PoliticalGraveyard.com
The Political Graveyard: A Database of American History
The Internet's Most Comprehensive Source of U.S. Political Biography
(or, The Web Site that Tells Where the Dead Politicians are Buried)
Created and maintained by Lawrence Kestenbaum

Namesake Politicians: Colleges and Universities

in alphabetical order

  Michael J. Adanti (1940-2005) — also known as "Red" — of Ansonia, New Haven County, Conn.; Shelton, Fairfield County, Conn. Born June 23, 1940. Democrat. Played football for the Ansonia Black Knights of the Atlantic Coast League; school teacher; mayor of Ansonia, Conn., 1973-77; candidate for U.S. Representative from Connecticut 5th District, 1976; president, Southern Connecticut State University, 1984-2003. Killed in an automobile accident, in Sardinia, July 31, 2005 (age 65 years, 38 days). Interment at Mt. St. Peter Catholic Cemetery, Derby, Conn.
  Relatives: Married to Linda Shashinska.
  The Michael J. Adanti Student Center, at Southern Connecticut State University, New Haven, Connecticut, is named for him.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  George Ade (1866-1944) — of Kentland, Newton County, Ind. Born in Kentland, Newton County, Ind., February 9, 1866. Republican. Author; humorist; newspaper columnist; delegate to Republican National Convention from Indiana, 1908. Member, Sigma Chi. Suffered a heart attack, fell into a coma, and died, in Brook, Newton County, Ind., May 16, 1944 (age 78 years, 97 days). Interment at Fairlawn Cemetery, Kentland, Ind.
  Relatives: Son of John Ade and Adaline (Bush) Ade; brother-in-law of Warren Terry McCray (1865-1938).
  The Ross-Ade Stadium (built 1924), at Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana, is partly named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS George Ade (built 1944 at Panama City, Florida; scrapped 1968) was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Leon Joseph Albert (1840-1912) — of Cape Girardeau, Cape Girardeau County, Mo. Born in 1840. Democrat. Steamboat builder; mayor of Cape Girardeau, Mo., 1877-79, 1886-91. Died in 1912 (age about 72 years). Burial location unknown.
  Albert Hall (built 1904, demolished 1960), one of the first two dormitory buildings at Southeast Missouri State University in Cape Girardeau, Missouri, was named for him.
Nelson W. Aldrich Nelson Wilmarth Aldrich (1841-1915) — also known as Nelson W. Aldrich; "General Manager of the United States" — of Providence, Providence County, R.I.; Warwick, Kent County, R.I. Born in Foster, Providence County, R.I., November 6, 1841. Republican. Served in the Union Army during the Civil War; grocer; director, Roger Williams Bank; president, First National Bank of Providence; trustee, Providence, Hartford and Fishkill Railroad; organizer and president, United Traction and Electric Company; member of Rhode Island state house of representatives, 1875-77; Speaker of the Rhode Island State House of Representatives, 1876-77; U.S. Representative from Rhode Island 1st District, 1879-81; U.S. Senator from Rhode Island, 1881-1911; author of Aldrich-Vreeland Currency Act and Payne-Aldrich Tariff Act. English ancestry. Member, Freemasons. Died, from an apoplectic stroke, in Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., April 16, 1915 (age 73 years, 161 days). Interment at Swan Point Cemetery, Providence, R.I.
  Relatives: Son of Anan Evans Aldrich (1807-1892) and Abby Ann (Burgess) Aldrich (1809-1888); married, October 9, 1866, to Abby Pearce Truman Chapman (1845-1917); father of Richard Steere Aldrich and Winthrop Williams Aldrich; grandfather of Nelson Aldrich Rockefeller and Winthrop Rockefeller; great-grandfather of John Davison Rockefeller IV and Winthrop Paul Rockefeller (1948-2006).
  Political family: Rockefeller family of New York City, New York (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Aldrich Hall (built 1953), at the Harvard University Business School, Boston, Massachusetts, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Image source: Library of Congress
James B. Angell James Burrill Angell (1829-1916) — also known as James B. Angell — of Ann Arbor, Washtenaw County, Mich. Born in Scituate, Providence County, R.I., January 7, 1829. Editor of Sen. Henry B. Anthony's newspaper, Providence Journal, 1860-66; president, University of Vermont, 1866-71; president, University of Michigan, 1871-1909; U.S. Minister to China, 1880-81; Turkey, 1897-98. Congregationalist. Member, American Historical Association. Died in Ann Arbor, Washtenaw County, Mich., April 1, 1916 (age 87 years, 85 days). Interment at Forest Hill Cemetery, Ann Arbor, Mich.
  Relatives: Son of Andrew Aldrich Angell and Amey (Aldrich) Angell; married, November 26, 1855, to Sarah S. Caswell (died 1903; daughter of Alexis Caswell (president, Brown University)); father of Alexis Caswell Angell (1857-1932).
  Political family: Angell-Cooley family of Ann Arbor, Michigan.
  Angell Hall, at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Mich., is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: Past and Present of Washtenaw County (1906)
  Benjamin William Arnett (1838-1906) — also known as Benjamin W. Arnett — of Wilberforce, Greene County, Ohio. Born in Brownsville, Fayette County, Pa., March 16, 1838. Republican. School teacher and principal; ordained minister; member of Ohio state house of representatives from Greene County, 1886-87; first Black state legislator elected to represent a majority white constituency; bishop; offered prayer, Republican National Convention, 1896. African Methodist Episcopal. African, Scottish, American Indian, and Irish ancestry. Lost a leg due to a tumor in 1858. Died, of uremia, in Wilberforce, Greene County, Ohio, October 7, 1906 (age 68 years, 205 days). Interment at Wilberforce Cemetery, Wilberforce, Ohio.
  Relatives: Son of Samuel G. Arnett and Mary Louisa Arnett; married, May 25, 1858, to Mary Louisa Gordon.
  Arnett Hall, at Wilberforce University, Wilberforce, Ohio, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Mark Evans Austad (1917-1988) — also known as Marcus Jacob Austad; "Mark Evans" — of Scottsdale, Maricopa County, Ariz. Born in Ogden, Weber County, Utah, April 1, 1917. Served in the U.S. Army during World War II; radio announcer, broadcast newsman, and host of his own television news show; U.S. Ambassador to Finland, 1975-77; Norway, 1981-84. Mormon. Norwegian ancestry. Died in Arizona, October 20, 1988 (age 71 years, 202 days). Interment at Washington Heights Memorial Park, South Ogden, Utah.
  The Mark Evans Austad Auditorium, at Weber State University, Ogden, Utah, is named for him.
  Epitaph: "Grandpa, I'll bet Heavenly Father will be happy to see you."
  See also Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Stephen Fuller Austin (1793-1836) — also known as Stephen F. Austin; "Father of Texas" — Born in Wythe County, Va., November 3, 1793. Member of Missouri territorial legislature, 1814-19; delegate to Texas Convention of 1832 from District of San Felipe de Austin, 1832; took petition to Mexico City for the establishment of Texas as a separate Mexican state, 1832; charged with attempting revolution, and imprisoned until 1835; delegate to Texas Convention of 1833 from District of Austin, 1833; delegate to Texas Consultation of 1835 from District of San Felipe de Austin, 1835; candidate for President of the Texas Republic, 1836; Texas Republic Secretary of State, 1836; died in office 1836. Member, Freemasons. Died of pneumonia, in Brazoria County, Tex., December 27, 1836 (age 43 years, 54 days). Original interment at Peach Point Cemetery, Gulf Prairie, Tex.; reinterment in 1910 at Texas State Cemetery, Austin, Tex.
  Relatives: Son of Moses Austin (1761-1821) and Maria (Brown) Austin (1768-1824).
  Austin County, Tex. is named for him.
  The city of Austin, Texas, is named for him.  — Stephen F. Austin State University, Nacogdoches, Texas, is named for him.  — Austin College, Sherman, Texas, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Handbook of Texas Online
  Books about Stephen F. Austin: Gregg Cantrell, Stephen F. Austin : Empresario of Texas
  John Bascom (1827-1911) — of Madison, Dane County, Wis.; Williamstown, Berkshire County, Mass. Born in Genoa, Cayuga County, N.Y., April 30, 1827. College professor; president, University of Wisconsin, 1874-87; Prohibition candidate for U.S. Representative from Massachusetts, 1890 (12th District), 1896 (1st District), 1902 (1st District); Prohibition candidate for Governor of Massachusetts, 1897. Died in Williamstown, Berkshire County, Mass., October 2, 1911 (age 84 years, 155 days). Interment at Williams College Cemetery, Williamstown, Mass.
  Relatives: Son of Rev. John Bascom (1784-1828) and Laura (Woodbridge) Bascom (1789-1870); married 1853 to Abbie Burt (1828-1854); married, January 8, 1856, to Emma Curtiss (1828-1916).
  Bascom Hall, on the campus of the University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin, is named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS John Bascom (built 1942-43 at Panama City, Florida; bombed and sank in the harbor at Bari, Italy, 1943) was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Kemp Plummer Battle (1831-1919) — also known as Kemp P. Battle — of Wake County, N.C. Born in Louisburg, Franklin County, N.C., December 19, 1831. Lawyer; delegate to North Carolina secession convention, 1861; president, Chatham Railroad during the Civil War; North Carolina state treasurer, 1866-68; president, University of North Carolina, 1876-91; historian. Died in Raleigh, Wake County, N.C., February 4, 1919 (age 87 years, 47 days). Interment at Oakwood Cemetery, Raleigh, N.C.
  Relatives: Son of William Horn Battle (1802-1879).
  Battle Hall (built 1912), a building at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article
  Robert Emmett Bledsoe Baylor (1793-1874) — also known as Robert E. B. Baylor — Born in Lincoln County, Ky., May 10, 1793. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812; member of Kentucky state house of representatives, 1819-20; member of Alabama state house of representatives, 1824; U.S. Representative from Alabama 2nd District, 1829-31; judge of Texas Republic, 1841-45; delegate to Texas state constitutional convention, 1845; district judge in Texas, 1845-60. Baptist. Member, Freemasons. One of the founders, in 1845, of Baylor University, and of Baylor Female College (now the University of Mary Hardin-Baylor). Slaveowner. Died in Gay Hill, Washington County, Tex., January 6, 1874 (age 80 years, 241 days). Original interment at Old Baylor University Campus, Independence, Tex.; reinterment in 1886 at University of Mary Hardin-Baylor Campus, Belton, Tex.
  Relatives: Nephew of Jesse Bledsoe (1776-1836).
  Political family: Brown-Breckinridge family of Lexington, Kentucky (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Baylor University, Waco, Texas, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Frederick William Behmler (1895-1966) — also known as Fred W. Behmler — of Appleton, Swift County, Minn.; Morris, Stevens County, Minn. Born in Jordan, Scott County, Minn., February 2, 1895. Served in the U.S. Army during World War I; physician; surgeon; member of Minnesota state senate 48th District, 1955-58; defeated, 1958. Lutheran. German ancestry. Member, American Medical Association; American Legion; Kiwanis; Freemasons; Shriners. Died, from a myocardial infarction, in Abbott Northwestern Hospital, Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minn., November 6, 1966 (age 71 years, 277 days). Interment at Summit Cemetery, Morris, Minn.
  Relatives: Son of Otto August Behmler (1864-1946) and Martha (Drager) Behmler (1871-1949); married, August 20, 1920, to Mathilda Ovedia Eidem (1894-1993).
  Behmler Hall, at the University of Minnesota Morris, is named for him.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial — Minnesota Legislator record
William Benton William Burnett Benton (1900-1973) — also known as William Benton — of Southport, Fairfield, Fairfield County, Conn. Born in Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minn., April 1, 1900. Democrat. Advertising business; introduced sound effects into television commercials; popularized the "Amos 'n' Andy" radio show; vice-president, University of Chicago, 1937-45; publisher of the Encyclopedia Brittanica; U.S. Assistant Secretary of State for Public Affairs, 1945-47; U.S. Senator from Connecticut, 1949-53; defeated, 1952; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Connecticut, 1952 (member, Platform and Resolutions Committee), 1956, 1960, 1968. Episcopalian. Member, American Legion; Council on Foreign Relations; Zeta Psi. Died, in the Waldorf Towers Hotel, Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., March 18, 1973 (age 72 years, 351 days). Cremated; ashes scattered.
  Relatives: Son of Charles William Benton and Elma (Hixson) Benton; married 1928 to Helen Hemingway.
  The William Benton Museum of Art, at the University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  Image source: Connecticut Register and Manual 1950
  William Howard Berkey (1874-1952) — also known as William H. Berkey — of Cassopolis, Cass County, Mich. Born in Cambria County, Pa., February 24, 1874. Republican. Newspaper editor and publisher; farmer; delegate to Republican National Convention from Michigan, 1920 (alternate), 1940; member of Michigan state board of agriculture, 1930-47; Dry candidate for delegate to Michigan convention to ratify 21st amendment from Cass County, 1933. Member, Freemasons. Died in Chicago, Cook County, Ill., March 22, 1952 (age 78 years, 27 days). Interment at Prospect Hill Cemetery, Cassopolis, Mich.
  Relatives: Son of Joshua Berkey (1843-1919) and Barbara (Mahan) Berkey (1851-1923); married, June 8, 1911, to Olive K. Gard.
  Berkey Hall, a classroom and office building at Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan, is named for him.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
John I. Blair John Insley Blair (1802-1899) — also known as John I. Blair — of Blairstown, Warren County, N.J. Born in Warren County, N.J., August 22, 1802. Republican. Merchant; postmaster; manufacturer; railroad builder; delegate to Republican National Convention from New Jersey, 1860, 1868; candidate for Governor of New Jersey, 1868. Presbyterian. Scottish ancestry. Died in Blairstown, Warren County, N.J., December 2, 1899 (age 97 years, 102 days). Interment at Gravel Hill Cemetery, Blairstown, N.J.
  Relatives: Son of John Blair and Rachel (Insley) Blair; married, September 20, 1826, to Nancy Ann Locke (1804-1888); father of Emma Elizabeth Blair (1827-1869; married the publisher Charles Scribner).
  The township of Blairstown, New Jersey, is named for him.  — The city of Blair, Nebraska, is named for him.  — The city of Blairstown, Iowa, is named for him.  — Blair Hall, at Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: King's Notable New Yorkers of 1896-1899
  John Frederick Bohler (1885-1960) — also known as J. Fred Bohler — of Pullman, Whitman County, Wash. Born in Reading, Berks County, Pa., April 14, 1885. Athletic coach; mayor of Pullman, Wash., 1949-51. Died in Pullman, Whitman County, Wash., July 12, 1960 (age 75 years, 89 days). Interment at Associated Order of United Workers Cemetery, Pullman, Wash.
  Bohler Gymnasium, at Washington State University, Pullman, Washington, is named for him.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  James Bowdoin (1726-1790) — of Massachusetts. Born in Boston, Suffolk County, Mass., August 7, 1726. Delegate to Massachusetts state constitutional convention, 1779-80; Governor of Massachusetts, 1785-87; delegate to Massachusetts convention to ratify U.S. constitution, 1788. French ancestry. Member, American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Died, of consumption (tuberculosis), in Boston, Suffolk County, Mass., November 6, 1790 (age 64 years, 91 days). Interment at Old Granary Burying Ground, Boston, Mass.
  Relatives: Son of James Bowdoin (1676-1747) and Hannah (Portage) Bowdoin (1686-1726); married to Elizabeth Erving (1731-1809); father of James Bowdoin III; great-grandfather of Robert Charles Winthrop; fifth great-grandfather of William Amory Gardner Minot and John Forbes Kerry; second cousin thrice removed of George Griswold Sill (1829-1907).
  Political family: Kellogg-Adams-Seymour-Chapin family of Connecticut and New York (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Bowdoin College, in Brunswick, Maine, is named for him.  — The towns of Bowdoin & Bowdoinham, Maine, are named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS James Bowdoin (built 1943 at South Portland, Maine; scrapped 1972) was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Louis Dembitz Brandeis (1856-1941) — also known as Louis D. Brandeis — of Dedham, Norfolk County, Mass. Born in Louisville, Jefferson County, Ky., November 13, 1856. Lawyer; law clerk to Justice Horace Gray, 1879-80; Associate Justice of U.S. Supreme Court, 1916-39; took senior status 1939. Jewish. Died in Washington, D.C., October 5, 1941 (age 84 years, 326 days). Cremated; ashes interred at University of Louisville Law School, Louisville, Ky.
  Relatives: Son of Adolph Brandeis (1822-1906) and Fredericka (Dembitz) Brandeis (1829-1901); brother of Fannie Brandeis (1850-1890; who married Charles Nagel (1849-1940)) and Alfred Brandeis (1854-1928; brother-in-law of Walter M. Taussig); married, March 23, 1891, to Alice Goldmark (1866-1945).
  Political family: Taussig family of St. Louis, Missouri.
  Cross-reference: Dean Acheson — James M. Landis — Calvert Magruder
  Brandeis University, in Waltham, Massachusetts, is named for him.  — The Louis D. Brandeis School of Law, in Louisville, Kentucky, is named for him.
  See also federal judicial profile — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about Louis D. Brandeis: Lewis J. Paper, Brandeis: An Intimate Biography of One of America's Truly Great Supreme Court Justices — Stephen W. Baskerville, Of Laws and Limitations : An Intellectual Portrait of Louis Dembitz Brandeis — Philippa Strum, Louis D. Brandeis: Justice for the People — Robert A. Burt, Two Jewish Justices: Outcasts in the Promised Land
Clark L. Brody Clark Louis Brody (1879-1961) — also known as Clark L. Brody — of Lansing, Ingham County, Mich. Born in Fabius, St. Joseph County, Mich., February 1, 1879. Republican. Farmer; county agricultural agent, 1915-21; executive with Farm Bureau; member of Michigan state board of agriculture, 1921-59; appointed 1921; alternate delegate to Republican National Convention from Michigan, 1956. Methodist. Member, Farm Bureau; Alpha Zeta; Phi Kappa Phi; Kiwanis. Died in Lansing, Ingham County, Mich., October 12, 1961 (age 82 years, 253 days). Interment at Evergreen Cemetery, Lansing, Mich.
  Relatives: Son of James Polk Brody (1845-1915) and Emma L. (Seeley) Brody (1853-1904); married, November 14, 1906, to Margaret Ellen York (1879-1960).
  The Brody Complex of dormitories at Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan, is named for him.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: Michigan Manual 1957-58
Martin G. Brumbaugh Martin Grove Brumbaugh (1862-1930) — also known as Martin G. Brumbaugh; "Hercules of the Educational World" — of Huntingdon County, Pa.; Germantown, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa. Born in Penn Township, Huntingdon County, Pa., April 14, 1862. Republican. Huntingdon County Superintendent of Schools, 1884-90; university professor; president, Juniata College, 1895-1906; Puerto Rico Commissioner of Education, 1900-02; Philadelphia superintendent of schools, 1906-15; Governor of Pennsylvania, 1915-19; candidate for Republican nomination for President, 1916; delegate to Republican National Convention from Pennsylvania, 1916. Brethren. German ancestry. Member, Union League. Died in Pinehurst, Moore County, N.C., March 14, 1930 (age 67 years, 334 days). Interment at Valley View Cemetery, McConnellstown, Pa.
