PoliticalGraveyard.com
The Political Graveyard: A Database of American History
Travis County
Texas

Cemeteries and Memorial Sites of Politicians in Travis County

Index to Locations

  • Austin Unknown location
  • Austin Austin Memorial Park
  • Austin Oakwood Cemetery
  • Austin Texas State Cemetery
  • University of Texas, Austin South Mall


    Unknown Location
    Austin, Travis County, Texas
    Politicians buried here:
      Thomas Watt Gregory (1861-1933) — also known as Thomas W. Gregory — of Austin, Travis County, Tex. Born in Crawfordsville (unknown county), Miss., November 6, 1861. Democrat. Lawyer; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Texas, 1904, 1912 (Honorary Vice-President); U.S. Attorney General, 1914-19. Presbyterian. Member, Alpha Tau Omega. Died, of pneumonia, in his room at the Hotel Pennsylvania, Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., February 26, 1933 (age 71 years, 112 days). Interment somewhere.
      Relatives: Son of Francis Robert Gregory (killed in Civil War) and Mary Cornelia (Watt) Gregory; married, February 22, 1893, to Julia Nalle.
      Gregory Gymnasium (built 1930), a sports arena at the University of Texas, Austin, Texas, is named for him.
      See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier


    Austin Memorial Park
    2800 Hancock Drive
    Austin, Travis County, Texas
    Founded 1927
    See also Findagrave page for this location.
    Politicians buried here:
      James Rumsey Beverley (1894-1967) — also known as James R. Beverley — of San Juan, San Juan Municipio, Puerto Rico. Born in Dalhart, Dallam County, Tex., June 15, 1894. Served in the U.S. Army during World War I; lawyer; Governor of Puerto Rico, 1929, 1932-33. Presbyterian. Member, American Bar Association; Phi Beta Kappa; Phi Delta Phi; Freemasons. Died, from myocardial failure, in Seton Hospital, Austin, Travis County, Tex., June 17, 1967 (age 73 years, 2 days). Interment at Austin Memorial Park.
      Relatives: Son of William Beverley (1854-1941) and Clara Eleanor (Hendricks) Beverley (1871-1926); married, June 20, 1925, to Mary Smith Jarmón (1898-1986); second great-grandson of Thomas Lloyd Posey (1750-1818).
      See also Find-A-Grave memorial
      Robert Christian Eckhardt (1913-2001) — also known as Bob Eckhardt — of Houston, Harris County, Tex. Born in Austin, Travis County, Tex., July 16, 1913. Democrat. Lawyer; served in the U.S. Army Air Force in World War II; member of Texas state house of representatives, 1959-66; U.S. Representative from Texas 8th District, 1967-81; defeated, 1980. Author of the War Powers Act and the Toxic Substances Act. Died, of a hemorrhagic stroke, in Seton Hospital, Austin, Travis County, Tex., November 13, 2001 (age 88 years, 120 days). Interment at Austin Memorial Park.
      Relatives: Nephew of Harry McLeary Wurzbach; grandnephew of Rudolph Kleberg (1847-1924); cousin *** of Richard Mifflin Kleberg, Sr..
      Political family: Kleberg-Wurzbach family of Texas.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
      James Albert Michener (1907-1997) — also known as James A. Michener — Born in Doylestown, Bucks County, Pa., February 3, 1907. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Navy during World War II; author; received the Pulitzer Prize in Literature, 1948; candidate for U.S. Representative from Pennsylvania 8th District, 1962; received the Medal of Freedom, 1977. Died in Austin, Travis County, Tex., October 16, 1997 (age 90 years, 255 days). Interment at Austin Memorial Park; cenotaph at Texas State Cemetery.
      Relatives: Married 1935 to Patti Koon (divorced 1948); married 1948 to Vange Nord (divorced 1955); married 1955 to Mari Yoriko Sabusawa (1920-1994).
      Epitaph: "Traveler, Citizen, Writer."
      See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial


    Oakwood Cemetery
    Austin, Travis County, Texas
    Politicians buried here:
      Albert Sidney Burleson (1863-1937) — also known as Albert S. Burleson — of Austin, Travis County, Tex. Born in San Marcos, Hays County, Tex., June 7, 1863. Democrat. Lawyer; U.S. Representative from Texas, 1899-1913 (9th District 1899-1903, 10th District 1903-13); alternate delegate to Democratic National Convention from Texas, 1912 (speaker); U.S. Postmaster General, 1913-21. Died, from a heart attack, in Austin, Travis County, Tex., November 24, 1937 (age 74 years, 170 days). Interment at Oakwood Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Edward Burleson, Jr. (1826-1877) and Emma Lucy (Kyle) Burleson (1832-1877); married 1889 to Adele Lubbock Steiner (1863-1948; author, playwright, poet); grandson of Edward Burleson.
      Political family: Burleson family of Austin, Texas.
      The World War II Liberty ship SS Albert S. Burleson (built 1943, scrapped 1971) was named for him.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
      Anne Legendre Armstrong (1927-2008) — also known as Anne Armstrong; Anne Legendre; Mrs. Tobin Armstrong — of Armstrong, Kenedy County, Tex. Born in New Orleans, Orleans Parish, La., December 27, 1927. Republican. Member of Texas Republican State Central Committee, 1961-66; delegate to Republican National Convention from Texas, 1964, 1968, 1972 (speaker); vice-chair of Texas Republican Party, 1966-; member of Republican National Committee from Texas, 1968-73; U.S. Ambassador to Great Britain, 1976-77; Presidential Elector for Texas, 1992. Female. Episcopalian. Member, Council on Foreign Relations; Phi Beta Kappa. Received the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1987. Died, of cancer, in a hospice at Houston, Harris County, Tex., July 30, 2008 (age 80 years, 216 days). Interment at Oakwood Cemetery.
