a Chicago daily newspaper; delegate to Republican National Convention from Illinois, 1928 (alternate), 1932, 1936 (member, Credentials Committee), 1948; candidate in primary for U.S. Representative from Illinois 1st District, 1938. African ancestry. Died in 1951. Burial location unknown.
  Presumably named for: Roscoe Conkling
  Relatives: Nephew by marriage of Booker T. Washington.
  Herbert Young Cho Choy (1916-2004) — also known as Herbert Y. C. Choy — of Honolulu, Island of Oahu, Honolulu County, Hawaii. Born in Makaweli, Island of Kauai, Kauai County, Hawaii, January 6, 1916. Lawyer; served in the U.S. Army during World War II; law partner of Hiram Fong; Hawaii territory attorney general, 1957-58; Judge of U.S. Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit, 1971-84; took senior status 1984. Korean ancestry. First person of Korean ancestry to be admitted to the practice of law in the United States; first Asian-American federal judge. Died in Honolulu, Island of Oahu, Honolulu County, Hawaii, March 10, 2004 (age 88 years, 64 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Doo Wook Choy and Helen (Nahm) Choy; married, June 16, 1945, to Dorothy Helen Shular.
  Cross-reference: Christopher Cox
  See also federal judicial profile
  Charles Poletti (1903-2002) — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born in Barre, Washington County, Vt., July 2, 1903. Democrat. Lawyer; delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1936 (alternate), 1940; Justice of New York Supreme Court 1st District, 1937-38; appointed 1937; delegate to New York state constitutional convention at-large, 1938; Lieutenant Governor of New York, 1939-42; defeated, 1942; Governor of New York, 1942-43; colonel in the U.S. Army during World War II. Baptist. Italian ancestry. Member, Urban League; American Bar Association; Knights of Pythias; Elks; Phi Beta Kappa. First American of Italian ancestry to serve as a Governor. During World War II, he was a senior officer in the Allied Military Government of occupied Italy. Died in Marco Island, Collier County, Fla., August 7, 2002 (age 99 years, 36 days). Interment at Calkins Cemetery, Elizabethtown, N.Y.
  Relatives: Married to Jean Knox Ellis (1904-1974).
  The Charles Poletti Power Plant (opened 1977, renamed for Poletti 1982, shut down 2010), in Astoria, Queens, New York, was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Arcada Stark Balz (1879-1973) — also known as Arcada Balz — of Indianapolis, Marion County, Ind. Born in Monroe County, Ind., December 31, 1879. Republican. School teacher; member of Indiana state senate, 1943; First woman elected to Indiana State Senate; alternate delegate to Republican National Convention from Indiana, 1944. Female. Methodist. Died August 18, 1973 (age 93 years, 230 days). Interment at Crown Hill Cemetery, Indianapolis, Ind.
  Jacqueline Cochran Odlum (1906-1980) — also known as Jacqueline C. Odlum; Jackie Odlum; Bessie Lee Pittman; Jacqueline Cochran — Born in Muscogee, Escambia County, Fla., May 11, 1906. Republican. Beautician; airplane pilot; during World War II, she trained many women pilots for duty ferrying supplies; she was the first woman ever to take off and land on an aircraft carrier, the first woman pilot ever to break the sound barrier, and to exceed Mach 2; in 1952, she was one of the leaders of the "Draft Ike" movement to nominate Dwight D. Eisenhower for president; candidate for U.S. Representative from California 29th District, 1956; elected to Aviation Hall of Fame, 1971. Female. Died in Indio, Riverside County, Calif., August 7, 1980 (age 74 years, 88 days). Interment at Coachella Valley Public Cemetery, Coachella, Calif.
  Relatives: Daughter of Ira Pittman and Mary (Grant) Pittman; married 1936 to Floyd Odlum (chairman, RKO movie studios).
  Jacqueline Cochran Regional Airport, in Thermal, California, is named for her.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Mildred Frick Taylor (1905-1981) — also known as Mildred F. Taylor — of Lyons, Wayne County, N.Y. Born April 21, 1905. Republican. Coal dealer; delegate to Republican National Convention from New York, 1940, 1948, 1952 (alternate), 1960; chair of Wayne County Republican Party, 1943-56; member of New York Republican State Executive Committee, 1945; member of New York state assembly from Wayne County, 1947-60; Presidential Elector for New York, 1956. Female. First woman to be elected a Republican county chair in New York State. Died, in Clifton Springs Hospital, Clifton Springs, Ontario County, N.Y., January 4, 1981 (age 75 years, 258 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Married to Paul Taylor (died 1969).
  Janet Hill Gordon (1915-1990) — also known as Janet Hill — of Norwich, Chenango County, N.Y. Born in New York, New York County, N.Y., January 11, 1915. Republican. Lawyer; member of New York Republican State Committee, 1942-46; Chenango County Attorney, 1944-45; first woman county attorney in New York State; member of New York state assembly from Chenango County, 1947-58; alternate delegate to Republican National Convention from New York, 1948; member of New York state senate 46th District, 1959-62; candidate for U.S. Representative from New York 35th District, 1962. Female. Episcopalian. Member, American Bar Association; Daughters of the American Revolution; Grange; Gamma Phi Beta; Delta Kappa Gamma; Order of the Eastern Star; American Legion Auxiliary. Died September 17, 1990 (age 75 years, 249 days). Interment at Mt. Hope Cemetery, Norwich, N.Y.
  Relatives: Daughter of James Perminter Hill (1878-1950) and Florine (Hall) Hill (1879-1951); married to William J. Gordon.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Harry S. McAlpin (b. 1906) — of Louisville, Jefferson County, Ky. Born in St. Louis, Mo., July 21, 1906. Democrat. Newspaper correspondent; in 1944, was the first African-American reporter to attend a White House news conference; lawyer; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Kentucky, 1956. Congregationalist. African ancestry. Member, NAACP; Alpha Phi Alpha; Freemasons; Elks. Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Harry S. McAlpin, Sr. and Louise (Scott) McAlpin; married 1929 to Alice Stokes.
  Bess Myerson (1924-2014) — Born in Bronx, Bronx County, N.Y., July 16, 1924. Democrat. Miss America, 1945; first and only Jewish woman to win the pageant; musician; television personality; New York City commissioner of consumer affairs, 1969-73, and commissioner of cultural affairs, 1983-87; candidate in primary for U.S. Senator from New York, 1980; accused in 1987 of bribing Justice Hortense Gabel by giving her daughter a city job; meanwhile, the judge reduced child support payments for Carl Andrew Capasso, Myerson's married lover; the scandal was called the "Bess Mess"; she was forced to resign as city consumer affairs commissioner; indicted on federal bribery charges in 1988, along with Capasso and Gabel; tried and found not guilty. Female. Jewish. Died in Santa Monica, Los Angeles County, Calif., December 14, 2014 (age 90 years, 151 days). Interment at Woodlawn Cemetery, Santa Monica, Calif.
  Relatives: Daughter of Louis Myerson and Bella (Podell) Myerson; married 1946 to Allan Wayne; married 1962 to Arnold Grant.
  Epitaph: "You Will Always Be Our Queen."
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Frank John Calvert (1875-1947) — also known as Frank J. Calvert — of Highland Park, Wayne County, Mich. Born in Champaign, Champaign County, Ill., March 2, 1875. Republican. Member of Michigan state house of representatives from Wayne County 2nd District, 1929-47; died in office 1947. First member of the Michigan House of Representatives to serve ten consecutive terms. Died in Highland Park, Wayne County, Mich., August 29, 1947 (age 72 years, 180 days). Interment at Riverside Cemetery, Albion, Mich.
  Relatives: Son of John Calvert (born 1834) and Mary (Threadgould) Calvert; married to Olive Rogers (1878-1959).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Theodore Carter Achilles (1905-1986) — also known as Theodore C. Achilles — of Washington, D.C. Born in Rochester, Monroe County, N.Y., December 29, 1905. Newspaper work; Foreign Service officer; U.S. Vice Consul in Havana, as of 1932; Rome, as of 1933; while serving as director of the State Department's Division of Western European Affairs in 1947-49, was one of the main architects of the North Atlantic Treaty, the founding document of NATO; U.S. Ambassador to Peru, 1956-60. Member, Beta Theta Pi; Council on Foreign Relations. Suffered an embolism, and died, in the Washington Hospital Center, Washington, D.C., April 8, 1986 (age 80 years, 100 days). Entombed at St. John's Church Cemetery, Lafayette Square, Washington, D.C.
  Relatives: Son of Henry Laurence Achilles and Gertrude (Strong) Achilles; married, June 4, 1933, to Marian Field; nephew of George Robert Carter (1866-1933).
  See also Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Oliver White Hill (1907-2007) — also known as Oliver W. Hill — of Richmond, Va. Born in Richmond, Va., May 1, 1907. Democrat. Lawyer; served in the U.S. Army during World War II; in 1947, he was elected as the first Black member of Richmond's city council since Reconstruction; candidate for Presidential Elector for Virginia, 1972. African ancestry. Member, NAACP. Received the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1999, and the Spingarn Medal in 2005. Died in Richmond, Va., August 5, 2007 (age 100 years, 96 days). Interment at Forest Lawn Cemetery, Richmond, Va.