  Relatives: Son of George Boyer Brumbaugh and Martha (Peightal) Brumbaugh; married 1884 to Anna Konigmacher (died 1914); married, January 29, 1916, to Flora Belle Parks.
  Brumbaugh Hall, a residence hall at Pennsylvania State University, University Park, State College, Pennsylvania, is named for him.
  See also National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Books about Martin Grove Brumbaugh: Earl C. Kaylor, Jr., Martin Grove Brumbaugh : A Pennsylvanian's Odyssey from Sainted Schoolman to Bedeviled World War I Governor, 1862-1930
  Image source: Smull's Legislative Hand Book and Manual 1916
  George Herbert Walker Bush (1924-2018) — also known as George Bush; "Poppy"; "Sheepskin"; "Timberwolf" — of Midland, Midland County, Tex.; Houston, Harris County, Tex. Born in Milton, Norfolk County, Mass., June 12, 1924. Republican. Served in the U.S. Navy during World War II; delegate to Republican National Convention from Texas, 1964; candidate for U.S. Senator from Texas, 1964, 1970; U.S. Representative from Texas 7th District, 1967-71; U.S. Representative to United Nations, 1971-73; Chairman of Republican National Committee, 1973-74; U.S. Liaison to China, 1974-75; director, U.S. Central Intelligence Agency, 1976-77; candidate for Republican nomination for President, 1980; Vice President of the United States, 1981-89; President of the United States, 1989-93; defeated, 1992. Episcopalian. Member, American Legion; Skull and Bones; Council on Foreign Relations; Delta Kappa Epsilon; Society of the Cincinnati; Phi Beta Kappa. Died in Houston, Harris County, Tex., November 30, 2018 (age 94 years, 171 days). Interment at George H. W. Bush Presidential Library and Museum, College Station, Tex.
  Relatives: Son of Prescott Sheldon Bush and Dorothy (Walker) Bush (1901-1992); married, January 6, 1945, to Barbara Pierce; father of George Walker Bush (who married Laura Lane Welch) and John Ellis Bush (born1953); grandfather of George Prescott Bush; first cousin thrice removed of David Davis.
  Political family: Bush family of Texas and Massachusetts.
  Cross-reference: Caspar W. Weinberger — John H. Sununu — Don Evans — James C. Oberwetter — Mary McClure Bibby
  The George Bush School of Government and Public Service, at Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas, is named for him.  — George Bush High School, in Richmond, Texas, is named for him.  — George Herbert Walker Bush Elementary School, in Addison, Texas, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Books by George H. W. Bush: All The Best, George Bush: My Life and Other Writings (1999) — Looking Forward (1987) — A World Transformed (1998)
  Books about George H. W. Bush: John Robert Greene, The Presidency of George Bush — Tim O'Shei & Joe Marren, George H. W. Bush (for young readers)
  Critical books about George H. W. Bush: Kevin Phillips, American Dynasty: Aristocracy, Fortune, and the Politics of Deceit in the House of Bush — Kitty Kelly, The Family : The Real Story of the Bush Dynasty
  Charles Clarke Chapman (1853-1944) — also known as Charles C. Chapman; "The Orange King of California" — of Chicago, Cook County, Ill.; Fullerton, Orange County, Calif. Born in Illinois, June 2, 1853. Republican. Publishing business; mayor of Fullerton, Calif., 1904-06; delegate to Republican National Convention from California, 1916, 1924. Disciples of Christ. Died in Orange County, Calif., March 5, 1944 (age 90 years, 277 days). Interment at Forest Lawn Memorial Park, Glendale, Calif.; statue at Chapman University Entrance, Orange, Calif.
  Chapman University, in Orange, California, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
Salmon P. Chase Salmon Portland Chase (1808-1873) — also known as Salmon P. Chase; "Old Mr. Greenbacks" — of Cincinnati, Hamilton County, Ohio. Born in Cornish, Sullivan County, N.H., January 13, 1808. Republican. Liberty candidate for U.S. Representative from Ohio 1st District, 1846; U.S. Senator from Ohio, 1849-55, 1861; Governor of Ohio, 1856-60; candidate for Republican nomination for President, 1856, 1860; U.S. Secretary of the Treasury, 1861-64; Chief Justice of U.S. Supreme Court, 1864-73; died in office 1873. Episcopalian. Died in New York, New York County, N.Y., May 7, 1873 (age 65 years, 114 days). Original interment at Oak Hill Cemetery, Washington, D.C.; reinterment at Spring Grove Cemetery, Cincinnati, Ohio.
  Relatives: Son of Ithamar Chase (1762-1817) and Janette Chase (1777-1832); married to Eliza Ann Smith (1821-1845); father of Katherine Jane 'Kate' Chase (1840-1899; who married William Sprague (1830-1915)); nephew of Dudley Chase; cousin *** of Dudley Chase Denison.
  Political families: Sprague family; Chase family of Vermont (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Chase County, Kan. is named for him.
  Chase Hall (dormitory, built 1926), at Harvard University Business School, Boston, Massachusetts, is named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS Salmon P. Chase (built 1942 at Portland, Oregon; scrapped 1960) was named for him.
  Politician named for him: Chase S. Osborn
  Coins and currency: His portrait appeared on various U.S. currency, including $1 and $10 notes in the 1860s, and the $10,000 bill from 1918 to 1946.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Books about Salmon P. Chase: Frederick J. Blue, Salmon P. Chase : A Life in Politics — John Niven, Salmon P. Chase : A Biography — Albert B. Hart, Salmon P. Chase — Doris Kearns Goodwin, Team of Rivals : The Political Genius of Abraham Lincoln
  Image source: Life and Work of James G. Blaine (1893)
  Thomas Green Clemson (1807-1888) — Born in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., July 1, 1807. Mining engineer; U.S. Charge d'Affaires to Belgium, 1844-51; served in the Confederate Army during the Civil War. Among the founders of the Maryland Agricultural College, now the University of Maryland. Bequeathed his home and land holdings to the state of South Carolina for the purpose of establishing an agricultural college, which went on to become Clemson University. Died in Pickens County, S.C., April 6, 1888 (age 80 years, 280 days). Interment at St. Paul's Episcopal Churchyard, Pendleton, S.C.
  Relatives: Son of Thomas Green Clemson and Elizabeth (Baker) Clemson; married, November 13, 1838, to Anna Maria Calhoun (1817-1875; daughter of John Caldwell Calhoun (1782-1850)).
  Political family: Calhoun-Pickens family of South Carolina (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Clemson University, in Clemson, South Carolina, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary
  Frances Cleveland (1864-1947) — also known as Frances Clara Folsom — Born in Buffalo, Erie County, N.Y., July 21, 1864. First Lady of the United States, 1886-89, 1893-97. Female. Died in Baltimore, Md., October 29, 1947 (age 83 years, 100 days). Interment at Princeton Cemetery, Princeton, N.J.
  Relatives: Daughter of Oscar Folsom (1837-1875) and Emma (Harmon) Folsom (1840-1915); married, June 2, 1886, to Grover Cleveland; married, February 10, 1913, to Thomas Jecks Preston (1862-1955); mother of Richard Folsom Cleveland (1897-1974).
  Political family: Kellogg-Adams-Seymour-Chapin family of Connecticut and New York (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Cleveland Hall of Languages (built 1911), at Wells College, Aurora, New York, is named for her.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  William Thad Cochran (1937-2019) — also known as Thad Cochran — of Jackson, Hinds County, Miss.; Oxford, Lafayette County, Miss. Born in Pontotoc, Pontotoc County, Miss., December 7, 1937. Republican. Lawyer; U.S. Representative from Mississippi 4th District, 1973-79; U.S. Senator from Mississippi, 1979-2018; resigned 2018; delegate to Republican National Convention from Mississippi, 2004, 2008, 2012. Baptist. Member, Pi Kappa Alpha. Died, from renal failure, in Oxford, Lafayette County, Miss., May 30, 2019 (age 81 years, 174 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of William Holmes Cochran and Emma Grace (Berry) Cochran; married 1964 to Rose Clayton; married, May 23, 2015, to Kay Webber.
  The Thad Cochran U.S. Courthouse, in Jackson, Mississippi, is named for him.  — The Thad Cochran Center building, at the University of Southern Mississippi, Hattiesburg, Mississippi, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile
Thomas M. Cooley Thomas McIntyre Cooley (1824-1898) — also known as Thomas M. Cooley — of Adrian, Lenawee County, Mich.; Toledo, Lucas County, Ohio; Ann Arbor, Washtenaw County, Mich. Born in Attica, Wyoming County, N.Y., January 6, 1824. Lawyer; newspaper editor; law partner of Charles M. Croswell, 1855; reporter, Michigan Supreme Court, 1857-64; law professor; justice of Michigan state supreme court, 1865-85; chief justice of Michigan state supreme court, 1868-69, 1876-77, 1884-85; member, Interstate Commerce Commission, 1887-92. Member, American Bar Association. Died in Ann Arbor, Washtenaw County, Mich., September 12, 1898 (age 74 years, 249 days). Interment at Forest Hill Cemetery, Ann Arbor, Mich.
  Relatives: Son of Thomas Cooley (1778-1847) and Rachel (Hubbard) Cooley (1790-1869); married, December 30, 1846, to Elizabeth Horton (1830-1890); father of Fanny Cooley (1857-1934; who married Alexis Caswell Angell (1857-1932)).
  Political family: Angell-Cooley family of Ann Arbor, Michigan.
  Cross-reference: Samuel W. Beakes — Consider A. Stacy
  Thomas M. Cooley Law School, in Lansing, Michigan, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial — Michigan Supreme Court Historical Society
  Image source: Portrait & Biographical Album of Washtenaw County (1891)
  William A. Craven (1921-1999) — also known as Bill Craven — of Oceanside, San Diego County, Calif. Born in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., June 30, 1921. Republican. Served in the U.S. Marine Corps during World War II; served in the U.S. Marine Corps during the Korean conflict; member of California state assembly, 1973-79; member of California state senate, 1979-99. Advocated and won the creation of a California State University campus at San Marcos. Died, of congestive heart failure and complications of diabetes, at the Villas de Carlsbad Health Center, Carlsbad, San Diego County, Calif., July 11, 1999 (age 78 years, 11 days). Interment at Eternal Hills Memorial Park, Oceanside, Calif.
  Craven Hall, at California State University San Marcos, is named for him.
  Michael Curb (b. 1944) — also known as Mike Curb — of California; Nashville, Davidson County, Tenn. Born in Savannah, Chatham County, Ga., December 24, 1944. Republican. Musician; record company executive; race car owner; member of Republican National Committee from California, 1977; Lieutenant Governor of California, 1979-83; defeated, 1986; candidate in primary for Governor of California, 1982. In 2003, he was inducted into the Georgia Music Hall of Fame. Still living as of 2014.
  Relatives: Married to Linda Dunphy.
  The Curb Event Center arena, at Belmont University, Nashville, Tennessee, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile
Jabez L. M. Curry Jabez Lamar Monroe Curry (1825-1903) — also known as Jabez L. M. Curry — of Talladega, Talladega County, Ala.; Washington, D.C. Born near Double Branches, Lincoln County, Ga., June 5, 1825. Lawyer; served in the U.S. Army during the Mexican War; member of Alabama state house of representatives, 1847-48, 1853-57; U.S. Representative from Alabama 7th District, 1857-61; Delegate from Alabama to the Confederate Provisional Congress, 1861-62; Representative from Alabama in the Confederate Congress 4th District, 1862-64; defeated, 1863; colonel in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; president, Howard College, Alabama, 1866-68; college professor; U.S. Minister to Spain, 1885-88. Baptist. Slaveowner. Died near Asheville, Buncombe County, N.C., February 12, 1903 (age 77 years, 252 days). Interment at Hollywood Cemetery, Richmond, Va.
  Relatives: Son of William Curry and Susan (Winn) Curry.
  The Curry School of Education at the University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia, was named for him from 1905 to 2020.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS J. L. M. Curry (built 1941-42 at Mobile, Alabama; sank in the North Sea, 1943) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: American Monthly Review of Reviews, February 1902
  Clarence Douglas Dillon (1909-2003) — also known as C. Douglas Dillon; Clarence Douglass Dillon — of Far Hills, Somerset County, N.J. Born in Geneva, Switzerland, of American parents, August 21, 1909. Republican. Served in the U.S. Navy during World War II; financier; delegate to Republican National Convention from New Jersey, 1952 (alternate), 1968; U.S. Ambassador to France, 1953-57; U.S. Secretary of the Treasury, 1961-65. Scottish, French, Swedish, and Jewish ancestry. Member, Council on Foreign Relations; Society of Colonial Wars. Recipient of the Presidential Medal of Freedom on July 6, 1989. Died in New York, New York County, N.Y., January 10, 2003 (age 93 years, 142 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Anne McEldin (Douglass) Dillon (1881-1961) and Clarence Dillon (1882-1979; financier); married, March 10, 1931, to Phyllis Chess Ellsworth; married 1983 to Susan Sage.
  Dillon House (offices, built 1965), at Harvard University Business School, Boston, Massachusetts, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile
  James H. Donovan (1923-1990) — of Chadwicks, Oneida County, N.Y. Born in Marcy, Oneida County, N.Y., November 12, 1923. Republican. Served in the U.S. Marine Corps during World War II; member of New York state senate, 1966-90 (51st District 1966, 46th District 1967-82, 47th District 1983-90); died in office 1990; delegate to Republican National Convention from New York, 1980. Catholic. Member, American Legion; Veterans of Foreign Wars; Knights of Columbus. Represented Oneida County in the New York State Senate longer than any other senator in the history of the county. Died, of colon cancer, in Chadwicks, Oneida County, N.Y., August 31, 1990 (age 66 years, 292 days). Interment at St. Mary's Cemetery, Clayville, N.Y.
  Donovan Middle School, and Donovan Hall, at the State University of New York Polytechnic Institute, Utica, New York, are named for him.
  Francis Marion Drake (1830-1903) — of Centerville, Appanoose County, Iowa. Born in Rushville, Schuyler County, Ill., December 30, 1830. Republican. General in the Union Army during the Civil War; lawyer; railroad builder; philanthropist; delegate to Republican National Convention from Iowa, 1888; Governor of Iowa, 1896-98. Disciples of Christ. Member, Grand Army of the Republic; Loyal Legion; Freemasons; Odd Fellows. Died, of diabetes, in Centerville, Appanoose County, Iowa, November 20, 1903 (age 72 years, 325 days). Interment at Oakland Cemetery, Centerville, Iowa.
  Presumably named for: Francis Marion
  Relatives: Son of John Adams Drake and Harriet Jane (O'Neal) Drake; married, December 24, 1855, to Mary Jane Lord (died 1883).
  Drake University, in Des Moines, Iowa, is named for him.
  See also National Governors Association biography
  John Morton Eshleman (1876-1916) — also known as John M. Eshleman; Jack Eshleman — of California. Born in Villa Ridge, Pulaski County, Ill., June 14, 1876. Republican. Member of California state assembly 52nd District; elected 1906; delegate to Republican National Convention from California, 1912; Lieutenant Governor of California, 1915-16; died in office 1916. Member, Freemasons. Died, of tuberculosis, in a train station at at Indio, Riverside County, Calif., February 28, 1916 (age 39 years, 259 days). Original interment in unknown location; reinterment at Sunset View Cemetery, El Cerrito, Calif.
  Relatives: Married to Elizabeth Ledgett Eshleman (c.1884-1961).
  Eshleman Hall, at the University of California Berkeley, is named for him.
  William Nash Everett (1864-1928) — of Rockingham, Richmond County, N.C. Born in Rockingham, Richmond County, N.C., December 29, 1864. Democrat. Member of North Carolina state senate, 1917-18; member of North Carolina state house of representatives from Richmond County, 1919-22; secretary of state of North Carolina, 1923-28; died in office 1928. Died of a heart attack in his room at the Sir Walter Raleigh Hotel, Raleigh, Wake County, N.C., February 7, 1928 (age 63 years, 40 days). Interment at Everett Cemetery, Rockingham, N.C.
  The Everett Residence Hall at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, is named for him.
  Wallace Rider Farrington (1871-1933) — of Hawaii. Born in Orono, Penobscot County, Maine, May 3, 1871. Governor of Hawaii Territory, 1921-29. Congregationalist. Died of heart disease in Honolulu, Island of Oahu, Honolulu County, Hawaii, October 6, 1933 (age 62 years, 156 days). Interment at Oahu Cemetery, Honolulu, Island of Oahu, Hawaii.
  Relatives: Son of Joseph Rider Farrington (1830-1897) and Ellen Elizabeth (Holyoke) Farrington (1835-1895); married, October 26, 1896, to Catharine McAlpine Crane (1870-1953); father of Joseph Rider Farrington (1897-1954); second cousin of Edward Silsby Farrington.
  Political family: Farrington family of Honolulu, Hawaii.
  Farrington High School, in Honolulu, Hawaii, is named for him.  — Farrington Street and Farrington Highway, in Honolulu, Hawaii, are named for him.  — Farrington Hall auditorium (built 1930, demolished in the 1970s), at the University of Hawaii, Honolulu, Hawaii, was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Jacob Sloat Fassett (1853-1924) — also known as J. Sloat Fassett — of Elmira, Chemung County, N.Y. Born in Elmira, Chemung County, N.Y., November 13, 1853. Republican. Lawyer; newspaper editor; Chemung County District Attorney, 1879-80; delegate to Republican National Convention from New York, 1880, 1892, 1904, 1908, 1916; member of New York state senate 27th District, 1884-91; Secretary of Republican National Committee, 1888-92; U.S. Collector of Customs, 1891; candidate for Governor of New York, 1891; U.S. Representative from New York 33rd District, 1905-11; defeated, 1910; banker; lumber business. Died in Vancouver, British Columbia, April 21, 1924 (age 70 years, 160 days). Interment at Woodlawn Cemetery, Elmira, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Newton Pomeroy Fassett (1822-1894) and Martha Ellen (Sloat) Fassett (1829-1907); married, February 13, 1879, to Jennie L. Crocker (1860-1939; daughter of Edwin Bryant Crocker; niece of Charles Crocker); fourth cousin once removed of Zenas Ferry Moody (1832-1917) and Alfred Clark Chapin.
