PoliticalGraveyard.com
The Political Graveyard: A Database of American History
The Internet's Most Comprehensive Source of U.S. Political Biography
(or, The Web Site that Tells Where the Dead Politicians are Buried)
Created and maintained by Lawrence Kestenbaum

Namesake Politicians: Parks

in alphabetical order

  Oliver Percy Archer (1869-1930) — also known as O. P. Archer — of McAllen, Hidalgo County, Tex. Born in Garland, Tipton County, Tenn., November 29, 1869. Mayor of McAllen, Tex., 1913-23. Member, Rotary. Died May 3, 1930 (age 60 years, 155 days). Interment at Roselawn Cemetery, McAllen, Tex.
  Relatives: Married to Clara Hill (1879-1958).
  Archer Park, McAllen, Texas, is named for him.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  William Henry Ashley (c.1778-1838) — also known as William H. Ashley — of St. Louis, Mo. Born in Powhatan County, Va., about 1778. Democrat. Fur trader; Lieutenant Governor of Missouri, 1820-24; U.S. Representative from Missouri at-large, 1831-37. Died near Boonville, Cooper County, Mo., March 26, 1838 (age about 60 years). Interment in private or family graveyard.
  Relatives: Married, November 17, 1806, to Mary Able; married, October 17, 1832, to Elizabeth Woodson Moss (1804-1873).
  The Ashley National Forest (established 1908), in Daggett, Duchesne, Summit, Uintah, and Utah counties, Utah, and Sweetwater County, Wyoming, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  Edward Dickinson Baker (1811-1861) — also known as Edward D. Baker — of Springfield, Sangamon County, Ill.; Galena, Jo Daviess County, Ill.; San Francisco, Calif.; Oregon City, Clackamas County, Ore. Born in London, England, February 24, 1811. Lawyer; member of Illinois state house of representatives, 1837-40; member of Illinois state senate, 1841-45; U.S. Representative from Illinois, 1845-46, 1849-51 (7th District 1845-46, 6th District 1849-51); resigned 1846; colonel in the U.S. Army during the Mexican War; U.S. Senator from Oregon, 1860-61; died in office 1861; general in the Union Army during the Civil War. Killed in battle at Balls Bluff, Loudoun County, Va., October 21, 1861 (age 50 years, 239 days). Interment at San Francisco National Cemetery, San Francisco, Calif.
  Relatives: Married, April 27, 1831, to Mary A. Lee.
  Baker County, Ore. is named for him.
  The city of Baker City, Oregon, is named for him.  — Fort Baker (previously, Lime Point Military Reservation; renamed Fort Baker in 1897; now part of Golden Gate National Recreation Area), in Marin County, California, is named for him.  — Baker Street, in San Francisco, California, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Matthias William Baldwin (1795-1866) — also known as Matthias W. Baldwin — Born in Elizabethtown, Essex County (now Elizabeth, Union County), N.J., December 10, 1795. Jeweler; inventor; locomotive manufacturer; abolitionist; delegate to Pennsylvania state constitutional convention, 1837. Died in Wissinoming, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., September 7, 1866 (age 70 years, 271 days). Interment at Laurel Hill Cemetery, Philadelphia, Pa.; statue at Philadelphia City Hall Grounds, Philadelphia, Pa.
  Relatives: Son of William Baldwin.
  Matthias Baldwin Park, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
William B. Bankhead William Brockman Bankhead (1874-1940) — also known as William B. Bankhead — of Jasper, Walker County, Ala. Born in Moscow (now Sulligent), Lamar County, Ala., April 12, 1874. Democrat. Lawyer; member of Alabama state house of representatives, 1900-02; speaker, Democratic National Convention, 1912 ; U.S. Representative from Alabama, 1917-40 (10th District 1917-33, 7th District 1933-40); died in office 1940; Speaker of the U.S. House, 1936-40; died in office 1940. Methodist. Member, Phi Delta Theta; Freemasons; Odd Fellows; Junior Order; Woodmen. Died in Washington, D.C., September 15, 1940 (age 66 years, 156 days). Interment at Oak Hill Cemetery, Jasper, Ala.
  Relatives: Son of John Hollis Bankhead and Tallulah James (Brockman) Bankhead; brother of Louise Bankhead (1867-1921; who married William Hayne Perry (1839-1902)) and John Hollis Bankhead II; married, January 31, 1900, to Adalaide Eugene Sledge; father of Tallulah Bankhead (1902-1968; actress); uncle of Walter Will Bankhead.
  Political family: Bankhead family of Jasper, Alabama.
  Cross-reference: Carter Manasco
  The William B. Bankhead National Forest (established as Alabama National Forest 1918; given current name 1942), in Franklin, Lawrence, and Winston counties, Alabama, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: Library of Congress
  Vito Piranesi Battista (1909-1990) — also known as Vito P. Battista — of Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y. Born in Bari, Italy, September 7, 1909. Republican. Architect; candidate for mayor of New York City, N.Y., 1957 (United Taxpayers), 1961 (United Taxpayers), 1965 (United Taxpayers), 1977; candidate for New York state senate 10th District, 1962; member of New York state assembly 38th District, 1968-75; member of New York Republican State Committee, 1970-73; delegate to Republican National Convention from New York, 1972; candidate for U.S. Representative from New York 9th District, 1980. Catholic. Italian ancestry. Member, Alpha Phi Delta; American Institute of Architects; Kiwanis. Died in Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y., May 24, 1990 (age 80 years, 259 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Vincenzo Battista and Sabina (Caputo) Battista; married, June 30, 1941, to JOsephine Palermo.
  The Vito P. Battista Playground, Brooklyn, New York, is named for him.
  Truxtun Beale (1856-1936) — of San Francisco, Calif.; Annapolis, Anne Arundel County, Md. Born in San Francisco, Calif., March 6, 1856. Republican. Lawyer; U.S. Minister to Persia, 1891-92; Greece, 1892-93; delegate to Republican National Convention from California, 1912; alternate delegate to Republican National Convention from Maryland, 1920. Died near Annapolis, Anne Arundel County, Md., June 2, 1936 (age 80 years, 88 days). Interment at Bruton Parish Churchyard, Williamsburg, Va.
  Relatives: Son of Edward Fitzgerald Beale (1822-1893) and Mary (Edwards) Beale (1827-1902); married, April 30, 1894, to Harriet 'Hattie' Blaine (1871-1958; daughter of James Gillespie Blaine); married, April 23, 1903, to Marie Oge (1880-1956).
  Political family: Beale-Blaine-Edwards family of Chester, Pennsylvania (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Truxtun Avenue and Beale Avenue, in Bakersfield, California, are named for him.  — Beale Park, in Bakersfield, California, is named for him.
  See also U.S. State Dept career summary — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Harvey Wesley Bolin (1909-1978) — also known as H. Wesley Bolin — of Phoenix, Maricopa County, Ariz. Born in Butler, Bates County, Mo., July 1, 1909. Democrat. Secretary of state of Arizona, 1949-77; Governor of Arizona, 1977-78; died in office 1978. Congregationalist. Member, Elks; Moose; Jaycees; Kiwanis. Died, from a heart attack, Phoenix, Maricopa County, Ariz., March 4, 1978 (age 68 years, 246 days). Interment at State Capitol Grounds, Phoenix, Ariz.
  Relatives: Son of Doc Strother Bolin and Margaret (Combs) Bolin; married, February 18, 1940, to Julia Elizabeth Hentz.
  The Wesley Bolin Memorial Plaza, Phoenix, Arizona, is named for him.
  See also National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Daniel Boone (1734-1820) — Born in Berks County, Pa., November 2, 1734. Explorer and frontiersman; member of Virginia state house of delegates, 1781, 1787. English and Welsh ancestry. Died in St. Charles County, Mo., September 26, 1820 (age 85 years, 329 days). Original interment at a private or family graveyard, St. Charles County, Mo.; reinterment at Frankfort Cemetery, Frankfort, Ky.
  Relatives: Married to Rebecca Ann Bryan (1739-1813); father of Jessie Bryan Boone and Nathan Boone; grandfather of Harriett Morgan Boone (1794-1861; who married Hiram Howell Baber); granduncle of Levi Day Boone (1808-1882); second great-grandfather of Elmer Charless Henderson.
  Political families: Thomas-Smith-Irwin family of Pennsylvania; Boone family of St. Charles County, Missouri (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Boone counties in Ark., Ill., Ind., Ky., Mo., Neb. and W.Va. are named for him.
  The Daniel Boone National Forest (established 1937 as Cumberland National Forest; renamed 1966), in Bath, Clay, Estill, Harlan, Jackson, Knox, Laurel, Lee, Leslie, McCreary, Menifee, Morgan, Owsley, Perry, Powell, Pulaski, Rockcastle, Rowan, Wayne, Whitley, and Wolfe counties, Kentucky, is named for him.  — Boone Dam (built 1950-52), on the South Fork Holston River, in Sullivan and Washington counties, Tennessee, and the Boone Lake reservoir behind the dam, are named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Walter Bowne (1770-1846) — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in Flushing, Queens, Queens County, N.Y., September 26, 1770. Member of New York state senate, 1816-24 (Southern District 1816-22, 1st District 1823-24); mayor of New York City, N.Y., 1829-33. Died August 31, 1846 (age 75 years, 339 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of James Bowne and Caroline (Rodman) Bowne; married 1803 to Elizabeth Southgate.
  Bowne Park, in Flushing, Queens, New York, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article
Lewis Cass Lewis Cass (1782-1866) — of Detroit, Wayne County, Mich. Born in Exeter, Rockingham County, N.H., October 9, 1782. Democrat. Member of Ohio state house of representatives, 1806; general in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812; Governor of Michigan Territory, 1813-31; U.S. Secretary of War, 1831-36; U.S. Minister to France, 1836-42; member of University of Michigan board of regents, 1843-44; appointed 1843; candidate for Democratic nomination for President, 1844, 1852; U.S. Senator from Michigan, 1845-48, 1849-57; resigned 1848; candidate for President of the United States, 1848; U.S. Secretary of State, 1857-60. Member, Freemasons. Died in Detroit, Wayne County, Mich., June 17, 1866 (age 83 years, 251 days). Interment at Elmwood Cemetery, Detroit, Mich.
  Relatives: Second great-grandfather of Thomas Cass Ballenger (1926-2015).
  Cass counties in Ill., Ind., Iowa, Mich., Minn., Mo., Neb. and Tex. are named for him.