      Relatives: Daughter of Armant Legendre and Olive (Martindale) Legendre; married, April 12, 1950, to Tobin Armstrong (1923-2005).
      See also Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — Find-A-Grave memorial
      Richard Bache, Jr. (1784-1848) — of Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa.; Galveston, Galveston County, Tex. Born in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., March 11, 1784. Served in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812; postmaster at Philadelphia, Pa., 1815-28; served in the Texas Navy during the Texas War of Independence; member of Texas state senate 11th District, 1846-48. Member, Freemasons. Died in Austin, Travis County, Tex., March 14, 1848 (age 64 years, 3 days). Interment at Oakwood Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Richard Bache and Sarah (Franklin) Bache (1743-1808); brother of Deborah Franklin Bache (1781-1863; who married William John Duane); married, April 4, 1805, to Sophia Burrell Dallas (1784-1860; daughter of Alexander James Dallas; sister of George Mifflin Dallas); father of Alexander Dallas Bache (1806-1867; physicist), Mary Blechenden Bache (1808-1873; who married Robert John Walker) and Sophia Arabella Bache (1815-1904; who married William Wallace Irwin (1803-1856)); grandson of Benjamin Franklin; grandfather of Robert Walker Irwin; third great-grandfather of Daniel Baugh Brewster; third great-granduncle of Elise du Pont; third cousin twice removed of Charles James Folger, Benjamin Dexter Sprague and Wharton Barker.
      Political families: Thomas-Smith-Irwin family of Pennsylvania; Bache-Dallas family of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      See also Wikipedia article
      Robert Thomas Miller (1893-1962) — also known as Tom Miller — of Austin, Travis County, Tex. Born in Austin, Travis County, Tex., September 21, 1893. Democrat. Mayor of Austin, Tex., 1933-49, 1955-61; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Texas, 1940, 1944, 1956. Died April 30, 1962 (age 68 years, 221 days). Interment at Oakwood Cemetery.
      Elisha Marshall Pease (1812-1883) — also known as Elisha M. Pease — of Galveston, Galveston County, Tex. Born in Enfield, Hartford County, Conn., January 3, 1812. Served in the Texas Army during the Texas War of Independence; member of Texas state house of representatives, 1846-48; member of Texas state senate, 1849-50; Governor of Texas, 1853-57, 1867-69; defeated, 1866; U.S. Collector of Customs, 1879. Died in Lampasas, Lampasas County, Tex., August 26, 1883 (age 71 years, 235 days). Interment at Oakwood Cemetery.
      Oscar Branch Colquitt (1861-1940) — also known as Oscar B. Colquitt — of Pittsburg, Camp County, Tex.; Terrell, Kaufman County, Tex. Born in Camilla, Mitchell County, Ga., December 16, 1861. Democrat. Lawyer; newspaper publisher; oil business; member of Texas state senate 9th District, 1895-98; Governor of Texas, 1911-15; defeated, 1906; candidate in primary for U.S. Senator from Texas, 1916; member, U.S. Board of Railway Labor Mediation. Methodist. Died March 8, 1940 (age 78 years, 83 days). Interment at Oakwood Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Thomas Jefferson Colquitt and Ann Elizabeth (Burkhalter) Colquitt; married, December 9, 1885, to Alice Murrell.
      Morgan Calvin Hamilton (1809-1893) — also known as Morgan C. Hamilton — of Austin, Travis County, Tex. Born near Huntsville, Madison County, Ala., February 25, 1809. Republican. Texas Republic Secretary of War and Marine, 1842-43, 1844-45; delegate to Texas state constitutional convention, 1868-69; U.S. Senator from Texas, 1870-77. Died in San Diego, San Diego County, Calif., November 21, 1893 (age 84 years, 269 days). Interment at Oakwood Cemetery.
      Relatives: Brother of Andrew Jackson Hamilton (1815-1875).
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Oran Milo Roberts (1815-1898) — of Alabama; Texas. Born in Laurens County, S.C., July 9, 1815. Member of Alabama state legislature, 1839; district judge in Texas, 1846-51; justice of Texas state supreme court, 1857-65, 1874-78; delegate to Texas secession convention, 1861; colonel in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; delegate to Texas state constitutional convention, 1866; Governor of Texas, 1879-83. Died in Austin, Travis County, Tex., May 19, 1898 (age 82 years, 314 days). Interment at Oakwood Cemetery.
      Alexander Penn Wooldridge (1847-1930) — also known as A. P. Wooldridge — of Austin, Travis County, Tex. Born in New Orleans, Orleans Parish, La., April 13, 1847. Lawyer; bank president; mayor of Austin, Tex., 1909-19. Died in Austin, Travis County, Tex., September 8, 1930 (age 83 years, 148 days). Interment at Oakwood Cemetery.
      Wooldridge Park, in downtown Austin, Texas, is named for him.  — Wooldridge Elementary School, in Austin, Texas, is named for him.