  Political families: Kellogg-Adams-Seymour-Chapin family of Connecticut and New York; Crocker-Whitehouse family of Sacramento, California (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  The village of Fassett, Quebec, Canada, is named for him.  — Fassett Elementary School, in Elmira, New York, is named for him.  — Fassett Commons, a building at Elmira College, Elmira, New York, is named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS Jacob Sloat Fassett (built 1944 at Savannah, Georgia; scrapped 1965) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  James Herman Faulkner, Sr. (1916-2008) — also known as Jimmy Faulkner — of Bay Minette, Baldwin County, Ala. Born in Lamar County, Ala., March 1, 1916. Democrat. Newspaper publisher; insurance agent; mayor of Bay Minette, Ala., 1941-43; member of Alabama Democratic State Executive Committee, 1942; served in the U.S. Army Air Force in World War II; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Alabama, 1948, 1952 (alternate); member of Alabama state senate, 1950-54; owned a chain of seven radio stations; bank director. Church of Christ. Died, in Oakwood Nursing Home, Bay Minette, Baldwin County, Ala., August 22, 2008 (age 92 years, 174 days). Interment at Bay Minette Cemetery, Bay Minette, Ala.
  Relatives: Son of Henry L. Faulkner and Ebbie (Johnson) Faulkner; married to Evelyn Louise Irwin (1910-1995).
  Faulkner University (founded 1942 as Montgomery Bible College; renamed 1953 as Alabama Christian College; renamed 1985 as Faulkner University), in Montgomery, Alabama, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
Reuben E. Fenton Reuben Eaton Fenton (1819-1885) — also known as Reuben E. Fenton — of Frewsburg, Chautauqua County, N.Y. Born in Carroll, Chautauqua County, N.Y., July 4, 1819. Lawyer; U.S. Representative from New York, 1853-55, 1857-65 (33rd District 1853-55, 1857-63, 29th District 1863-65); delegate to Republican National Convention from New York, 1856; Governor of New York, 1865-69; candidate for Republican nomination for Vice President, 1868; U.S. Senator from New York, 1869-75. Died in Jamestown, Chautauqua County, N.Y., August 25, 1885 (age 66 years, 52 days). Entombed at Lake View Cemetery, Jamestown, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of George Washington Fenton (1783-1860) and Elsie (Owen) Fenton (1790-1875); married, February 5, 1840, to Jane Frew (1820-1841); married, June 12, 1844, to Elizabeth Scudder (1824-1901); second cousin once removed of Nathaniel Freeman Jr.; third cousin of Benjamin Fessenden and Charles Backus Hyde Fessenden; third cousin twice removed of Desda Chapin (1893-1945); third cousin thrice removed of Peronneau Finley Henderson; fourth cousin once removed of George Champlin, John Baldwin, Levi Yale, Herschel Harrison Hatch and Frank P. Fenton.
  Political families: Kellogg-Adams-Seymour-Chapin family of Connecticut and New York; Otis family of Connecticut (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  The town of Fenton, New York, is named for him.  — The community of Fentonville, New York, is named for him.  — Fenton Hall, at the State University of New York at Fredonia, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: New York Red Book 1896
  Clinton Bowen Fisk (1828-1890) — also known as Clinton B. Fisk — of Coldwater, Branch County, Mich.; New Jersey. Born in York, Livingston County, N.Y., December 8, 1828. Merchant; miller; banker; insurance business; general in the Union Army during the Civil War; Prohibition candidate for President of the United States, 1888. Died in New York, New York County, N.Y., July 9, 1890 (age 61 years, 213 days). Interment at Oak Grove Cemetery, Coldwater, Mich.
  Relatives: Son of Benjamin Bigford e Fisk and Lydia (Aldrich) Fisk; married 1850 to Jeannette Crippen.
  Fisk University, Nashville, Tennessee, is named for him.  — Clinton B. Fisk Avenue, in Westerleigh, Staten Island, New York, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Henry Hammill Fowler (1908-2000) — also known as Henry H. Fowler; Joe Fowler — of Alexandria, Va. Born in Roanoke, Va., September 5, 1908. Democrat. Lawyer; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Virginia, 1956, 1960 (alternate); U.S. Secretary of the Treasury, 1965-69. Episcopalian. Member, Council on Foreign Relations; Pi Kappa Phi; Phi Delta Phi; American Bar Association; Americans for Democratic Action. Died, of pneumonia, in a nursing home at Falls Church, Va., January 3, 2000 (age 91 years, 120 days). Interment at Christ Church Episcopal Cemetery, Alexandria, Va.
  Relatives: Son of Mack Johnson Fowler and Bertha (Browning) Fowler; married, October 19, 1938, to Trudye Pamela Hathcote (1910-2008).
  Fowler House (office buiding, built 1940, named for Fowler in the 1960s, renamed Connell House 2003), at Harvard University Business School, Boston, Massachusetts, was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Robert Haines Frazier (1899-1978) — also known as Robert H. Frazier — of Greensboro, Guilford County, N.C. Born in Greensboro, Guilford County, N.C., January 8, 1899. Democrat. Lawyer; mayor of Greensboro, N.C., 1951-55. Quaker. Member, American Bar Association; Federal Bar Association; American Judicature Society; American Society for International Law; Sons of the American Revolution; Beta Theta Pi; Phi Delta Phi; Knights of Pythias; Kiwanis. Died in Greensboro, Guilford County, N.C., August 21, 1978 (age 79 years, 225 days). Interment at Green Hill Cemetery, Greensboro, N.C.
  Relatives: Son of Cyrus Pickett Frazier (1853-1933) and Lucetta (Churchill) Frazier (1860-1918); brother of Cyrus Clifford Frazier, Sr. (1884-1967); married, July 16, 1958, to Florence Hyde (daughter of Laurance Mastick Hyde).
  Political family: Hyde family of Princeton, Missouri (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Frazier Hall, at North Carolina A. & T. State University, Greensboro, North Carolina, is named for him.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
Albert Gallatin Albert Gallatin (1761-1849) — also known as Abraham Albert Alphonse de Gallatin — of Fayette County, Pa.; New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in Geneva, Switzerland, January 29, 1761. Democrat. Delegate to Pennsylvania state constitutional convention, 1790; member of Pennsylvania state house of representatives, 1790-92; U.S. Senator from Pennsylvania, 1793-94; U.S. Representative from Pennsylvania 11th District, 1795-1801; U.S. Secretary of the Treasury, 1801-14; U.S. Minister to France, 1815-23; Great Britain, 1826-27. Swiss ancestry. Died in Astoria, Queens, Queens County, N.Y., August 12, 1849 (age 88 years, 195 days). Entombed at Trinity Churchyard, Manhattan, N.Y.; statue at Treasury Building Grounds, Washington, D.C.
  Relatives: Son of Jean Gallatin and Sophia Albertina Rolaz du Rosey Gallatin; married 1789 to Sophie Allègre (1766-1789); married, November 11, 1793, to Hannah Nicholson (1766-1849); second great-grandfather of May Preston Davie; cousin by marriage of Joseph Hopper Nicholson (1770-1817).
  Political families: Pendleton-Lee family of Maryland; Davie family of Maryland (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Cross-reference: John L. Dawson
  Gallatin counties in Ill., Ky. and Mont. are named for him.
  The city of Gallatin, Tennessee, is named for him.  — The village of Galatia, Illinois, is named for him.  — The Gallatin River, which flows through Gallatin County, Montana, is named for him.  — Gallatin Hall (dormitory, built 1926), at Harvard University Business School, Boston, Massachusetts, is named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS Albert Gallatin (built 1941 at Terminal Island, Los Angeles, California; torpedoed and sunk 1944 in the Arabian Sea) was named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: Albert Galliton HarrisonAlbert G. JewettAlbert G. HawesAlbert G. WakefieldAlbert Gallatin TalbottAlbert G. DowAlbert G. DoleAlbert Gallatin KelloggAlbert Gallatin MarchandAlbert G. BrownAlbert G. Brodhead, Jr.Albert G. AllisonAlbert G. RiddleAlbert Galiton WatkinsAlbert G. PorterAlbert Gallatin EgbertAlbert Gallatin JenkinsAlbert Gallatin CalvertAlbert G. LawrenceAlbert G. FosterAlbert G. Simms
  Coins and currency: His portrait appeared on the U.S. $500 note in 1862-63.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about Albert Gallatin: John Austin Stevens, Albert Gallatin: An American Statesman — L. B. Kuppenheimer, Albert Gallatin's Vision of Democratic Stability — Nicholas Dungan, Gallatin: America's Swiss Founding Father — Raymond Walters, Albert Gallatin: Jeffersonian Financier and Diplomat
  Image source: New York Public Library
  Dean Anderson Gallo (1935-1994) — also known as Dean A. Gallo — of West Orange, Essex County, N.J.; Parsippany, Morris County, N.J. Born in Hackensack, Bergen County, N.J., November 23, 1935. Republican. Realtor; member of New Jersey state house of assembly, 1976-84; U.S. Representative from New Jersey 11th District, 1985-94; died in office 1994. Methodist. Died, of prostate cancer, in Denville, Morris County, N.J., November 6, 1994 (age 58 years, 348 days). Burial location unknown.
  Cross-reference: Bob Franks
  The Dean and Betty Gallo Prostate Cancer Center, at the Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey, is partly named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Ettie Garner (1869-1948) — also known as Mariette Elizabeth Rheiner — Born in Sabinal, Uvalde County, Tex., July 17, 1869. Democrat. Second Lady of the United States, 1933-41. Female. Swiss ancestry. Died, from Parkinson's disease, in Uvalde, Uvalde County, Tex., September 17, 1948 (age 79 years, 62 days). Interment at Uvalde Cemetery, Uvalde, Tex.
  Relatives: Daughter of Johann Peter Rheiner (1832-1879) and Mary Elizabeth (Watson) Rheiner (1849-1870); married, November 25, 1895, to John Nance Garner (1868-1967).
  Ettie R. Garner Hall, at Southwest Texas Junior College, Uvalde, Texas, is named for her.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Edwin Peabody Gerry (1846-1911) — also known as E. Peabody Gerry — of Jamaica Plain, Boston, Suffolk County, Mass. Born in Standish, Cumberland County, Maine, November 2, 1846. Republican. Physician; candidate in primary for mayor of Boston, Mass., 1903. Died in Phillipston, Worcester County, Mass., June 22, 1911 (age 64 years, 232 days). Interment at Mt. Auburn Cemetery, Cambridge, Mass.
  Relatives: Son of Edwin Jerome Gerry (1820-1885) and Sophia J. (Goodwin) Gerry (1827-1898).
  Gerry Hall (opened 1962, demolished 2007), at Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire, was named for him.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Don Lee Gevirtz (1928-2001) — also known as Don L. Gevirtz — of Beverly Hills, Los Angeles County, Calif.; Montecito, Santa Barbara County, Calif. Born in Chicago, Cook County, Ill., March 1, 1928. Democrat. Venture capitalist and philanthropist; delegate to Democratic National Convention from California, 1968 (alternate), 1988; U.S. Ambassador to Fiji, 1995-97; Nauru, 1995-97; Tonga, 1995-97; Tuvalu, 1995-97. Died, of a heart attack, in Montecito, Santa Barbara County, Calif., April 22, 2001 (age 73 years, 52 days). Interment at Santa Barbara Cemetery, Santa Barbara, Calif.
  The Gevirtz Graduate School of Education, at the University of California Santa Barbara, is named for him.
  Epitaph: Beloved Husband, Father, Grandfather and Friend -- HE GREW -- "When the angels ask me to recall the thrill of them all, I will tell them I remember you"
  See also U.S. State Dept career summary — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Albert Waller Gilchrist (1858-1926) — also known as Albert W. Gilchrist — of Punta Gorda, Charlotte County, Fla. Born in Greenwood, Greenwood County, S.C., January 15, 1858. Democrat. Civil engineer; real estate dealer; orange grower; member of Florida state house of representatives, 1893-96, 1903-06; Speaker of the Florida State House of Representatives, 1905; served in the U.S. Army during the Spanish-American War; Governor of Florida, 1909-13; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Florida, 1912 (speaker), 1924; candidate in primary for U.S. Senator from Florida, 1916. Member, Freemasons. Died, from a tumor of the thigh, in the Hospital for the Ruptured and Crippled, Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., May 15, 1926 (age 68 years, 120 days). Interment at Indian Spring Cemetery, Punta Gorda, Fla.
  Relatives: Son of William E. Gilchrist (born c.1828) and Rhoda Elizabeth (Waller) Gilchrist.
  Gilchrist County, Fla. is named for him.
  Gilchrist Hall (opened 1926), a dormitory at Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida, is named for him.
  See also National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Eugene Allen Gilmore (1871-1953) — also known as Eugene A. Gilmore — of Iowa City, Johnson County, Iowa. Born in Brownville, Nemaha County, Neb., July 4, 1871. Lawyer; law professor; Governor-General of the Philippine Islands, 1927, 1929; president, University of Iowa, 1934-40. Died, from a heart attack, in Iowa City, Johnson County, Iowa, November 4, 1953 (age 82 years, 123 days). Cremated.
  Relatives: Son of Andrew Hall Gilmore (1829-1907) and Sarah Jane (Allen) Gilmore (1840-1932); married, December 27, 1899, to Blanche Bayse.
  Gilmore Hall, at the University of Iowa, Iowa City, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
Carter Glass Carter Glass (1858-1946) — also known as George Carter Glass; "Father of the Federal Reserve"; "Pluck" — of Lynchburg, Va. Born in Lynchburg, Va., January 4, 1858. Democrat. Newspaper publisher; member of Virginia state senate, 1899-1902; delegate to Virginia state constitutional convention from Lynchburg city, 1901-02; U.S. Representative from Virginia 6th District, 1902-18; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Virginia, 1916, 1920, 1924, 1928, 1932, 1940, 1944; member of Democratic National Committee from Virginia, 1916-28; U.S. Secretary of the Treasury, 1918-20; U.S. Senator from Virginia, 1920-46; died in office 1946; candidate for Democratic nomination for President, 1920. Methodist. Member, Freemasons. Died, from congestive heart failure, in his room at the Mayflower Hotel, Washington, D.C., May 28, 1946 (age 88 years, 144 days). Interment at Spring Hill Cemetery, Lynchburg, Va.
  Relatives: Son of Robert Henry Glass and August Elizabeth (Christian) Glass (1826-1860); married 1886 to Mary Aurelia Caldwell (1859-1937); married, June 22, 1940, to Mary Everett (Scott) Meade (1886-1959); father of Carter Glass Jr. (1893-1955).
  Political family: Glass family of Lynchburg, Virginia.
  Glass House (offices, built 1926), at Harvard University Business School, Boston, Massachusetts, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial — Federal Reserve History
  Image source: Federal Reserve History
  John Brown Gordon (1832-1904) — also known as John B. Gordon — of Atlanta, Fulton County, Ga. Born in Upson County, Ga., February 6, 1832. Democrat. General in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Georgia, 1868; U.S. Senator from Georgia, 1873-80, 1891-97; Governor of Georgia, 1886-90. Slaveowner. Died in Miami, Dade County (now Miami-Dade County), Fla., January 9, 1904 (age 71 years, 337 days). Interment at Oakland Cemetery, Atlanta, Ga.
  Gordon State College, Barnesville, Georgia, is named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS John B. Gordon (built 1943 at Brunswick, Georgia; scrapped 1961) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article
  Frank Porter Graham (1886-1972) — also known as Frank P. Graham — of Chapel Hill, Orange County, N.C. Born in Fayetteville, Cumberland County, N.C., October 14, 1886. Democrat. School teacher; college instructor; lawyer; served in the U.S. Army during World War I; university professor; president of the University of North Carolina, 1931-49; U.S. Senator from North Carolina, 1949-50; appointed 1949; defeated, 1950. Presbyterian. Member, Americans for Democratic Action; Phi Beta Kappa. Died in Chapel Hill, Orange County, N.C., February 16, 1972 (age 85 years, 125 days). Interment at Old Chapel Hill Cemetery, Chapel Hill, N.C.
  Relatives: Son of Alexander Graham and Katherine Bryan (Sloan) Graham; married 1932 to Marian Drane (1899-1967).
  The Frank Porter Graham Student Union building, at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial — NCpedia
  Thomas Watt Gregory (1861-1933) — also known as Thomas W. Gregory — of Austin, Travis County, Tex. Born in Crawfordsville (unknown county), Miss., November 6, 1861. Democrat. Lawyer; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Texas, 1904 (member, Credentials Committee), 1912 (Honorary Vice-President); U.S. Attorney General, 1914-19. Presbyterian. Member, Alpha Tau Omega. Died, of pneumonia, in his room at the Hotel Pennsylvania, Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., February 26, 1933 (age 71 years, 112 days). Interment somewhere in Austin, Tex.
  Relatives: Son of Francis Robert Gregory (killed in Civil War) and Mary Cornelia (Watt) Gregory; married, February 22, 1893, to Julia Nalle.
  Gregory Gymnasium (built 1930), a sports arena at the University of Texas, Austin, Texas, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Josiah Bushnell Grinnell (1821-1891) — also known as Josiah B. Grinnell — of Grinnell, Poweshiek County, Iowa. Born in New Haven, Addison County, Vt., December 22, 1821. Republican. Pastor; abolitionist; member of Iowa state senate, 1856-60; lawyer; delegate to Republican National Convention from Iowa, 1860; U.S. Representative from Iowa 4th District, 1863-67; director, Rock Island Railroad; receiver, Iowa Central Railroad; president, First National Bank of Grinnell. Congregationalist. He claimed to be the original recipient of Horace Greeley's famous advice to "Go West, young man.". Died, from a throat ailment and asthma, in Grinnell, Poweshiek County, Iowa, March 31, 1891 (age 69 years, 99 days). Interment at Hazelwood Cemetery, Grinnell, Iowa.
  Relatives: Married to Julia Ann Chapin (1827-1907).
  Cross-reference: Lovell H. Rousseau
  The city of Grinnell, Iowa, (which he founded), is named for him.  — Grinnell College (originally Iowa College), Grinnell, Iowa, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Charles Harold Haden II (1937-2004) — also known as Charles H. Haden II — of Morgantown, Monongalia County, W.Va.; Charleston, Kanawha County, W.Va. Born in Morgantown, Monongalia County, W.Va., April 16, 1937. Republican. Lawyer; member of West Virginia state house of delegates from Monongalia County, 1963-64; defeated, 1964; candidate for West Virginia state attorney general, 1968; West Virginia State Tax Commissioner, 1969-72; judge of West Virginia supreme court of appeals, 1972-75; appointed 1972; resigned 1975; U.S. District Judge for the Northern District of West Virginia, 1975-83; U.S. District Judge for the Southern District of West Virginia, 1975-2004; died in office 2004. Member, American Bar Association. Died in Charleston, Kanawha County, W.Va., March 20, 2004 (age 66 years, 339 days). Cremated; ashes scattered.
  Relatives: Son of Charles H. Haden and Beatrice (Costolo) Haden.