  Relatives: Married, September 5, 1934, to Beresenia Ann Walker (1911-1993).
  See also Wikipedia article
  John C. Youle (1916-1999) — also known as Clint Youle — of Illinois. Born April 4, 1916. Republican. Broadcaster; one of the first to present the weather on television, in 1948; member of Illinois state house of representatives; elected 1964. Died in a hospital at Galena, Jo Daviess County, Ill., July 23, 1999 (age 83 years, 110 days). Burial location unknown.
  Mary V. Beck (1908-2005) — of Detroit, Wayne County, Mich. Born in Ford City, Armstrong County, Pa., February 29, 1908. Democrat. Social worker; lawyer; member, Detroit City Council, 1950-70 (first woman to be elected); candidate in primary for U.S. Representative from Michigan 16th District, 1950; candidate in primary for mayor of Detroit, Mich., 1969. Female. Eastern Orthodox. Ukrainian ancestry. Died, in St. Joseph Mercy Hospital, Clinton Township, Macomb County, Mich., January 30, 2005 (age 97 years, 0 days). Interment at St. Andrew Ukrainian Orthodox Cemetery, South Bound Brook, N.J.
  Relatives: Daughter of Michael Beck and Anna (Woytowych) Beck.
  Campaign slogan (1969): "Sweep the Deck with Mary Beck."
  William J. Winchester — of Wilmington, New Castle County, Del. Republican. Member of Delaware state house of representatives from New Castle County 1st District, 1949-52; defeated, 1944. African ancestry. He was the first Black member of the Delaware legislature. Presumed deceased. Burial location unknown.
Walt Disney Walter Elias Disney (1901-1966) — also known as Walt Disney; "Uncle Walt" — of Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, Calif. Born in Chicago, Cook County, Ill., December 5, 1901. Republican. Candidate for Presidential Elector for California, 1944. Irish ancestry. Producer or director of several hundred films from 1922 until the 1960s; creator and first voice of Mickey Mouse; founder of Disney entertainment company and of Disneyland, the world's first theme park; recipient of the Presidential Medal of Freedom on September 14, 1964. In honor of his invention of the multiplane camera, he is an inductee to the National Inventors Hall of Fame. Died, of lung cancer, in Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, Calif., December 15, 1966 (age 65 years, 10 days). Cremated; ashes interred at Forest Lawn Memorial Park, Glendale, Calif.; statue erected 1993 at Disneyland, Anaheim, Calif.
  Relatives: Son of Elias Disney (1859-1941) and Flora (Call) Disney (1868-1938); married, July 13, 1925, to Lillian Marie Bounds (1899-1997).
  Cross-reference: George J. Mitchell
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about Walt Disney: Richard Schickel, The Disney Version: The Life, Times, Art and Commerce of Walt Disney — Leonard Mosley, Disney's World: A Biography — Katherine Greene & Richard Greene, The Man Behind the Magic: The Story of Walt Disney — Bob Thomas, Walt Disney: An American Original — Jean-Pierre Isbouts, Discovering Walt: The Magical Life of Walt Disney (for young readers)
  Image source: Boy Scouts of America
  Carolyn C. Moore (b. 1904) — also known as Carrie Moore — of Franklin, Simpson County, Ky. Born in 1904. Member of Kentucky state senate 5th District, 1950. Female. First woman to serve in Kentucky Senate. Interment somewhere in Franklin, Ky.
  Relatives: Married to J. Lee Moore (1898-1949?).
  Ruth Thompson (1887-1970) — of Muskegon, Muskegon County, Mich.; Whitehall, Muskegon County, Mich. Born in Whitehall, Muskegon County, Mich., September 15, 1887. Republican. Muskegon County Register of Probate, 1905-25; probate judge in Michigan, 1925-36; lawyer; member of Michigan state house of representatives from Muskegon County 1st District, 1939-40; U.S. Representative from Michigan 9th District, 1951-57; defeated in primary, 1956. Female. Congregationalist or Methodist. First woman to represent Michigan in Congress; first woman to serve in the Judiciary Committee of the U.S. House of Representatives. Died in Plainwell Sanatorium, Plainwell, Allegan County, Mich., April 5, 1970 (age 82 years, 202 days). Interment at Oakhurst Cemetery, Whitehall, Mich.
  Relatives: Daughter of Tom Thompson and Brita (Nelson) Thompson.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Dalip Singh Saund (1899-1973) — also known as D. S. Saund — of Westmorland, Imperial County, Calif. Born in Amritsar, Punjab, India, September 20, 1899. Democrat. Naturalized U.S. citizen; farmer; fertilizer dealer; state court judge in California, 1952-57; delegate to Democratic National Convention from California, 1956 (alternate), 1960; U.S. Representative from California 29th District, 1957-63. Indian subcontinent ancestry. Member, Lions; Toastmasters. First native of India to be elected to a U.S. public office. Died in Hollywood, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, Calif., April 22, 1973 (age 73 years, 214 days). Cremated; ashes interred at Forest Lawn Memorial Park, Glendale, Calif.
  Relatives: Son of Natha Singh Saund and Jeoni (Kaur) Saund; married, July 21, 1928, to Marian Z. Kosa.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Samuel Roman (1910-1998) — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born, in a hospital, in New York, New York County, N.Y., August 26, 1910. Republican. Member of New York state assembly from New York County 15th District, 1947-54; defeated, 1942 (New York County 23rd District), 1944 (New York County 15th District), 1954 (New York County 15th District). Jewish. Member, B'nai B'rith. Author and sponsor of nation's first law against racial discrimination in places of public accomodation, 1953. Died, of a stroke, in Spring Valley, Rockland County, N.Y., September 11, 1998 (age 88 years, 16 days). Interment at Riverside Cemetery, Saddle Brook, N.J.
Frances E. Willis Frances Elizabeth Willis (1899-1983) — also known as Frances E. Willis — of Redlands, San Bernardino County, Calif. Born in Metropolis, Massac County, Ill., May 20, 1899. College professor; Foreign Service officer; U.S. Vice Consul in Valparaiso, 1928-31; Santiago, 1931-32; U.S. Consul in Madrid, 1940-43; London, 1947-50; U.S. Ambassador to Switzerland, 1953-57; Norway, 1957-61; Ceylon, 1961-64. Female. Episcopalian. Member, Phi Beta Kappa. She was the first female career foreign service officer to serve as Ambassador. Died in Redlands, San Bernardino County, Calif., July 23, 1983 (age 84 years, 64 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Daughter of John Gilbert Willis and Belle Whitfield (James) Willis.
  See also U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier
  Image source: U.S. State Department
  Frances Payne Bolton (1885-1977) — also known as Frances P. Bolton; Frances Payne Bingham — of Lyndhurst, Cuyahoga County, Ohio. Born in Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, Ohio, March 29, 1885. Republican. Member of Ohio Republican State Central Committee, 1938-40; U.S. Representative from Ohio 22nd District, 1940-69; delegate to Republican National Convention from Ohio, 1948 (speaker), 1952 (Honorary Vice-President), 1956, 1960, 1964, 1968. Female. Presbyterian. Member, League of Women Voters; National Trust for Historic Preservation; Daughters of the American Revolution. First woman member of Congress to head a mission abroad, 1955. Died in Lyndhurst, Cuyahoga County, Ohio, March 9, 1977 (age 91 years, 345 days). Interment at Lake View Cemetery, Cleveland, Ohio.
  Relatives: Daughter of Charles William Bingham (1846-1929) and Mary Perry (Payne) Bingham (1854-1898); married, September 14, 1907, to Chester Castle Bolton; mother of Oliver Payne Bolton; granddaughter of Henry B. Payne; first cousin once removed of Cornelius Vanderbilt Whitney and John Hay Whitney (1904-1982); second cousin five times removed of Erastus Wolcott and Oliver Wolcott, Sr.; third cousin twice removed of Leveret Brainard; third cousin thrice removed of Amaziah Brainard; fourth cousin of Benjamin Lewis Fairchild; fourth cousin once removed of George Buckingham Beecher.
  Political families: Roosevelt family of New York City, New York; Wolcott-Wadsworth family of Connecticut and Maryland; Bolton-Whitney-Brainard-Wolcott family of Cleveland, Ohio; Hay-Morton-Turner-Wadsworth family of Taunton, Massachusetts; Whitney-Nye family of Massachusetts and New York (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Bessie Allison Buchanan (1902-1980) — also known as Bessie A. Buchanan — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born in New York, New York County, N.Y., March 7, 1902. Democrat. Actress; member of New York state assembly from New York County 12th District, 1955-62; alternate delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1956. Female. Episcopalian. African ancestry. Member, Screen Actors Guild; Urban League. First Black woman member of the New York legislature. Died in September, 1980 (age 78 years, 0 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Married to Charles P. Buchanan.