  The town and village of Cassville, Wisconsin, is named for him.  — The village of Cass City, Michigan, is named for him.  — The village of Cassopolis, Michigan, is named for him.  — The city of Cassville, Missouri, is named for him.  — Cass Lake, and the adjoining city of Cass Lake, Minnesota, are named for him.  — Cass Lake, in Oakland County, Michigan, is named for him.  — The Cass River, in Tuscola and Saginaw counties, Michigan, is named for him.  — The Lewis Cass Building (opened 1921 as the State Office Building; damaged in a fire in 1951; rebuilt and named for Lewis Cass; changed to Elliott-Larsen Building in 2020), in Lansing, Michigan, was named for him.  — Cass Avenue, Cass Park, and Cass Technical High School, in Detroit, Michigan, are named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: Lewis Cass WilmarthLewis C. CarpenterLewis C. VandergriftLewis C. TidballLewis Cass WickLewis Cass Tidball IILewis C. Gabbert
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Books about Lewis Cass: Willard Carl Klunder, Lewis Cass and the Politics of Moderation — Frank Bury Woodford, Lewis Cass, the Last Jeffersonian
  Image source: Library of Congress
  Burton W. Chace (1901-1972) — of Long Beach, Los Angeles County, Calif. Born in Stanton, Stanton County, Neb., July 6, 1901. Republican. Lumber dealer; mayor of Long Beach, Calif., 1947-53; alternate delegate to Republican National Convention from California, 1952; member, Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors, 1953-72. Died in a car accident, August 22, 1972 (age 71 years, 47 days). Burial location unknown.
  Burton Chace Park, in Marina del Rey, California, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article
Grover Cleveland Grover Cleveland (1837-1908) — also known as Stephen Grover Cleveland; "Uncle Jumbo"; "The Veto Mayor"; "Grover The Good"; "The Sage of Princeton"; "Dumb Prophet"; "Buffalo Hangman"; "The Veto President"; "Beast of Buffalo"; "Big Steve" — of Buffalo, Erie County, N.Y.; Princeton, Mercer County, N.J.; Tamworth, Carroll County, N.H. Born in Caldwell, Essex County, N.J., March 18, 1837. Democrat. Lawyer; Erie County Sheriff, 1870-73; mayor of Buffalo, N.Y., 1882; Governor of New York, 1883-85; President of the United States, 1885-89, 1893-97; defeated, 1888. Presbyterian. Member, Sigma Chi. Elected to the Hall of Fame for Great Americans in 1935. Died in Princeton, Mercer County, N.J., June 24, 1908 (age 71 years, 98 days). Interment at Princeton Cemetery, Princeton, N.J.; statue at City Hall Grounds, Buffalo, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Rev. Richard Falley Cleveland (1804-1853) and Anne (Neal) Cleveland (1806-1882); married, June 2, 1886, to Frances Folsom (1864-1947) and Frances Clara Folsom; father of Richard Folsom Cleveland (1897-1974) (son-in-law of Thomas Frank Gailor; brother-in-law of Frank Hoyt Gailor); first cousin once removed of Francis Landon Cleveland; second cousin of James Harlan Cleveland; second cousin once removed of James Harlan Cleveland Jr.; second cousin twice removed of Jonathan Usher and Joseph Wheeler Bloodgood; third cousin once removed of John Palmer Usher and Robert Cleveland Usher; third cousin thrice removed of Ephraim Safford and Isaiah Kidder; fourth cousin once removed of Samuel Lord and Rollin Usher Tyler.
  Political family: Kellogg-Adams-Seymour-Chapin family of Connecticut and New York (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Cross-reference: Henry T. Ellett — Wilson S. Bissell — David King Udall — Edward S. Bragg — Thomas F. Grady — Lyman K. Bass — George B. Cortelyou
  Cleveland counties in Ark. and Okla. are named for him.
  Mount Cleveland, a volcano on Chuginadak Island, Alaska, is named for him.  — The town of Grover, North Carolina, is named for him.  — The Cleveland National Forest (established 1908), in San Diego, Riverside, Orange counties, California, is named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: Grover C. CookGrover C. MeyrsGrover C. TalbotGrover C. HelmGrover C. RobertsonG. C. CooleyGrover A. WhalenGrover C. TaylorGrover C. WinnGrover C. LukeGrover C. AlbrightGrover Cleveland WelshGrover C. BelknapGrover C. WorrellGrover B. HillGrover C. DillmanGrover C. BrennemanGrover C. GeorgeGrover C. MitchellGrover C. LadnerGrover C. HallGrover C. TyeGrover C. CiselGrover C. HedrickGrover C. HunterGrover C. MontgomeryGrover C. FarwellGrover C. GillinghamGrover C. StudivanGrover C. LayneGrover C. HudsonGrover C. CombsGrover C. SnyderGrover C. GuernseyGrover C. HendersonGrover C. SmithGrover C. JacksonGrover C. HunterGrover C. BowerGrover C. LandGrover C. MoritzGrover C. GreggGrover C. Richman, Jr.Grover C. AndersonGrover C. ChrissGrover C. CriswellGrover C. BrownGrover C. Robinson III
  Coins and currency: His portrait appeared on the U.S. $20 bill (1914-28), and on the $1,000 bill (1928-46).
  Campaign slogan (1884): "We love him for the enemies he has made."
  Opposition slogan (1884): "Ma, Ma, Where's My Pa?"
  See also National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Books about Grover Cleveland: Alyn Brodsky, Grover Cleveland : A Study in Character — H. Paul Jeffers, An Honest President: The Life and Presidencies of Grover Cleveland — Mark Wahlgren Summers, Rum, Romanism, & Rebellion : The Making of a President, 1884 — Henry F. Graff, Grover Cleveland — Jeff C. Young, Grover Cleveland (for young readers)
  Critical books about Grover Cleveland: Matthew Algeo, The President Is a Sick Man: the Supposedly Virtuous Grover Cleveland Survives a Secret Surgery at Sea and Vilifies the Courageous Newspaperman Who Dared Expose the Truth — Charles Lachman, A Secret Life : The Lies and Scandals of President Grover Cleveland
  Image source: New York Red Book 1896
  Charles Emmett Coffin (1849-1934) — also known as Charles E. Coffin — of Indianapolis, Marion County, Ind. Born in Salem, Washington County, Ind., July 14, 1849. Real estate business; banker; Vice-Consul for Paraguay in Indianapolis, Ind., 1900-03. Methodist. Member, Optimist Club; Freemasons; Knights Templar; Shriners. Died in Indianapolis, Marion County, Ind., October 15, 1934 (age 85 years, 93 days). Interment at Crown Hill Cemetery, Indianapolis, Ind.
  Relatives: Son of Zachariah T. Coffin (1820-1882) and Caroline (Armfield) Coffin (1830-1917); married 1875 to Elizabeth H. Holloway (1853-1893); married, September 20, 1897, to Mary (Birch) Fletcher (1861-1933).
  The Charles E. Coffin Municipal Golf Course, in Indianapolis, Indiana, is named for him.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  John H. Coyne — of Yonkers, Westchester County, N.Y. Mayor of Yonkers, N.Y., 1906-07; defeated, 1907 (Democratic), 1913 (Progressive). Burial location unknown.
  Coyne Park and Playground, in Yonkers, New York, is named for him.
  David Crockett (1786-1836) — also known as Davy Crockett; "King of the Wild Frontier" — of Tennessee. Born in Greene County, Tenn., August 17, 1786. Democrat. Member of Tennessee state house of representatives, 1821; U.S. Representative from Tennessee, 1827-31, 1833-35 (9th District 1827-31, 12th District 1833-35); served in the Texas Army during the Texas War of Independence. Member, Freemasons. Slaveowner. Killed while defending the Alamo, in San Antonio, Bexar County, Tex., March 6, 1836 (age 49 years, 202 days). Cremated; ashes interred at San Fernando Cathedral, San Antonio, Tex.
  Relatives: Son of John Crockett and Rebecca (Hawkins) Crockett; married, August 16, 1806, to Mary 'Polly' Finley; married 1815 to Elizabeth Patton; father of John Wesley Crockett; first cousin twice removed of Charles Carroll Walcutt (1838-1898).
  Political family: Crockett-Walcutt family of Tennessee.
  Crockett counties in Tenn. and Tex. are named for him.
  The Davy Crockett National Forest (established 1936), in Houston and Trinity counties, Texas, is named for him.
  Personal motto: "Be sure you're right, then go ahead."
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books by David Crockett: A Narrative of the Life of David Crockett of the State of Tennessee
  Books about David Crockett: William C. Davis, Three Roads to the Alamo: The Lives and Fortunes of David Crockett, James Bowie, and William Barret Travis — Constance Rourke, Davy Crockett — Elaine Alphin, Davy Crockett (for young readers)
  Samuel Sam Dale (1772-1841) — also known as Sam Dale — of Alabama; Mississippi. Born in Rockbridge County, Va., 1772. Served in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812; member of Alabama state house of representatives, 1819; member of Mississippi state house of representatives, 1836. Scotch-Irish ancestry. Died near Daleville, Lauderdale County, Miss., May 24, 1841 (age about 68 years). Original interment at a private or family graveyard, Lauderdale County, Miss.; reinterment at Oakwood Cemetery, Montgomery, Ala.
  Dale County, Ala. is named for him.
  The community of Daleville, Mississippi, is named for him.  — Sam Dale State Park, on Highway 39, near Daleville, Mississippi, is named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS Sam Dale (built 1944 at New Orleans, Louisiana; scrapped 1973) was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Jay Norwood Darling (1876-1962) — also known as Jay N. Darling; "Ding" — of Des Moines, Polk County, Iowa. Born in Norwood, Charlevoix County, Mich., October 21, 1876. Republican. Cartoonist; received the Pulitzer Prize for his political cartoons in 1924 and 1943; delegate to Republican National Convention from Iowa, 1932; founder and first president, National Wildlife Federation; head of the U.S. Biological Survey (which later became the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service), 1934-35; obtained millions of acres for wildlife refuges. Member, Beta Theta Pi. Died January 12, 1962 (age 85 years, 83 days). Interment at Logan Park Cemetery, Sioux City, Iowa.
  Relatives: Son of Rev. Marcellus Warner Darling (1844-1913) and Clara (Woolson) Darling (1848-1916); married, September 19, 1911, to Genevieve Pendleton (1877-1968).
  The J.N. 'Ding' Darling National Wildlife Refuge, Sanibel Island, Florida, is named for him.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Germain P. Dupont (c.1915-1963) — of Manchester, Hillsborough County, N.H. Born in Manchester, Hillsborough County, N.H., about 1915. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army during World War II; employed at J. F. McElwain Shoe Company; secretary-treasurer, New Hampshire Shoe Workers Union; Hillsborough County Commissioner, 1959-63; candidate in primary for mayor of Manchester, N.H., 1963. Catholic. Member, Catholic War Veterans; American Legion; Disabled American Veterans; Foresters. Suffered a heart attack at his home, and was dead on arrival at Notre Dame Hospital, Manchester, Hillsborough County, N.H., December 12, 1963 (age about 48 years). Interment at Mt. Calvary Cemetery, Manchester, N.H.
  Relatives: Married to Laurette E. Prince.
  Dupont Pool (now Dupont Splash Pad), a public park facility in Manchester, New Hampshire, is named for him.
  Asher Bates Emery (1867-1924) — also known as Asher B. Emery — of East Aurora, Erie County, N.Y. Born in East Aurora, Erie County, N.Y., February 18, 1867. Republican. Physician; lawyer; bank director; alternate delegate to Republican National Convention from New York, 1908; Justice of New York Supreme Court 8th District, 1922-24; appointed 1922; died in office 1924. Member, Freemasons; Odd Fellows; Knights of Pythias. Died, from kidney disease, in Sisters Hospital, Buffalo, Erie County, N.Y., August 8, 1924 (age 57 years, 172 days). Interment at Oakwood Cemetery, East Aurora, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Josiah Emery (1819-1896) and Elizabeth C. (Kellogg) Emery (1828-1884); brother of Edward Kellogg Emery (1851-1919).