  Cross-reference: John Preston Bailey
  The Charles H. Haden II Professorship of Law, at West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia, is named for him.
  See also federal judicial profile — Find-A-Grave memorial — Biographical Directory of Federal Judges
Alexander Hamilton Alexander Hamilton (1757-1804) — also known as "Alexander the Coppersmith" — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in Charles Town, Nevis, January 11, 1757. Served in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; lawyer; Delegate to Continental Congress from New York, 1782-83; member of New York state assembly from New York County, 1786-87; member, U.S. Constitutional Convention, 1787; delegate to New York convention to ratify U.S. constitution from New York County, 1788; U.S. Secretary of the Treasury, 1789-95. Episcopalian. Scottish and French ancestry. Member, Freemasons; Society of the Cincinnati. Elected to the Hall of Fame for Great Americans in 1915. Shot and mortally wounded in a duel with Aaron Burr, on July 11, 1804, and died the next day in New York, New York County, N.Y., July 12, 1804 (age 47 years, 183 days). Interment at Trinity Churchyard, Manhattan, N.Y.; statue at Treasury Building Grounds, Washington, D.C.; statue at Commonwealth Avenue Mall, Boston, Mass.
  Relatives: Son of James Hamilton and Rachel (Faucette) Hamilton; married, December 14, 1780, to Elizabeth Schuyler (1757-1854; daughter of Philip John Schuyler; sister of Philip Jeremiah Schuyler); father of Alexander Hamilton Jr., James Alexander Hamilton (1788-1878) and William Stephen Hamilton; great-grandfather of Robert Ray Hamilton; second great-grandfather of Laurens M. Hamilton; ancestor *** of Robert Hamilton Woodruff.
  Political families: Livingston-Schuyler family of New York; VanRensselaer family of Albany, New York (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Cross-reference: Nathaniel Pendleton — Robert Troup — John Tayler — William P. Van Ness
  Hamilton counties in Fla., Ill., Ind., Kan., Neb., N.Y., Ohio and Tenn. are named for him.
  The city of Hamilton, Ohio, is named for him.  — Hamilton Hall (dormitory, built 1926), at Harvard University Business School, Boston, Massachusetts, is named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: Alexander H. BuellAlexander H. HolleyHamilton FishAlexander H. StephensAlexander H. BullockAlexander H. BaileyAlexander H. RiceAlexander Hamilton JonesAlexander H. WatermanAlexander H. CoffrothAlexander H. DudleyAlexander H. RevellAlexander Hamilton HargisAlexander Hamilton PhillipsAlex Woodle
  Coins and currency: His portrait appears on the U.S. $10 bill; from the 1860s to the 1920s, his portrait also appeared on U.S. notes and certificates of various denominations from $2 to $1,000.
  Personal motto: "Do it better yet."
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial — Historical Society of the New York Courts
  Books about Alexander Hamilton: Richard Brookhiser, Alexander Hamilton, American — Forrest McDonald, Alexander Hamilton: A Biography — Gertrude Atherton, Conqueror : Dramatized Biography of Alexander Hamilton — Ron Chernow, Alexander Hamilton — Thomas Fleming, Duel: Alexander Hamilton, Aaron Burr, and the Future of America — Arnold A. Rogow, A Fatal Friendship: Alexander Hamilton and Aaron Burr — Willard Sterne Randall, Alexander Hamilton: A Life — John Harper, American Machiavelli : Alexander Hamilton and the Origins of U.S. Foreign Policy — Stephen F. Knott, Alexander Hamilton and the Persistence of Myth — Charles Cerami, Young Patriots: The Remarkable Story of Two Men. Their Impossible Plan and The Revolution That Created The Constitution — Donald Barr Chidsey, Mr. Hamilton and Mr. Jefferson
  Critical books about Alexander Hamilton: Thomas DiLorenzo, Hamilton's Curse : How Jefferson's Arch Enemy Betrayed the American Revolution -- and What It means for Americans Today
  Image source: U.S. postage stamp (1957)
  Lee Herbert Hamilton (b. 1931) — also known as Lee H. Hamilton — of Columbus, Bartholomew County, Ind. Born in Daytona Beach, Volusia County, Fla., April 20, 1931. Democrat. Lawyer; U.S. Representative from Indiana 9th District, 1965-99; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Indiana, 1968, 1996; received the Medal of Freedom in 2015. Methodist. Member, American Bar Association; Trilateral Commission; Rotary; Jaycees; Alpha Tau Omega. Inducted into the Indiana Basketball Hall of Fame. Still living as of 2018.
  Relatives: Son of Frank A. Hamilton (1895-1956) and Myra (Jones) Hamilton (1899-1979); married, August 21, 1954, to Nancy Ann Nelson (1930-2012; artist, died in an auto accident).
  The Lee H. Hamilton Highway (I-265 and Indiana 265), in Floyd and Clark counties, Indiana, is named for him.  — The Hamilton-Lugar School of Global and International Studies, at Indiana University, is partly named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — NNDB dossier
Hannibal Hamlin Hannibal Hamlin (1809-1891) — of Hampden, Penobscot County, Maine; Bangor, Penobscot County, Maine. Born in Paris, Oxford County, Maine, August 27, 1809. Farmer; surveyor; compositor; lawyer; member of Maine state house of representatives, 1836-41, 1847; Speaker of the Maine State House of Representatives, 1837, 1839-40; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Maine, 1840; U.S. Representative from Maine 6th District, 1843-47; U.S. Senator from Maine, 1848-57, 1857-61, 1869-81; Governor of Maine, 1857; Vice President of the United States, 1861-65; candidate for Republican nomination for Vice President, 1864, 1868; U.S. Collector of Customs, 1865-66; U.S. Minister to Spain, 1881-82. Died in Bangor, Penobscot County, Maine, July 4, 1891 (age 81 years, 311 days). Interment at Mt. Hope Cemetery, Bangor, Maine; statue at Kenduskeag Parkway, Bangor, Maine.
  Relatives: Son of Cyrus Hamlin (1769-1829) and Anna (Livermore) Hamlin (1775-1852); brother of Elijah Livermore Hamlin; married, December 10, 1833, to Sarah Jane Emery (1815-1855; daughter of Stephen Emery (1790-1863)); married, September 25, 1856, to Ellen Vesta Emery (daughter of Stephen Emery (1790-1863)); father of Charles Hamlin and Hannibal Emery Hamlin (1858-1938); granduncle of Isaiah Kidder Stetson; great-granduncle of Clarence Cutting Stetson; first cousin once removed of John Appleton; first cousin twice removed of Charles Sumner Hamlin; third cousin once removed of David Sears; fourth cousin of George Pickering Bemis; fourth cousin once removed of Henry Fisk Janes, John Mason Jr., William Henry Harrison Stowell, Walter S. Bemis and Eldred C. Pitkin.
  Political families: Hamlin-Bemis family of Bangor, Maine; Kellogg-Adams-Seymour-Chapin family of Connecticut and New York (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Hamlin County, S.Dak. is named for him.
  The town of Hamlin, Maine, is named for him.  — The town of Hamlin, New York, is named for him.  — The city of Hamlin, Kansas, is named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS Hannibal Hamlin (built 1942-43 at South Portland, Maine; scrapped 1971) was named for him.  — Hannibal Hamlin Hall, at the University of Maine, Orono, Maine, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Books about Hannibal Hamlin: Charles Eugene Hamlin, The Life and Times of Hannibal Hamlin — Mark Scroggins, Hannibal
  Image source: James G. Blaine, Twenty Years of Congress, vol. 2 (1886)
  Dudley Chase Haskell (1842-1883) — also known as Dudley C. Haskell — of Lawrence, Douglas County, Kan. Born in Springfield, Windsor County, Vt., March 23, 1842. Republican. Member of Kansas state house of representatives, 1872; U.S. Representative from Kansas 2nd District, 1877-83; died in office 1883. Died December 16, 1883 (age 41 years, 268 days). Interment at Oak Hill Cemetery, Lawrence, Kan.
  Relatives: Grandfather of Otis Halbert Holmes (1902-1977).
  Haskell County, Kan. is named for him.
  Haskell Indian Nations University (founded in 1884 as a residential boarding school for Amerian Indian children), in Lawrence, Kansas, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
Rutherford B. Hayes Rutherford Birchard Hayes (1822-1893) — also known as Rutherford B. Hayes; "Rutherfraud B. Hayes"; "His Fraudulency" — of Ohio. Born in Delaware, Delaware County, Ohio, October 4, 1822. Republican. Lawyer; general in the Union Army during the Civil War; U.S. Representative from Ohio 2nd District, 1865-67; Governor of Ohio, 1868-72, 1876-77; President of the United States, 1877-81. Methodist. Scottish ancestry. Member, Loyal Legion; Grand Army of the Republic; Odd Fellows; Delta Kappa Epsilon. Stricken by a heart attack at the railroad station in Cleveland, Ohio, and died that night in Fremont, Sandusky County, Ohio, January 17, 1893 (age 70 years, 105 days). Original interment and cenotaph at Oakwood Cemetery, Fremont, Ohio; reinterment in 1915 at Rutherford B. Hayes State Memorial Grounds, Fremont, Ohio.
  Relatives: Son of Rutherford Hayes, Jr. and Sophia (Birchard) Hayes; married, December 30, 1852, to Lucy Webb Hayes; father of James Webb Cook Hayes (1856-1934).
  Political family: Hayes family of Fremont, Ohio.
  Cross-reference: Leopold Markbreit — James M. Comly — Joseph P. Bradley
  Hayes County, Neb. is named for him.
  Rutherford B. Hayes High School, in Delaware, Ohio, is named for him.  — The Presidente Hayes Department (province), and its capital city, Villa Hayes, in Paraguay, are named for him.  — Hayes Hall (built 1893), at Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio, is named for him.
  Personal motto: "He serves his party best who serves his country best."
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Books about Rutherford B. Hayes: Ari Hoogenboom, Rutherford B. Hayes: Warrior and President — Hans Trefousse, Rutherford B. Hayes: 1877 - 1881 — William H. Rehnquist, Centennial Crisis : The Disputed Election of 1876
  Image source: James G. Blaine, Twenty Years of Congress, vol. 2 (1886)
  John Williamson Herron (1827-1912) — also known as John W. Herron — of Hamilton County, Ohio. Born in Shippensburg, Cumberland County, Pa., May 10, 1827. Lawyer; delegate to Ohio state constitutional convention from Hamilton County, 1873; U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of Ohio, 1889-94. Died in Cincinnati, Hamilton County, Ohio, August 5, 1912 (age 85 years, 87 days). Interment at Spring Grove Cemetery, Cincinnati, Ohio.
  Relatives: Son of Francis Herron (1794-1841) and Jane (Willis) Herron (1800-1877); married, March 7, 1854, to Harriet Anne Collins (1833-1902); father of Helen Louise Herron (who married William Howard Taft); grandfather of Robert Alphonso Taft, Charles Phelps Taft II and Frederick Lippitt (1916-2005); great-grandfather of William Howard Taft III, Robert Taft Jr. and Seth Chase Taft; second great-grandfather of Robert Alphonso Taft III.
  Political families: Kellogg-Adams-Seymour-Chapin family of Connecticut and New York; Greene-Lippitt family of Providence, Rhode Island (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Herron Gymnasium (built 1896; later named Van Voorhis Hall; demolished 1986) at Miami University, Oxford, Ohio, was named for him.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Philip Henderson Hoff (1924-2018) — also known as Philip H. Hoff — of Burlington, Chittenden County, Vt. Born in Turners Falls, Montague, Franklin County, Mass., June 29, 1924. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Navy during World War II; lawyer; member of Vermont state house of representatives, 1961-62; Governor of Vermont, 1963-69; candidate for U.S. Senator from Vermont, 1970; member of Vermont state senate, 1983-88. Episcopalian. Member, American Bar Association; Elks; Freemasons; Shriners; Grange; Eagles; Moose. Died, at The Residence at Shelburne Bay assisted living facility, in Shelburne, Chittenden County, Vt., April 26, 2018 (age 93 years, 301 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Olaf Hoff and Agnes (Henderson) Hoff; married 1948 to Joan Brower.
  Hoff Hall, at Castleton State University, Castleton, Vermont, is named for him.
  See also National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about Philip Hoff: Samuel B. Hand et al, Philip Hoff: How Red Turned Blue in the Green Mountain State
  Edward Dwight Holton (1815-1892) — also known as Edward D. Holton — of Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, Wis. Born in Lancaster, Coos County, N.H., April 28, 1815. Abolitionist; wheat trader; Liberty candidate for Delegate to U.S. Congress from Wisconsin Territory, 1845; founder, Milwaukee and Prairie du Chien Railroad; banker; Free Soil candidate for Governor of Wisconsin, 1853; Presidential Elector for Wisconsin, 1856; delegate to Republican National Convention from Wisconsin, 1856; member of Wisconsin state assembly from Milwaukee County 4th District, 1860. Died, from malaria and erysipelas, in Savannah, Chatham County, Ga., April 21, 1892 (age 76 years, 359 days). Interment at Forest Home Cemetery, Milwaukee, Wis.
  Relatives: Married, October 14, 1845, to Lucinda Millard (1824-1910).
  The city of Holton, Kansas, is named for him.  — Holton Hall, at the University of Wisconsin Milwaukee, is named for him.  — Holton Street, in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Alice Merrill Horne (1868-1948) — also known as Alice Smith Merrill — of Utah. Born in Fillmore, Millard County, Utah, January 2, 1868. School teacher; member of Utah state house of representatives, 1898. Female. Mormon. Died, of a heart attack, October 7, 1948 (age 80 years, 279 days). Interment at Salt Lake City Cemetery, Salt Lake City, Utah.
  Relatives: Married to George H. Horne.
  Horne Hall at Brigham Young University, in Provo, Utah, is named for her.
  Robert Morton Hughes (1855-1940) — also known as Robert M. Hughes — Born in Abingdon, Washington County, Va., September 10, 1855. Republican. Lawyer; candidate for U.S. Representative from Virginia 2nd District, 1902, 1904; member, Virginia state board of education, 1930-35. Died January 15, 1940 (age 84 years, 127 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Robert William Hughes (1821-1901) and Eliza (Johnston) Hughes; grandnephew of Joseph Eggleston Johnston.
  Political families: Breckinridge-Preston-Cabell family of Virginia; Johnston family of Abingdon, Virginia (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  The Robert M. Hughes Memorial Library (now Dragas Hall), at Old Dominion University, Norfolk, Virginia, was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article
George Magoffin Humphrey George Magoffin Humphrey (1890-1970) — also known as George M. Humphrey — of Mentor, Lake County, Ohio. Born in Cheboygan, Cheboygan County, Mich., March 8, 1890. Lawyer; president, M.A. Hanna Company (mining and processing iron and nickel ores), 1929-52; chairman of Pittsburgh Consolidated Coal Company; chairman, Executive Committee, National Steel Corporation; U.S. Secretary of the Treasury, 1953-57. Episcopalian. Died, from heart disease, in University Hospital, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, Ohio, January 20, 1970 (age 79 years, 318 days). Interment at Lake View Cemetery, Cleveland, Ohio.
  Relatives: Son of Watts Sherman Humphrey (1844-1916) and Caroline (Magoffin) Humphrey (1861-1946); married, January 15, 1913, to Pamela Stark.
  Humphrey House (offices, built 1965 and named for Humphrey, renovated and renamed Greenhill House 2004), at Harvard University Business School, Boston, Massachusetts, was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Image source: Eminent Americans (1954)
  James Baxter Hunt Jr. (b. 1937) — also known as James B. Hunt, Jr.; Jim Hunt — of North Carolina. Born in Greensboro, Guilford County, N.C., May 16, 1937. Democrat. Lieutenant Governor of North Carolina, 1973-77; Governor of North Carolina, 1977-85, 1993-2001; candidate for U.S. Senator from North Carolina, 1984; delegate to Democratic National Convention from North Carolina, 1996, 2000. Presbyterian. Still living as of 2014.
  The James B. Hunt, Jr. Library, at the North Carolina State University Centennial Campus, Raleigh, North Carolina, is named for him.  — Hunt Hall, a dormitory at the University of North Carolina Charlotte, in Charlotte, North Carolina, is named for him.  — The James B. Hunt Jr. Residence Hall, at the North Carolina School of Science and Mathematics, in Durham, North Carolina, is named for him.
  See also National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile
  Books about James B. Hunt: Wayne Grimsley, James B. Hunt: A North Carolina Progressive — Gary Pearce, Jim Hunt: A Biography
  Claude Burton Hutchison (1885-1980) — also known as Claude B. Hutchison — of Berkeley, Alameda County, Calif. Born near Chillicothe, Livingston County, Mo., April 9, 1885. Botanist; agricultural economist; university professor; mayor of Berkeley, Calif., 1955-63. Member, Alpha Phi Omega. Died August 25, 1980 (age 95 years, 138 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of William Moses Hutchison and Ada (Smith) Hutchison; married 1908 to Roxie Pritchard; father of Claude B. Hutchison Jr. (born c.1942).
  Hutchison Hall, at the University of California Davis, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article
  Beauford Halbert Jester (1893-1949) — also known as Beauford Jester — of Corsicana, Navarro County, Tex. Born in Corsicana, Navarro County, Tex., January 12, 1893. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army during World War I; Governor of Texas, 1947-49; died in office 1949; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Texas, 1948. Methodist. Member, American Legion; Veterans of Foreign Wars; Sons of the American Revolution; Kappa Sigma; Sigma Delta Chi; Freemasons; Shriners; Elks; Rotary; Lions. Died, aboard a Pullman railroad car, near Houston, Harris County, Tex., July 11, 1949 (age 56 years, 180 days). Interment at Oakwood Cemetery, Corsicana, Tex.
  Relatives: Son of George Taylor Jester (1846-1922) and Frances Paine (Gordon) Jester (1861-1953); married, June 15, 1921, to Mabel Buchanan (1901-1984); second cousin of Perry Northen Jester.
  Political family: Jester family of Corsicana, Texas.
  Jester Center Residence Hall (built 1969), at the University of Texas, Austin, is named for him.
  See also National Governors Association biography
  Herbert Warren Ladd (1843-1913) — also known as Herbert W. Ladd — of Providence, Providence County, R.I. Born in New Bedford, Bristol County, Mass., October 15, 1843. Newspaper reporter; dry goods merchant; Governor of Rhode Island, 1889-90, 1891-92. Member, Freemasons. Died, from a cerebral hemorrhage, in Butler Hospital, Providence, Providence County, R.I., November 29, 1913 (age 70 years, 45 days). Interment at Swan Point Cemetery, Providence, R.I.
  Relatives: Son of Warren Ladd and Lucy Washburn (Kingman) Ladd; married, May 25, 1870, to Emma Burrows.
  Ladd Observatory, at Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island, is named for him.