  William Cato Cramer (1922-2003) — also known as William C. Cramer; Bill Cramer; "Mr. Republican" — of St. Petersburg, Pinellas County, Fla.; Tarpon Springs, Pinellas County, Fla. Born in Denver, Colo., August 4, 1922. Republican. Served in the U.S. Navy during World War II; lawyer; member of Florida state legislature, 1950-52; U.S. Representative from Florida, 1955-71 (1st District 1955-63, 12th District 1963-67, 8th District 1967-71); defeated, 1952; first Republican congressman from Florida since Reconstruction; delegate to Republican National Convention from Florida, 1956, 1960, 1972; member of Republican National Committee from Florida, 1964-68; candidate for U.S. Senator from Florida, 1970; Presidential Elector for Florida, 1972. Methodist. Member, Veterans of Foreign Wars; American Legion; Amvets; Elks; Moose; Freemasons; Order of the Eastern Star; Shriners; Order of Ahepa. Died, from complications of a heart attack, in South Pasadena, Pinellas County, Fla., October 18, 2003 (age 81 years, 75 days). Interment at Woodlawn Memory Gardens, St. Petersburg, Fla.
  Relatives: Son of Walter B. Cramer (1893-1979) and Doreen E. Cramer (1899-1965).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
  George William Crockett, Jr. (1909-1997) — also known as George W. Crockett, Jr. — of Detroit, Wayne County, Mich. Born in Jacksonville, Duval County, Fla., August 10, 1909. Democrat. Recorder's court judge in Michigan, 1966-78; U.S. Representative from Michigan 13th District, 1980-91; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Michigan, 1984, 1988; arrested during an anti-apartheid protest outside the South African Embassy in Washington, 1984. Baptist. African ancestry. Member, Kappa Alpha Psi; National Lawyers Guild. Served four months in federal prison for contempt of court in 1950, following his defense of a Communist leader on trial in New York for advocating the overthrow of the government. Among the founders of the nation's first interracial law firm. Ill with bone cancer in 1997, he suffered a stroke and died five days later, in Washington Home and Hospice, Washington, D.C., September 7, 1997 (age 88 years, 28 days). Cremated.
  Relatives: Father of George W. Crockett III (1926?-).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  Margaret Towsley (1906-1994) — also known as Margaret Grace Dow — of Ann Arbor, Washtenaw County, Mich. Born January 3, 1906. Republican. First woman member of the Ann Arbor City Council; candidate for Presidential Elector for Michigan, 1964. Female. Died, of a stroke, at St. Joseph Mercy Hospital, Superior Township, Washtenaw County, Mich., May 2, 1994 (age 88 years, 119 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Daughter of Herbert Henry Dow (1866-1930; founder, Dow Chemical); sister of Alden Dow (1904-1983; architect) and Ruth Alden Dow (who married Leland Ira Doan (1894-1974)); married to Harry A. Towsley (1905-1993); mother of Margaret Ann Riecker; aunt of Ruth Elizabeth Hale (who married Wiley Thomas Buchanan, Jr.).
  Political family: Dow-Towsley-Hale-Buchanan family of Ann Arbor and Midland, Michigan.
  Stephen Cornelius O'Connell (1916-2001) — also known as Stephen C. O'Connell — of Florida. Born in West Palm Beach, Palm Beach County, Fla., January 22, 1916. Major in the U.S. Army during World War II; lawyer; justice of Florida state supreme court, 1955-67; appointed 1955; chief justice of Florida state supreme court, 1966-67; first Catholic to win a statewide election in Florida, 1956; president, University of Florida, 1967-73. Catholic. Died, of cancer, in Tallahassee, Leon County, Fla., April 13, 2001 (age 85 years, 81 days). Burial location unknown.
  The O'Connell Center sports arena, at the University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, is named for him.
  John W. Gibson (1910-1976) — of Michigan. Born in Harrisburg, Saline County, Ill., August 23, 1910. Democrat. Assistant U.S. Secretary of Labor, 1945-49;; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Michigan, 1948; chairman, U.S. Displaced Persons Commission, 1950-52; banker. In 1957, was one of the first owners of a McDonald's Hamburgers franchise in the Washington area. Died, following a heart attack, in a hospital at Lewes, Sussex County, Del., October 22, 1976 (age 66 years, 60 days). Interment at Columbia Gardens Cemetery, Arlington, Va.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  William Robert Anderson (1921-2007) — also known as William R. Anderson — of Waverly, Humphreys County, Tenn.; Leesburg, Loudoun County, Va. Born in Bakerville, Humphreys County, Tenn., June 17, 1921. Independent candidate for Governor of Tennessee, 1962; U.S. Representative from Tennessee 6th District, 1965-73. Protestant. Member, American Legion; Veterans of Foreign Wars; Amvets. Commanded the U.S.S. Nautilus on the first under-ice crossing of the North Pole, 1958. Died in Leesburg, Loudoun County, Va., February 25, 2007 (age 85 years, 253 days). Interment at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Va.
  Relatives: Son of David Hensley Anderson and Mary (McKelvey) Anderson; married, June 10, 1943, to Yvonne Etzel (divorced).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Daniel Ken Inouye (1924-2012) — also known as Daniel K. Inouye — of Honolulu, Island of Oahu, Honolulu County, Hawaii. Born in Honolulu, Island of Oahu, Honolulu County, Hawaii, September 7, 1924. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army during World War II; lawyer; member of Hawaii territorial House of Representatives, 1954-58; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Hawaii Territory, 1956; member of Hawaii territorial senate, 1958-59; U.S. Representative from Hawaii at-large, 1959-63; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Hawaii, 1960, 1972, 1980, 1996, 2000, 2004, 2008 (delegation chair); Temporary Chair, 1968; speaker, 1968; Co-Chair, 1984; U.S. Senator from Hawaii, 1963-. Methodist. Japanese ancestry. Member, American Bar Association; Disabled American Veterans; Phi Delta Phi; Lions. Lost his right arm as the result of a combat injury in Italy during World War II. His Distinguished Service Cross was upgraded in 2000 to a Medal of Honor. First American of Japanese descent to serve in Congress. Died, from respiratory failure, in Walter Reed Hospital, Bethesda, Montgomery County, Md., December 17, 2012 (age 88 years, 101 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Hyotaro I. Inouye and Kame Imanaga Inouye; married, June 12, 1949, to Margaret Shinobu Awamura.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — votes in Congress from the Washington Post — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile
Charles C. Diggs, Jr. Charles Coles Diggs, Jr. (1922-1998) — also known as Charles C. Diggs, Jr. — of Detroit, Wayne County, Mich. Born in Detroit, Wayne County, Mich., December 2, 1922. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army Air Force in World War II; mortician; member of Michigan state senate 3rd District, 1951-54; U.S. Representative from Michigan 13th District, 1955-80; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Michigan, 1956, 1960, 1964, 1968, 1976 (alternate); candidate for Presidential Elector for Michigan, 1956. Baptist. African ancestry. Member, Elks; Freemasons; American Legion. First chairman of the Congressional Black Caucus; charged in March 1978 with taking kickbacks from staff whose salaries he raised; convicted, October 7, 1978, on eleven counts of mail fraud and filing false payroll forms; insisted he had done nothing wrong, and was re-elected while awaiting sentencing; censured by the House on July 31, 1979; sentenced to three years in prison and served 14 months. Died, of a stroke, at Greater Southwest Community Hospital, Washington, D.C., August 24, 1998 (age 75 years, 265 days). Interment at Detroit Memorial Park East, Warren, Mich.
  Relatives: Son of Charles Coles Diggs, Sr. (1894-1967).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: Michigan Manual 1957-58
  Horacio Rivero (1910-2000) — also known as "Rivets" — of California. Born in Ponce, Ponce Municipio, Puerto Rico, May 16, 1910. Served in the U.S. Navy during World War II; served in the U.S. Navy during the Korean conflict; U.S. Ambassador to Spain, 1972-74. Puerto Rican ancestry. First U.S. Navy four-star admiral of Hispanic heritage. Died in Coronado, San Diego County, Calif., September 24, 2000 (age 90 years, 131 days). Cremated; ashes interred at Fort Rosecrans National Cemetery, San Diego, Calif.
  Relatives: Married to Hazel Rivero (1908-1997).
  See also U.S. State Dept career summary
  Charles Evans Boineau, Jr. (b. 1923) — of South Carolina. Born in Columbia, Richland County, S.C., September 27, 1923. Republican. Served in the U.S. Navy during World War II; member of South Carolina state house of representatives, 1961-62; defeated, 1962, 1964; delegate to Republican National Convention from South Carolina, 1964. Member, Rotary. Elected to the South Carolina House of Representatives in August 1961; he was the first Republican representative since 1900. Presumed deceased. Burial location unknown.
  Otis Milton Smith (1922-1994) — also known as Otis M. Smith — of Flint, Genesee County, Mich. Born in Memphis, Shelby County, Tenn., February 20, 1922. Democrat. Lawyer; Michigan state auditor general, 1959-61; alternate delegate to Democratic National Convention from Michigan, 1960; justice of Michigan state supreme court, 1961-66; appointed 1961; defeated, 1966; first Black member of the Michigan Supreme Court; member of University of Michigan board of regents, 1967-71; Presidential Elector for Michigan, 1968; vice-president and general counsel of General Motors. African ancestry. Member, Urban League; Kiwanis. Died, of prostate cancer, in Detroit, Wayne County, Mich., June 29, 1994 (age 72 years, 129 days). Burial location unknown.