  Asher B. Emery County Park, in South Wales, New York, is named for him.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  James Edgar Evins — also known as J. Edgar Evins — of Smithville, DeKalb County, Tenn. Democrat. Delegate to Democratic National Convention from Tennessee, 1940, 1944. Entombed in mausoleum at Smithville Town Cemetery, Smithville, Tenn.
  Relatives: Father of Joseph Landon Evins (1910-1984).
  Edgar Evins State Park, in DeKalb County, Tennessee, is named for him.
  Clyde Edward Fant (1905-1973) — also known as Clyde E. Fant — of Shreveport, Caddo Parish, La. Born in Linden, Cass County, Tex., 1905. Democrat. Mayor of Shreveport, La., 1946-54, 1958-70. Baptist. Died in Shreveport, Caddo Parish, La., 1973 (age about 68 years). Interment at Forest Park East Cemetery, Shreveport, La.
  Clyde Fant Park, along the Red River, in Shreveport, Louisiana, is named for him.
  Herman Daniel Farrell Jr. (1932-2018) — also known as Denny Farrell — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born in Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., February 4, 1932. Democrat. Automobile mechanic; member of New York state assembly, 1975-2017 (74th District 1975-82, 71st District 1983-2017); delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1980, 1984, 1996, 2000, 2004, 2008; candidate in primary for mayor of New York City, N.Y., 1985; member of Democratic National Committee from New York, 1988, 2004-08; Presidential Elector for New York, 1996, 2000; New York Democratic state chair, 2001-06. African ancestry. Died in New York City (unknown county), N.Y., May 26, 2018 (age 86 years, 111 days). Burial location unknown.
  Denny Farrell Riverbank State Park (opened 1993 as Riverbank State Park; renamed 2017), in Manhattan, New York, is named for him.  — The Herman 'Denny' Farrell Pedestrian Bridge (opened 2017), over the Henry Hudson Parkway and railroad tracks, to Riverside Park, in Manhattan, New York, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article
Edwin H. Fitler Edwin Henry Fitler (1825-1896) — also known as Edwin H. Fitler — of Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa. Born in Kensington (now part of Philadelphia), Philadelphia County, Pa., December 2, 1825. Republican. Rope and cordage manufacturer; Presidential Elector for Pennsylvania, 1876; Presidential Elector for Pennsylvania, 1876; mayor of Philadelphia, Pa., 1887-91; candidate for Republican nomination for President, 1888. German ancestry. Died in Torresdale, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., May 31, 1896 (age 70 years, 181 days). Interment at Laurel Hill Cemetery, Philadelphia, Pa.
  Relatives: Son of William Fitler (1785-1836) and Elizabeth (Wonderly) Fitler (1788-1880); married 1850 to Josephine R. Baker (1831-1904); great-grandfather of Margaretta Large Fitler (who married Nelson Aldrich Rockefeller (1908-1979)).
  Political families: Rockefeller family of New York City, New York; Wise-Sergeant-Rockefeller family (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  The Edwin H. Fitler School (built 1897-98), in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, is named for him.  — Fitler Square, a public park in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Image source: Philadelphia Inquirer, June 20, 1888
  Lucy Louisa Flower (1837-1921) — also known as Lucy L. Flower; Lucy Louisa Coues; "The Mother of the Juvenile Court" — of Chicago, Cook County, Ill. Born in Boston, Suffolk County, Mass., May 10, 1837. Republican. School teacher; social reformer; founder of nursing school; advocate for the creation of a "parental court" to handle cases of delinquent children; her efforts led to the world's first juvenile court legislation, which created the Chicago Juvenile Court in 1899; University of Illinois trustee; elected 1894. Female. Died in Coronado, San Diego County, Calif., April 27, 1921 (age 83 years, 352 days). Interment at Graceland Cemetery, Chicago, Ill.
  Relatives: Married, September 4, 1862, to James Monroe Flower (1835-1909); mother of Harriet Flower (daughter-in-law of John Villiers Farwell (1825-1908)) and Elliott Flower (1863-1920; author).
  Political family: Farwell family of Chicago, Illinois.
  Lucy Flower Park, on West Moffat Street, and Lucy Flower Technical High School (opened, 1911; moved to new building, 1927; renamed Flower Vocational High School, 1956; renamed Lucy Flower Career Academy High School, 1995; closed, 2003), both in Chicago, Illinois, were named for her.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Irving C. Freese (b. 1903) — of Norwalk, Fairfield County, Conn. Born in East Brunswick, Middlesex County, N.J., February 19, 1903. Socialist. Photographer; candidate for Connecticut state house of representatives from Norwalk, 1946; mayor of Norwalk, Conn., 1947-55, 1957-59; defeated, 1939, 1941, 1943, 1945. Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Married to Elizabeth E. Hutchinson (niece of Jasper McLevy (1878-1962)).
  Irving Freese Park, in Norwalk, Connecticut, is named for him.
  Melville Weston Fuller (1833-1910) — also known as Melville W. Fuller — of Chicago, Cook County, Ill. Born in Augusta, Kennebec County, Maine, February 11, 1833. Democrat. Delegate to Illinois state constitutional convention from Cook County, 1862; member of Illinois state house of representatives, 1863; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Illinois, 1876, 1880 (member, Resolutions Committee); Chief Justice of U.S. Supreme Court, 1888-1910; died in office 1910. Episcopalian. Died in Sorrento, Hancock County, Maine, July 4, 1910 (age 77 years, 143 days). Interment at Graceland Cemetery, Chicago, Ill.
  Relatives: Father of Mildred Fuller (who married Hugh Campbell Wallace (1863-1931)).
  Cross-reference: Stephen A. Day
  Fuller Park (opened about 1914), in Chicago, Illinois, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Books about Melville W. Fuller: James W. Ely, Jr., The Chief Justiceship of Melville W. Fuller, 1888-1910
  Thomas Oscar Fuller Sr. (1867-1942) — also known as Thomas O. Fuller, Sr. — of Wilmington, New Hanover County, N.C.; Memphis, Shelby County, Tenn. Born in Franklinton, Franklin County, N.C., October 25, 1867. Minister; member of North Carolina state senate; elected 1898; historian. African ancestry. Member, NAACP. Died in Memphis, Shelby County, Tenn., June 21, 1942 (age 74 years, 239 days). Interment at New Park Cemetery, Memphis, Tenn.
  Relatives: Son of J. Henderson Fuller and Mary Eliza Fuller.
  T.O. Fuller State Park, in Memphis, Tennessee, is named for him.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
William J. Gaynor William Jay Gaynor (1849-1913) — also known as William J. Gaynor; "Brother Adrian Denys" — of Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y. Born in Oriskany, Oneida County, N.Y., February 2, 1849. Democrat. Lawyer; Justice of New York Supreme Court 2nd District, 1894-1909; Justice of the Appellate Division of the New York Supreme Court 2nd Department, 1908-09; mayor of New York City, N.Y., 1910-13; died in office 1913; shot in the throat by James J. Gallagher, a former city employee, on August 9, 1910. Irish ancestry. Died, from a heart attack, on board the steamship Baltic, in the North Atlantic Ocean, September 10, 1913 (age 64 years, 220 days). Interment at Green-Wood Cemetery, Brooklyn, N.Y.; memorial monument at Cadman Plaza Park, Brooklyn, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Keiron Gaynor and Elizabeth (Handwright) Gaynor.
  Cross-reference: Edward M. Grout — James P. Kohler
  Gaynor Plaza, the triangle between Flatbush Avenue, St. John's Place, and Eighth Avenue, Brooklyn, New York, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: Library of Congress
  Raymond R. Guest (1939-2001) — also known as Andy Guest — of Front Royal, Warren County, Va. Born in Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., September 29, 1939. Republican. Farmer; banker; member of Virginia state house of delegates, 1973-99. Episcopalian. Member, Elks; Rotary; Izaak Walton League; Ruritan. Died, of cancer, in Front Royal, Warren County, Va., April 2, 2001 (age 61 years, 185 days). Interment at Old Chapel Cemetery, Millwood, Va.
  Relatives: Son of Raymond Richard Guest and Elizabeth Polk Guest (1910-1990); nephew of Winston Frederick Churchill Guest; grandson of Frank Lyon Polk; fifth great-grandson of Philemon Hawkins; first cousin four times removed of William Dallas Polk Haywood; second cousin twice removed of Rufus King Polk; second cousin four times removed of James Knox Polk and William Hawkins Polk; third cousin twice removed of Paul Fletcher Faison; third cousin thrice removed of Marshall Tate Polk, Tasker Polk, Richard Tyler Polk and Edwin Fitzhugh Polk.
  Political families: Polk family; Manly-Haywood-Polk family of Raleigh, North Carolina (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Raymond R. 'Andy' Guest Jr. Shenandoah River State Park, in Warren County, Virginia, is named for him.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Louis Francis Haffen (1854-1935) — also known as Louis F. Haffen; "Father of the Bronx" — of Melrose, Westchester County (now part of Bronx, Bronx County), N.Y.; Bronx, Bronx County, N.Y. Born in Melrose, Westchester County (now part of Bronx, Bronx County), N.Y., November 6, 1854. Democrat. Civil engineer; engineer, New York City Department of Parks, 1883-93; commissioner of street improvement in Annexed Territory (Bronx), 1893-98; borough president of Bronx, New York, 1898-1909; removed 1909; removed from office by Gov. Charles Evans Hughes over maladministration charges, 1909; delegate to New York state constitutional convention 22nd District, 1915; member of New York Democratic State Committee, 1930. Catholic. German and Irish ancestry. Member, Royal Arcanum; Tammany Hall. Died, from arteriosclerosis, in Bronx, Bronx County, N.Y., December 25, 1935 (age 81 years, 49 days). Interment at Woodlawn Cemetery, Bronx, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Mathias Haffen and Catharine (Hayes) Haffen; married 1886 to Caroline Kurz.
  Haffen Park, Bronx, New York, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article
  Kenneth Frederick Hahn (1920-1997) — also known as Kenneth Hahn; Kenny Hahn — of Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, Calif. Born in Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, Calif., August 19, 1920. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Navy during World War II; member, Los Angeles City Council, 1947-52; Los Angeles County Supervisor, 1952-92; alternate delegate to Democratic National Convention from California, 1952; candidate in primary for U.S. Senator from California, 1970. Church of Christ. Died, from heart failure, in a hospital at Inglewood, Los Angeles County, Calif., October 12, 1997 (age 77 years, 54 days). Interment at Inglewood Park Cemetery, Inglewood, Calif.
  Relatives: Son of John Heinrich Hahn and Hattie Louise (Wiggins) Hahn; brother of Gordon R. Hahn; father of James Kenneth Hahn and Janice Kay Hahn (born1952).
  Political family: Hahn family of Los Angeles, California.