  See also National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article
  Mirabeau Buonaparte Lamar (1798-1859) — also known as Mirabeau B. Lamar — of Texas. Born near Louisville, Jefferson County, Ga., August 16, 1798. Member of Georgia state senate, 1829-30; candidate for U.S. Representative from Georgia, 1832, 1834; colonel in the Texas Army during the Texas War of Independence; Texas Republic Secretary of War, 1836; Vice President of the Texas Republic, 1836-38; President of the Texas Republic, 1838-41; colonel in the U.S. Army during the Mexican War; member of Texas state legislature, 1847; U.S. Minister to Costa Rica, 1858-59; Nicaragua, 1858-59. Member, Freemasons. Died of a heart attack, near Richmond, Fort Bend County, Tex., December 19, 1859 (age 61 years, 125 days). Interment at Morton Cemetery, Richmond, Tex.
  Relatives: Son of John A. Lamar (1769-1833) and Rebecca (Kelly) Lamar (1774-1839); brother of Lucius Quintus Cincinnatus Lamar (1797-1834) and Loretta Rebecca Lamar (1818-1905; who married Absalom Harris Chappell); uncle of Lucius Quintus Cincinnatus Lamar (1825-1893); third cousin once removed of William McKendree Robbins (1828-1905); third cousin twice removed of Gaston Ahi Robbins.
  Political family: Lamar family of Georgia.
  Lamar County, Tex. is named for him.
  Lamar University, in Beaumont, Texas, is named for him.
  Politician named for him: Mirabeau Lamar Towns
  See also U.S. State Dept career summary
  Amos Adams Lawrence (1814-1886) — also known as Amos A. Lawrence — of Brookline, Norfolk County, Mass. Born in Boston, Suffolk County, Mass., July 31, 1814. Owner, Ipswich Mills, maker of cotton and woollen goods; abolitionist; candidate for Governor of Massachusetts, 1858 (American), 1860 (Constitutional Union). Episcopalian. Died in Nahant, Essex County, Mass., August 22, 1886 (age 72 years, 22 days). Interment at Mt. Auburn Cemetery, Cambridge, Mass.
  Relatives: Son of Amos Lawrence (1786-1852) and Sarah (Richards) Lawrence (1790-1819); married, March 31, 1842, to Sarah Elizabeth Appleton (1822-1891; daughter of William Appleton); father of Susan Mason Lawrence (1852-1923; who married William Caleb Loring); nephew of Luther Lawrence and Abbott Lawrence (1792-1855); great-grandfather of Leverett Saltonstall and Richard Saltonstall; second great-grandfather of William Lawrence Saltonstall; first cousin of Samuel Abbott Green; third cousin twice removed of Charles Moore Bancroft; fourth cousin of Alonzo M. Garcelon; fourth cousin once removed of John Albion Andrew, Charles Courtney Pinkney Holden, Ebenezer Gregg Danforth Holden, Winfield Scott Holden and Alonzo Marston Garcelon.
  Political families: Saltonstall-Davis-Frelinghuysen-Appleton family of Massachusetts; Woodbury-Holden family of Massachusetts and New Hampshire; Holden-Davis-Lawrence-Garcelon family of Massachusetts; Lawrence-Andrew-Rodney-Parrish family of Adel, Georgia (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  The city of Lawrence, Kansas, is named for him.  — Lawrence University, in Appleton, Wisconsin, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
Herbert H. Lehman Herbert Henry Lehman (1878-1963) — also known as Herbert H. Lehman — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born in New York, New York County, N.Y., March 28, 1878. Democrat. Director, Consolidated Cotton Duck Co., Imperial Cotton Co., U.S. Cotton Duck Co., Washington Mills; colonel in the U.S. Army during World War I; delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1928, 1932, 1936, 1940, 1948, 1952, 1956, 1960; Lieutenant Governor of New York, 1929-32; Governor of New York, 1933-42; U.S. Senator from New York, 1949-57; defeated, 1946. Jewish. Member, American Jewish Committee; Council on Foreign Relations; Phi Gamma Delta; Americans for Democratic Action. Awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom posthumously in 1963; inducted into the Jewish-American Hall of Fame in 1974. Died in Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., December 5, 1963 (age 85 years, 252 days). Interment at Kensico Cemetery, Valhalla, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Mayer Lehman (1830-1897) and Babette (Newgass) Lehman; brother of Irving Lehman; married, April 28, 1910, to Edith Louise Altschul (1880-1976); father of Peter Lehman (1917-1944; killed on active duty in World War II); uncle of Elinor Fatman Morgenthau; granduncle of Robert Morris Morgenthau (1919-2019), Orin Lehman and John Langeloth Loeb Jr..
  Political family: Morgenthau-Lehman family of New York City, New York (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Cross-reference: Nathan R. Sobel — Thomas L. J. Corcoran
  Lehman College, Bronx, New York, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Image source: New York Red Book 1936
  Merit E. Leming (1862-1938) — of Cape Girardeau, Cape Girardeau County, Mo. Born in Dearborn County, Ind., March 14, 1862. Republican. Lumber business; delegate to Republican National Convention from Missouri, 1900; mayor of Cape Girardeau, Mo., 1909-11. Died, from coronary occlusion and influenza, in Cape Girardeau, Cape Girardeau County, Mo., March 4, 1938 (age 75 years, 355 days). Interment at Cape County Memorial Park Cemetery, Cape Girardeau, Mo.
  Relatives: Son of William Leming and Elizabeth (Rosecrans) Leming; married to Eugenia R. Bouchman (1863-1950).
  Leming Hall (built 1905, demolished 1972), one of the first two dormitory buildings at Southeast Missouri State University in Cape Girardeau, Missouri, was named for him.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Asbury Francis Lever (1875-1940) — also known as A. Frank Lever — of Lexington, Lexington County, S.C.; Columbia, Richland County, S.C. Born near Springhill, Lexington County, S.C., January 5, 1875. Democrat. Lawyer; private secretary to U.S. Rep. J. William Stokes, 1897-1901; member of South Carolina state house of representatives from Lexington County, 1900-01; resigned 1901; U.S. Representative from South Carolina 7th District, 1901-19. Member, Freemasons. Died in Lexington County, S.C., April 28, 1940 (age 65 years, 114 days). Interment at Woodland Cemetery, Clemson, S.C.
  Relatives: Son of Asbury Washington Lever and Mary Elvira (Derrick) Lever; married, July 5, 1911, to Lucile Scurry Butler (1889-1957); father of Asbury Francis Lever Jr. (1918-2000).
  Lever Hall, at Clemson University, Clemson, South Carolina, is named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS A. Frank Lever. (built 1943 at Savannah, Georgia; scrapped 1968) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
Abraham Lincoln Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865) — also known as "Honest Abe"; "Old Abe"; "The Rail-Splitter"; "The Illinois Baboon" — of New Salem, Menard County, Ill.; Springfield, Sangamon County, Ill. Born in a log cabin, Hardin County (part now in Larue County), Ky., February 12, 1809. Republican. Served in the U.S. Army during the Black Hawk War; postmaster; lawyer; member of Illinois state house of representatives, 1834-41; U.S. Representative from Illinois 7th District, 1847-49; candidate for Republican nomination for Vice President, 1856; candidate for U.S. Senator from Illinois, 1858; President of the United States, 1861-65; died in office 1865; His election as president in 1860 precipitated the Civil War; determined to preserve the Union, he led the North to victory on the battlefield, freed the slaves in the conquered states, and in doing this, redefined American nationhood. He was. English ancestry. Elected in 1900 to the Hall of Fame for Great Americans. Shot by the assassin John Wilkes Booth, during a play at Ford's Theater, in Washington, D.C., April 14, 1865; died at Peterson's Boarding House, across the street, the following day, April 15, 1865 (age 56 years, 62 days). Interment at Oak Ridge Cemetery, Springfield, Ill.; memorial monument at National Mall, Washington, D.C.; statue erected 1868 at Judiciary Park, Washington, D.C.
  Relatives: Son of Thomas Lincoln (1778-1851) and Nancy (Hanks) Lincoln (1784-1818); married, November 4, 1842, to Mary Ann Todd (sister-in-law of Ninian Wirt Edwards (1809-1889); half-sister-in-law of Nathaniel Henry Rhodes Dawson and Benjamin Hardin Helm; half-sister of Emilie Pariet Todd; aunt of Martha Dee Todd; grandniece of David Rittenhouse Porter); father of Robert Todd Lincoln; second cousin four times removed of Richard Henry Lee, Francis Lightfoot Lee and Arthur Lee; third cousin twice removed of Levi Lincoln; third cousin thrice removed of Thomas Sim Lee, Henry Lee, Charles Lee, Edmund Jennings Lee and Zachary Taylor; fourth cousin once removed of Levi Lincoln Jr. and Enoch Lincoln.
  Political families: Lincoln-Lee family; Walker-Helm-Lincoln-Brown family of Kentucky; Edwards-Cook family (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Cross-reference: Clement Claiborne Clay, Jr. — Isham N. Haynie — William M. Stone — John Pitcher — Stephen Miller — John T. Stuart — William H. Seward — Henry L. Burnett — Judah P. Benjamin — Robert Toombs — Richard Taylor Jacob — George W. Jones — James Adams — John G. Nicolay — Edward Everett — Stephen T. Logan — Francis P. Blair — John Hay — Henry Reed Rathbone — James A. Ekin — Frederick W. Seward — John H. Surratt — John H. Surratt, Jr. — James Shields — Emily T. Helm — John A. Campbell
  Lincoln counties in Ark., Colo., Idaho, Kan., La., Minn., Miss., Mont., Neb., Nev., N.M., Okla., Ore., Wash., W.Va., Wis. and Wyo. are named for him.
  The city of Lincoln, Nebraska, is named for him.  — Lincoln Memorial University, in Harrogate, Tennessee, is named for him.  — Lincoln University, in Jefferson City, Missouri, is named for him.  — Lincoln University, near Oxford, Pennsylvania, is named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: Abraham L. KeisterAbraham L. TuckerAbraham L. BrickAbraham L. KelloggAbraham Lincoln BernsteinA. Lincoln ReileyA. L. HelmickAbraham L. SuttonA. Lincoln AckerAbraham L. OsgoodAbraham L. WitmerAbraham L. PhillipsAbraham L. PaytonA. L. AuthA. Lincoln MooreA. Lincoln NiditchAbraham L. RubensteinAbraham L. Davis, Jr.Abraham L. FreedmanA. L. MarovitzLincoln GordonAbraham L. BannerAbraham Lincoln Tosti
  Coins and currency: His portrait has appeared on the U.S. penny (one cent coin) since 1909, and on the $5 bill since 1913. From the 1860s until 1927, his portrait also appeared on U.S. notes and certificates of various denominations from $1 to $500.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Books about Abraham Lincoln: David Herbert Donald, Lincoln — George Anastaplo, Abraham Lincoln : A Constitutional Biography — G. S. Boritt, ed., The Lincoln Enigma : The Changing Faces of an American Icon — Albert J. Beveridge, Abraham Lincoln 1809-1858 — Geoffrey Perret, Lincoln's War : The Untold Story of America's Greatest President as Commander in Chief — David Herbert Donald, We Are Lincoln Men : Abraham Lincoln and His Friends — Edward Steers, Jr., Blood on the Moon: The Assassination of Abraham Lincoln — Mario Cuomo, Why Lincoln Matters : Today More Than Ever — Michael W. Kauffman, American Brutus : John Wilkes Booth and the Lincoln Conspiracies — Doris Kearns Goodwin, Team of Rivals : The Political Genius of Abraham Lincoln — Joshua Wolf Shenk, Lincoln's Melancholy : How Depression Challenged a President and Fueled His Greatness — John Channing Briggs, Lincoln's Speeches Reconsidered — Ronald C. White, Jr., The Eloquent President : A Portrait of Lincoln Through His Words — Harold Holzer, Lincoln at Cooper Union : The Speech That Made Abraham Linco ln President — Michael Lind, What Lincoln Believed : The Values and Convictions of America's Greatest President — Doris Kearns Goodwin, Team of Rivals : The Political Genius of Abraham Lincoln — Michael Burlingame, ed., Abraham Lincoln: The Observations of John G. Nicolay and John Hay — Thomas J. Craughwell, Stealing Lincoln's Body — Roy Morris, Jr., The Long Pursuit: Abraham Lincoln's Thirty-Year Struggle with Stephen Douglas for the Heart and Soul of America — John Stauffer, Giants: The Parallel Lives of Frederick Douglass and Abraham Lincoln — Karen Judson, Abraham Lincoln (for young readers) — Maira Kalman, Looking at Lincoln (for young readers)
  Critical books about Abraham Lincoln: Thomas J. DiLorenzo, The Real Lincoln : A New Look at Abraham Lincoln, His Agenda, and an Unnecessary War
  Fiction about Abraham Lincoln: Gore Vidal, Lincoln: A Novel
  Image source: Portrait & Biographical Album of Washtenaw County (1891)
  John Langeloth Loeb Jr. (b. 1930) — also known as John L. Loeb, Jr. — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born in New York City (unknown county), N.Y., May 2, 1930. Republican. Alternate delegate to Republican National Convention from New York, 1964; U.S. Ambassador to Denmark, 1981-83. Still living as of 1996.
  Relatives: Son of John Langeloth Loeb and Frances (Lehman) Loeb; grandnephew of Herbert Henry Lehman; cousin *** of Robert Morris Morgenthau (1919-2019).
  Political family: Morgenthau-Lehman family of New York City, New York (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Loeb House (offices, built 1940), at Harvard University Business School, Boston, Massachusetts, is named for him and his father.
  See also U.S. State Dept career summary
  Richard Green Lugar (1932-2019) — also known as Richard G. Lugar — of Indianapolis, Marion County, Ind. Born in Indianapolis, Marion County, Ind., April 4, 1932. Republican. Rhodes scholar; mayor of Indianapolis, Ind., 1968-75; delegate to Republican National Convention from Indiana, 1968, 1972; U.S. Senator from Indiana, 1977-; defeated, 1974; candidate for Republican nomination for President, 1996. Methodist. Member, Phi Beta Kappa; Omicron Delta Kappa; Pi Delta Epsilon; Pi Sigma Alpha; Beta Theta Pi; Rotary; Blue Key. Died in Annandale, Fairfax County, Va., April 28, 2019 (age 87 years, 24 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Marvin L. Lugar and Bertha (Green) Lugar; married, September 8, 1956, to Charlene Smeltzer.
  Cross-reference: Todd C. Young — Mitch Daniels
   — The Hamilton Lugar School of Global and International Studies, at Indiana University, is partly named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Books about Richard Lugar: John T. Shaw, Richard G. Lugar, Statesman of the Senate: Crafting Foreign Policy from Capitol Hill
  Kenneth Leon Maddy (1934-2000) — also known as Kenneth L. Maddy; Ken Maddy — of Fresno, Fresno County, Calif. Born in Santa Monica, Los Angeles County, Calif., May 22, 1934. Republican. Lawyer; member of California state assembly 14th District, 1971-78; candidate in primary for Governor of California, 1978; member of California state senate, 1979-98; delegate to Republican National Convention from California, 1992. Member, Rotary; Sigma Nu; Phi Delta Phi. Died, of lung cancer, at Sutter Memorial Hospital, Sacramento, Sacramento County, Calif., February 19, 2000 (age 65 years, 273 days). Interment at Inglewood Park Cemetery, Inglewood, Calif.
  Relatives: Son of Russell Thomas Maddy (1901-1954) and Anna Marie (Balzer) Maddy (1904-2009); married, February 7, 1957, to Beverly Chinello (divorced); married, November 28, 1981, to Norma (Quesenberry) Foster.
  The Kenneth L. Maddy Laboratory, at the School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California at Davis, is named for him.
  Epitaph: "Your Humor and Spirit Will Be Remembered Forever."
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  David Parshall Mapes (1798-1890) — also known as David P. Mapes — of Roxbury, Delaware County, N.Y.; Ripon, Fond du Lac County, Wis. Born in Coxsackie, Greene County, N.Y., January 10, 1798. Steamboat business; member of New York state assembly from Delaware County, 1831; merchant; Presidential Elector for Wisconsin, 1848. Principal founder of Ripon College, 1850. Died in Fond du Lac, Fond du Lac County, Wis., May 18, 1890 (age 92 years, 128 days). Interment at Hillside Cemetery, Ripon, Wis.
  Relatives: Son of Timothy Mapes and Hannah (Brown) Mapes; married, April 14, 1822, to Ruth Frisbee (1804-1854); married, January 26, 1855, to Mary C. Frisbee (1827-1863); married, November 9, 1864, to Emeline (Huntsinger) Wilson (1827-1882); married, September 15, 1883, to Augusta R. Miles (1837-1911); father of Fannie Mapes (1867-1926) (who married Otto Christian Neuman); first cousin once removed of Jonas Mapes; third cousin once removed of George Hammond Parshall; third cousin thrice removed of Irving Anthony Jennings and Renz L. Jennings; fourth cousin once removed of David Gardiner and Bertha Mapes.
  Mapes Hall (built 1959), at Ripon College, Ripon, Wisconsin, is named for him.
  Epitaph: "In grateful recognition of David P, Mapes, for his vision and valuable services as pioneer, founder, benefactor and promoter of the City of Ripon and its College, the citizens of Ripon dedicate this marker."
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
Clarence D. Martin Clarence Daniel Martin (1886-1955) — also known as Clarence D. Martin — of Cheney, Spokane County, Wash. Born in Cheney, Spokane County, Wash., June 29, 1886. Democrat. Grain milling business; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Washington, 1920, 1924, 1928 (alternate); mayor of Cheney, Wash., 1928-32; Governor of Washington, 1933-41; defeated in primary, 1948; member of Washington state house of representatives, 1944. Died in Cheney, Spokane County, Wash., August 11, 1955 (age 69 years, 43 days). Entombed at Fairmount Memorial Park, Spokane, Wash.
  Relatives: Son of Frank Marion Martin (1857-1925) and Phelena Jane (Fellows) Martin (1859-1919); married, July 18, 1907, to Margaret Mulligan (divorced 1943); married 1944 to Merle L. Lewis (divorced 1946); married 1951 to Lou Eckhart; father of Clarence Daniel Martin Jr. (1916-1976).
  Cross-reference: John Clyde Bowen
  Martin Stadium (built 1972), at Washington State University, in Pullman, Washington, is named for him.
  See also National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: Cheney Museum
  Enoch Mather Marvin (1823-1877) — also known as Enoch M. Marvin — of St. Louis, Mo. Born in Warren County, Mo., June 12, 1823. Democrat. Methodist bishop; chaplain of the Confederate Army during the Civil War; offered prayer, Democratic National Convention, 1876. Methodist. Member, Freemasons; Royal Arch Masons. Died, of pneumonia, in St. Louis, Mo., November 26, 1877 (age 54 years, 167 days). Interment at Bellefontaine Cemetery, St. Louis, Mo.