      See also Wikipedia article
      Jacob Carl Maria DeGress (1842-1894) — also known as Jacob Carl DeGress — of Austin, Travis County, Tex. Born in Cologne (Köln), Germany, April 23, 1842. Republican. Colonel in the Union Army during the Civil War; Texas superintendent of public instruction, 1871-74; mayor of Austin, Tex., 1877-80; postmaster at Austin, Tex., 1881-85, 1889-93. Catholic. Died, of complications of his Civil War wounds, in Austin, Travis County, Tex., March 21, 1894 (age 51 years, 332 days). Interment at Oakwood Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Carl Franz Wilhelm von Gress and Johanna Walburga (di Bramino) von Gress; married, January 1, 1867, to Elizabeth Buckner 'Bettie' Young (1844-1880); married, August 2, 1882, to Willie Mae Johnston (1860-1944).
      See also Find-A-Grave memorial
      James Stephen Hogg (1851-1906) — also known as Jim Hogg — of Wood County, Tex. Born in a log cabin, near Rusk, Cherokee County, Tex., March 24, 1851. Democrat. Wood County Attorney, 1878-80; District Attorney, 7th District, 1880-84; Texas state attorney general, 1886-90; Governor of Texas, 1891-95. Died March 3, 1906 (age 54 years, 344 days). Interment at Oakwood Cemetery.
      Relatives: Father of Ima Hogg (philanthropist and social figure).
      Jim Hogg County, Tex. is named for him.
      Andrew Jackson Hamilton (1815-1875) — of Texas. Born in Huntsville, Madison County, Ala., January 28, 1815. Republican. Texas state attorney general, 1850; member of Texas state house of representatives, 1851; U.S. Representative from Texas 2nd District, 1859-61; Governor of Texas, 1865-66; justice of Texas state supreme court, 1866; delegate to Republican National Convention from Texas, 1868; member of Republican National Committee from Texas, 1868-70. Died in Austin, Travis County, Tex., April 11, 1875 (age 60 years, 73 days). Interment at Oakwood Cemetery.
      Presumably named for: Andrew Jackson
      Relatives: Brother of Morgan Calvin Hamilton (1809-1893).
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      William Penn DeNormandie (1824-1881) — also known as William P. DeNormandie — of Austin, Travis County, Tex. Born in Yardley, Bucks County, Pa., September 28, 1824. Republican. Mayor of Austin, Tex., 1853; postmaster at Austin, Tex., 1865-69. Died in Austin, Travis County, Tex., November 28, 1881 (age 57 years, 61 days). Interment at Oakwood Cemetery.
      Presumably named for: William Penn
      Relatives: Married to Catherina S. TenEyck.
      See also Find-A-Grave memorial
      John Hancock (1824-1893) — of Austin, Travis County, Tex. Born near Bellefonte, Jackson County, Ala., October 24, 1824. Democrat. State court judge in Texas, 1851; member of Texas state house of representatives, 1860; delegate to Texas state constitutional convention, 1866; U.S. Representative from Texas, 1871-77, 1883-85 (4th District 1871-75, 5th District 1875-77, 10th District 1883-85); delegate to Democratic National Convention from Texas, 1880. Died July 19, 1893 (age 68 years, 268 days). Interment at Oakwood Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
    Rudolph Kleberg Rudolph Kleberg (1847-1924) — of Cuero, DeWitt County, Tex. Born in Cat Spring, Austin County, Tex., June 26, 1847. Democrat. Served in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; lawyer; member of Texas state senate, 1883-84; U.S. Attorney for the Western District of Texas, 1885-89; U.S. Representative from Texas 11th District, 1896-1903. Died December 28, 1924 (age 77 years, 185 days). Interment at Oakwood Cemetery.
      Relatives: Uncle of Richard Mifflin Kleberg, Sr. (1887-1955); granduncle of Robert Christian Eckhardt.
      Political family: Kleberg-Wurzbach family of Texas.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Image source: Autobiographies and Portraits of the President, Cabinet, etc. (1899)
      George Whitfield Terrell (1803-1846) — also known as George W. Terrell — of Tennessee; Texas. Born in Nelson County, Ky., 1803. Lawyer; member of Tennessee state house of representatives, 1829-36; Attorney General of the Texas Republic, 1841-44. Died May 13, 1846 (age about 42 years). Interment at Oakwood Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Col. James Terrell; married to Barbara Ann Culp (1807-1873; who later married Joseph Carroll Harrison (1822-1855)).
      Political family: Harrison-Rountree family of Austin, Texas.
      Atkins Jefferson McLemore (1857-1929) — also known as A. Jeff McLemore — of Houston, Harris County, Tex. Born in Tennessee, 1857. Democrat. Member of Texas state legislature, 1890; U.S. Representative from Texas, 1915-19 (at-large 1915-17, 2nd District 1917-19). Died in 1929 (age about 72 years). Interment at Oakwood Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      William Alexander — Texas state attorney general, 1865-66, 1867, 1870-74. Interment at Oakwood Cemetery.
      John Gordon Chalmers (1803-1847) — also known as John G. Chalmers — of La Grange, Fayette County, Tex. Born in Halifax County, Va., August 25, 1803. Newspaper editor; member of Virginia state legislature, 1830; Texas Republic Secretary of the Treasury, 1841. During a fight with Joshua Holden, he was Stabbed and mortally wounded; he died soon after, January 1, 1847 (age 43 years, 129 days). Interment at Oakwood Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of James Ronald Chalmers and Sarah Lanier (Williams) Chalmers; brother of Joseph Williams Chalmers (1807-1853); married 1827 to Mary Wade Henderson; uncle of H. H. Chalmers and James Ronald Chalmers (1831-1898).
      Political family: Chalmers family of Mississippi.