  Books by Otis M. Smith: Looking Beyond Race : The Life of Otis Milton Smith (2000)
  John Herschel Glenn, Jr. (1921-2016) — also known as John Glenn — of Columbus, Franklin County, Ohio. Born in Cambridge, Guernsey County, Ohio, July 18, 1921. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Marine Corps during World War II; Astronaut; in February 1962, first American to orbit the earth; U.S. Senator from Ohio, 1975-99; candidate for Democratic nomination for President, 1984; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Ohio, 1996, 2004, 2008. Presbyterian. Member, Freemasons; Scottish Rite Masons. Died December 8, 2016 (age 95 years, 143 days). Interment at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Va.
  Relatives: Married 1943 to Anna Margaret Castor.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — votes in Congress from the Washington Post — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile
  Books by John Glenn: John Glenn: A Memoir (1999)
  Books about John Glenn: Robert Green, John Glenn : Astronaut and U.S. Senator (for young readers)
  Sarah Tilghman Hughes (1896-1985) — of Texas. Born in Baltimore, Md., August 2, 1896. Member of Texas state house of representatives, 1931-35; district judge in Texas, 1935-61; U.S. District Judge for the Northern District of Texas, 1961. Female. In 1963, she became the first woman to swear in a President of the United States. Died April 23, 1985 (age 88 years, 264 days). Interment at Sparkman Hillcrest Memorial Park, Dallas, Tex.
  Elizabeth McCullough Johnson (1909-1973) — of Orlando, Orange County, Fla. Born in Pennsylvania, 1909. Member of Florida state house of representatives, 1959-62; member of Florida state senate, 1963-67. Female. Member, League of Women Voters. first woman to serve in the Florida Senate; inducted 1986 into the Florida Women's Hall of Fame. Died in 1973 (age about 64 years). Burial location unknown.
  John William King (1918-1996) — also known as John W. King — of Manchester, Hillsborough County, N.H.; Goffstown, Hillsborough County, N.H. Born in Manchester, Hillsborough County, N.H., October 10, 1918. Democrat. Member of New Hampshire state house of representatives, 1954-62; delegate to New Hampshire state constitutional convention from Manchester 10th Ward, 1956; Governor of New Hampshire, 1963-69; candidate for U.S. Senator from New Hampshire, 1968; superior court judge in New Hampshire, 1969-79; justice of New Hampshire state supreme court, 1979-81; chief justice of New Hampshire state supreme court, 1981-86. Catholic. Member, American Bar Association; American Judicature Society; Knights of Columbus; Elks; Eagles; Moose. Started the first modern state lottery in 1963. Died, of heart trouble, at a nursing home in Manchester, Hillsborough County, N.H., October 9, 1996 (age 77 years, 365 days). Interment at New St. Joseph's Cemetery, Bedford, N.H.
  Samuel Riley Pierce, Jr. (1922-2000) — also known as Samuel R. Pierce, Jr.; "Silent Sam" — Born in Glen Cove, Nassau County, Long Island, N.Y., September 8, 1922. Served in the U.S. Army during World War II; U.S. Secretary of Housing and Urban Development, 1981-89. African ancestry. Member, Phi Beta Kappa; Alpha Phi Alpha. First Black partner of a major New York City law firm. First Black member of the board of directors of a Fortune 500 corporation. Only Black member of the Reagan Cabinet. An independent counsel appointed in March 1990 found "a pervasive pattern of improper and illegal behavior" within HUD, amounting to a "monumental and calculated abuse of the public trust." Pierce acknowledged that he helped create a climate in which the corruption took place, and in return for that statement, prosecutors agreed not to pursue charges against him. Died October 31, 2000 (age 78 years, 53 days). Burial location unknown.
  See also NNDB dossier
  William Fitts Ryan (1922-1972) — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born in Albion, Orleans County, N.Y., June 28, 1922. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army during World War II; lawyer; U.S. Representative from New York 20th District, 1961-72; died in office 1972; candidate in primary for mayor of New York City, N.Y., 1965; delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1968. Member, Americans for Democratic Action. First member of the U.S. House to speak out against the Vietnam War. Died in New York, New York County, N.Y., September 17, 1972 (age 50 years, 81 days). Interment at St. Thomas Church Cemetery, Croom, Md.
  Relatives: Son of Bernard Ryan, Sr.; married to Priscilla Marbury Ryan; grandson of William Cochrane Fitts (1866-1954).
  Political family: Ryan family of Albion and New York City, New York.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Harvey B. Gantt (b. 1943) — of Charlotte, Mecklenburg County, N.C. Born in Charleston, Charleston County, S.C., 1943. Democrat. First Black student at Clemson University in South Carolina; graduated with honors in 1965; architect; mayor of Charlotte, N.C., 1983-87; candidate for U.S. Senator from North Carolina, 1990, 1996; delegate to Democratic National Convention from North Carolina, 1996. African ancestry. Still living as of 1996.
  Dorothy Haener (1917-2001) — of New Boston, Wayne County, Mich. Born in Detroit, Wayne County, Mich., 1917. Democrat. Alternate delegate to Democratic National Convention from Michigan, 1976, 1980. Female. Member, National Organization for Women; United Auto Workers. Among the founders of the National Organization for Women in 1966. Died, of congestive heart failure, in Oakwood Hospital Seaway Center, Trenton, Wayne County, Mich., January 6, 2001 (age about 83 years). Interment at Michigan Memorial Park, Huron Township, Wayne County, Mich.
  Robert Clifton Weaver (1907-1997) — also known as Robert C. Weaver — of Washington, D.C.; Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born in Washington, D.C., December 29, 1907. Democrat. Economist; received the Spingarn Medal in 1962; U.S. Secretary of Housing and Urban Development, 1966-68; first African-American cabinet member; speaker, Democratic National Convention, 1968 ; president, Baruch College, 1969; trustee, Mount Sinai Medical Center. Methodist. African ancestry. Member, NAACP; Americans for Democratic Action. Died in Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., July 17, 1997 (age 89 years, 200 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Mortimer G. Weaver and Florence (Freeman) Weaver; married, July 19, 1935, to Ella V. Hiath (c.1911-1991).
  The Robert C. Weaver Federal Building (opened 1968; named 2000; headquarters of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development), in Washington, D.C., is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Herbert Arlene (1917-1989) — of Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa. Born in Harrison, Washington County, Ga., September 5, 1917. Democrat. Member of Pennsylvania state house of representatives, 1959-66; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Pennsylvania, 1960 (alternate), 1964, 1984; member of Pennsylvania state senate 3rd District, 1967-80. African Methodist Episcopal. African ancestry. Member, NAACP; Urban League; Freemasons; Shriners; Odd Fellows; Elks. First Black member of the Pennsylvania state senate. Died November 9, 1989 (age 72 years, 65 days). Burial location unknown.
  Edward William Brooke III (1919-2015) — also known as Edward W. Brooke — of Newton Center, Newton, Middlesex County, Mass. Born in Washington, D.C., October 26, 1919. Republican. Served in the U.S. Army during World War II; lawyer; candidate for secretary of state of Massachusetts, 1960; Massachusetts state attorney general, 1963-67; U.S. Senator from Massachusetts, 1967-79; defeated, 1978. Episcopalian. African ancestry. Member, American Bar Association; American Academy of Arts and Sciences; Amvets; Alpha Phi Alpha. First Black U.S. Senator in the 20th century; recipient of the Spingarn Medal in 1967. Died in Coral Gables, Miami-Dade County, Fla., January 3, 2015 (age 95 years, 69 days). Interment at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Va.
  Relatives: Son of Edward W. Brooke and Helen (Seldon) Brooke; married, June 7, 1947, to Remigia Ferrari Scacco.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Thurgood Marshall (1908-1993) — also known as Thoroughgood Marshall — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born in Baltimore, Md., July 2, 1908. Judge of U.S. Court of Appeals for the 2nd Circuit, 1961-65; resigned 1965; U.S. Solicitor General, 1965-67; Associate Justice of U.S. Supreme Court, 1967-91; took senior status 1991. Episcopalian. African ancestry. Member, Freemasons; NAACP; National Bar Association; Alpha Phi Alpha; American Civil Liberties Union. Received Spingarn Medal in 1946 First African-American Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court. Died, from a heart attack, in the National Naval Medical Center, Bethesda, Montgomery County, Md., January 24, 1993 (age 84 years, 206 days). Interment at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Va.; memorial monument at Lawyers' Mall, Annapolis, Md.
  Relatives: Married, September 4, 1929, to Vivien Burey (died 1955); married, December 17, 1955, to Cecilia Suyat; father of Thurgood Marshall, Jr. (1956-).
  Political family: Marshall family of New York City, New York.
  Cross-reference: William Curtis Bryson
  See also federal judicial profile — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about Thurgood Marshall: Juan Williams, Thurgood Marshall : American Revolutionary — Randall W. Bland, Justice Thurgood Marshall, Crusader for Liberalism : His Judicial Biography — Mark V. Tushnet, Making Constitutional Law: Thurgood Marshall and the Supreme Court, 1961-1991 — Mark V. Tushnet, Making Civil Rights Law: Thurgood Marshall and the Supreme Court, 1936-1961 — Gilbert King, Devil in the Grove: Thurgood Marshall, the Groveland Boys, and the Dawn of a New America
  Frank Savickas (1935-2001) — of Chicago, Cook County, Ill. Born in Chicago, Cook County, Ill., May 14, 1935. Democrat. Member of Illinois state house of representatives 27th District, 1967-71; member of Illinois state senate, 1971-93 (27th District 1971-83, 15th District 1983-93). Catholic. Lithuanian ancestry. Member, Moose; Knights of Columbus. First Lithuanian-American member of the Illinois legislature. Died in Venice, Sarasota County, Fla., May 14, 2001 (age 66 years, 0 days). Burial location unknown.