  Relatives: Son of Wells E. Marvin.
  Marvin College (founded 1870, closed 1884), and Marvin Elementary School (on the former college site), in Waxahachie, Texas, were named for him.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  George Mason (1725-1792) — of Virginia. Born in Stafford County, Va., December 11, 1725. Member of Virginia House of Burgesses, 1759; member of Virginia state house of delegates, 1776-80, 1786-88; member, U.S. Constitutional Convention, 1787-88. Episcopalian. Slaveowner. Died in Fairfax County, Va., October 7, 1792 (age 66 years, 301 days). Interment at Gunston Hall Grounds, Near Lorton, Fairfax County, Va.; statue at State Capitol Grounds, Richmond, Va.
  Relatives: Son of George Mason (1690-1735) and Ann (Thomson) Mason (1699-1762); brother of Thomson Mason; married, April 4, 1750, to Ann Eilbeck (1734-1773); married, April 11, 1780, to Sarah Brent (1733-1805; aunt of George Graham); uncle of Stevens Thomson Mason (1760-1803) and John Thomson Mason (1765-1824); grandfather of Thomson Francis Mason and James Murray Mason; granduncle of John Thomson Mason (1787-1850), Armistead Thomson Mason and John Thomson Mason Jr.; great-grandfather of Fitzhugh Lee; great-granduncle of Stevens Thomson Mason (1811-1843); third great-grandfather of Charles O'Conor Goolrick; fourth great-granduncle of Jerauld Wright (1898-1995).
  Political family: Mason family of Virginia (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Mason counties in Ky. and W.Va. are named for him.
  George Mason University, Fairfax, Virginia, is named for him.
  See also NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about George Mason: Jeff Broadwater, George Mason : Forgotten Founder
Hugh McCulloch Hugh McCulloch (1808-1895) — of Fort Wayne, Allen County, Ind.; Washington, D.C.; Vansville, Prince George's County, Md. Born in Kennebunk, York County, Maine, December 7, 1808. Republican. Lawyer; banker; U.S. Comptroller of the Currency, 1863-65; U.S. Secretary of the Treasury, 1865-69, 1884-85. Died in Vansville, Prince George's County, Md., May 24, 1895 (age 86 years, 168 days). Interment at Rock Creek Cemetery, Washington, D.C.
  Relatives: Son of Hugh McCulloch (1773-1830) and Abigail (Perkins) McCulloch (1774-1846); married, June 23, 1834, to Eunice Hardy (1816-1836); married, March 21, 1838, to Susan Maria Man (1818-1898).
  McCulloch Hall (dormitory, built 1926), at Harvard University Business School, Boston, Massachusetts, is named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS Hugh McCulloch (built 1943 at Richmond, California; scrapped 1962) was named for him.
  Coins and currency: His portrait appeared on $20 U.S. national bank notes in 1902.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial — Comptrollers of the Currency
  Image source: Life and Work of James G. Blaine (1893)
  Robert Ligon McWhorter (1891-1960) — also known as Bob McWhorter — of Athens, Clarke County, Ga. Born in Lexington, Oglethorpe County, Ga., June 4, 1891. Law professor; mayor of Athens, Ga., 1940-47; named to the College Football Hall of Fame in 1954. Member, Phi Beta Kappa; Chi Phi. Died in Athens, Clarke County, Ga., June 29, 1960 (age 69 years, 25 days). Interment at Oconee Hill Cemetery, Athens, Ga.
  Relatives: Son of Hamilton McWhorter (1857-1929; judge) and Sallie (Pharr) McWhorter (1860-1923); brother of Camilla Oliver McWhorter (born 1884; who married Andrew Cobb Erwin (1884-1941)); married, October 12, 1921, to Louise Walker (1895-1942).
  Political family: Jackson-Lee family (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  McWhorter Hall (dormitory, built 1966, rebuilt in new location 2004), University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
Andrew W. Mellon Andrew William Mellon (1855-1937) — also known as Andrew W. Mellon — of Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, Pa. Born in Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, Pa., March 24, 1855. Republican. Banker; co-founder, Mellon Institute of Industrial Research, which later became Carnegie Mellon University; delegate to Republican National Convention from Pennsylvania, 1920, 1924 (speaker), 1928; U.S. Secretary of the Treasury, 1921-32; U.S. Ambassador to Great Britain, 1932-33. Episcopalian. Died in Southampton, Suffolk County, Long Island, N.Y., August 26, 1937 (age 82 years, 155 days). Original interment at Allegheny Cemetery, Pittsburgh, Pa.; subsequent interment at a private or family graveyard, Fauquier County, Va.; reinterment at Trinity Episcopal Church Cemetery, Upperville, Va.; memorial monument at Federal Triangle, Washington, D.C.
  Relatives: Son of Thomas Mellon (1813-1908) and Sarah Jane (Negley) Mellon (1817-1909); married 1900 to Nora McMullen (1878-1973); father of Ailsa Mellon (1901-1969; who married David Kirkpatrick Este Bruce); uncle of William Larimer Mellon (1868-1949); granduncle of Richard Mellon Scaife.
  Political family: Bruce-Mellon family of Virginia.
  Cross-reference: J. McKenzie Moss
  Carnegie Mellon University, in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, is partly named for him.  — Mellon Hall (dormitory, built 1926), at Harvard University Business School, Boston, Massachusetts, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial — Federal Reserve History
  Books about Andrew Mellon: David Cannadine, Mellon : An American Life
  Image source: American Review of Reviews, March 1922
  Robert Morris (1734-1806) — of Pennsylvania. Born in Liverpool, England, January 31, 1734. Delegate to Continental Congress from Pennsylvania, 1776; signer, Declaration of Independence, 1776; member of Pennsylvania state house of representatives, 1785; member, U.S. Constitutional Convention, 1787; U.S. Senator from Pennsylvania, 1789-95. Episcopalian. English ancestry. Financier of the American Revolution, but went broke in the process. Imprisoned for debt from February 1798 to August 1801. Slaveowner. Died in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., May 8, 1806 (age 72 years, 97 days). Entombed at Christ Church Burial Ground, Philadelphia, Pa.; statue at Independence National Historical Park, Philadelphia, Pa.; memorial monument at Constitution Gardens, Washington, D.C.
  Relatives: Son of Robert Morris (1711-1750) and Elizabeth (Murphet) Morris (1712-1778); married, March 2, 1769, to Mary White (1749-1827); father of Thomas Morris and Henrietta 'Hetty' Morris (1774-1816; who married James Markham Marshall (1764-1848)); great-grandfather of John Augustine Marshall.
  Political families: Harrison-Randolph-Marshall-Cabell family of Virginia; Lee-Randolph family; Biddle-Randolph family of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Morris Hall (dormitory, built 1926), at Harvard University Business School, Boston, Massachusetts, is named for him.
  Coins and currency: His portrait appeared on the U.S. $10 silver certificate in the 1870s and 1880s.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about Robert Morris: Charles Rappleye, Robert Morris: Financier of the American Revolution
Francis T. Nicholls Francis Redding Tillou Nicholls (1834-1912) — also known as Francis T. Nicholls — of Napoleonville, Assumption Parish, La.; New Orleans, Orleans Parish, La. Born in Donaldsonville, Ascension Parish, La., August 20, 1834. Democrat. Lawyer; general in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; lost an arm in the battle of Winchester, Va.; lost a foot at Chancellorsville; Governor of Louisiana, 1877-80, 1888-92; chief justice of Louisiana state supreme court, 1892-1904; appointed 1892; justice of Louisiana state supreme court, 1904-11; resigned 1911. Died near Thibodaux, Lafourche Parish, La., January 4, 1912 (age 77 years, 137 days). Entombed at St. John's Episcopal Cemetery, Thibodaux, La.
  Relatives: Son of Thomas Clark Nicholls and Louisa Hannah (Drake) Nicholls; married 1861 to Caroline Zilpha Guion.
  Nicholls State University (founded 1948 as Francis T. Nicholls Junior College; became a state college 1956; became a university 1970) in Thibodaux, Louisiana, is named for him.
  See also National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article
  Image source: Life and Work of James G. Blaine (1893)
  Stephen Cornelius O'Connell (1916-2001) — also known as Stephen C. O'Connell — of Florida. Born in West Palm Beach, Palm Beach County, Fla., January 22, 1916. Major in the U.S. Army during World War II; lawyer; justice of Florida state supreme court, 1955-67; appointed 1955; chief justice of Florida state supreme court, 1966-67; first Catholic to win a statewide election in Florida, 1956; president, University of Florida, 1967-73. Catholic. Died, of cancer, in Tallahassee, Leon County, Fla., April 13, 2001 (age 85 years, 81 days). Burial location unknown.
  The O'Connell Center sports arena, at the University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, is named for him.
  Ransom Eli Olds (1864-1950) — also known as Ransom E. Olds — of Lansing, Ingham County, Mich. Born in Geneva, Ashtabula County, Ohio, June 3, 1864. Republican. Founder in 1897 of Olds Motor Vehicle Company, maker of the first commercially successful American-made automobile; founder in 1905 of the REO Motor Car Company (later, the Olds company became the Oldsmobile division of General Motors, and Reo became part of truck manufacturer Diamond Reo); owner of several hotels; banker; delegate to Republican National Convention from Michigan, 1908. Baptist. Member, Freemasons; Knights Templar; Shriners. Died in Lansing, Ingham County, Mich., August 26, 1950 (age 86 years, 84 days). Entombed at Mt. Hope Cemetery, Lansing, Mich.
  Relatives: Son of Pliny Fisk Olds (1828-1908) and Sarah (Whipple) Olds (1834-1910); married, June 5, 1889, to Metta Ursula Woodward (1864-1950); second cousin thrice removed of Martin Olds (1798-1872).
  Political families: Greene-Lippitt family of Providence, Rhode Island; Baldwin-Greene-Upson-Hoar family of Connecticut; Kellogg-Adams-Seymour-Chapin family of Connecticut and New York (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Olds Hall (built 1917 for the College of Engineering, now used as offices), Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan, is named for him.  — The city of Oldsmar, Florida, is named for him.  — R. E. Olds Park, on the waterfront in Oldsmar, FLorida, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis (1929-1994) — also known as Jackie Onassis; Jaqueline Lee Bouvier; Jacqueline Kennedy — Born in Southampton, Suffolk County, Long Island, N.Y., July 28, 1929. First Lady of the United States, 1961-63. Female. Catholic. Died, from non-Hodgkin lymphoma, in Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., May 19, 1994 (age 64 years, 295 days). Interment at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Va.
  Relatives: Step-daughter of Hugh Dudley Auchincloss; daughter of John Vernou Bouvier (1891-1957) and Janet Norton (Lee) Bouvier (1907-1989); step-sister of Eugene Luther Gore Vidal Jr. and Hugh Dudley Auchincloss III; married, September 12, 1953, to John Fitzgerald Kennedy (son of Joseph Patrick Kennedy, Sr. (1888-1969); brother of Jean Kennedy Smith; grandson of John Francis Fitzgerald); married 1968 to Aristotle Socrates Onassis (1906-1975); mother of John Fitzgerald Kennedy Jr..
  Political family: Kennedy family.
  The Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis High School for International Careers, in Manhattan, New York, is named for her.  — Jacqueline Bouvier Kennedy Onassis Hall, at George Washington University, Washington, D.C., is named for her.  — Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis Reservoir, in Central Park, Manhattan, New York, is named for her.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Gary M. Owen (b. 1944) — of Ypsilanti, Washtenaw County, Mich. Born in Lawrence County, Ala., September 9, 1944. Democrat. Member of Michigan state house of representatives 22nd District, 1973-88; Speaker of the Michigan State House of Representatives, 1983-88. Baptist. Member, Jaycees; Phi Delta Kappa. Still living as of 1995.
  The Gary M. Owen College of Business, at Eastern Michigan University, Ypsilanti, Michigan, is named for him.
  Ralph Moses Paiewonsky (1907-1991) — also known as Ralph Paiewonsky — of Charlotte Amalie, St. Thomas, Virgin Islands. Born in St. Thomas, Danish West Indies (now Virgin Islands), November 9, 1907. Democrat. Manager or president of distillery, movie theaters, a liquor store and a gift shop; one of the organizers of the West Indies Bank and Trust Co.; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Virgin Islands, 1940, 1944 (member, Credentials Committee; member, Platform and Resolutions Committee; member, Committee to Notify Vice-Presidential Nominee), 1948, 1952 (member, Committee on Permanent Organization), 1956, 1964, 1980; member of Democratic National Committee from Virgin Islands, 1940-60; Governor of U.S. Virgin Islands, 1961-69. Jewish. Member, Freemasons; Shriners. Died, of congestive heart failure, in St. Thomas Hospital, St. Thomas, Virgin Islands, November 9, 1991 (age 84 years, 0 days). Entombed at Altona Jewish Cemetery, Charlotte Amalie, St. Thomas, Virgin Islands.
  Relatives: Son of Isaac Paiewonsky (1884-1963) and Rebecca (Kushner) Paiewonsky (1885-1963); married to Ethel Heller (died 1997); uncle of Michael Albert Paiewonsky; granduncle of Sebastiano Paiewonsky Cassinelli.
  Political family: Paiewonsky family of New York.
  The Ralph M. Paiewonky Library, at the University of the Virgin Islands, in SAINT Thomas, Virgin Islands, is named for him.
  See also National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  John Rockey Park (1833-1900) — also known as John R. Park — of Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Utah. Born in Tiffin, Seneca County, Ohio, May 7, 1833. Republican. School teacher; president, University of Deseret (now University of Utah), 1869-92; Utah superintendent of public instruction, 1895-1900; died in office 1900. Mormon. Died in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Utah, September 29, 1900 (age 67 years, 145 days). Interment at Salt Lake City Cemetery, Salt Lake City, Utah.
  Relatives: Son of John Park (1788-1868) and Anna Elizabeth (Waggoner) Park (1797-1881).
  The Park Building at the University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah, is named for him.  — Draper Park School (built 1912; converted to city hall 1972; sold 2017), in Draper, Utah, was named for him.  — Draper Park Middle School (built 2013), in Draper, Utah, is named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS John R. Park (built 1943 at Richmond, California; torpedoed and lost in the English Channel, 1945) was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Edwin Wendell Pauley, Sr. (1903-1981) — also known as Edwin W. Pauley — of Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, Calif.; Beverly Hills, Los Angeles County, Calif. Born in Indiana, January 7, 1903. Democrat. President, Fortuna Petroleum, and involved in other oil companies; Regent, University of California, 1938-72; Treasurer of Democratic National Committee, 1944; delegate to Democratic National Convention from California, 1944 (speaker), 1960, 1964; member of Democratic National Committee from California, 1944-47; part owner of the Los Angeles Rams football team; director, Western Airlines. Died July 28, 1981 (age 78 years, 202 days). Entombed in mausoleum at Forest Lawn Memorial Park, Glendale, Calif.
  Relatives: Son of Elbert L. Pauley and Ellen (Van Petten) Pauley.
  The Pauley Pavilion indoor arena, at the University of California Angeles, Los Angeles, California, is named for him.
  Epitaph: "Beloved Husband, Father and Grandfather. Home is the sailor, home from the Sea, and the hunter, home from the hill."
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Austin Peay IV (1876-1927) — also known as "The Maker of Modern Tennessee" — of Clarksville, Montgomery County, Tenn. Born in Christian County, Ky., June 1, 1876. Democrat. Lawyer; member of Tennessee state house of representatives, 1901-05; Tennessee Democratic state chair, 1905; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Tennessee, 1916 (Honorary Vice-President), 1924; Governor of Tennessee, 1923-27; died in office 1927. Baptist. Member, Freemasons; Elks; Knights of Pythias; Kappa Alpha Order. Died, of a cerebral hemorrhage, at the Governor's Residence, Nashville, Davidson County, Tenn., October 2, 1927 (age 51 years, 123 days). Interment at Greenwood Cemetery, Clarksville, Tenn.
  Relatives: Son of Austin Peay and Cornelia Frances (Leavell) Peay; married, September 19, 1895, to Sallie Hurst; father of Austin Peay V (1901-1949).
  Austin Peay State University, Clarksville, Tennessee, is named for him.
  See also National Governors Association biography
  James Johnston Pettigrew (1828-1863) — also known as J. Johnston Pettigrew — of Charleston, Charleston County, S.C. Born in Tyrrell County, N.C., July 4, 1828. Lawyer; member of South Carolina state house of representatives, 1856; general in the Confederate Army during the Civil War. French Huguenot ancestry. Mortally wounded at the Battle of Gettysburg, and died soon after at Bunker Hill, Berkeley County, W.Va., July 17, 1863 (age 35 years, 13 days). Original interment somewhere in Raleigh, N.C.; reinterment in 1865 at Pettigrew Family Cemetery, Tyrrell County, N.C.
  Pettigrew Hall (built 1912), a building at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, is named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS James J. Pettigrew (built 1942 at Wilmington, North Carolina; scrapped 1960) was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
Franklin Pierce Franklin Pierce (1804-1869) — also known as "Young Hickory"; "Young Hickory of the Granite Hills"; "The Fainting General" — of Hillsborough, Hillsborough County, N.H. Born in Hillsborough, Hillsborough County, N.H., November 23, 1804. Democrat. Lawyer; member of New Hampshire state house of representatives, 1829-33; Speaker of the New Hampshire State House of Representatives, 1832-33; U.S. Representative from New Hampshire at-large, 1833-37; U.S. Senator from New Hampshire, 1837-42; U.S. Attorney for New Hampshire, 1845-47; general in the U.S. Army during the Mexican War; delegate to New Hampshire state constitutional convention, 1850; President of the United States, 1853-57; candidate for Democratic nomination for President, 1856. Episcopalian. Died in Concord, Merrimack County, N.H., October 8, 1869 (age 64 years, 319 days). Interment at Old North Cemetery, Concord, N.H.
  Relatives: Son of Benjamin Pierce (1757-1839) and Anna (Kendrick) Pierce (1768-1838); half-brother of Elizabeth Andrews Pierce (1788-1855; who married John McNeil Jr.); married, November 19, 1834, to Jane Means Appleton; uncle of Anne McNeil (1816-1901; who married Tappan Wentworth); cousin by marriage of David Meriwether; fourth cousin once removed of Jedediah Sabin.
  Political families: Wentworth family of New Hampshire; Kellogg-Adams-Seymour-Chapin family of Connecticut and New York; Merriam family of Massachusetts (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Pierce counties in Ga., Neb., Wash. and Wis. are named for him.