      Nimrod Lindsay Norton (1830-1903) — of Missouri. Born in Nicholas County, Ky., April 18, 1830. Colonel in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; Representative from Missouri in the Confederate Congress, 1864-65. Died in Austin, Travis County, Tex., September 28, 1903 (age 73 years, 163 days). Interment at Oakwood Cemetery.
      Ezekiel B. Turner — Texas state attorney general, 1867-70. Interment at Oakwood Cemetery.
      Nathan George Shelley — Texas state attorney general, 1862-64. Interment at Oakwood Cemetery.
      Annie Webb Blanton (1870-1945) — of Austin, Travis County, Tex. Born in Houston, Harris County, Tex., August 19, 1870. Democrat. College professor; Texas superintendent of public instruction, 1919-23. Female. Methodist. Member, American Association of University Women; Daughters of the American Revolution; United Daughters of the Confederacy; Phi Beta Kappa; Kappa Delta Pi; Pi Lambda Theta; Pi Gamma Mu; Delta Kappa Gamma; Order of the Eastern Star; Maccabees. First woman to be elected to statewide office in Texas. Died October 2, 1945 (age 75 years, 44 days). Interment at Oakwood Cemetery.
      Relatives: Daughter of Thomas Lindsay Blanton and Eugenia (Webb) Blanton; sister of Thomas Lindsay Blanton (1872-1957).
      William Martin Walton — Texas state attorney general, 1866-67. Interment at Oakwood Cemetery.
      Jane Y. McCallum (1878-1957) — of Austin, Travis County, Tex. Born December 30, 1878. Democrat. Secretary of state of Texas, 1927-33; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Texas, 1928 (alternate), 1944. Female. Found and rescued the original Texas Declaration of Independence. Died August 14, 1957 (age 78 years, 227 days). Interment at Oakwood Cemetery.
      James Gibson Swisher (1794-1864) — also known as James G. Swisher — of Texas. Born in Tennessee, 1794. Delegate to Texas Republic Republic constitutional convention from District of Washington, 1836; signer, Texas Declaration of Independence, 1836; served in the Texas Army during the Texas War of Independence. Died in 1864 (age about 70 years). Interment at Oakwood Cemetery.
      Henry Walton Raglin (1817-1882) — also known as H. W. Raglin — of Texas. Born in Mississippi, 1817. Texas Republic Land Office Commissioner, 1840. Died in Austin, Travis County, Tex., December 7, 1882 (age about 65 years). Interment at Oakwood Cemetery.
      Joseph Carroll Harrison (1822-1855) — also known as J. C. Harrison — of Cherokee County, Tex. Born in Alabama, October 3, 1822. Newspaper publisher; insurance agent; hotel operator; livery business; member of Texas Republic House of Representatives, 1855; died in office 1855. Methodist. Died in Austin, Travis County, Tex., November 9, 1855 (age 33 years, 37 days). Interment at Oakwood Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Joseph D. Harrison and Rachel (Lockhart) Harrison; brother of Greenbury Horras Harrison and Hannah D. Harrison (who married Samuel Johnson (1804-1882)); married to Barbara Ann Culp (1807-1873; widow of George Whitfield Terrell).
      Political family: Harrison-Rountree family of Austin, Texas.
      Joseph Baker (1804-1846) — of Texas. Born in Maine, 1804. Served in the Texas Army during the Texas War of Independence; member of Texas Republic House of Representatives, 1837-38. Died in Austin, Travis County, Tex., July 11, 1846 (age about 42 years). Interment at Oakwood Cemetery.
      See also Find-A-Grave memorial


    Texas State Cemetery
    901 Navasota Street
    Austin, Travis County, Texas
    Listed in National Register of Historic Places, 1986

    Politicians buried here:
      John Bowden Connally, Jr. (1917-1993) — also known as John B. Connally — of Fort Worth, Tarrant County, Tex. Born near Floresville, Wilson County, Tex., February 27, 1917. Lawyer; served in the U.S. Navy during World War II; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Texas, 1956, 1964; Governor of Texas, 1963-69; U.S. Secretary of the Treasury, 1971-72; candidate for Republican nomination for President, 1980. Methodist. Shot and wounded in Dallas, Tex., November 22, 1963, in the same volley of gunfire that killed President John F. Kennedy. Prosecuted for bribery conspiracy in connection with milk price supports; acquitted. Died of pulmonary fibrosis, in Methodist Hospital, Houston, Harris County, Tex., June 15, 1993 (age 76 years, 108 days). Interment at Texas State Cemetery; statue at Sam Houston Park, Houston, Tex.
      Relatives: Son of John Bowden Connally, Sr. and Lela (Wright) Connally.
      See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — Find-A-Grave memorial
      James Pinckney Henderson (1808-1858) — also known as J. Pinckney Henderson — of Marshville (unknown county), Tex. Born in Lincolnton, Lincoln County, N.C., March 31, 1808. Lawyer; general in the Texas Army during the Texas War of Independence; Attorney General of the Texas Republic, 1836-37; Texas Republic Secretary of State, 1837; delegate to Texas state constitutional convention, 1845; Governor of Texas, 1846-47; general in the U.S. Army during the Mexican War; U.S. Senator from Texas, 1857-58; died in office 1858. Died in Washington, D.C., June 4, 1858 (age 50 years, 65 days). Original interment and cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery, Washington, D.C.; reinterment in 1930 at Texas State Cemetery.