  The Kenneth Hahn State Recreation Area, in Los Angeles, California, is named for him.  — The Kenneth Hahn Hall of Administration, in Los Angeles, California, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article
  Phil Hardberger (b. 1934) — of San Antonio, Bexar County, Tex. Born in Morton, Cochran County, Tex., July 27, 1934. Democrat. Lawyer; mayor of San Antonio, Tex., 2005-09. Baptist. Still living as of 2014.
  Relatives: Son of Homer Reeves Hardberger (1908-1986) and Bess (Scott) Hardberger (1913-2008); married 1968 to Linda Morgan.
  Phil Hardberger Park (formerly Voelcker Park), in San Antonio, Texas, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  William Hasson (1833-1923) — of Oil City, Venango County, Pa. Born in Shippenville, Clarion County, Pa., March 17, 1833. Democrat. Served in the Union Army during the Civil War; oil business; banker; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Pennsylvania, 1872, 1904, 1912; member of Pennsylvania state house of representatives from Venango County, 1875-76, 1883-84, 1899-1900. Died in Oil City, Venango County, Pa., May 15, 1923 (age 90 years, 59 days). Interment at St. Joseph's Cemetery, Oil City, Pa.
  Relatives: Son of James Hasson (1797-1883) and Sarah (Fetzer) Hasson (1805-1884); married 1871 to Mary Collins (1850-1925).
  Hasson Park, in Oil City, Pennsylvania, is named for him.  — Hasson Avenue, in Oil City, Pennsylvania, is named for him.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Hans Christian Heg (1829-1863) — of Wisconsin. Born in Lierbyen, Norway, December 21, 1829. Went to California for the 1849 Gold Rush; abolitionist; Wisconsin state prison commissioner, elected 1859; colonel in the Union Army during the Civil War. Norwegian ancestry. Suffered wounds in battle, and died the next day, at Chickamauga, Walker County, Ga., September 20, 1863 (age 33 years, 273 days). Interment at Norway Lutheran Cemetery, Wind Lake, Wis.; statue at State Capitol Grounds, Madison, Wis.
  Relatives: Son of Even Heg (1789-1850) and Sigrid (Kallerud) Heg (1799-1842); married to Gunhild Einong (1833-1922).
  Heg Memorial Park, in Wind Lake, Wisconsin, is named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS Hans Heg (built 1944 at Richmond, California; scrapped 1961) was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
Weldon B. Heyburn Weldon Brinton Heyburn (1852-1912) — also known as Weldon B. Heyburn — of Wallace, Shoshone County, Idaho. Born in Chadds Ford Township, Delaware County, Pa., May 23, 1852. Republican. Lawyer; delegate to Republican National Convention from Idaho Territory, 1888; delegate to Idaho state constitutional convention, 1889; delegate to Republican National Convention from Idaho, 1892, 1900, 1904; candidate for U.S. Representative from Idaho, 1898; U.S. Senator from Idaho, 1903-12; died in office 1912; member of Republican National Committee from Idaho, 1904. Died in Washington, D.C., October 17, 1912 (age 60 years, 147 days). Interment at Lafayette Cemetery, Chadds Ford, Pa.
  The city of Heyburn, Idaho, is named for him.  — Mount Heyburn, in Custer County, Idaho, is named for him.  — Heyburn State Park, in Benewah County, Idaho, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  Image source: Library of Congress
  Henry Edwards Huntington (1850-1927) — also known as Henry E. Huntington — of Oneonta, Otsego County, N.Y.; San Francisco, Calif.; San Marino, Los Angeles County, Calif. Born in Oneonta, Otsego County, N.Y., February 27, 1850. Republican. Owned and expanded the streetcar and trolley system in Southern California; real estate developer; Presidential Elector for New York, 1908. Member, Sons of the Revolution. Died, from kidney disease and pneumonia, in Lankenau Hospital, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., May 23, 1927 (age 77 years, 85 days). Entombed in mausoleum at Huntington Library and Botanical Gardens, San Marino, Calif.
  Relatives: Son of Solon Huntington (1812-1890) and Harriet (Saunders) Huntington (1821-1906); married 1873 to Mary Alice Prentice (1852-1916); married 1913 to Arabella Duval 'Belle' (Yarrington) Huntington (1850-1924; his uncle's widow).
  The city of Huntington Beach, California, is named for him.  — The city of Huntington Park, California, is named for him.  — Huntington Lake, in Fresno County, California, is named for him.  — The Huntington Hotel (built 1907 as Hotel Wentworth; expanded and reopened 1914 as the Huntington Hotel; demolished 1989 and rebuilt; now Langham Huntington hotel) in Pasadena, California, is named for him.  — The Huntington Library, Art Museum, and Botanical Gardens, on his former estate, in San Marino, California, is named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS Henry E. Huntington (built 1943-44 at Terminal Island, California; scrapped 1961) was named for him.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Edgar Lanier Jenkins (1933-2012) — also known as Ed Jenkins — of Jasper, Pickens County, Ga. Born in Young Harris, Towns County, Ga., January 4, 1933. Democrat. Lawyer; staff member for U.S. Rep. Phillip M. Landrum, 1959-62; U.S. Representative from Georgia 9th District, 1977-93. Died in Atlanta, Fulton County, Ga., January 1, 2012 (age 78 years, 362 days). Interment at Antioch Baptist Church Cemetery, Blairsville, Ga.
  Ed Jenkins National Recreation Area (established as Springer Mountain National Recreation Area in 1991; renamed in 1992; southern terminus of the Appalachian Trail), in Fannin and Union counties, Georgia, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  John Winthrop Jones (1817-1887) — also known as J. Winthrop Jones — of Ellsworth, Hancock County, Maine; Greenpoint, Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y. Born in Ellsworth, Hancock County, Maine, February 14, 1817. Democrat. School teacher; merchant; shipbuilder; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Maine, 1860; lumber business. Died, from pneumonia, in Greenfield, Franklin County, Mass., September 19, 1887 (age 70 years, 217 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Theodore Jones (1760-1842) and Catherine Winthrop (Sargent) Jones (1775-1848); married to Ann Maria Peters (1819-1887; sister of John Andrew Peters (1822-1904); aunt of John Andrew Peters (1864-1953)); first cousin twice removed of Winthrop Sargent (1753-1820).
  Political family: Peters-Sargent family of Ellsworth, Maine.
  Winthrop Park (created 1889; renamed 1941 as Msgr. McGolrick Park), in Brooklyn, New York, was named for him.
  Eugene A. Leahy (1929-2000) — also known as Gene Leahy — of Omaha, Douglas County, Neb. Born in Imogene, Fremont County, Iowa, May 8, 1929. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army during the Korean conflict; lawyer; municipal judge in Nebraska, 1964-68; mayor of Omaha, Neb., 1969-73. Catholic. Member, Veterans of Foreign Wars. Died, from complications of lung cancer, at the Veterans Administration Medical Center, Omaha, Douglas County, Neb., January 18, 2000 (age 70 years, 255 days). Interment at Forest Lawn Memorial Park, Omaha, Neb.
  Gene Leahy Mall, a downtown park (created 1977 as "Central Park Mall", renamed 1992, closed and demolished 2019), in Omaha, Nebraska, was named for him.
  James T. Lennon — of Yonkers, Westchester County, N.Y. Democrat. Mayor of Yonkers, N.Y., 1910-17; defeated, 1917; delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1912. Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Married to Winifred Butler (c.1858-1911).
  Lennon Park, in Yonkers, New York, is named for him.
John A. Logan John Alexander Logan (1826-1886) — also known as John A. Logan; "Black Jack"; "Black Eagle of Illinois" — of Benton, Franklin County, Ill.; Chicago, Cook County, Ill. Born in Murphysboro, Jackson County, Ill., February 9, 1826. Member of Illinois state house of representatives, 1852; Presidential Elector for Illinois, 1856; U.S. Representative from Illinois, 1859-62, 1867-71 (9th District 1859-62, at-large 1867-71); general in the Union Army during the Civil War; delegate to Republican National Convention from Illinois, 1868, 1880; U.S. Senator from Illinois, 1871-77, 1879-86; died in office 1886; candidate for Republican nomination for President, 1884; Republican candidate for Vice President of the United States, 1884. Member, Freemasons. Conceived the idea of Memorial Day and inaugurated the observance in May 1868. Died in Washington, D.C., December 26, 1886 (age 60 years, 320 days). Entombed at U.S. Soldiers' & Airmen's Home National Cemetery, Washington, D.C.
  Relatives: Son of John Logan (born c.1800).
  Logan counties in Colo., Kan., Neb., N.Dak. and Okla. are named for him.
  Fort Logan (established 1887, closed 1946), and Fort Logan National Cemetery (established 1950 on part of the same site) in Denver, Colorado, were named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS John A. Logan (built 1942-43 at Richmond, California; renamed USS Alnitah; scrapped 1961) was originally named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about John A. Logan: James Pickett Jones, John A. Logan : Stalwart Republican from Illinois
  Image source: Life and Work of James G. Blaine (1893)
  Jack Griffith London (1876-1916) — also known as Jack London; John Griffith Chaney — of Oakland, Alameda County, Calif.; Glen Ellen, Sonoma County, Calif. Born in San Francisco, Calif., January 12, 1876. Socialist. Novelist; candidate for mayor of Oakland, Calif., 1901 (Social Democratic), 1905 (Socialist). Died in Glen Ellen, Sonoma County, Calif., November 22, 1916 (age 40 years, 315 days). Interment at Jack London State Historic Park Cemetery, Glen Ellen, Calif.
  Relatives: Son of William Henry Chaney (1821-1903) and Flora (Wellman) London (1843-1922); married 1900 to Elizabeth May Maddern (1876-1947); married 1905 to Charmian 'Clara' Kittredge (1871-1955).
  Mount London, on the border between British Columbia, Canada, and Haines Borough, Alaska, is named for him.  — Jack London Square (entertainment and business development), and the surrounding Jack London District neighborhood, in Oakland, California, are named for him.  — Jack London Lake (Ozero Dzheja Londona), and the surrounding Jack London Nature Park, in Magadan Oblast, Russia, are named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS Jack London (built 1943 at Sausalito, California; scrapped 1968) was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Francis Marion (1732-1795) — also known as "Swamp Fox" — of South Carolina. Born in 1732. Served in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; member of South Carolina state senate, 1782-90. Died February 27, 1795 (age about 62 years). Interment at Belle Isle Plantation, Berkeley County, S.C.
  Marion counties in Ala., Ark., Fla., Ga., Ill., Ind., Iowa, Kan., Ky., Miss., Mo., Ohio, Ore., S.C., Tenn., Tex. and W.Va. are named for him.