  Edward Hirsch Levi (1911-2000) — also known as Edward H. Levi — of Chicago, Cook County, Ill. Born in Chicago, Cook County, Ill., June 26, 1911. Lawyer; law professor; president of the University of Chicago, 1968-75; first Jewish president of a major U.S. university; U.S. Attorney General, 1975-77. Jewish. Member, American Bar Association; American Judicature Society; Phi Beta Kappa; Order of the Coif. Died, from Alzheimer's disease, in Chicago, Cook County, Ill., March 7, 2000 (age 88 years, 255 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Gerson B. Levi and Elsa B. (Hirsch) Levi; married, June 4, 1946, to Kate (Sulzberger) Hecht (1918-2003); father of David F. Levi (1951-).
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Books by Edward H. Levi: An Introduction to Legal Reasoning
  John W. Porter (1931-2012) — of East Lansing, Ingham County, Mich.; Ann Arbor, Washtenaw County, Mich. Born in Fort Wayne, Allen County, Ind., August 13, 1931. School teacher; Michigan superintendent of public instruction, 1969-79; first African-American state school superintendent; president, Eastern Michigan University, 1979-89. United Church of Christ. African ancestry. Member, Urban League; Phi Delta Kappa; NAACP. Died June 27, 2012 (age 80 years, 319 days). Burial location unknown.
  The John W. Porter Education Building (opened 1999), at Eastern Michigan University, Ypsilanti, Michigan, is named for him.
  Lois Shaw — of Jersey City, Hudson County, N.J. Democrat. Candidate for Presidential Elector for New Jersey, 1972; alternate delegate to Democratic National Convention from New Jersey, 1980. Female. First woman elected to the city council in Jersey City. Still living as of 2012.
  David W. Williams (1910-2000) — of Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, Calif. Born in Atlanta, Fulton County, Ga., March 20, 1910. Republican. Lawyer; municipal judge in California, 1956-62; superior court judge in California, 1963-69; U.S. District Judge for the Southern District of California, 1969-81. African ancestry. First Black federal judge west of the Mississippi. Died, of pneumonia, at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, Calif., May 6, 2000 (age 90 years, 47 days). Burial location unknown.
  Gwendolyn Sawyer Cherry (1923-1979) — also known as Gwen Cherry — of Florida. Born in Miami, Dade County (now Miami-Dade County), Fla., 1923. Lawyer; member of Florida state house of representatives, 1971-79. Female. African ancestry. first Black woman elected to the Florida legislature; inducted 1986 into the Florida Women's Hall of Fame. Died, in an automobile accident, in Tallahassee, Leon County, Fla., 1979 (age about 56 years). Burial location unknown.
  George M. Michaels (c.1910-1992) — of Auburn, Cayuga County, N.Y. Born about 1910. Democrat. Candidate for New York state senate 47th District, 1946; member of New York state assembly, 1961-66, 1969-70 (Cayuga County 1961-65, 137th District 1966, 122nd District 1969-70); defeated, 1942. Jewish. In April 1970, when the vote in the State Assembly was tied, he changed his vote and passed the bill which made New York the first state to legalize abortion. Died in 1992 (age about 82 years). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Father of Lee S. Michaels (1932?-).
  Lucy Phelps Patterson (c.1932-2000) — of Dallas, Dallas County, Tex. Born in Dallas, Dallas County, Tex., about 1932. Republican. Social worker; candidate for U.S. Representative from Texas 24th District, 1982. Female. Methodist. African ancestry. First Black woman ever elected to Dallas city council. Died, of pneumonia, in Dallas, Dallas County, Tex., June 15, 2000 (age about 68 years). Burial location unknown.
  Betty Wilson (c.1915-2000) — of Santa Fe Springs, Los Angeles County, Calif. Born about 1915. Democrat. Candidate for California state senate 33rd District, 1976. Female. One of the founders and leaders of the city of Santa Fe Springs. Died in Santa Fe Springs, Los Angeles County, Calif., March 14, 2000 (age about 85 years). Burial location unknown.
Herman Badillo Herman Badillo (1929-2014) — of Bronx, Bronx County, N.Y. Born in Caguas, Caguas Municipio, Puerto Rico, August 21, 1929. Lawyer; accountant; borough president of Bronx, New York, 1966-69; delegate to New York state constitutional convention 29th District, 1967; delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1968, 1972, 1976, 1980, 1988; candidate for mayor of New York City, N.Y., 1969 (Democratic primary), 1973 (Democratic primary), 1977 (Democratic primary), 2001 (Republican primary); U.S. Representative from New York 21st District, 1971-77; Democratic candidate for New York state comptroller, 1986. Protestant. Puerto Rican ancestry. Member, Beta Gamma Sigma. First person of Puerto Rican birth to have a vote in the U.S. Congress. Died in Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., December 3, 2014 (age 85 years, 104 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Francisco Badillo and Carmen (Rivera) Badillo; married, May 18, 1961, to Irma Deutsch (1932?-).
  Cross-reference: Charles M. Kinsolving, Jr.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: Library of Congress
Patience Latting Patience Latting (b. 1918) — also known as Patience Sewell; Mrs. Trimble B. Latting — of Oklahoma City, Oklahoma County, Okla. Born in Texhoma, Texas County, Okla., August 27, 1918. Mayor of Oklahoma City, Okla., 1971-83. Female. Member, American Association of University Women; League of Women Voters; Phi Beta Kappa; Pi Beta Phi. First woman to be mayor of a U.S. city over 350,000 population. Presumed deceased. Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Daughter of Frank Asa Sewell and Leila (Yates) Sewell; married, August 23, 1941, to Trimble B. Latting.
  Image source: City of Oklahoma City
  Theodore Moody Berry (1905-2000) — also known as Theodore M. Berry; Ted Berry — of Cincinnati, Hamilton County, Ohio. Born in Maysville, Mason County, Ky., November 5, 1905. Democrat. Lawyer; associate general counsel, Dunbar Life Insurance Co.; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Ohio, 1972; mayor of Cincinnati, Ohio, 1972-75. Methodist. African ancestry. Member, Freemasons; NAACP; Urban League; Alpha Phi Alpha; Sigma Pi Phi. First Black mayor of Cincinnati. Died October 15, 2000 (age 94 years, 345 days). Interment at Spring Grove Cemetery, Cincinnati, Ohio.
  Relatives: Son of Daniel Berry and Cora (Parks) Berry; married 1938 to Johnnie Mae Newton (1910-2002).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  James R. Ford (1925-2017) — of Tallahassee, Leon County, Fla. Born in Leon County, Fla., December 1, 1925. Mayor-commissioner of Tallahassee, Florida, 1972-73, 1976-77, 1982-83. African ancestry. Member, Urban League. First Black mayor of Tallahassee; also first Black mayor of any U.S. state capital city. Died October 11, 2017 (age 91 years, 314 days). Burial location unknown.
  See also Wikipedia article
  Theodora Nathalia Nathan (b. 1923) — also known as Theodora Nathan; Tonie Nathan — of Oregon. Born February 9, 1923. Libertarian. Candidate for Vice President of the United States, 1972; first woman in U.S. history to receive an Electoral College vote; candidate for U.S. Senator from Oregon, 1980; candidate for U.S. Representative from Oregon 4th District, 1990, 1996. Female. Still living as of 2002.
  Mark Wampler (born c.1952) — Born about 1952. Republican. Presidential Elector for Iowa, 1972. First presidential elector under the age of 21. Still living as of 2010.
  Elizabeth Richards Andujar (1912-1997) — also known as Betty Andujar; Elizabeth Richards — of Fort Worth, Tarrant County, Tex. Born in Harrisburg, Dauphin County, Pa., November 6, 1912. Republican. Delegate to Republican National Convention from Texas, 1968, 1976; member of Texas state senate, 1973-82; member of Republican National Committee from Texas, 1976-82. Female. Presbyterian. First woman member of the Texas Senate; first Republican member of the Texas Senate since Reconstruction. Died June 8, 1997 (age 84 years, 214 days). Interment at Texas State Cemetery, Austin, Tex.
  Relatives: Married 1935 to John Jose Andujar (1912-2003; physician).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Peter John Daley II (b. 1950) — also known as Peter J. Daley II; Pete Daley — of Coal Center, Washington County, Pa.; California, Washington County, Pa. Born in Brownsville General Hospital, Brownsville, Fayette County, Pa., August 8, 1950. Democrat. Lawyer; alternate delegate to Democratic National Convention from Pennsylvania, 1972; mayor of the Borough of California, Pa., 1973-81; youngest mayor in Pennsylvania at age 22; member of Pennsylvania state house of representatives 49th District, 1983-2003. United Church of Christ or Disciples of Christ. Member, Optimist Club. Still living as of 2003.