      Henderson County, Tex. is named for him.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Thomas William Ward (1807-1872) — also known as "Peg Leg" — of Austin, Travis County, Tex. Born in Ireland, 1807. Served in the Texas Army during the Texas War of Independence; mayor of Austin, Tex., 1840-41, 1853, 1865; Texas Republic Land Office Commissioner, 1840-46. Lost a leg in the storming of Bexar, 1835; lost his right arm while firing a cannon to celebrate Texas independence, 1841. Died of typhoid fever, in Austin, Travis County, Tex., November 25, 1872 (age about 65 years). Interment at Texas State Cemetery.
      Ward County, Tex. is named for him.
      Miriam Amanda Wallace Ferguson (1875-1961) — also known as Ma Ferguson; Miriam Amanda Wallace — of Texas. Born in Bell County, Tex., June 13, 1875. Democrat. Governor of Texas, 1925-27, 1933-35; defeated in primary, 1926. Female. Episcopalian. Died of heart failure. June 25, 1961 (age 86 years, 12 days). Interment at Texas State Cemetery.
      Relatives: Daughter of Joseph Lapsley Wallace and Eliza (Garrison) Wallace; married, December 31, 1899, to James Edward Ferguson (1871-1944).
      See also OurCampaigns candidate detail
      Daniel James Moody, Jr. (1893-1966) — also known as Dan Moody — of Taylor, Williamson County, Tex. Born in Taylor, Williamson County, Tex., June 1, 1893. Democrat. Lawyer; served in the U.S. Army during World War I; Williamson County Attorney, 1920-22; District Attorney, 1922-25; Texas state attorney general, 1925-27; Governor of Texas, 1927-31; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Texas, 1928, 1944 (member, Platform and Resolutions Committee), 1948, 1952; candidate in primary for U.S. Senator from Texas, 1942. Member, Odd Fellows; Knights of Pythias; Freemasons; Knights Templar; Shriners. Died in Austin, Travis County, Tex., May 22, 1966 (age 72 years, 355 days). Interment at Texas State Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Daniel Moody and Nanny E. (Robertson) Moody; married, April 20, 1926, to Mildred Paxton.
      See also OurCampaigns candidate detail
      Ralph Webster Yarborough (1903-1996) — also known as Ralph W. Yarborough — of Austin, Travis County, Tex. Born in Chandler, Henderson County, Tex., June 8, 1903. Democrat. Lawyer; district judge in Texas, 1936-41; candidate for nomination for Texas state attorney general, 1938; colonel in the U.S. Army during World War II; candidate in primary for Governor of Texas, 1952, 1954, 1956; U.S. Senator from Texas, 1957-71; defeated in primary, 1970, 1972; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Texas, 1964, 1980. Baptist. Member, American Bar Association; American Judicature Society; American Legion; Veterans of Foreign Wars; Phi Delta Phi; Order of the Coif; Moose; Freemasons; Shriners; Acacia. Died January 27, 1996 (age 92 years, 233 days). Interment at Texas State Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — NNDB dossier
      Books about Ralph W. Yarborough: Patrick L. Cox, Ralph W. Yarborough, The People's Senator
    James E. Ferguson James Edward Ferguson (1871-1944) — also known as James E. Ferguson; "Pa Ferguson" — of Temple, Bell County, Tex. Born near Salado, Bell County, Tex., August 31, 1871. Democrat. Governor of Texas, 1915-17; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Texas, 1916 (member, Platform and Resolutions Committee). Indicted on embezzlement and other charges in 1917; soon after, was impeached by the Texas House, and removed from office by the Texas Senate. Died in Austin, Travis County, Tex., September 21, 1944 (age 73 years, 21 days). Interment at Texas State Cemetery.
      Relatives: Married, December 31, 1899, to Miriam Amanda Wallace (1875-1961).
      Cross-reference: M. M. Crane
      See also Wikipedia article
      Image source: Library of Congress
      John Hemphill (1803-1862) — of Texas. Born in Chester County, S.C., December 18, 1803. Judge of Texas Republic, 1840; justice of Texas state supreme court, 1846-58; U.S. Senator from Texas, 1859-61; Delegate from Texas to the Confederate Provisional Congress, 1861-62; died in office 1862; candidate for Senator from Texas in the Confederate Congress, 1861. When the Civil War began, he left Washington but did not resign his seat in the Senate; one of ten Southern senators expelled in absentia on July 11, 1861. Died in Richmond, Va., January 7, 1862 (age 58 years, 20 days). Interment at Texas State Cemetery.
      Relatives: Uncle of John James Hemphill; great-granduncle of Robert Witherspoon Hemphill (1915-1983).
      Political family: Hemphill family of Chester, South Carolina.
      Hemphill County, Tex. is named for him.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Edmund Jackson Davis (1827-1883) — also known as Edmund J. Davis — of Texas. Born in St. Augustine, St. Johns County, Fla., October 2, 1827. Republican. District judge in Texas, 1856-61; general in the Union Army during the Civil War; delegate to Texas state constitutional convention, 1866; Governor of Texas, 1870-74; defeated, 1873, 1880; member of Republican National Committee from Texas, 1872-74; candidate for U.S. Representative from Texas 10th District, 1882. After his defeat as Governor, he refused to give up the office, and barricaded himself in the state capitol. Died in Austin, Travis County, Tex., February 7, 1883 (age 55 years, 128 days). Interment at Texas State Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son-in-law of Forbes N. Britton (1820?-1861).