  The Francis Marion National Forest (established 1936), in Charleston, Berkeley counties, South Carolina, is named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: Francis M. BristowFrancis M. D. HopkinsFrancis Marion ZiebachFrancis Marion DrakeFrancis Marion MartinF. M. CrosbyFrancis M. CockrellFrancis M. HamiltonFrancis Marion GregoryFrancis M. GriffithFrancis M. NicholsFrancis Marion MorrisFrancis M. TaittFrancis Marion BryanF. M. NormanFrancis M. FieldsFrancis Marion WhaleyFrancis M. Bistline
Patrick H. McCarren Patrick Henry McCarren (1849-1909) — also known as Patrick H. McCarren; "Friend of the Sugar Trust" — of Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y. Born in East Cambridge, Cambridge, Middlesex County, Mass., June 18, 1849. Democrat. Cooper; lawyer; member of New York state assembly from Kings County 6th District, 1882-83, 1889; member of New York state senate, 1890-93, 1896-1909 (4th District 1890-93, 7th District 1896-1909); died in office 1909; delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1892, 1904. Catholic. Irish ancestry. Political boss who dominated Brooklyn politics for twenty years. Died, from intestinal degeneration, complicated by appendicitis and myocarditis, in St. Catherine's Hospital, Williamsburg, Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y., October 23, 1909 (age 60 years, 127 days). Interment at Calvary Cemetery, Woodside, Queens, N.Y.
  Presumably named for: Patrick Henry
  Relatives: Married to Catherine M. 'Katie' Hogan (1854-1883).
  McCarren Park (opened 1906 as Greenpoint Park; renamed in 1909), in Brooklyn, New York, is named for him.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: New York Red Book 1907
  Samuel Roy McKelvie (1881-1956) — also known as Sam R. McKelvie — of Lincoln, Lancaster County, Neb. Born in Fairfield, Clay County, Neb., April 15, 1881. Republican. Publisher, The Nebraska Farmer magazine; member of Nebraska state house of representatives, 1911-13; Lieutenant Governor of Nebraska, 1913-15; Governor of Nebraska, 1919-23; delegate to Republican National Convention from Nebraska, 1928 (speaker), 1932, 1936, 1944. Methodist. Member, Freemasons; Odd Fellows; Elks. Died in Arizona, October 6, 1956 (age 75 years, 174 days). Interment at Wyuka Cemetery, Lincoln, Neb.
  Relatives: Son of Samuel McKelvie and Jennie (Glandon) McKelvie; married, June 19, 1904, to Flossie DeArnold.
  The Samuel R. McKelvie National Forest (established 1902; given current name 1971), in Cherry County, Nebraska, is named for him.
  See also National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Stewart Brett McKinney (1931-1987) — also known as Stewart B. McKinney — of Fairfield, Fairfield County, Conn.; Westport, Fairfield County, Conn. Born in Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, Pa., January 30, 1931. Republican. Member of Connecticut state house of representatives, 1967-71; U.S. Representative from Connecticut 4th District, 1971-87; died in office 1987; delegate to Republican National Convention from Connecticut, 1972. Bisexual. Member, Rotary; American Legion. Died, from acquired immune deficiency syndrome, Washington, D.C., May 7, 1987 (age 56 years, 97 days). Interment at Oak Lawn Cemetery, Fairfield, Conn.
  Relatives: Son of James Polk McKinney (1889-1941) and Clare Louise (Brett) McKinney (1893-1957); married, October 2, 1954, to Lucy Cunningham (1934-2014); father of John P. McKinney (born1964).
  The Stewart B. McKinney Transportation Center (built 1987), in Stamford, Connecticut, is named for him.  — The Stewart B. McKinney National Wildlife Refuge (etablished 1972 as the Salt Meadow Wildlife Refuge; renamed 1987), in Fairfield, New Haven, and Middlesex counties, Connecticut, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Eugene Hoffman Nickerson (1918-2002) — also known as Eugene H. Nickerson — of Roslyn Harbor, Nassau County, Long Island, N.Y. Born in Orange, Essex County, N.J., August 2, 1918. Democrat. Lawyer; law clerk for U.S. Circuit Judge Augustus N. Hand, 1943-44, and for U.S. Supreme Court Justice Harlan F. Stone, 1944-46; Nassau County Executive, 1962-70; delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1964, 1972; U.S. District Judge for the Eastern District of New York, 1977-94; took senior status 1994; senior judge, 1994-2002. His right arm was paralyzed by polio in his youth. Died, from complications of ulcer surgery, in St. Luke's Hospital, Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., January 1, 2002 (age 83 years, 152 days). Interment at St. Philip's Cemetery, Garrison, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Hoffman Nickerson (1888-1965) and Ruth Constance (Comstock) Nickerson (1892-1988); married to Marie-Louise Steiner (1920-2003).
  Nickerson Beach Park, in Lido Beach, New York, is named for him.
  See also federal judicial profile — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Pat Nixon (1912-1993) — also known as Thelma Catherine Ryan; "Starlight" — of California. Born in Ely, White Pine County, Nev., March 16, 1912. Republican. School teacher; Second Lady of the United States, 1953-61; First Lady of the United States, 1969-74; speaker, Republican National Convention, 1972. Female. Protestant. Irish and German ancestry. Died, from lung cancer, in Park Ridge, Bergen County, N.J., June 22, 1993 (age 81 years, 98 days). Interment at Richard Nixon Library and Birthplace, Yorba Linda, Calif.
  Relatives: Daughter of William M. Ryan, Sr. and Katherine (Halberstadt) Ryan; married, June 21, 1940, to Richard Milhous Nixon (1913-1994).
  Political families: Eisenhower-Nixon family; Carroll family of Maryland (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  The Patricia Nixon Elementary School (opened 1973; now Nixon Academy), in Cerritos, California, is named for her.  — Pat Nixon Park (established 1969), in Cerritos, California, is named for her.
  Epitaph: "Even when people can't speak your language, they can tell if you have love in your heart."
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Ransom Eli Olds (1864-1950) — also known as Ransom E. Olds — of Lansing, Ingham County, Mich. Born in Geneva, Ashtabula County, Ohio, June 3, 1864. Republican. Founder in 1897 of Olds Motor Vehicle Company, maker of the first commercially successful American-made automobile; founder in 1905 of the REO Motor Car Company (later, the Olds company became the Oldsmobile division of General Motors, and Reo became part of truck manufacturer Diamond Reo); owner of several hotels; banker; delegate to Republican National Convention from Michigan, 1908. Baptist. Member, Freemasons; Knights Templar; Shriners. Died in Lansing, Ingham County, Mich., August 26, 1950 (age 86 years, 84 days). Entombed at Mt. Hope Cemetery, Lansing, Mich.
  Relatives: Son of Pliny Fisk Olds (1828-1908) and Sarah (Whipple) Olds (1834-1910); married, June 5, 1889, to Metta Ursula Woodward (1864-1950); second cousin thrice removed of Martin Olds (1798-1872).
  Political families: Greene-Lippitt family of Providence, Rhode Island; Baldwin-Greene-Upson-Hoar family of Connecticut; Kellogg-Adams-Seymour-Chapin family of Connecticut and New York (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Olds Hall (built 1917 for the College of Engineering, now used as offices), Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan, is named for him.  — The city of Oldsmar, Florida, is named for him.  — R. E. Olds Park, on the waterfront in Oldsmar, FLorida, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis (1929-1994) — also known as Jackie Onassis; Jaqueline Lee Bouvier; Jacqueline Kennedy — Born in Southampton, Suffolk County, Long Island, N.Y., July 28, 1929. First Lady of the United States, 1961-63. Female. Catholic. Died, from non-Hodgkin lymphoma, in Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., May 19, 1994 (age 64 years, 295 days). Interment at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Va.
  Relatives: Step-daughter of Hugh Dudley Auchincloss; daughter of John Vernou Bouvier (1891-1957) and Janet Norton (Lee) Bouvier (1907-1989); step-sister of Eugene Luther Gore Vidal Jr. and Hugh Dudley Auchincloss III; married, September 12, 1953, to John Fitzgerald Kennedy (son of Joseph Patrick Kennedy, Sr. (1888-1969); brother of Jean Kennedy Smith; grandson of John Francis Fitzgerald); married 1968 to Aristotle Socrates Onassis (1906-1975); mother of John Fitzgerald Kennedy Jr..
  Political family: Kennedy family.
  The Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis High School for International Careers, in Manhattan, New York, is named for her.  — Jacqueline Bouvier Kennedy Onassis Hall, at George Washington University, Washington, D.C., is named for her.  — Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis Reservoir, in Central Park, Manhattan, New York, is named for her.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
Carroll W. Parcher Carroll Wilmot Parcher (1903-1992) — also known as Carroll W. Parcher; "Mr. Glendale" — of Tujunga, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, Calif.; Glendale, Los Angeles County, Calif. Born in Glendale, Los Angeles County, Calif., September 13, 1903. Republican. Newspaper editor-publisher, columnist; candidate in primary for California state assembly, 1936; delegate to Republican National Convention from California, 1952, 1956 (alternate); mayor of Glendale, Calif., 1977-78, 1979-81, 1984-85. Member, Native Sons of the Golden West; Sigma Delta Chi; Kiwanis. Died, of cancer, in Glendale Adventist Medical Center, Glendale, Los Angeles County, Calif., March 31, 1992 (age 88 years, 200 days). Interment at Grand View Memorial Park, Glendale, Calif.
  Relatives: Son of Wilmot Parcher (born c.1866) and Nannie (McBryde) Parcher; married, November 8, 1924, to Frances Morgan.
  Parcher Plaza, in the Glendale Civic Center, Glendale, California, is named for him.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: Glendale Public Library
  Frank Pate Jr. — of Port St. Joe, Gulf County, Fla. Born in Paul, Conecuh County, Ala. Mayor of Port St. Joe, Fla., 1966-97, 1999-2007. Baptist. Member, Rotary. Still living as of 2009.
  Relatives: Married 1947 to Evelyn J. Griner (1932-2009).
  Frank Pate Park, in Port SAINT Joe, Florida, is named for him.
  Lynn F. Pett (1940-2017) — of Murray, Salt Lake County, Utah. Born in Payson, Utah County, Utah, December 20, 1940. Mayor of Murray, Utah, 1990-98. Died in Taylorsville, Salt Lake County, Utah, September 17, 2017 (age 76 years, 271 days). Burial location unknown.
  The Lynn F. Pett Parkway Golf Course, Murray, Utah, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article
  Gifford Pinchot (1865-1946) — of Milford, Pike County, Pa. Born in Simsbury, Hartford County, Conn., August 11, 1865. Chief Forester of the U.S.; close confidant of President Theodore Roosevelt; candidate for U.S. Senator from Pennsylvania, 1914 (Roosevelt Progressive), 1926 (Republican primary); Governor of Pennsylvania, 1923-27, 1931-35; defeated in Republican primary, 1938. French ancestry. Member, American Academy of Arts and Sciences; American Forestry Association; American Academy of Political and Social Science. Died, from leukemia, at the Harkness Pavilion, Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center, Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., October 4, 1946 (age 81 years, 54 days). Interment at Milford Cemetery, Milford, Pa.
  Relatives: Son of James W. Pinchot and Mary (Eno) Pinchot; married 1914 to Cornelia Elizabeth Bryce (daughter of Lloyd Stephens Bryce (1851-1917)).
  Political family: Cooper-Ashley family of New York City, New York.
  The Gifford Pinchot National Forest (established 1908 as the Columbia National Forest; renamed 1949), in Skamania, Lewis, Yakima, Cowlitz, and Klickitat counties, Washington, is named for him.