  Joan Heggen — of Tallahassee, Leon County, Fla. Born in Wisconsin. Mayor-commissioner of Tallahassee, Florida, 1973-74. Female. First woman mayor of Tallahassee; also first woman mayor of any U.S. state capital city. Still living as of 1974.
  See also Wikipedia article
  Arie Parks Taylor (1927-2003) — also known as Arie P. Taylor; "Denver's Bella Abzug" — of Denver, Colo. Born in Bedford, Cuyahoga County, Ohio, 1927. Democrat. Delegate to Democratic National Convention from Colorado, 1968, 1972 (alternate); member of Colorado state house of representatives 7th District, 1973-84; Denver clerk and recorder, 1991-95. Female. African ancestry. Colorado's first African-American woman legislator. Died, in Presbyterian/St. Luke's Hospital, Denver, Colo., September 27, 2003 (age about 76 years). Interment at Fort Logan National Cemetery, Denver, Colo.
  The Arie P. Taylor Municipal Center, in Denver, Colorado, is named for her.
  Abraham David Beame (1906-2001) — also known as Abraham D. Beame; Abe Beame; "Spunky" — of Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y.; Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born in London, England, March 20, 1906. Democrat. Accountant; delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1960 (alternate), 1964, 1980; mayor of New York City, N.Y., 1974-77; defeated, 1965, 1977; delegate to New York state constitutional convention 17th District, 1967. Jewish. First Jewish mayor of New York City. Died, from complications after heart surgery, in New York University Medical Center, New York, New York County, N.Y., February 10, 2001 (age 94 years, 327 days). Interment at New Montefiore Cemetery, Pinelawn, Long Island, N.Y.
  Campaign slogan (1973): "New York needs what Abe Beame knows."
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — Find-A-Grave memorial
  William Venoid Banks (1903-1985) — also known as William V. Banks — of Detroit, Wayne County, Mich. Born in Geneva, Henderson County, Ky., May 6, 1903. Lawyer; ordained minister; candidate in primary for circuit judge in Michigan 3rd Circuit, 1941; candidate in Democratic primary for Michigan state senate 3rd District, 1942; founder and president of WGPR-FM radio and WGPR-TV television station (in 1975, the first Black-owned and operated television station in the U.S.); candidate in Democratic primary for Michigan state house of representatives 10th District, 1966; delegate to Republican National Convention from Michigan, 1976. Baptist. African ancestry. Died in Detroit, Wayne County, Mich., August 24, 1985 (age 82 years, 110 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Married to Ivy Banks (1936?-).
  See also Wikipedia article
  Noel C. Taylor (1924-1998) — of Roanoke, Va. Born in Bedford County, Va., July 15, 1924. Republican. Baptist minister; alternate delegate to Republican National Convention from Virginia, 1972; mayor of Roanoke, Va., 1975-92. African ancestry. Member, Freemasons; NAACP. First Black mayor of Roanoke. Died in Roanoke, Va., October 29, 1998 (age 74 years, 106 days). Interment somewhere in Bedford County, Va.
Irma Rangel Irma Lerma Rangel (1931-2003) — also known as Irma Rangel — of Kingsville, Kleberg County, Tex. Born in Kingsville, Kleberg County, Tex., May 15, 1931. Democrat. School teacher; lawyer; member of Texas state house of representatives, 1977-2003 (49th District 1977-82, 37th District 1983-92, 35th District 1993-2002, 43rd District 2003); died in office 2003. Female. Mexican ancestry. In 1976, was the first Mexican-American woman elected to the Texas House. Died, of brain cancer, in Brackinridge Hospital, March 18, 2003 (age 71 years, 307 days). Interment at Texas State Cemetery, Austin, Tex.
  Relatives: Daughter of P. M. Rangel and Herminia L. Rangel.
  See also Texas Legislators Past & Present
  Image source: Texas Legislative Reference Library
  Patricia Roberts Harris (1924-1985) — also known as Patricia Roberts — of Washington, D.C. Born in Mattoon, Coles County, Ill., May 31, 1924. Democrat. Presidential Elector for District of Columbia, 1964; delegate to Democratic National Convention from District of Columbia, 1964; U.S. Ambassador to Luxembourg, 1965-67; U.S. Secretary of Housing and Urban Development, 1977-79; U.S. Secretary of Health, Education and Welfare, 1979-80; U.S. Secretary of Health and Human Services, 1980-81. Female. African ancestry. First African-American woman cabinet member; inducted, National Women's Hall of Fame, 2003. Died in Washington, D.C., March 23, 1985 (age 60 years, 296 days). Interment at Rock Creek Cemetery, Washington, D.C.
  Relatives: Married 1955 to William Beasley Harris.
  See also Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial — National Women's Hall of Fame
  Rose Ann Vuich (c.1927-2001) — of Dinuba, Tulare County, Calif. Born about 1927. Democrat. Accountant; farmer; member of California state senate, 1977-92. Female. Serbian ancestry. First woman member of the California Senate. Died, from complications of Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease, in Dinuba, Tulare County, Calif., August 30, 2001 (age about 74 years). Burial location unknown.
  Cross-reference: Calvin M. Dooley
  Ann Smith Bedsole (b. 1930) — also known as Ann Bedsole; Ann Smith; Mrs. Palmer Bedsole — of Mobile, Mobile County, Ala. Born in Selma, Dallas County, Ala., January 7, 1930. Republican. Delegate to Republican National Convention from Alabama, 1964 (alternate), 1972; member of Alabama Republican State Executive Committee, 1966; Presidential Elector for Alabama, 1972; member of Alabama state house of representatives, 1979-82; first Republican woman to be elected to the Alabama House; member of Alabama state senate, 1983-94; candidate for mayor of Mobile, Ala., 2005. Female. Methodist. Member, Junior League. Still living as of 2006.
  Relatives: Daughter of Malcolm White Smith and Sybil (Huey) Smith; married 1958 to Massey Palmer Bedsole, Jr.
  Oscar William Adams, Jr. (1925-1997) — also known as Oscar W. Adams — of Birmingham, Jefferson County, Ala. Born in Birmingham, Jefferson County, Ala., February 7, 1925. Lawyer; associate justice of Alabama state supreme court, 1980-93. African Methodist Episcopal. African ancestry. Member, National Bar Association; American Judicature Society; Omega Psi Phi; NAACP. First African-American ever elected to statewide office in Alabama. Died of an infection related to cancer, in Baptist Medical Center-Montclair, Birmingham, Jefferson County, Ala., February 15, 1997 (age 72 years, 8 days). Burial location unknown.
  Sherry Lansing (b. 1944) — of California. Born in Chicago, Cook County, Ill., July 31, 1944. Democrat. Delegate to Democratic National Convention from California, 2000. Female. Had a brief acting career; became a motion picture executive; as president of 20th Century Fox in 1980, was first woman to head a major studio; producer of five films, including Fatal Attraction, The Accused, and Indecent Proposal. Still living as of 2014.
  Relatives: Married 1991 to William Friedkin (director).
  See also NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile
  Marie L. Garibaldi (1934-2016) — of Weehawken, Hudson County, N.J. Born in Jersey City, Hudson County, N.J., November 26, 1934. Lawyer; municipal judge in New Jersey, 1973-75; associate justice of New Jersey state supreme court, 1982-2000. Female. First woman to serve on New Jersey's highest court. Died January 15, 2016 (age 81 years, 50 days). Burial location unknown.
  See also Wikipedia article
  Richard A. Heyman (c.1935-1994) — of Key West, Monroe County, Fla. Born about 1935. Mayor of Key West, Fla., 1983-85, 1987-89. Gay. One of the first openly gay public officials. Died of AIDS-related pneumonia, September 16, 1994 (age about 59 years). Burial location unknown.
  See also Wikipedia article
Gerry E. Studds Gerry Eastman Studds (1937-2006) — also known as Gerry E. Studds — of Cohasset, Norfolk County, Mass. Born in Mineola, Nassau County, Long Island, N.Y., May 12, 1937. Democrat. Foreign Service officer; member of White House staff during the administration of President John F. Kennedy, 1962-63; legislative assistant to U.S. Sen. Harrison A. Williams, 1964; state coordinator for U.S. Sen. Eugene J. McCarthy's presidential primary campaign, 1968; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Massachusetts, 1968, 1996; U.S. Representative from Massachusetts, 1973-97 (12th District 1973-83, 10th District 1983-97). Episcopalian. Gay. First openly gay member of Congress. Censured by the House of Representatives on July 20, 1983, for having sexual relations with a teenage House page ten years earlier. Died, of respiratory failure, in Boston Medical Center, Boston, Suffolk County, Mass., October 14, 2006 (age 69 years, 155 days). Burial location unknown.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — votes in Congress from the Washington Post — NNDB dossier
  Image source: Public Officers of Massachusetts, 1979-80
  Roxanne Jones (c.1928-1996) — of Pennsylvania. Born about 1928. Democrat. Member of Pennsylvania state senate 3rd District, 1985-96; died in office 1996. Female. African ancestry. First Black woman elected to the Pennsylvania state senate. Died of a heart attack, in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., May 19, 1996 (age about 68 years). Burial location unknown.