      Cross-reference: J. Goldsteen Dupree
      Books about Edmund J. Davis: Carl H. Moneyhon, Edmund J. Davis of Texas: Civil War General, Republican Leader, Reconstruction Governor
      Thomas Gibbs Gee (c.1925-1994) — of Houston, Harris County, Tex. Born in Jacksonville, Duval County, Fla., about 1925. Judge of U.S. Court of Appeals for the 5th Circuit, 1973-91. Died, from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (Lou Gehrig's disease), at Methodist Hospital, Houston, Harris County, Tex., October 25, 1994 (age about 69 years). Interment at Texas State Cemetery.
      John Ireland (1827-1896) — also known as "Oxcart John" — of Texas. Born near Millerstown, Grayson County, Ky., January 21, 1827. Democrat. Mayor of Seguin, Tex., 1858; delegate to Texas secession convention, 1861; colonel in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; delegate to Texas state constitutional convention, 1866; district judge in Texas, 1866-67; member of Texas state house of representatives, 1870; member of Texas state senate, 1870; justice of Texas state supreme court, 1875-76; candidate for U.S. Representative from Texas, 1878; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Texas, 1880 (member, Resolutions Committee); Governor of Texas, 1883-87. Presbyterian. Member, Freemasons. Died March 5, 1896 (age 69 years, 44 days). Interment at Texas State Cemetery.
      Peter Hansborough Bell (1812-1898) — also known as Peter H. Bell — of Austin, Travis County, Tex. Born in Spotsylvania County, Va., May 12, 1812. Democrat. Served in the Texas Army during the Texas War of Independence; colonel in the U.S. Army during the Mexican War; Governor of Texas, 1849-53; U.S. Representative from Texas 2nd District, 1853-57; colonel in the Confederate Army during the Civil War. Died in Littleton, Halifax County, N.C., March 8, 1898 (age 85 years, 300 days). Original interment at City Cemetery, Littleton, N.C.; reinterment in 1930 at Texas State Cemetery; memorial monument at Courthouse Grounds, Belton, Tex.
      Bell County, Tex. is named for him.
      The city of Belton, Texas, is named for him.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Calvin Maples Cureton (b. 1874) — of Meridian, Bosque County, Tex. Born near Walnut Springs, Bosque County, Tex., September 1, 1874. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army during the Spanish-American War; lawyer; member of Texas state house of representatives, 1909-12; Texas state attorney general, 1919-21; chief justice of Texas state supreme court, 1921-36. Member, American Bar Association; Knights of Pythias. Interment at Texas State Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of William E. Cureton and Mary (Odle) Cureton; married, April 28, 1901, to Nora Morris.
      Hardin Richard Runnels (1820-1873) — of Boston, Bowie County, Tex. Born in Mississippi, August 30, 1820. Democrat. Member of Texas state house of representatives, 1847-54; Speaker of the Texas State House of Representatives, 1853-54; Lieutenant Governor of Texas, 1855-57; Governor of Texas, 1857-59; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Texas, 1860; delegate to Texas secession convention, 1861; delegate to Texas state constitutional convention, 1866. Member, Freemasons. Died December 25, 1873 (age 53 years, 117 days). Original interment at a private or family graveyard, Bowie County, Tex.; reinterment in 1929 at Texas State Cemetery.
      Relatives: Nephew of Hiram George Runnels; uncle of Cornelia Runnels (1829-1884; who married David Smith Terry (1823-1889)).
      Political family: Runnels-Terry family of Houston, Texas.
      Alexander Watkins Terrell (1827-1912) — also known as Alexander Terrell; Alex Terrell — of Texas. Born in Patrick County, Va., November 23, 1827. District judge in Texas, 1857-62; general in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; member of Texas state senate, 1875-82; member of Texas state house of representatives, 1891-93, 1903-07; U.S. Minister to Turkey, 1893-97. Died in Mineral Wells, Palo Pinto County, Tex., September 9, 1912 (age 84 years, 291 days). Interment at Texas State Cemetery.
      Terrell County, Tex. is named for him.
      See also U.S. State Dept career summary — Find-A-Grave memorial
      Andrew Jackson Houston (1854-1941) — of La Porte, Harris County, Tex. Born in Independence, Washington County, Tex., June 21, 1854. Lawyer; candidate for Governor of Texas, 1892 (Republican), 1910 (Prohibition), 1912 (Prohibition); U.S. Senator from Texas, 1941; died in office 1941. Died in a hospital at Baltimore, Md., June 26, 1941 (age 87 years, 5 days). Originally entombed at Abbey Mausoleum (which no longer exists), Arlington, Va.; reinterment at Texas State Cemetery.
      Presumably named for: Andrew Jackson
      Relatives: Son of Samuel Houston (1793-1863) and Margaret (Lea) Houston.
      Political family: Daniel-Houston family of Texas.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
      Alexander James Patterson (1883-1948) — of Texas. Born April 21, 1883. Chief justice of Texas state supreme court, 1941-48. Died January 1, 1948 (age 64 years, 255 days). Interment at Texas State Cemetery.
      Francis Richard Lubbock (1815-1905) — of Houston, Harris County, Tex. Born in Beaufort, Beaufort County, S.C., October 16, 1815. Democrat. Lieutenant Governor of Texas, 1857-59; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Texas, 1860; Governor of Texas, 1861-63; general in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; Texas state treasurer, 1879-91. Died in Austin, Travis County, Tex., June 22, 1905 (age 89 years, 249 days). Interment at Texas State Cemetery.