  See also National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article
  Books about Gifford Pinchot: Char Miller, Gifford Pinchot and the Making of Modern Environmentalism
  David Rittenhouse (1732-1796) — of Pennsylvania. Born in Germantown (now part of Philadelphia), Philadelphia County, Pa., April 8, 1732. Astronomer; mathematician; financier; clockmaker; surveyor; Pennsylvania state treasurer, 1777-89; first director of the U.S. Mint. Member, American Philosophical Society. Died in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., June 26, 1796 (age 64 years, 79 days). Original interment in unknown location; reinterment at Laurel Hill Cemetery, Philadelphia, Pa.
  Relatives: Son of Matthias Rittenhouse (1702-1792) and Elizabeth (Williams) Rittenhouse (1705-1792); married to Eleanor Coulston and Hannah Jacobs (1735-1799); father of Elizabeth Rittenhouse (1767-1836; who married Jonathan Dickinson Sergeant (1746-1793)); second great-granduncle of Barton Myers; third great-granduncle of Robert Baldwin Myers.
  Political families: Kellogg-Adams-Seymour-Chapin family of Connecticut and New York; Rockefeller family of New York City, New York; Wise-Sergeant-Rockefeller family; Sergeant-Whitehill-Kunkel-Spencer family of Pennsylvania; Myers family of Norfolk, Virginia (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Rittenhouse Square (originally Southwest Square; renamed 1825) in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, is named for him.  — Rittenhouse, a crater on the Moon, about 26 km (16 miles) in diameter, is named for him.
  See also NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  John Long Routt (1826-1907) — also known as John L. Routt — of Central City, Gilpin County, Colo.; Denver, Colo. Born April 25, 1826. Republican. Governor of Colorado Territory, 1875-76; delegate to Republican National Convention from Colorado, 1876, 1880; Governor of Colorado, 1876-79, 1891-93; mayor of Denver, Colo., 1883-85. Died in Denver, Colo., August 13, 1907 (age 81 years, 110 days). Interment at Riverside Cemetery, Denver, Colo.
  Routt County, Colo. is named for him.
  Routt National Forest (established 1905, now part of Medicine Bow-Routt National Forest), in Routt, Jackson, Rio Blanco, Grand, Moffat, and Garfield counties, Colorado, is named for him.
  See also National Governors Association biography
  Books about John Routt: Joyce B. Lohse, First Governor, First Lady: John and Eliza Routt of Colorado
  Edgar Backus Schermerhorn (1851-1923) — also known as Edgar B. Schermerhorn — of Galena, Cherokee County, Kan. Born in Channahon, Will County, Ill., November 19, 1851. Organizer, Citizens Bank of Galena; member of Kansas state house of representatives, 1903-05; Chairman, Kansas Board of Control, 1905-11. Episcopalian. Dutch ancestry. Member, Freemasons; Scottish Rite Masons; Knights Templar; Shriners; Elks; Knights of Pythias; Ancient Order of United Workmen. Died, of heart failure, in Galena, Cherokee County, Kan., February 1, 1923 (age 71 years, 74 days). Entombed at Mt. Hope Cemetery, Webb City, Mo.
  Relatives: Son of Isaac B. Schermerhorn and Jane B. Schermerhorn; married, November 21, 1878, to Abbie Brown Simpson (1851-1915); married, November 19, 1919, to Ella Marie Brace Sumner (1877-1923).
  Schermerhorn Park, in Galena, Kansas, is named for him.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
Carl Schurz Carl Christian Schurz (1829-1906) — also known as Carl Schurz — of Watertown, Jefferson County, Wis.; Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, Wis.; St. Louis, Mo.; New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in Liblar (now part of Erfstadt), Germany, March 2, 1829. Republican. Lawyer; candidate for Lieutenant Governor of Wisconsin, 1857; delegate to Republican National Convention from Wisconsin, 1860; U.S. Minister to Spain, 1861; general in the Union Army during the Civil War; newspaper editor; delegate to Republican National Convention from Missouri, 1868 (Temporary Chair; speaker); U.S. Senator from Missouri, 1869-75; U.S. Secretary of the Interior, 1877-81. German ancestry. Member, American Philosophical Society. Died in New York City (unknown county), N.Y., May 14, 1906 (age 77 years, 73 days). Interment at Sleepy Hollow Cemetery, Sleepy Hollow, N.Y.; statue at Morningside Park, Manhattan, N.Y.
  The community of Schurz, Nevada, is named for him.  — Mount Schurz, in Park County, Wyoming, is named for him.  — Carl Schurz Park, in Manhattan, New York, is named for him.  — Carl Schurz High School, in Chicago, Illinois, is named for him.  — Schurz Elementary School, in Watertown, Wisconsin, is named for him.  — Carl Schurz Elementary School, in New Braunfels, Texas, is named for him.
  Politician named for him: Carl S. Thompson
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary
  Books about Carl Schurz: Hans Louis Trefousse, Carl Schurz: A Biography
  Image source: William C. Roberts, Leading Orators (1884)
  Samuel Seabury (1873-1958) — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y.; East Hampton, Suffolk County, Long Island, N.Y. Born in New York, New York County, N.Y., February 22, 1873. Lawyer; Justice of New York Supreme Court 1st District, 1907-14; defeated, 1905; judge of New York Court of Appeals, 1914-16; defeated (Progressive), 1913; Democratic candidate for Governor of New York, 1916; alternate delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1920. Episcopalian. Member, American Bar Association. Died in East Hampton, Suffolk County, Long Island, N.Y., May 7, 1958 (age 85 years, 74 days). Interment at Trinity Cemetery, Manhattan, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Rev. William Jones Seabury and Alice Van Wyck (Beare) Seabury; married, June 6, 1900, to Josephine Maud Richey.
  Samuel Seabury Playground (opened 1962, renamed 1989), Lexington Avenue at 96th Street, Manhattan, New York, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
William H. Seward William Henry Seward (1801-1872) — also known as William H. Seward — of Auburn, Cayuga County, N.Y. Born in Florida, Orange County, N.Y., May 16, 1801. Lawyer; co-founded (with Thurlow Weed), the Albany Evening Journal newspaper in 1830; member of New York state senate 7th District, 1831-34; Governor of New York, 1839-43; defeated (Whig), 1834; U.S. Senator from New York, 1849-61; candidate for Republican nomination for President, 1856, 1860; U.S. Secretary of State, 1861-69; as Secretary of State in 1867, he made a treaty with Russia for the purchase of Alaska; critics dubbed the territory "Seward's Folly". Survived an assassination attempt on April 14, 1865 (the same night Abraham Lincoln was shot), when Lewis Payne, an associate of John Wilkes Booth, broke into his bedroom and stabbed him repeatedly. Payne was arrested, tried with the other conspirators, and hanged. Died in Auburn, Cayuga County, N.Y., October 16, 1872 (age 71 years, 153 days). Interment at Fort Hill Cemetery, Auburn, N.Y.; statue at Madison Square Park, Manhattan, N.Y.; statue at Volunteer Park, Seattle, Wash.
  Relatives: Son of Samuel Swayze Seward and Mary (Jennings) Seward (1769-1845); married to Frances Adeline Miller (1805-1865); father of Frederick William Seward and William Henry Seward Jr.; uncle of Caroline Cornelia Canfield (1834-1922; who married John Lawrence Schoolcraft) and George Frederick Seward (1840-1910); granduncle of Frederick Whittlesey Seward Jr..
  Political family: Seward family of New York (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Cross-reference: George W. Jones — Samuel J. Barrows — Frederick W. Seward — Elias P. Pellet
  Seward counties in Kan. and Neb. are named for him.
  Seward Mountain, in the Adirondack Mountains, Franklin County, New York, is named for him.  — The city of Seward, Nebraska, is named for him.  — The town of Seward, New York, is named for him.  — The city of Seward, Alaska, is named for him.  — Seward Park (300 acres on a forested peninsula, established 1911), in Seattle, Washington, is named for him.  — Seward Park (three acres on East Broadway, opened 1903), in Manhattan, New York, is named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: W. Seward WhittleseyW. H. Seward ThomsonWilliam S. Shanahan
  Coins and currency: His portrait appeared on the $50 U.S. Treasury note in the 1890s.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about William H. Seward: Doris Kearns Goodwin, Team of Rivals : The Political Genius of Abraham Lincoln — Walter Stahr, Seward: Lincoln's Indispensable Man — Walter Stahr, Seward: Lincoln's Indispensable Man — Michael Burgan, William Henry Seward : Senator and Statesman (for young readers)
  Image source: New York Public Library
  Edwin Alonzo Sherman (1844-1916) — also known as E. A. Sherman — of Sioux Falls, Minnehaha County, S.Dak. Born in Wayland, Middlesex County, Mass., June 19, 1844. Republican. Treasurer of Dakota Territory, 1871-74; Dakota territorial auditor, 1879-81; member of South Dakota state house of representatives 10th District, 1911-12. Died June 13, 1916 (age 71 years, 360 days). Interment at Mt. Pleasant Cemetery, Sioux Falls, S.Dak.
  Relatives: Son of Calvin Sherman and Lucy (Parmenter) Sherman.
  Sherman Park, in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article
  James Richard Slack (1818-1881) — also known as J. R. Slack — of Huntington, Huntington County, Ind. Born in Bucks County, Pa., September 28, 1818. Democrat. Lawyer; candidate for U.S. Representative from Indiana, 1854, 1880; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Indiana, 1856, 1868, 1880 (Convention Vice-President); member of Indiana state senate, 1850; general in the Union Army during the Civil War; circuit judge in Indiana, 1872-78. Died, of a heart attack, in Chicago, Cook County, Ill., July 28, 1881 (age 62 years, 303 days). Interment at Mt. Hope Cemetery, Huntington, Ind.
  General Slack Park in Huntington, Indiana, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article
  Thomas A. Soetaert (1936-2016) — also known as Tony Soetaert — of Shawnee, Johnson County, Kan. Born in Shawnee, Johnson County, Kan., October 1, 1936. Insurance agent; mayor of Shawnee, Kan., 1977-89. Catholic. Died December 16, 2016 (age 80 years, 76 days). Interment at St. Joseph Catholic Cemetery, Shawnee, Kan.
  Relatives: Married to Joyce Huff (1938-2018).
  The Soetaert Aquatic Center, in Shawnee, Kansas, is named for him.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  John Diedrich Spreckels (1853-1926) — also known as John D. Spreckels — of San Francisco, Calif.; Coronado, San Diego County, Calif. Born in Charleston, Charleston District (now Charleston County), S.C., August 16, 1853. Republican. Founder and president, Oceanic Steamship Company; president, Western Sugar Company; owned the Hotel de Coronado, the San Diego Electric Railway, newspapers in San Francisco and San Diego; built the San Diego and Arizona Railway, from San Diego to Calexico; delegate to Republican National Convention from California, 1896, 1924; member of Republican National Committee from California, 1896. German ancestry. Died in Coronado, San Diego County, Calif., June 7, 1926 (age 72 years, 295 days). Entombed at Cypress Lawn Memorial Park, Colma, Calif.
  Relatives: Son of Claus Spreckels and Anna Christina (Mangels) Spreckels (1830-1910); brother of Adolph Bernard Spreckels (1857-1924); married 1877 to Lillie C. Siebein (1855-1924).