  Franklin Pierce University, Rindge, New Hampshire, is named for him.  — Mount Pierce (formerly called Bald Mountain; later, Mount Clinton; received current name 1913), in the White Mountains, Coos County, New Hampshire, is named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: Franklin P. SaundersFrank P. WoodburyFrank P. HollandFrank P. DunwellFrank TylerF. P. CombestF. Pierce MortimerFranklin P. OwenFranklin P. StoyFrank P. AlspaughFranklin P. MonfortFranklin Pierce LambertFranklin Pierce McGowanFranklin Pierce Huddle, Jr.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Books about Franklin Pierce: Roy Nichols, Franklin Pierce : Young Hickory of the Granite Hills — Larry Gara, The Presidency of Franklin Pierce
  Critical books about Franklin Pierce: Nathan Miller, Star-Spangled Men : America's Ten Worst Presidents
  Image source: Portrait & Biographical Album of Washtenaw County (1891)
  John W. Porter (1931-2012) — of East Lansing, Ingham County, Mich.; Ann Arbor, Washtenaw County, Mich. Born in Fort Wayne, Allen County, Ind., August 13, 1931. School teacher; Michigan superintendent of public instruction, 1969-79; first African-American state school superintendent; president, Eastern Michigan University, 1979-89. United Church of Christ. African ancestry. Member, Urban League; Phi Delta Kappa; NAACP. Died June 27, 2012 (age 80 years, 319 days). Burial location unknown.
  The John W. Porter Education Building (opened 1999), at Eastern Michigan University, Ypsilanti, Michigan, is named for him.
  Nick James Rajkovich (1910-1969) — also known as Nick J. Rajkovich — of Ironwood, Gogebic County, Mich.; Traverse City, Grand Traverse County, Mich. Born in Krispolje, Austria (now Krizpolje, Croatia), February 8, 1910. Republican. School teacher; college professor; delegate to Michigan state constitutional convention from Grand Traverse District, 1961-62; mayor of Traverse City, Mich., 1969; died in office 1969. Catholic. Member, Kiwanis. Died, from a heart attack, in Munson Hospital, in Traverse City, Grand Traverse County, Mich., November 11, 1969 (age 59 years, 276 days). Interment at Oakwood Catholic Cemetery, Traverse City, Mich.
  Relatives: Son of Andrew Rajkovich and Mary (Ticak) Rajkovich; married to Frances C. Derbyshire.
  The Rajkovich Physical Education Center (opened 1969), at Northwestern Michigan College, Traverse City, Michigan, is named for him.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Elmer Edwin Rasmuson (1909-2000) — also known as Elmer E. Rasmuson — of Alaska. Born in Yakutat, Alaska, February 15, 1909. Republican. President, National Bank of Alaska; regent, University of Alaska, 1950-69; philanthropist; mayor of Anchorage, Alaska, 1964-67; candidate for U.S. Senator from Alaska, 1968. Swedish ancestry. Died, from congestive heart failure, in Seattle, King County, Wash., December 1, 2000 (age 91 years, 290 days). Interment at Anchorage Memorial Park Cemetery, Anchorage, Alaska.
  Relatives: Son of Edward Anton Rasmuson (1882-1949) and Jenny (Olson) Rasmuson; married 1939 to Lile Bernard (died 1960); married 1961 to Mary Louise Milligan; father of Lile Gibbons (born c.1945).
  The Rasmuson Library, at the University of Alaska Fairbanks, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
Whitelaw Reid Whitelaw Reid (1837-1912) — also known as James Whitelaw Reid; "Agate" — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born in Cedarville, Greene County, Ohio, October 27, 1837. Republican. Newspaper editor; librarian; cotton planter; U.S. Minister to France, 1889-92; candidate for Vice President of the United States, 1892; U.S. Ambassador to Great Britain, 1905-12, died in office 1912. Died in London, England, December 15, 1912 (age 75 years, 49 days). Interment at Sleepy Hollow Cemetery, Sleepy Hollow, N.Y.
  Relatives: Married, April 26, 1881, to Elizabeth Mills (aunt of Ogden Livingston Mills); father of Ogden Mills Reid (1882-1947; newspaper publisher); uncle of Ella Spencer Reid (who married Ralph Chandler Harrison); grandfather of Ogden Rogers Reid (1925-2019).
  Political family: Reid-Mills family of New York City, New York (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Reid Hall (built 1948, demolished 2006), a dormitory at Miami University, Oxford, Ohio, was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier
  Image source: Cornell University Library
  Roland Roger Renne (1905-1989) — also known as Roland Renne — of Bozeman, Gallatin County, Mont. Born in Greenwich, Cumberland County, N.J., December 12, 1905. Democrat. Economist; college professor; president, Montana State College, Bozeman, 1943-64; candidate for Governor of Montana, 1964. Presbyterian or Unitarian. Member, Rotary; American Economic Association; American Academy of Political and Social Science; Phi Beta Kappa; Phi Kappa Phi; Alpha Zeta. Died August 30, 1989 (age 83 years, 261 days). Interment at Sunset Hills Cemetery, Bozeman, Mont.
  Relatives: Son of Fred Christian Renne and Caroline Augusta (Young) Renne; married, August 9, 1932, to Mary Kneeland Wisner (1911-1999).
  Renne Library at Montana State University, Bozeman, Montana, is named for him.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Bonny Kaslo Roberts (1907-1999) — also known as B. K. Roberts — of Florida. Born in Sopchoppy, Wakulla County, Fla., February 5, 1907. Lawyer; justice of Florida state supreme court, 1949-76. Died in Tallahassee, Leon County, Fla., August 4, 1999 (age 92 years, 180 days). Interment at Oakland Cemetery, Tallahassee, Fla.
  Relatives: Son of Thomas Roberts (1877-1949) and Florida (Morrison) Roberts (1883-1976); married to Mary Newman (1911-2005).
  The B.K. Roberts Main Classroom Building, at Florida State University College of Law, Tallahassee, Florida, is named for him.
  Epitaph: "Qualis vita, finis eta." / As the quality of life is, so the end will be.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Lawrence Sullivan Ross (1838-1898) — also known as Sul Ross — of Texas. Born in Benton, Ringgold County, Iowa, September 27, 1838. General in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; delegate to Texas state constitutional convention, 1875; member of Texas state senate, 1880; Governor of Texas, 1887-91; president, Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas (now Texas A&M University), 1891-98. Died in College Station, Brazos County, Tex., January 3, 1898 (age 59 years, 98 days). Interment at Oakwood Cemetery, Waco, Tex.; statue at Academic Plaza, College Station, Tex.
  Relatives: Son of Shapley Prince Ross (1811-1889) and Catherine Hanby (Fulkerson) Ross (1812-1886); married to Elizabeth Dorothy Tinsley (1846-1905).
  Sul Ross University (founded 1917 as Sul Ross Normal College; became a university 1969), in Alpine, Texas, is named for him.
  See also National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about Lawrence Sullivan Ross: Dede W. Casad, The Governor's Stake: The Parallel Lives of Two Texas Governors: Richard Coke and Lawrence Sullivan Ross
  Henry Rutgers (1745-1830) — of New York, New York County, N.Y.; New Brunswick, Middlesex County, N.J. Born in New York, New York County, N.Y., October 7, 1745. Served in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; member of New York state assembly from New York County, 1777-78, 1783-84, 1800-02, 1803-05, 1806-08; resigned 1778. Dutch Reformed. Died February 17, 1830 (age 84 years, 133 days). Original interment at Dutch Church Burial Ground, Manhattan, N.Y.; reinterment in 1865 at Green-Wood Cemetery, Brooklyn, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Hendrick Rutgers and Catharine (De Peyster) Rutgers; nephew of Johannes DePeyster; grandson of Johannes de Peyster; grandnephew of Abraham de Peyster; first cousin of Matthew Clarkson; first cousin once removed of Philip DePeyster; second cousin of Pierre Van Cortlandt; second cousin once removed of Philip Peter Livingston, Philip Van Cortlandt, John Stevens III and Pierre Van Cortlandt Jr.; second cousin twice removed of William Alexander Duer, John Duer (1782-1858) and Charles Ludlow Livingston; second cousin thrice removed of William Duer and Denning Duer; second cousin four times removed of Nicholas Fish, Hamilton Fish Jr. (1849-1936), John Kean and Hamilton Fish Kean; second cousin five times removed of Robert Reginald Livingston, Hamilton Fish Jr. (1888-1991) and Robert Winthrop Kean.
  Political families: Livingston-Schuyler family of New York; Roosevelt family of New York (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Rutgers University (founded 1766 as Queens College; renamed 1825 as Rutgers College) in New Brunswick, New Jersey, is named for him.  — Henry Street and Rutgers Street, in Manhattan, New York, are both named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Antonin Gregory Scalia (1936-2016) — also known as Antonin Scalia — Born in Trenton, Mercer County, N.J., March 11, 1936. Judge of U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit, 1982-86; Associate Justice of U.S. Supreme Court, 1986-2016; died in office 2016. Catholic. Italian ancestry. Died in Shafter, Presidio County, Tex., February 13, 2016 (age 79 years, 339 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Salvatore Scalia and Catherine (Panaro) Scalia; nephew of Vincent R. Panaro (1910-1998).
  Cross-reference: J. Michael Luttig — Philip J. Berg
  Antonin Scalia Law School, Arlington, Virginia, is named for him.
  See also federal judicial profile — Wikipedia article — Ballotpedia article — NNDB dossier — Biographical Directory of Federal Judges
  Books by Antonin Scalia: A Matter of Interpretation (1998)
  Books about Antonin Scalia: Kevin A. Ring, Scalia Dissents : Writings of the Supreme Court's Wittiest, Most Outspoken Justice — Richard A. Brisbin, Justice Antonin Scalia and the Conservative Revival
  Peter Finley Secchia (1937-2020) — also known as Peter F. Secchia — of Grand Rapids, Kent County, Mich.; Ferrysburg, Ottawa County, Mich. Born in Englewood, Bergen County, N.J., April 15, 1937. Republican. Chief executive, Universal Forest Products, 1971-89; owner of restaurants; real estate developer; member of Republican National Committee from Michigan, 1980-88; delegate to Republican National Convention from Michigan, 1984, 2000 (alternate), 2004; Presidential Elector for Michigan, 1988; U.S. Ambassador to Italy, 1989-93. Italian ancestry. Died, from COVID-19 and other health issues, in East Grand Rapids, Kent County, Mich., October 21, 2020 (age 83 years, 189 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Cesare 'Charlie' Secchia and Valerie (Smith) Secchia; married 1964 to Joan Peterson.
  Secchia Stadium (baseball field) at Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary
  John S. R. Shad (1923-1994) — of Washington, D.C. Born in 1923. Investment banker; chair, U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, 1981-87; U.S. Ambassador to Netherlands, 1987-89. Died in 1994 (age about 71 years). Burial location unknown.
  Shad Hall (fitness center, built 1990), at Harvard University Business School, Boston, Massachusetts, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary
  James Smith (1719-1806) — of Pennsylvania. Born in Dublin, Ireland, September 17, 1719. Lawyer; Delegate to Continental Congress from Pennsylvania, 1776; signer, Declaration of Independence, 1776; member of Pennsylvania state house of representatives, 1780. Presbyterian. Died in York, York County, Pa., July 11, 1806 (age 86 years, 297 days). Interment at First Presbyterian Churchyard, York, Pa.; memorial monument at Constitution Gardens, Washington, D.C.
  Relatives: Married to Eleanor Armor (1721-1818).
  James Smith Hall, a dormitory at the University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware, is named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS James Smith (built 1942 at Richmond, California; scrapped 1963) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Preston Earnest Smith (1912-2003) — also known as Preston Smith — of Austin, Travis County, Tex. Born March 8, 1912. Democrat. Lieutenant Governor of Texas, 1963-69; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Texas, 1964, 1972; Governor of Texas, 1969-73. Died October 18, 2003 (age 91 years, 224 days). Burial location unknown.
  Preston Smith Road (named 1997), which circles the campus of the University of Texas of the Permian Basin, Odessa, Texas, is named for him.
  See also National Governors Association biography — NNDB dossier
  Abraham Owen Smoot (1815-1895) — also known as Abraham O. Smoot; A. O. Smoot — of Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Utah; Provo, Utah County, Utah. Born in Owenton, Owen County, Ky., February 17, 1815. Mayor of Salt Lake City, Utah, 1857-66; mayor of Provo, Utah, 1868-81; banker; lumber business. Mormon. Died in Provo, Utah County, Utah, March 6, 1895 (age 80 years, 17 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of George Washigton Smoot (1785-1842) and Nancy Ann (Rowlett) Smoot (1787-1871); married, November 11, 1838, to Margaret Thompson McMeans (1809-1884); married, February 17, 1856, to Anna Kirstine Mauritzdatter (1833-1894); father of Abraham Owen Smoot and Reed Owen Smoot; nephew of Daniel Owen Rowlett and Joseph Rowlett; grandfather of Abraham Owen Smoot III (1879-1937) and Isaac Albert Smoot.
  Political families: Bullock family of Massachusetts; Clinton-DeWitt family of New York; DeWitt-Bruyn-Hasbrouck-Kellogg family of New York (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  The Abraham O. Smoot Administration Building (opened 1962), at Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article
  Sam Solon (1931-2001) — also known as "Senator Sam" — of Duluth, St. Louis County, Minn. Born in Duluth, St. Louis County, Minn., June 25, 1931. Democrat. School teacher; member of Minnesota state house of representatives, 1971-72; member of Minnesota state senate, 1973-2001; died in office 2001. Eastern Orthodox. Greek ancestry. Pleaded guilty in 1995 to telecommunications fraud for letting his ex-wife make $2,430 in calls on his State Senate telephone line; reprimanded by the Senate in 1996. Died, of liver cancer, in St. Mary's Medical Center, Duluth, St. Louis County, Minn., December 28, 2001 (age 70 years, 186 days). Burial location unknown.
  The Solon Campus Center (built 1995, named 2001), at the University of Minnesota Duluth, is named for him.
  William Cameron Sproul (1870-1928) — also known as William C. Sproul — of Chester, Delaware County, Pa. Born in Octoraro, Lancaster County, Pa., September 16, 1870. Republican. Farmer; manufacturer; journalist; member of Pennsylvania state senate 9th District, 1897-1919; resigned 1919; delegate to Republican National Convention from Pennsylvania, 1916, 1920, 1924; Governor of Pennsylvania, 1919-23; candidate for Republican nomination for President, 1920. Quaker. Member, American Philosophical Society; Phi Beta Kappa; Sigma Xi; Phi Kappa Psi; Grange; Freemasons; Elks; Union League; Patriotic Order Sons of America. Died March 21, 1928 (age 57 years, 187 days). Interment at Chester Rural Cemetery, Chester, Pa.
  Relatives: Son of William Hall Sproul and Deborah Dickinson (Slokom) Sproul; married, January 21, 1892, to Emeline Wallace Roach.
  Sproul Hall, a residence hall at Pennsylvania State University, University Park, State College, Pennsylvania, is named for him.  — The Sproul State Forest, in Clinton County, Pennsylvania, is named for him.
  See also National Governors Association biography
  Ronald B. Stafford (1935-2005) — of Plattsburgh, Clinton County, N.Y. Born in Plattsburgh, Clinton County, N.Y., June 29, 1935. Republican. Lawyer; member of New York state senate, 1966-2002 (48th District 1966, 42nd District 1967-72, 43rd District 1973-82, 45th District 1983-2002). Died, of lung cancer, in Plattsburgh, Clinton County, N.Y., June 24, 2005 (age 69 years, 360 days). Entombed at Evergreen Cemetery, Canton, N.Y.
  Relatives: Married 2000 to Kay McCabe.
  Cross-reference: Robert A. Regan
  The Ronald B. Stafford Ice Arena (renamed 1987), at the State University of New York at Plattsburgh, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Isaac Ingalls Stevens (1818-1862) — also known as Isaac I. Stevens — of Washington. Born in North Andover, Essex County, Mass., March 25, 1818. Major in the U.S. Army during the Mexican War; Governor of Washington Territory, 1853-57; Delegate to U.S. Congress from Washington Territory, 1857-61; general in the Union Army during the Civil War. Shot and killed at the Civil War battle of Chantilly, Fairfax County, Va., September 1, 1862 (age 44 years, 160 days). Interment at Island Cemetery, Newport, R.I.; memorial monument at Ox Hill Battlefield Park, Fairfax County, Va.
  Relatives: Cousin *** of Charles Abbot Stevens (1816-1892) and Moses Tyler Stevens.
  Political family: Stevens-Woodhull family of New York City, New York.
  Stevens counties in Minn. and Wash. are named for him.
  Fort Stevens (established 1863; decomissioned 1947; now a state park) in Warrenton, Oregon, was named for him.  — Fort Stevens (active during the Civil War, 1861-65; site now a park) in Washington, D.C., was named for him.  — The city (and lake) of Lake Stevens, Washington, is named for him.  — The town of Stevensville, Montana, is named for him.  — Stevens Peak (6,838 feet), in Shoshone County, Idaho, is named for him.  — Stevens Peak (5,372 feet), in Bingham County, Idaho, is named for him.  — Upper Stevens Lake, and Lower Stevens Lake, in Shoshone County, Idaho, are named for him.  — The Stevens Hall dormitory, at Washington State University, Pullman, Washington, is named for him.  — Isaac I. Stevens Elementary School (opened 1906, expanded 1928, renovated and reopened 2001), in Seattle, Washington, is named for him.  — Stevens Middle School, in Port Angeles, Washington, is named for him.  — Stevens Junior High School (now Middle School), in Pasco, Washington, is named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS Isaac I. Stevens (built 1943 at Portland, Oregon; scrapped 1967) was named for him.
  Epitaph: "Who gave to the service of his country a quick and comprehensive mind, a warm and generous heart, a firm will, and a strong arm, and who fell while rallying his command, with the flag of the Republic in his dying grasp, at the battle of Chantilly, Va."
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about Isaac Ingalls Stevens: Joseph Taylor Hazard, Companion of Adventure: A Biography of Isaac Ingalls Stevens, First Governor of Washington
  Walter William Stiern (1914-1988) — also known as Walter W. Stiern — of Bakersfield, Kern County, Calif. Born in San Diego, San Diego County, Calif., March 8, 1914. Democrat. Veterinarian; member of California state senate, 1959-86 (34th District 1959-66, 18th District 1967-86); alternate delegate to Democratic National Convention from California, 1960. Died in Bakersfield, Kern County, Calif., February 21, 1988 (age 73 years, 350 days). Interment at Greenlawn Memorial Park, Bakersfield, Calif.
  The Walter W. Stiern Library, at California State University Bakersfield, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Isidor Straus (1845-1912) — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in Otterberg, Bavaria (now Germany), February 6, 1845. Democrat. U.S. Representative from New York 15th District, 1894-95. Jewish. One of the owners of the R. H. Macy & Co. department store in New York. Perished in the wreck of the steamship Titanic, in the North Atlantic Ocean, April 15, 1912 (age 67 years, 69 days); his body was subsequently recovered. Originally entombed at Beth El Cemetery, Glendale, Queens, N.Y.; later interred at Woodlawn Cemetery, Bronx, N.Y.; memorial monument at Straus Park, Manhattan, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Lazarus Straus (1809-1898) and Sara (Straus) Straus (1823-1876); brother of Oscar Solomon Straus; married, July 12, 1871, to Ida Blum (1849-1912); father of Jesse Isidor Straus (1872-1936); uncle of Nathan Straus Jr.; grandfather of Stuart Scheftel; granduncle of Ronald Peter Straus.