      Robert Allan Shivers (1907-1985) — also known as Allan Shivers — of Texas. Born in Lufkin, Angelina County, Tex., October 5, 1907. Democrat. Member of Texas state senate, 1935-47; major in the U.S. Army during World War II; Lieutenant Governor of Texas, 1947-49; Governor of Texas, 1949-57; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Texas, 1952; member, Commission on Intergovernmental Relations, 1953-55. Member, Delta Theta Phi. Died of a heart attack, in Austin, Travis County, Tex., January 14, 1985 (age 77 years, 101 days). Interment at Texas State Cemetery.
      See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
      Books about Allan Shivers: Ricky F. Dobbs & Herman J. Obermayer, Yellow Dogs And Republicans: Allan Shivers And Texas Two-party Politics
      Edwin Waller (1800-1881) — of Austin, Travis County, Tex. Born in Spotsylvania County, Va., November 4, 1800. Delegate to Texas Consultation of 1835 from District of Columbia, 1835; delegate to Texas Republic Republic constitutional convention from District of Brazoria, 1836; signer, Texas Declaration of Independence, 1836; Texas Republic Postmaster General, 1839; mayor of Austin, Tex., 1840; county judge in Texas, 1844; delegate to Texas secession convention, 1861. Member, Freemasons. Died in Austin, Travis County, Tex., January 3, 1881 (age 80 years, 60 days). Original interment in private or family graveyard; reinterment in 1928 at Texas State Cemetery.
      Waller County, Tex. is named for him.
      James Jarrell Pickle (1913-2005) — also known as J. J. 'Jake' Pickle — of Austin, Travis County, Tex. Born in Roscoe, Nolan County, Tex., October 11, 1913. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Navy during World War II; one of the founders of radio station KVET, in Austin, Texas; U.S. Representative from Texas 10th District, 1963-95. Methodist. Died June 18, 2005 (age 91 years, 250 days). Interment at Texas State Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — votes in Congress from the Washington Post — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
      Ann Richards (1933-2006) — also known as Dorothy Ann Willis — of Texas. Born in Lakeview (now part of Lacy Lakeview), McLennan County, Tex., September 1, 1933. Democrat. Travis County Commissioner, 1976-82; Texas state treasurer, 1983-91; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Texas, 1988 (speaker); Governor of Texas, 1991-95; defeated, 1994. Female. Member, Council on Foreign Relations. Died, of esophageal cancer, in Austin, Travis County, Tex., September 13, 2006 (age 73 years, 12 days). Interment at Texas State Cemetery.
      Relatives: Daughter of Cecil Willis and Iona (Warren) Willis; married 1953 to David Richards (divorced 1984); mother of Cecile Richards (1958?-).
      The Ann Richards School for Young Women Leaders, in Austin, Texas, is named for her.
      See also NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — Find-A-Grave memorial
      Books by Ann Richards: Straight from the Heart : My Life in Politics and Other Places (1990) — I'm Not Slowing Down : Winning My Battle With Osteoporosis, with Richard U. Levine
      Books about Ann Richards: Mike Shropshire and Frank Schaeffer, The Thorny Rose of Texas : An Intimate Portrait of Governor Ann Richards — Celia Morris, Storming the Statehouse : Running for Governor with Ann Richards and Dianne Feinstein — Sue Tolleson-Rinehart and Jeanie R. Stanley, Claytie and the Lady : Ann Richards, Gender, and Politics in Texas — Jan Reid, Let the People In: The Life and Times of Ann Richards
      Abner Smith Lipscomb (1789-1856) — Born in South Carolina, February 10, 1789. Member of Alabama territorial legislature, 1818; associate justice of Alabama state supreme court, 1820-35; Texas Republic Secretary of State, 1840; delegate to Texas state constitutional convention, 1845; justice of Texas state supreme court, 1846-56. Died December 8, 1856 (age 67 years, 302 days). Interment at Texas State Cemetery.
      Lipscomb County, Tex. is named for him.
      William Womack Heath (1903-1971) — also known as William W. Heath — of Texas. Born in Normangee, Lee County, Tex., December 7, 1903. Democrat. County judge in Texas, 1931-33; secretary of state of Texas, 1933-35; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Texas, 1964; U.S. Ambassador to Sweden, 1967-69. Died in Austin, Travis County, Tex., June 27, 1971 (age 67 years, 202 days). Interment at Texas State Cemetery.
      See also U.S. State Dept career summary
      Royal Tyler Wheeler (1810-1864) — of Texas. Born in Vermont, 1810. District judge in Texas, 1844; justice of Texas state supreme court, 1845-64; died in office 1864. Died by suicide, in Washington County, Tex., April 9, 1864 (age about 53 years). Interment at Texas State Cemetery.
      Wheeler County, Tex. is named for him.
      Jack English Hightower (1926-2013) — also known as Jack Hightower — of Texas. Born in Memphis, Hall County, Tex., September 6, 1926. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Navy during World War II; lawyer; member of Texas state house of representatives, 1953-54; member of Texas state senate, 1965-74; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Texas, 1968; U.S. Representative from Texas 13th District, 1975-85; defeated, 1961, 1984; justice of Texas state supreme court, 1988, 1992-95. Died in Austin, Travis County, Tex., August 3, 2013 (age 86 years, 331 days). Interment at Texas State Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Stephen Fuller Austin (1793-1836) — also known as Stephen F. Austin; "Father of Texas" — Born in Wythe County, Va., November 3, 1793. Member of Missouri territorial legislature, 1814-19; delegate to Texas Convention of 1832 from District of San Felipe de Austin, 1832; took petition to Mexico City for the establishment of Texas as a separate Mexican state, 1832; charged with attempting revolution, and imprisoned until 1835; delegate to Texas Convention of 1833 from District of Austin, 1833; delegate to Texas Consultation of 1835 from District of San Felipe de Austin, 1835; candidate for President of the Texas Republic, 1836; Texas Republic Secretary of State, 1836; died in office 1836. Member, Freemasons. Died of pneumonia, in Brazoria County, Tex., December 27, 1836 (age 43 years, 54 days). Original interment at Peach Point Cemetery, Gulf Prairie, Tex.; reinterment in 1910 at Texas State Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Moses Austin (1761-1821) and Maria (Brown) Austin (1768-1824).