  Cal Anderson (1948-1995) — of Washington. Born May 2, 1948. Democrat. Delegate to Democratic National Convention from Washington, 1984; member of Washington state house of representatives, 1987-95; member of Washington state senate, 1995; died in office 1995. Gay. First openly gay member of the Washington state legislature. Died from complications of AIDS, August 4, 1995 (age 47 years, 94 days). Burial location unknown.
  Clarence H. Burns (1918-2003) — also known as Du Burns — of Baltimore, Md. Born September 17, 1918. Democrat. Mayor of Baltimore, Md., 1987; defeated in primary, 1987, 1991. African ancestry. First African-American mayor of Baltimore. Died in Baltimore, Md., January 12, 2003 (age 84 years, 117 days). Interment at New Cathedral Cemetery, Baltimore, Md.
  Campaign slogan: "Du Knows Baltimore."
  See also Wikipedia article
  Robert D. Glass (c.1923-2001) — of Connecticut. Born in Wetumpka, Elmore County, Ala., about 1923. Served in the U.S. Army during World War II; lawyer; superior court judge in Connecticut, 1978-86; justice of Connecticut state supreme court, 1987-92. African ancestry. First Black member of Connecticut's highest court. Died November 27, 2001 (age about 78 years). Burial location unknown.
  Carrie Saxon Perry (b. 1931) — of Hartford, Hartford County, Conn. Born August 30, 1931. Democrat. Mayor of Hartford, Conn., 1987-93; defeated, 1993; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Connecticut, 1988 (speaker). Female. African ancestry. First woman to be mayor of Hartford; first Black woman to be mayor of a large city. Still living as of 1993.
  James W. Clifton — also known as Jimmy Clifton — of Addison, Lenawee County, Mich. Libertarian. Candidate for Michigan state board of education, 1988. Elected to Addison City Council in 1988; first Libertarian elected on party ticket in Michigan history. Still living as of 2001.
  Sophie Masloff (1917-2014) — of Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, Pa. Born in Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, Pa., December 21, 1917. Democrat. Delegate to Democratic National Convention from Pennsylvania, 1984, 1996, 2000, 2004, 2008; mayor of Pittsburgh, Pa., 1988-94; Presidential Elector for Pennsylvania, 1996; member of Democratic National Committee from Pennsylvania, 2004-08. Female. Jewish. Romanian ancestry. First woman and first Jewish mayor of Pittsburgh. Died in Mt. Lebanon, Allegheny County, Pa., August 17, 2014 (age 96 years, 239 days). Burial location unknown.
  See also Wikipedia article
  Mark Thornton (b. 1960) — of Auburn, Lee County, Ala. Born in Geneva, Ontario County, N.Y., June 7, 1960. Libertarian. Economist; candidate for U.S. Representative from Alabama 3rd District, 1984; candidate for U.S. Senator from Alabama, 1996; university professor. The first person to win election in Alabama on the Libertarian Party ticket, as Lee County Constable in 1988. Still living as of 2002.
  David Norman Dinkins (b. 1927) — also known as David N. Dinkins — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born in Trenton, Mercer County, N.J., July 10, 1927. Democrat. Served in U.S. Marines, 1945-46; lawyer; member of New York state assembly 78th District, 1966; delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1980, 1984, 1988 (speaker), 1996, 2000, 2004, 2008; borough president of Manhattan, New York, 1986-89; mayor of New York City, N.Y., 1990-93; defeated, 1993; Presidential Elector for New York, 1992. African ancestry. Member, Urban League; NAACP. First Black mayor of New York City. Still living as of 2020.
  Relatives: Son of William Harvey Dinkins, Jr. and Sarah 'Sally' (Lucy) Dinkins; married to Joyce Burrows (daughter of Daniel L. Burrows (1908-?)).
  Campaign slogan (1989): "Strong enough to draw the line, caring enough to find the solution."
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile
  Books about David Dinkins: Chris McNickle, The Power of the Mayor: David Dinkins: 1990-1993
  Joan Finney (1925-2001) — also known as Joan McInroy — of Topeka, Shawnee County, Kan. Born in Topeka, Shawnee County, Kan., February 12, 1925. Candidate in Republican primary for U.S. Representative from Kansas, 1972; Kansas state treasurer, 1975-91; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Kansas, 1984, 2000; Governor of Kansas, 1991-95; candidate in Democratic primary for U.S. Senator from Kansas, 1996. Female. Catholic. Member, American Legion Auxiliary. First woman governor of Kansas. Died, from complications of liver cancer, in St. Francis Hospital and Medical Center, Topeka, Shawnee County, Kan., July 28, 2001 (age 76 years, 166 days). Interment at Mt. Calvary Cemetery, Topeka, Kan.
  See also NNDB dossier
  Carrie P. Meek (b. 1926) — of Miami, Miami-Dade County, Fla. Born in Tallahassee, Leon County, Fla., April 29, 1926. Democrat. Member of Florida state house of representatives, 1979-83; member of Florida state senate, 1983-92; U.S. Representative from Florida 17th District, 1993-2003; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Florida, 1996, 2000, 2004. Female. Baptist. African ancestry. First Black women elected to Congress from Florida; inducted 1992 into the Florida Women's Hall of Fame. Still living as of 2014.
  Relatives: Mother of Kendrick B. Meek (1966-).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — votes in Congress from the Washington Post — NNDB dossier
  Carol Moseley Braun (b. 1947) — also known as Carol Elizabeth Moseley — of Chicago, Cook County, Ill. Born in Chicago, Cook County, Ill., August 16, 1947. Democrat. Member of Illinois state house of representatives, 1979-88 (24th District 1979-82, 25th District 1983-88); U.S. Senator from Illinois, 1993-99; defeated, 1998; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Illinois, 1996; U.S. Ambassador to New Zealand, 1999-2001; Samoa, 1999-2001; candidate for Democratic nomination for President, 2004; candidate for mayor of Chicago, Ill., 2011. Female. Catholic. African ancestry. Member, Delta Sigma Theta. First African-American woman to be elected to U.S. Senate. Still living as of 2011.
  Relatives: Married to Michael Braun.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — votes in Congress from the Washington Post — Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — Internet Movie Database profile — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Roberta Achtenberg (b. 1950) — of San Francisco, Calif. Born July 20, 1950. Democrat. Lawyer; candidate for California state assembly, 1988; Assistant Secretary of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, 1993-95; first openly gay person to be confirmed for appointment by the U.S. Senate; candidate for mayor of San Francisco, Calif., 1995; delegate to Democratic National Convention from California, 1996, 2000. Female. Jewish. Member, National Lawyers Guild; Lesbian. Still living as of 2000.
  Relatives: Married to David Chavkin (divorced).
  See also Wikipedia article
  Tom Fetzer — of Raleigh, Wake County, N.C. Republican. Candidate for U.S. Representative from North Carolina 4th District, 1988; mayor of Raleigh, N.C., 1993-99. First Republican elected mayor in Raleigh history. Still living as of 2001.
  Janet Reno (1938-2016) — of Miami, Miami-Dade County, Fla. Born in Miami, Dade County (now Miami-Dade County), Fla., July 21, 1938. Democrat. Lawyer; Dade County State's Attorney, 1978-93; U.S. Attorney General, 1993-2001; the first female U.S. attorney general; candidate in primary for Governor of Florida, 2002. Female. Danish ancestry. Member, American Bar Association; American Judicature Society. Inducted, Florida Women's Hall of Fame, 1993; inducted, National Women's Hall of Fame, 2000. Died in Miami, Miami-Dade County, Fla., November 7, 2016 (age 78 years, 109 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Daughter of Henry Reno and Jane (Wood) Reno.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — National Women's Hall of Fame
  Books about Janet Reno: Paul Anderson, Janet Reno : Doing the Right Thing
  Sharon Sayles Belton (b. 1951) — of Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minn. Born in St. Paul, Ramsey County, Minn., May 13, 1951. Democrat. Delegate to Democratic National Convention from Minnesota, 1984, 1996; mayor of Minneapolis, Minn., 1994-2001; the first woman and the first African-American mayor of Minneapolis. Female. Still living as of 2020.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Samuel Mitchell (b. 1957) — also known as Sam Mitchell; "Psycho Sam" — of Honolulu, Island of Oahu, Honolulu County, Hawaii. Born in Harrisburg, Dauphin County, Pa., November 18, 1957. Democrat. Submarine mechanic at Pearl Harbor Naval Shipyard; president, Machinist & Aerospace Workers Local 1998; vice-president, Federal Employees Metal Trades Council; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Hawaii, 1996. Scottish ancestry. First federal employee to be a political party delegate after the repeal of the Hatch Act. Still living as of 2004.
  Madeleine Korbel Albright (b. 1937) — also known as Madeleine K. Albright; Marie Jana Korbelova; Madeleine Korbel — Born in Prague, Czechoslovakia (now Czechia), May 15, 1937. University professor; U.S. Representative to United Nations, 1993; U.S. Secretary of State, 1997-2001. Female. Episcopalian. Czech and Jewish ancestry. Member, Council on Foreign Relations. First woman to serve as Secretary of State. Inducted, National Women's Hall of Fame, 1998. Still living as of 2020.
  Relatives: Daughter of Josef Korbel and Anna Spiegelova; married 1959 to Joseph Medill Patterson Albright (divorced 1982-83; second great-grandson of Joseph Meharry Medill (1823-1899)).