  Political family: Spreckels family of San Francisco, California.
  The Spreckels Theatre, in San Diego, California, is named for him.  — Spreckels Elementary School, in San Diego, California, is named for him.  — Spreckels Park, in Coronado, California, is named for him.  — The Spreckels Organ Pavilion, an outdoor performance venue, in Balboa Park, San Diego, California, is named for him and his brother.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  William Cameron Sproul (1870-1928) — also known as William C. Sproul — of Chester, Delaware County, Pa. Born in Octoraro, Lancaster County, Pa., September 16, 1870. Republican. Farmer; manufacturer; journalist; member of Pennsylvania state senate 9th District, 1897-1919; resigned 1919; delegate to Republican National Convention from Pennsylvania, 1916, 1920, 1924; Governor of Pennsylvania, 1919-23; candidate for Republican nomination for President, 1920. Quaker. Member, American Philosophical Society; Phi Beta Kappa; Sigma Xi; Phi Kappa Psi; Grange; Freemasons; Elks; Union League; Patriotic Order Sons of America. Died March 21, 1928 (age 57 years, 187 days). Interment at Chester Rural Cemetery, Chester, Pa.
  Relatives: Son of William Hall Sproul and Deborah Dickinson (Slokom) Sproul; married, January 21, 1892, to Emeline Wallace Roach.
  Sproul Hall, a residence hall at Pennsylvania State University, University Park, State College, Pennsylvania, is named for him.  — The Sproul State Forest, in Clinton County, Pennsylvania, is named for him.
  See also National Governors Association biography
  Robert Theodore Stafford (1913-2006) — also known as Robert T. Stafford — of Rutland, Rutland County, Vt. Born in Rutland, Rutland County, Vt., August 8, 1913. Republican. Lawyer; served in the U.S. Navy during World War II; Rutland County State's Attorney, 1947-51; served in the U.S. Navy during the Korean conflict; Vermont state attorney general, 1955-57; Lieutenant Governor of Vermont, 1957-59; Governor of Vermont, 1959-61; delegate to Republican National Convention from Vermont, 1960; U.S. Representative from Vermont at-large, 1961-71; resigned 1971; U.S. Senator from Vermont, 1971-89; appointed 1971. Congregationalist. Member, American Legion; Veterans of Foreign Wars; Lions; Eagles; Elks; Freemasons. Died in Rutland, Rutland County, Vt., December 23, 2006 (age 93 years, 137 days). Interment at Evergreen Cemetery, Rutland, Vt.
  Relatives: Son of Bert Linus Stafford (1877-1941) and Mabel R. (Stratton) Stafford (1883-1976); married, October 15, 1938, to Helen Content Kelley (1917-2011).
  The Robert T. Stafford Student Loan Program (established 1965 as the Federal Guaranteed Student Loan Program; renamed 1988) is named for him.  — The Robert T. Stafford White Rocks National Recreation Area (established 1984 as White Rocks National Recreation Area; renamed 2006), in Bennington, Rutland, and Windsor counties, Vermont, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  William Brown Stansbury (1923-1985) — also known as William B. Stansbury — of Louisville, Jefferson County, Ky. Born in Corydon, Harrison County, Ind., March 18, 1923. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army Air Force in World War II; lawyer; chair of Jefferson County Democratic Party, 1968-76; mayor of Louisville, Ky., 1977-81; in 1978, during a firemen's strike, he left the city, saying that he was going to a conference in Atlanta; instead, he went to New Orleans for a tryst with his administrative assistant; the scandal led to an effort to impeach him; soon after, a city official pleaded guilty to extorting $16,000 from local businessmen; when questioned by a federal grand jury as to whether this money came to his campaign or to him personally, Stansbury refused to answer, claiming the Fifth Amendment right against self-incrimination. Member, Delta Upsilon; American Bar Association. While crossing Bardstown Road to enter St. Francis of Assisi Church, he was hit by a car, and died soon after, in Humana Hospital-University, Louisville, Jefferson County, Ky., April 4, 1985 (age 62 years, 17 days); His mother was killed in the same accident, and his wife was injured. Interment at Calvary Cemetery, Louisville, Ky.
  Relatives: Son of James Bernard Stansbury and Alliene (Brown) Stansbury; married 1983 to Mary Ellen Farmer.
  William B. Stansbury Park (established 1900, received current name 1985), in Louisville, Kentucky, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article
  Isaac Ingalls Stevens (1818-1862) — also known as Isaac I. Stevens — of Washington. Born in North Andover, Essex County, Mass., March 25, 1818. Major in the U.S. Army during the Mexican War; Governor of Washington Territory, 1853-57; Delegate to U.S. Congress from Washington Territory, 1857-61; general in the Union Army during the Civil War. Shot and killed at the Civil War battle of Chantilly, Fairfax County, Va., September 1, 1862 (age 44 years, 160 days). Interment at Island Cemetery, Newport, R.I.; memorial monument at Ox Hill Battlefield Park, Fairfax County, Va.
  Relatives: Cousin *** of Charles Abbot Stevens (1816-1892) and Moses Tyler Stevens.
  Political family: Stevens-Woodhull family of New York City, New York.
  Stevens counties in Minn. and Wash. are named for him.
  Fort Stevens (established 1863; decomissioned 1947; now a state park) in Warrenton, Oregon, was named for him.  — Fort Stevens (active during the Civil War, 1861-65; site now a park) in Washington, D.C., was named for him.  — The city (and lake) of Lake Stevens, Washington, is named for him.  — The town of Stevensville, Montana, is named for him.  — Stevens Peak (6,838 feet), in Shoshone County, Idaho, is named for him.  — Stevens Peak (5,372 feet), in Bingham County, Idaho, is named for him.  — Upper Stevens Lake, and Lower Stevens Lake, in Shoshone County, Idaho, are named for him.  — The Stevens Hall dormitory, at Washington State University, Pullman, Washington, is named for him.  — Isaac I. Stevens Elementary School (opened 1906, expanded 1928, renovated and reopened 2001), in Seattle, Washington, is named for him.  — Stevens Middle School, in Port Angeles, Washington, is named for him.  — Stevens Junior High School (now Middle School), in Pasco, Washington, is named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS Isaac I. Stevens (built 1943 at Portland, Oregon; scrapped 1967) was named for him.
  Epitaph: "Who gave to the service of his country a quick and comprehensive mind, a warm and generous heart, a firm will, and a strong arm, and who fell while rallying his command, with the flag of the Republic in his dying grasp, at the battle of Chantilly, Va."
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about Isaac Ingalls Stevens: Joseph Taylor Hazard, Companion of Adventure: A Biography of Isaac Ingalls Stevens, First Governor of Washington
  Robert William Straub (1920-2002) — also known as Robert W. Straub; Bob Straub — of Eugene, Lane County, Ore. Born in San Francisco, Calif., May 6, 1920. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army during World War II; member of Oregon state senate, 1959-63; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Oregon, 1964; Oregon state treasurer, 1965-73; Governor of Oregon, 1975-79; defeated, 1966, 1978. Died, from complications of Alzheimer's disease, in a long-term care facility at Springfield, Lane County, Ore., November 27, 2002 (age 82 years, 205 days). Cremated.
  Bob Straub State Park, in Pacific City, Oregon, is named for him.
  See also National Governors Association biography — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Isidor Straus (1845-1912) — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in Otterberg, Bavaria (now Germany), February 6, 1845. Democrat. U.S. Representative from New York 15th District, 1894-95. Jewish. One of the owners of the R. H. Macy & Co. department store in New York. Perished in the wreck of the steamship Titanic, in the North Atlantic Ocean, April 15, 1912 (age 67 years, 69 days); his body was subsequently recovered. Originally entombed at Beth El Cemetery, Glendale, Queens, N.Y.; later interred at Woodlawn Cemetery, Bronx, N.Y.; memorial monument at Straus Park, Manhattan, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Lazarus Straus (1809-1898) and Sara (Straus) Straus (1823-1876); brother of Oscar Solomon Straus; married, July 12, 1871, to Ida Blum (1849-1912); father of Jesse Isidor Straus (1872-1936); uncle of Nathan Straus Jr.; grandfather of Stuart Scheftel; granduncle of Ronald Peter Straus.
  Political family: Straus family of New York City, New York (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Straus Hall (built 1926), a dormitory at Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts, is named for him and his wife.  — Straus Park (established 1895 as Schuyler Square; renamed 1907 as Bloomingdale Square; renamed 1915 as Straus Park), at Broadway and West End Avenue in Morningside Heights, Manhattan, New York, is named for him and his wife.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about Isidor Straus: June Hall McCash, A Titanic Love Story: Ida and Isidor Straus
Thomas Sumter Thomas Sumter (1734-1832) — of Statesburg, Sumter County, S.C. Born in Hanover County, Va., August 14, 1734. Democrat. General in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; member of South Carolina state senate from District Eastward of Wateree River, 1781-82; U.S. Representative from South Carolina, 1789-93, 1797-1801 (at-large 1789-93, 1797-99, 4th District 1799-1801); U.S. Senator from South Carolina, 1801-10; U.S. Minister to Portugal, 1809-19. Slaveowner. Died near Statesburg, Sumter County, S.C., June 1, 1832 (age 97 years, 292 days). Interment in private or family graveyard.
  Relatives: Grandfather of Thomas De Lage Sumter (1809-1874).
  Fort Sumter (built during 1829-61), in Charleston, South Carolina, is named for him.  — The Sumter National Forest (established 1936), in Oconee, Union, Newberry, McCormick, Edgefield, Abbeville, Laurens, Chester, Fairfield, Greenwood, Saluda counties, South Carolina, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier
  Image source: The South in the Building of the Nation (1909)
  Leslie M. Sutherland — of Yonkers, Westchester County, N.Y. Republican. Vice-president, Third Avenue Railway, New York; mayor of Yonkers, N.Y., 1898-1901; delegate to Republican National Convention from New York, 1900, 1920. Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Married to Matilda Karg (c.1876-1950).
  Leslie Sutherland Park, in Yonkers, New York, is named for him.
Daniel D. Tompkins Daniel D. Tompkins (1774-1825) — of New York, New York County, N.Y.; Staten Island, Richmond County, N.Y. Born in Scarsdale, Westchester County, N.Y., June 21, 1774. Democrat. Lawyer; delegate to New York state constitutional convention, 1801; member of New York state assembly from New York County, 1802-03; U.S. Representative from New York 3rd District, 1805; Governor of New York, 1807-17; Vice President of the United States, 1817-25; delegate to New York state constitutional convention, 1821. Presbyterian or Christian Reformed. Member, Freemasons. Died in Staten Island, Richmond County, N.Y., June 11, 1825 (age 50 years, 355 days). Entombed at St. Mark's-in-the-Bowery Churchyard, Manhattan, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Jonathan Griffin Tompkins and Sarah Ann (Hyatt) Tompkins (1740-1810); brother of Caleb Tompkins (1759-1846); married, February 20, 1798, to Hannah Tompkins; father of Arietta Minthorne Tompkins (1800-1837; who married Gilbert Livingston Thompson) and Mangle Minthorne Tompkins; grandfather of Hannah Minthorne Tompkins (1828-1899; who married Theodore Chardavoyne Vermilye); great-grandfather of Guy Vernor Henry.