  Political family: Straus family of New York City, New York (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Straus Hall (built 1926), a dormitory at Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts, is named for him and his wife.  — Straus Park (established 1895 as Schuyler Square; renamed 1907 as Bloomingdale Square; renamed 1915 as Straus Park), at Broadway and West End Avenue in Morningside Heights, Manhattan, New York, is named for him and his wife.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about Isidor Straus: June Hall McCash, A Titanic Love Story: Ida and Isidor Straus
Booth Tarkington Newton Booth Tarkington (1869-1946) — also known as Booth Tarkington — of Indianapolis, Marion County, Ind. Born in Indianapolis, Marion County, Ind., July 29, 1869. Republican. Novelist; member of Indiana state house of representatives, 1903-04. Member, Sigma Chi. Won the Pulitzer Prize in fiction, 1919, for The Magnificent Ambersons and in 1922 for Alice Adams. Died in Indianapolis, Marion County, Ind., May 19, 1946 (age 76 years, 294 days). Entombed at Crown Hill Cemetery, Indianapolis, Ind.
  Relatives: Son of John Stevenson Tarkington and Elizabeth (Booth) Tarkington; brother-in-law of Ovid Butler Jameson; married, June 18, 1902, to Laura Louisa Fletcher (divorced 1911); married 1912 to Susannah Kiefer Robinson; nephew of Newton Booth; uncle of John Tarkington Jameson and Donald Ovid Butler Jameson; grandnephew of William Clayborne Tarkington; first cousin of Fenton Whitlock Booth (1869-1947).
  Political family: Booth-Tarkington-Jameson family of Indianapolis, Indiana.
  Tarkington Hall, at Purdue University, in West Lafayette, Indiana, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books by Booth Tarkington: The Gentleman from Indiana (1899) — In The Arena : Stories of Political Life (1905)
  Fiction by Booth Tarkington: The Turmoil — Alice Adams — Penrod and Sam — The Magnificent Ambersons — Penrod — Seventeen — Gentle Julia — Ramsey Milholland — The Conquest of Canaan — The Two Vanrevels — Harlequin and Columbine — The Beautiful Lady — Monsieur Beaucaire — The Gibson Upright — The Guest of Quesnay — His Own People — Women — Beasley's Christmas Party
  Books about Booth Tarkington: James L. Woodress, Booth Tarkington : Gentleman from Indiana — Keith J. Fennimore, Booth Tarkington
  Image source: Time Magazine, December 21, 1925
  Elbert Lee Trinkle (1876-1939) — also known as E. Lee Trinkle — of Virginia. Born in Wytheville, Wythe County, Va., March 12, 1876. Democrat. Member of Virginia state senate 5th District, 1916-21; Governor of Virginia, 1922-26; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Virginia, 1924, 1928. Died in Richmond, Va., November 25, 1939 (age 63 years, 258 days). Interment at East End Cemetery, Wytheville, Va.
  Trinkle Hall (opened 1926; renamed "Unity Hall" in 2020), at the College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, Virginia, was named for him.
  See also National Governors Association biography — NNDB dossier
Harry S. Truman Harry S. Truman (1884-1972) — also known as "Give 'Em Hell Harry" — of Independence, Jackson County, Mo. Born in Lamar, Barton County, Mo., May 8, 1884. Democrat. Major in the U.S. Army during World War I; county judge in Missouri, 1922-24, 1926-34; U.S. Senator from Missouri, 1935-45; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Missouri, 1940, 1944 (member, Platform and Resolutions Committee), 1952, 1960; Vice President of the United States, 1945; President of the United States, 1945-53; candidate for Democratic nomination for President, 1952. Baptist. Member, Freemasons; Scottish Rite Masons; Knights Templar; American Legion; Eagles; Elks; Lambda Chi Alpha; Phi Alpha Delta. Two members of a Puerto Rican nationalist group, Griselio Torresola and Oscar Collazo, tried to shoot their way into Blair House, temporary residence of the President, as part of an attempted assassination, November 1, 1950. Torresola and a guard, Leslie Coffelt, were killed. Collazo, wounded, was arrested, tried, and convicted of murder. Died at Research Hospital and Medical Center, Kansas City, Jackson County, Mo., December 26, 1972 (age 88 years, 232 days). Interment at Truman Presidential Library and Museum, Independence, Mo.; statue at Independence Square, Independence, Mo.
  Relatives: Son of John Anderson Truman (1851-1914) and Martha Ellen (Young) Truman (1852-1947); married, June 28, 1919, to Elizabeth Virginia "Bess" Wallace and Elizabeth Virginia Wallace (granddaughter of Benjamin Franklin Wallace (1817-1877)); grandnephew of James C. Chiles.
  Political family: Truman-Wallace family of Independence, Missouri.
  Cross-reference: Andrew J. May — Milton Lipson — Samuel I. Rosenman — Stephen J. Spingarn — James M. Curley — George E. Allen — George E. Allen — Jonathan Daniels
  Truman State University, Kirksville, Missouri, is named for him.  — Truman College, Chicago, Illinois, is named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: H. Truman ChafinHarry Truman Moore
  Personal motto: "The Buck Stops Here."
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Books by Harry S. Truman: The Autobiography of Harry S. Truman
  Books about Harry S. Truman: David McCullough, Truman — Alonzo L. Hamby, Man of the People : A Life of Harry S. Truman — Sean J. Savage, Truman and the Democratic Party — Ken Hechler, Working With Truman : A Personal Memoir of the White House Years — Alan Axelrod, When the Buck Stops With You: Harry S. Truman on Leadership — Ralph Keyes, The Wit and Wisdom of Harry S. Truman — William Lee Miller, Two Americans: Truman, Eisenhower, and a Dangerous World — Matthew Algeo, Harry Truman's Excellent Adventure: The True Story of a Great American Road Trip — David Pietrusza, 1948: Harry Truman's Improbable Victory and the Year that Transformed America
  Image source: Who's Who in United States Politics (1950)
John Tyler John Tyler (1790-1862) — also known as "The Accidental President" — of Williamsburg, Va. Born in Charles City County, Va., March 29, 1790. Whig. Lawyer; member of Virginia state house of delegates, 1811-16, 1823-25, 1839-40; served in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812; U.S. Representative from Virginia 23rd District, 1817-21; Governor of Virginia, 1825-27; U.S. Senator from Virginia, 1827-36; delegate to Virginia state constitutional convention, 1829-30; delegate to Whig National Convention from Virginia, 1839 (Convention Vice-President); Vice President of the United States, 1841; defeated, 1836; President of the United States, 1841-45; delegate to Virginia secession convention, 1861; Delegate from Virginia to the Confederate Provisional Congress, 1861-62; died in office 1862. Episcopalian. English ancestry. A bill to impeach him was defeated in the House of Representatives in January 1843. Slaveowner. Died, probably from a stroke, in a hotel room at Richmond, Va., January 18, 1862 (age 71 years, 295 days). Interment at Hollywood Cemetery, Richmond, Va.
  Relatives: Son of John Tyler and Mary (Armistead) Tyler (1761-1797); married, March 29, 1813, to Letitia Tyler; married, June 26, 1844, to Julia Tyler (daughter of David Gardiner (1784-1844)); father of David Gardiner Tyler and Lyon Gardiner Tyler; third cousin of George Madison; third cousin once removed of Zachary Taylor; third cousin twice removed of John Strother Pendleton, Albert Gallatin Pendleton and Aylett Hawes Buckner; third cousin thrice removed of James Francis Buckner and Bronson Murray Cutting.
  Political families: Saltonstall-Davis-Frelinghuysen-Appleton family of Massachusetts; Mapes-Jennings-Denby-Harrison family of New York and Arizona; Tyler family of Virginia (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Cross-reference: Benjamin Tappan
  Tyler County, Tex. is named for him.
  John Tyler High School, in Tyler, Texas, is named for him.  — John Tyler Community College, in Chester, Virginia, is named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: John T. RichJohn T. CuttingJohn Tyler CooperJohn Tyler Hammons
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Books about John Tyler: Oliver P. Chitwood, John Tyler : Champion of the Old South — Norma Lois Peterson, Presidencies of William Henry Harrison and John Tyler — Jane C. Walker, John Tyler : A President of Many Firsts — Edward P. Crapol, John Tyler, the Accidental President — Gary May, John Tyler: The 10th President, 1841-1845 — Donald Barr Chidsey, And Tyler Too
  Image source: Portrait & Biographical Album of Washtenaw County (1891)
  Zebulon Baird Vance (1830-1894) — also known as Zebulon B. Vance — of Asheville, Buncombe County, N.C.; Charlotte, Mecklenburg County, N.C. Born in Asheville, Buncombe County, N.C., May 13, 1830. Democrat. Member of North Carolina state legislature, 1854; U.S. Representative from North Carolina 8th District, 1858-61; colonel in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; Governor of North Carolina, 1862-65, 1877-79; U.S. Senator from North Carolina, 1879-94; died in office 1894. Slaveowner. Died in Washington, D.C., April 14, 1894 (age 63 years, 336 days). Interment at Riverside Cemetery, Asheville, N.C.; statue at Union Square, Raleigh, N.C.
  Relatives: Son of David Vance (1792-1844) and Elmira Margaret (Baird) Vance (1802-1878); brother of Robert Brank Vance (1828-1899); married to Harriette Newell Espy (1832-1878) and Florence Steele (1840-1924); father of Thomas Malvern Vance; nephew of Robert Brank Vance (1793-1827).
  Political family: Vance family of Asheville, North Carolina.
  Cross-reference: Lee S. Overman
  Vance County, N.C. is named for him.
  Vance Hall (built 1912), a building at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — National Governors Association biography — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about Zebulon B. Vance: Cordelia Camp, Governor Vance : a life for young people (for young readers)
  Lurleen Burns Wallace (1926-1968) — also known as Lurleen B. Wallace; Lurleen Brigham Burns — of Montgomery, Montgomery County, Ala. Born in Tuscaloosa, Tuscaloosa County, Ala., September 19, 1926. Democrat. Governor of Alabama, 1967-68; died in office 1968. Female. Methodist. Died, of uterine cancer, in Montgomery, Montgomery County, Ala., May 7, 1968 (age 41 years, 231 days). Interment at Greenwood Cemetery, Montgomery, Ala.
  Relatives: Daughter of Henry Burns and Estelle (Burroughs) Burns; married, May 21, 1943, to George Corley Wallace Jr. (1919-1998).
  Political family: Wallace-Folsom family of Montgomery, Alabama.
  The Lurleen Wallace Tumor Institute, at the University of Alabama Birmingham, is named for her.  — Lurleen B. Wallace Community College (established 1967 as Lurleen B. Wallace Junior College), with campuses in Covington, Butler, and Crenshaw counties, Alabama, is named for her.  — Lake Lurleen, and Lake Lurleen State Park, in Tuscaloosa County, Alabama, are named for her.
  See also National Governors Association biography — NNDB dossier
  Adonijah Strong Welch (1821-1889) — also known as Adonijah S. Welch — of Jonesville, Hillsdale County, Mich.; Ypsilanti, Washtenaw County, Mich.; Pensacola, Escambia County, Fla.; Jacksonville, Duval County, Fla.; Ames, Story County, Iowa. Born in East Hampton, Middlesex County, Conn., April 12, 1821. Republican. First principal, in 1851-65, of the Michigan State Normal School in Ypsilanti, Mich. (later Eastern Michigan University); member of Michigan state board of agriculture, 1863-66; established a lumber mill at Jacksonville, Fla.; U.S. Senator from Florida, 1868-69; first president, in 1869-83, of the Iowa Agricultural College in Ames, Iowa (later Iowa State University); college professor; author. Died in Pasadena, Los Angeles County, Calif., March 14, 1889 (age 67 years, 336 days). Interment at Iowa State College Cemetery, Ames, Iowa.
  Welch Hall (built 1896), at Eastern Michigan University, Ypsilanti, Michigan, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  Hezekiah Griffith Wells (1812-1885) — also known as Hezekiah G. Wells — of Kalamazoo, Kalamazoo County, Mich. Born in Steubenville, Jefferson County, Ohio, June 16, 1812. Lawyer; delegate to Michigan state constitutional convention 11th District, 1835; Whig candidate for U.S. Representative from Michigan at-large, 1837, 1838; Presidential Elector for Michigan, 1840; delegate to Michigan state constitutional convention, 1850; delegate to Republican National Convention from Michigan, 1856, 1872 (alternate); Presidential Elector for Michigan, 1860; member of Michigan state board of agriculture, 1871-83; member of Michigan state constitutional commission 4th District, 1873. Episcopalian. Died in Kalamazoo, Kalamazoo County, Mich., April 4, 1885 (age 72 years, 292 days). Interment at Mountain Home Cemetery, Kalamazoo, Mich.
  Relatives: Married 1840 to Achsah Strong.
  Wells Hall (built 1877 as dormitory, burned 1905; rebuilt on same site 1907, converted to offices 1940s, demolished 1966; rebuilt on different site 1960s as a major classroom and office building, and expanded since) at Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan, is named for him.
  John Greenleaf Whittier (1807-1892) — of Amesbury, Essex County, Mass. Born in Haverhill, Essex County, Mass., December 17, 1807. Poet; newspaper editor; member of Massachusetts state house of representatives, 1835; Liberty candidate for U.S. Representative from Massachusetts, 1842. Quaker. Member, American Anti-Slavery Society. Elected to the Hall of Fame for Great Americans in 1905. Died in Hampton Falls, Rockingham County, N.H., September 7, 1892 (age 84 years, 265 days). Interment at Union Cemetery, Amesbury, Mass.
  Relatives: Son of John Whittier (1760-1830) and Abigail (Hussey) Whittier (1780-1857); third cousin twice removed of Robert Foss Fernald; fourth cousin once removed of Daniel Davis, Albert Gallatin Dole, William Henry Barnum (1818-1889), George Winthrop Maston Pitman and Joseph Pitman.
  Political families: Kellogg-Adams-Seymour-Chapin family of Connecticut and New York; Pitman family of Bartlett, New Hampshire (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Cross-reference: Abraham Davenport
  The city of Whittier, California, is named for him.  — Whittier College, in Whittier, California, is named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS John G. Whittier (built 1942 at Portland, Oregon; scrapped 1962) was named for him.
  Politician named for him: John Greenleaf Whittier Lewis
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  George Wolf (1777-1840) — of Easton, Northampton County, Pa.; Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa. Born in Allen Township, Northampton County, Pa., August 12, 1777. Democrat. Lawyer; postmaster at Easton, Pa., 1802-03; member of Pennsylvania state house of representatives, 1814; U.S. Representative from Pennsylvania 8th District, 1824-29; Governor of Pennsylvania, 1829-35; defeated, 1835; comptroller of the U.S. Treasury, 1836-38; U.S. Collector of Customs, 1838-40; died in office 1840. German ancestry. Died in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., March 11, 1840 (age 62 years, 212 days). Interment at Harrisburg Cemetery, Harrisburg, Pa.
  Relatives: Son of Maria Margaretta Wolf (1736-1811) and George Wolf (1737-1808).
  Wolf Township, in Lycoming County, Pennsylvania, is named for him.  — Wolf Hall, at Penn State University, State College, Pennsylvania, is named for him.  — Governor Wolf Elementary School (built 1956), in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, is named for him.  — George Wolf Elementary School, in Bath, Pennsylvania, is named for him.  — The Governor Wolf Building (built 1893, a former school converted to apartments), in Easton, Pennsylvania, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Wilson W. Wyatt (1905-1996) — of Louisville, Jefferson County, Ky. Born in Louisville, Jefferson County, Ky., November 21, 1905. Democrat. Lawyer; mayor of Louisville, Ky., 1941-45; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Kentucky, 1944 (member, Platform and Resolutions Committee), 1948, 1952, 1960; Lieutenant Governor of Kentucky, 1959-63; candidate for U.S. Senator from Kentucky, 1962; member of Democratic National Committee from Kentucky, 1963. Presbyterian. Member, Americans for Democratic Action; American Bar Association; Rotary. Died in Louisville, Jefferson County, Ky., June 11, 1996 (age 90 years, 203 days). Interment at Cave Hill Cemetery, Louisville, Ky.
  Relatives: Son of Richard H. Wyatt and Mary (Watkins) Wyatt; married, June 14, 1930, to Anne Kinnaird Duncan.
  Wyatt Hall (built 1939, named 1995), which houses the law school at the University of Louisville, Louisville, Kentucky, is named for him.  — Wyatt Hall (including theaters and an art gallery), at Bellarmine University, Louisville, Kentucky, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article
  Charles Emmett Yeater (1861-1943) — also known as Charles E. Yeater — of Sedalia, Pettis County, Mo. Born in Osceola, St. Clair County, Mo., April 24, 1861. Democrat. Member of Missouri state senate 15th District, 1893-96; Governor-General of the Philippine Islands, 1921; alternate delegate to Democratic National Convention from Philippine Islands, 1928. Died in Sedalia, Pettis County, Mo., July 20, 1943 (age 82 years, 87 days). Interment at Crown Hill Cemetery, Sedalia, Mo.
  Relatives: Son of John Jameson Yeater (1831-1909) and Sarah Jeanette (Ellis) Yeater (1832-1921); married to Anna Richardson (1866-1918).
  The Charles E. Yeater Learning Center (classroom building, opened 1976), State Fair Community College, Sedalia, Missouri, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Brigham Young (1801-1877) — of Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Utah. Born in Whitingham, Windham County, Vt., June 1, 1801. Leader of the Mormon Church 1841-1877; Governor of Utah Territory, 1850-58. Mormon. Member, Freemasons. Died, of peritonitis and appendicitis, in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Utah, August 29, 1877 (age 76 years, 89 days). Interment at Mormon Pioneer Memorial, Salt Lake City, Utah; statue at Temple Square, Salt Lake City, Utah; statue at Heritage Plaza, St. George, Utah.
  Relatives: Father of Susa Young Gates (1856-1933).
  Brigham Young University, in Provo, Utah, is named for him.  — The city of Brigham City, Utah, is named for him.
  See also NNDB dossier
"Enjoy the hospitable entertainment of a political graveyard."
Henry L. Clinton, Apollo Hall, New York City, February 3, 1872
The Political Graveyard

The Political Graveyard is a web site about U.S. political history and cemeteries. Founded in 1996, it is the Internet's most comprehensive free source for American political biography, listing 315,917 politicians, living and dead.
 
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