  Political family: McCormick-Guggenheim-Morton-Medill family of Illinois and New York.
  See also Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — OurCampaigns candidate detail — National Women's Hall of Fame
  Books by Madeleine Albright: Madam Secretary: A Memoir (2003) — Read My Pins: Stories from a Diplomat's Jewel Box (2009)
  Books about Madeleine Albright: Michael Dobbs, Madeleine Albright: A twentieth-century odyssey — Thomas W. Lippman, Madeleine Albright and the New American Diplomacy — Robert Maass, UN Ambassador: A Behind-The-Scenes Look at Madeleine Albright's World — Thomas Blood, Madam Secretary: A Biography of Madeleine Albright — Judy L. Hasday, Madeleine Albright, Stateswoman (for young readers)
  Donna Marie Christian-Christensen (b. 1945) — also known as Donna M. Christian-Christensen; Donna Christian; Donna Christian-Green — of St. Croix, Virgin Islands. Born in Teaneck, Bergen County, N.J., September 19, 1945. Democrat. Physician; television journalist; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Virgin Islands, 1984, 1988, 1992, 2000, 2004, 2008 (member, Platform Committee); Delegate to U.S. Congress from the Virgin Islands, 1997-2003. Female. African ancestry. First female physician in the U.S. Congress. Still living as of 2014.
  Relatives: Daughter of Almeric Christian and Virginia (Sterling) Christian; married 1998 to Chris Christensen.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — NNDB dossier
  Gary Faye Locke (b. 1950) — also known as Gary Locke — of Washington. Born in Seattle, King County, Wash., January 21, 1950. Democrat. Member of Washington state house of representatives, 1983-93; Governor of Washington, 1997-2005; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Washington, 2000, 2004; member of Democratic National Committee from Washington, 2004. Baptist. Chinese ancestry. First Chinese-American governor in U.S. history. Still living as of 2014.
  Relatives: Son of James Locke and Julia Locke.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Charlotte Gentry Burks — also known as Charlotte Rose Gentry — of near Monterey, Putnam County, Tenn. Member of Tennessee state senate; elected 1998. Female. Running in place of her murdered husband, became the first write-in candidate ever elected to the Tennessee State Senate. Still living as of 1999.
  Relatives: Married 1960 to Tommy Burks (1940-1998).
  George Holbrook Hawes (1904-2002) — also known as George Hawes — of Ely, White Pine County, Nev.; Carson City, Nev. Born in Skowhegan, Somerset County, Maine, May 10, 1904. School teacher; automobile dealer; member of Nevada state house of representatives, 1951-55; defeated, 1958 (Republican), 1972 (Democratic); candidate in Republican primary for Lieutenant Governor of Nevada, 1954. Member, Rotary; Elks. Member of an elected hospital board in 1988-98, making him probably the oldest elected official in the history of Nevada. Died, at the Evergreen Healthcare Center nursing home, Carson City, Nev., April 9, 2002 (age 97 years, 334 days). Burial location unknown.
  Susan Oki Mollway (b. 1950) — Born in Honolulu, Honolulu County, Hawaii, 1950. Lawyer; U.S. District Judge for Hawaii, 1998-2015; took senior status 2015. Female. Japanese ancestry. First Asian woman ever appointed a federal judge. Still living as of 2015.
  See also federal judicial profile — Wikipedia article
  Danny Smith — of Virginia. Republican. Candidate for Virginia state house of delegates 38th District, 2001; first openly gay candidate for state office in Virginia. Gay. Still living as of 2001.
  Keith Maurice Ellison (b. 1963) — also known as Keith Ellison — of Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minn. Born in Detroit, Wayne County, Mich., August 4, 1963. Democrat. Lawyer; member of Minnesota state house of representatives District 58-B, 2003-06; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Minnesota, 2004, 2008; U.S. Representative from Minnesota 5th District, 2007-. Muslim. African ancestry. First Muslim elected to the U.S. Congress; first African-American elected to the U.S. House from Minnesota. Still living as of 2016.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — NNDB dossier — Minnesota Legislator record
  Books by Keith Ellison: My Country, 'Tis of Thee: My Faith, My Family, Our Future
  Louis J. Butler, Jr. (b. 1952) — Born in Chicago, Cook County, Ill., 1952. Circuit judge in Wisconsin, 2003-04; justice of Wisconsin state supreme court, 2004-08; appointed 2004; defeated, 2008; first African-American justice of the Wisconsin Supreme Court. African ancestry. Member, NAACP. Still living as of 2016.
  See also Wisconsin Supreme Court biography
  Elise Marie Stefanik (b. 1984) — also known as Elise M. Stefanik — Born in Albany, Albany County, N.Y., July 2, 1984. Republican. U.S. Representative from New York 21st District, 2015-. Female. She is the youngest woman ever elected to Congress. Still living as of 2018.
  See also congressional biography — Wikipedia article
  Gina Marie Raimondo (b. 1971) — also known as Gina Raimondo — of Providence, Providence County, R.I. Born in Smithfield, Providence County, R.I., May 17, 1971. Democrat. Rhodes scholar; lawyer; Rhode Island general treasurer, 2011-15; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Rhode Island, 2012; Governor of Rhode Island, 2015-. Female. Member, Council on Foreign Relations. First woman to be Governor of Rhode Island. Still living as of 2020.
  Relatives: Daughter of Joseph Raimondo and Josephine (Piro) Raimondo; married, November 1, 2001, to Andrew Moffit.
  See also Wikipedia article
  Lisa Blunt Rochester (b. 1962) — also known as Lisa LaTrelle Blunt — Born in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., February 10, 1962. Democrat. Delaware Secretary of Labor, 1998-2001; U.S. Representative from Delaware at-large, 2017-. Female. African ancestry. Member, Urban League. First woman and first African-American to represent Delaware in Congress. Still living as of 2020.
  Relatives: Daughter of Ted Blunt and Alice LaTrelle (Jackson) Blunt; married 1982 to Alex Bradley (divorced 2003); married 2006 to Charles Rochester (died 2014).
  See also congressional biography — Wikipedia article
  Barbara Dale Underwood (b. 1944) — also known as Barbara Underwood — of New York City (unknown county), N.Y. Born in Evansville, Vanderburgh County, Ind., August 16, 1944. Lawyer; Solicitor General of New York State, 2007-18; New York state attorney general, 2018. Female. Jewish. First woman to serve as New York Attorney General. Still living as of 2021.
  Relatives: Married 1985 to Martin Halpern.
  See also Wikipedia article — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Letitia James (b. 1958) — of Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y. Born in Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y., October 18, 1958. Democrat. Lawyer; New York state attorney general, 2019-. Female. African ancestry. First African-American to be Attorney General of New York; first woman to be elected to that position. Still living as of 2021.
  See also Wikipedia article — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Peter Paul Montgomery Buttigieg (b. 1982) — also known as Pete Buttigieg; "Mayor Pete" — of South Bend, St. Joseph County, Ind. Born in South Bend, St. Joseph County, Ind., January 19, 1982. Democrat. Rhodes scholar; candidate for Indiana state treasurer, 2010; mayor of South Bend, Ind., 2012-19; candidate for Democratic nomination for President, 2020; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Indiana, 2020 (delegation chair); U.S. Secretary of Transportation, 2021-. Gay. First openly gay U.S. cabinet member. Still living as of 2021.
  Relatives: Married to Chasten Glezman.
  See also Wikipedia article
  Kamala Devi Harris (b. 1964) — also known as Kamala D. Harris — of San Francisco, Calif. Born in Oakland, Alameda County, Calif., October 20, 1964. Democrat. Lawyer; delegate to Democratic National Convention from California, 2008 (member, Platform Committee); California state attorney general, 2011-17; U.S. Senator from California, 2017-21; candidate for Democratic nomination for President, 2020; Vice President of the United States, 2021-. Female. African and Indian subcontinent ancestry. First woman, and first person of Asian or African descent, to be Vice-President of the United States. Still living as of 2021.
  See also Wikipedia article — Ballotpedia article
"Enjoy the hospitable entertainment of a political graveyard."
Henry L. Clinton, Apollo Hall, New York City, February 3, 1872
The Political Graveyard

The Political Graveyard is a web site about U.S. political history and cemeteries. Founded in 1996, it is the Internet's most comprehensive free source for American political biography, listing 312,576 politicians, living and dead.
  The listings are incomplete; development of the database is a continually ongoing project.  
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Copyright notices: (1) Facts are not subject to copyright; see Feist v. Rural Telephone. (2) Politician portraits displayed on this site are 70-pixel-wide monochrome thumbnail images, which I believe to constitute fair use under applicable copyright law. Where possible, each image is linked to its online source. However, requests from owners of copyrighted images to delete them from this site are honored. (3) Original material, programming, selection and arrangement are © 1996-2019 Lawrence Kestenbaum. (4) This work is also licensed for free non-commercial re-use, with attribution, under a Creative Commons License.
Site information: The Political Graveyard is created and maintained by Lawrence Kestenbaum, who is solely responsible for its structure and content. — The mailing address is The Political Graveyard, P.O. Box 2563, Ann Arbor MI 48106. — This site is hosted by HDL. — The Political Graveyard opened on July 1, 1996; the last full revision was done on March 10, 2021.

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