  Political family: Livingston-Schuyler family of New York (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Tompkins County, N.Y. is named for him.
  Tompkins Square Park, in Manhattan, New York, is named for him.
  Politician named for him: Daniel D. T. Farnsworth
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: New York Red Book 1896
  William Bradley Umstead (1895-1954) — also known as William B. Umstead — of Durham, Durham County, N.C. Born in Mangum Township, Durham County, N.C., May 13, 1895. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army during World War I; lawyer; U.S. Representative from North Carolina 6th District, 1933-39; North Carolina Democratic state chair, 1945; U.S. Senator from North Carolina, 1946-48; delegate to Democratic National Convention from North Carolina, 1948; Governor of North Carolina, 1953-54; died in office 1954. Methodist. Died, from arteriosclerotic heart disease and congestive heart failure, while also suffering from bronchopneumonia, in Watts Hospital, Durham, Durham County, N.C., November 7, 1954 (age 59 years, 178 days). Interment at Mt. Tabor Church Cemetery, Mangum Township, Durham County, N.C.
  Relatives: Son of John Wesley Umstead (1844-1926) and Lulie Elizabeth (Lunsford) Umstead (1857-1943); married, September 5, 1929, to Merle Davis (1901-1988); second cousin five times removed of Charles Willing Byrd; third cousin of Angier Biddle Duke; third cousin once removed of Benjamin Hubbard Cozart; fourth cousin once removed of Julia Grimmet Fortson.
  Political family: Umstead-Grimmet-Byrd family of Durham, North Carolina (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  William B. Umstead State Park, in Wake County, North Carolina, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — National Governors Association biography
  Robert Ferdinand Wagner III (1944-1993) — also known as Robert F. Wagner III; Bobby Wagner — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born January 6, 1944. Democrat. Candidate in primary for borough president of Manhattan, New York, 1977. Catholic. Died in his room at the Embassy Suites Hotel, San Antonio, Bexar County, Tex., November 15, 1993 (age 49 years, 313 days). Interment at Calvary Cemetery, Woodside, Queens, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Susan (Edwards) Wagner (1909-1964) and Robert Ferdinand Wagner Jr. (1910-1991); grandson of Robert Ferdinand Wagner.
  Political family: Wagner family of Woodside and New York City, New York.
  Robert F. Wagner Jr. Park (opened 1996), in Battery Park City, Manhattan, New York, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Lurleen Burns Wallace (1926-1968) — also known as Lurleen B. Wallace; Lurleen Brigham Burns — of Montgomery, Montgomery County, Ala. Born in Tuscaloosa, Tuscaloosa County, Ala., September 19, 1926. Democrat. Governor of Alabama, 1967-68; died in office 1968. Female. Methodist. Died, of uterine cancer, in Montgomery, Montgomery County, Ala., May 7, 1968 (age 41 years, 231 days). Interment at Greenwood Cemetery, Montgomery, Ala.
  Relatives: Daughter of Henry Burns and Estelle (Burroughs) Burns; married, May 21, 1943, to George Corley Wallace Jr. (1919-1998).
  Political family: Wallace-Folsom family of Montgomery, Alabama.
  The Lurleen Wallace Tumor Institute, at the University of Alabama Birmingham, is named for her.  — Lurleen B. Wallace Community College (established 1967 as Lurleen B. Wallace Junior College), with campuses in Covington, Butler, and Crenshaw counties, Alabama, is named for her.  — Lake Lurleen, and Lake Lurleen State Park, in Tuscaloosa County, Alabama, are named for her.
  See also National Governors Association biography — NNDB dossier
  Albert Harold Wheeler (1915-1994) — also known as Albert H. Wheeler — of Ann Arbor, Washtenaw County, Mich. Born December 11, 1915. Democrat. University professor; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Michigan, 1968; mayor of Ann Arbor, Mich., 1975-78; defeated, 1978. Catholic. African ancestry. Died April 4, 1994 (age 78 years, 114 days). Cremated; ashes scattered.
  Relatives: Father of Alma Wheeler Smith (born1941).
  Political family: Smith-Wheeler-Warren family of Ann Arbor, Michigan.
  Wheeler Park, in Ann Arbor, Michigan, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article
Woodrow Wilson Woodrow Wilson (1856-1924) — also known as Thomas Woodrow Wilson; "Schoolmaster in Politics" — of New Jersey. Born in Staunton, Va., December 28, 1856. Democrat. University professor; president of Princeton University, 1902-10; Governor of New Jersey, 1911-13; President of the United States, 1913-21. Presbyterian. Member, Phi Kappa Psi; Phi Alpha Delta. Recipient of Nobel Peace Prize in 1919; elected to the Hall of Fame for Great Americans in 1950. Died in Washington, D.C., February 3, 1924 (age 67 years, 37 days). Entombed at Washington National Cathedral, Washington, D.C.
  Relatives: Son of Rev. Joseph Ruggles Wilson (1822-1903) and Janet 'Jessie' (Woodrow) Wilson (1826-1888); married, June 24, 1885, to Ellen Wilson; married, December 18, 1915, to Edith Wilson; father of Eleanor Randolph Wilson (1889-1967; who married William Gibbs McAdoo (1863-1941)); grandfather of Woodrow Wilson Sayre.
  Political family: Harrison-Randolph-Marshall-Cabell family of Virginia (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Cross-reference: William C. Bullitt — Bainbridge Colby — Joseph E. Davies — Joseph P. Tumulty — Thomas H. Birch — Byron R. Newton
  Mount Woodrow Wilson, in Fremont County and Sublette County, Wyoming, is named for him.  — Woodrow Wilson Plaza, in the Federal Triangle, Washington, D.C., is is named for him.  — Wilson Dam (built 1924), on the Tennessee River in Colbert and Lauderdale counties, Alabama, as well as the Wilson Lake reservoir, which extends into Lawrence county, are named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: Woodrow W. BeanWoodrow W. JonesWoodrow W. ScottTom Woodrow PayneW. W. DumasWoodrow Wilson MannWoodrow W. BairdWoodrow W. MathnaWoodrow W. HulmeWoodrow W. KlineWoodrow W. McDonaldWoodrow W. HollanWoodrow W. CarterWoodrow W. FergusonW. Wilson GoodeWoodrow Wilson StoreyWoodrow W. Bean III
  Coins and currency: His portrait appeared on the U.S. $100,000 gold certificate, which was issued in 1934-45 for cash transactions between banks.
  Campaign slogan (1916): "He kept us out of war."
  See also National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Books about Woodrow Wilson: Louis Auchincloss, Woodrow Wilson — Herbert Hoover, The Ordeal of Woodrow Wilson — James Chace, 1912 : Wilson, Roosevelt, Taft and Debs : The Election that Changed the Country — John Milton Cooper, Reconsidering Woodrow Wilson: Progressivism, Internationalism, War, and Peace — A. Scott Berg, Wilson — Anne Schraff, Woodrow Wilson (for young readers)
  Critical books about Woodrow Wilson: Jim Powell, Wilson's War : How Woodrow Wilson's Great Blunder Led to Hitler, Lenin, Stalin, and World War II
  Image source: American Monthly Review of Reviews, July 1902
  Alexander Penn Wooldridge (1847-1930) — also known as A. P. Wooldridge — of Austin, Travis County, Tex. Born in New Orleans, Orleans Parish, La., April 13, 1847. Lawyer; bank president; mayor of Austin, Tex., 1909-19. Died in Austin, Travis County, Tex., September 8, 1930 (age 83 years, 148 days). Interment at Oakwood Cemetery, Austin, Tex.
  Wooldridge Park, in downtown Austin, Texas, is named for him.  — Wooldridge Elementary School, in Austin, Texas, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article
  Carl Frederick Zeidler (1908-1942) — also known as Carl Zeidler; "Singing Mayor"; "Boy Mayor" — of Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, Wis. Born in Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, Wis., January 4, 1908. Mayor of Milwaukee, Wis., 1940-42; resigned 1942; served in the U.S. Navy during World War II. Killed when the munitions ship La Salle was struck by torpedos, exploded, and sank, about 350 miles southeast of the Cape of Good Hope, in the Indian Ocean, November 7, 1942 (age 34 years, 307 days); his remains were never found. Cenotaph at Forest Home Cemetery, Milwaukee, Wis.
  Relatives: Brother of Frank P. Zeidler (1912-2006).
  Carl F. Zeidler Park (now Zeidler Union Square), in downtown Milwaukee, Wisconsin, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
"Enjoy the hospitable entertainment of a political graveyard."
Henry L. Clinton, Apollo Hall, New York City, February 3, 1872
The Political Graveyard

The Political Graveyard is a web site about U.S. political history and cemeteries. Founded in 1996, it is the Internet's most comprehensive free source for American political biography, listing 315,917 politicians, living and dead.
 
  The coverage of this site includes (1) the President, Vice President, members of Congress, elected state and territorial officeholders in all fifty states, the District of Columbia, and U.S. territories; and the chief elected official, typically the mayor, of qualifying municipalities; (2) candidates at election, including primaries, for any of the above; (3) all federal judges and all state appellate judges; (4) certain federal officials, including the federal cabinet, diplomatic chiefs of mission, consuls, U.S. district attorneys, collectors of customs and internal revenue, members of major federal commissions; and political appointee (pre-1971) postmasters of qualifying communities; (5) state and national political party officials, including delegates, alternate delegates, and other participants in national party nominating conventions. Note: municipalities or communities "qualify", for TPG purposes, if they have at least half a million person-years of history, inclusive of predecessor, successor, and merged entities.  
  The listings are incomplete; development of the database is a continually ongoing project.  
  Information on this page — and on all other pages of this site — is believed to be accurate, but is not guaranteed. Users are advised to check with other sources before relying on any information here.  
  The official URL for this page is: https://politicalgraveyard.com/special/namesake-parks.html.  
  Links to this or any other Political Graveyard page are welcome, but specific page addresses may sometimes change as the site develops.  
  If you are searching for a specific named individual, try the alphabetical index of politicians.  
  More information: FAQ; privacy policy; cemetery links.  
  If you find any error or omission in The Political Graveyard, or if you have information to share, please see the biographical checklist and submission guidelines.  
Copyright notices: (1) Facts are not subject to copyright; see Feist v. Rural Telephone. (2) Politician portraits displayed on this site are 70-pixel-wide monochrome thumbnail images, which I believe to constitute fair use under applicable copyright law. Where possible, each image is linked to its online source. However, requests from owners of copyrighted images to delete them from this site are honored. (3) Original material, programming, selection and arrangement are © 1996-2019 Lawrence Kestenbaum. (4) This work is also licensed for free non-commercial re-use, with attribution, under a Creative Commons License.
Site information: The Political Graveyard is created and maintained by Lawrence Kestenbaum, who is solely responsible for its structure and content. — The mailing address is The Political Graveyard, P.O. Box 2563, Ann Arbor MI 48106. — This site is hosted by HDL. — The Political Graveyard opened on July 1, 1996; the last full revision was done on May 10, 2022.

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