      Austin County, Tex. is named for him.
      The city of Austin, Texas, is named for him.  — Stephen F. Austin State University, Nacogdoches, Texas, is named for him.  — Austin College, Sherman, Texas, is named for him.
      See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Handbook of Texas Online
      Books about Stephen F. Austin: Gregg Cantrell, Stephen F. Austin : Empresario of Texas
      Joe Madison Kilgore (1918-1999) — also known as Joe M. Kilgore — of McAllen, Hidalgo County, Tex.; Austin, Travis County, Tex. Born near Brownwood, Brown County, Tex., December 10, 1918. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army Air Force in World War II; member of Texas state house of representatives, 1947-54; U.S. Representative from Texas 15th District, 1955-65; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Texas, 1956. Died February 10, 1999 (age 80 years, 62 days). Interment at Texas State Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      David Spangler Kaufman (1813-1851) — also known as David S. Kaufman — of Nacogdoches, Nacogdoches County, Tex. Born in Boiling Springs, Cumberland County, Pa., December 18, 1813. Democrat. Member of Texas Republic House of Representatives, 1839-41; member of Texas Republic Senate, 1843-45; U.S. Representative from Texas 1st District, 1846-51; died in office 1851. Jewish. Member, Freemasons. Died in Washington, D.C., January 31, 1851 (age 37 years, 44 days). Original interment and cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery, Washington, D.C.; reinterment in 1932 at Texas State Cemetery.
      Kaufman County, Tex. is named for him.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
      Barbara Charline Jordan (1936-1996) — also known as Barbara Jordan — of Houston, Harris County, Tex. Born in Houston, Harris County, Tex., February 21, 1936. Democrat. Member of Texas state senate, 1967; U.S. Representative from Texas 18th District, 1973-79; speaker, Democratic National Convention, 1988. Female. African ancestry. Lesbian. Inducted, National Women's Hall of Fame, 1990; received the Spingarn Medal in 1992, and the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1994. Died of leukemia and multiple sclerosis, January 17, 1996 (age 59 years, 330 days). Interment at Texas State Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — NNDB dossier — National Women's Hall of Fame
      Books about Barbara Jordan: Mary Beth Rogers, Barbara Jordan : American Hero — Ann Fears Crawford, Barbara Jordan : Breaking the Barriers (for young readers)
      Vincent Waggoner Carr (1918-2004) — also known as Waggoner Carr — of Lubbock County, Tex. Born in Fairlie, Hunt County, Tex., October 1, 1918. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army Air Force in World War II; lawyer; Lubbock County Attorney, 1948-50; member of Texas state house of representatives, 1951-61; Speaker of the Texas State House of Representatives, 1957-61; Texas state attorney general, 1963-67; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Texas, 1964; candidate for U.S. Senator from Texas, 1966; candidate for Governor of Texas, 1968. Member, American Legion; Freemasons; Knights of Pythias; Lions. Breakfasted with Pres. John F. Kennedy, in Dallas, Texas, on the morning of his assassination, November 22, 1963. Died, of cancer, in Austin, Travis County, Tex., February 25, 2004 (age 85 years, 147 days). Interment at Texas State Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Vincent Carr and Ruth (Warlick) Carr; married, December 21, 1941, to Ernestine Story.
      See also Find-A-Grave memorial
      Robert McAlpin Williamson (1806-1859) — also known as "Three Legged Willie" — of Texas. Born in Georgia, 1806. Delegate to Texas Convention of 1833 from District of Washington, 1833; delegate to Texas Consultation of 1835 from District of Mina, 1835; served in the Texas Army during the Texas War of Independence; justice of Texas Republic supreme court, 1837-40; member of Texas Republic House of Representatives, 1840-43, 1844-45; member of Texas Republic Senate, 1843-44; member of Texas state senate, 1846-48; candidate for U.S. Representative from Texas, 1849; candidate for Lieutenant Governor of Texas, 1851. Due to a deformity developed during an illness when he was 15, causing his right leg to be drawn back at the knee, he wore a partial wooden leg attached at the knee. Died in Wharton, Wharton County, Tex., December 22, 1859 (age about 53 years). Interment at Texas State Cemetery.
      Williamson County, Tex. is named for him.
      Robert Potter (c.1800-1842) — of Oxford, Granville County, N.C. Born near Williamsboro, Vance County, N.C., about 1800. Member of North Carolina house of commons from Granville County, 1828, 1834; U.S. Representative from North Carolina 6th District, 1829-31; delegate to Texas Republic Republic constitutional convention from District of Nacogdoches, 1836; signer, Texas Declaration of Independence, 1836; Texas Republic Secretary of the Navy, 1836; member of Texas Republic Senate from District of Red River and Fannin, 1840-42; died in office 1842. Resigned from the U.S. Congress in 1831 after maiming two men in a jealous rage; convicted, and sentenced to six months in prison. Expelled in 1834 from the North Carolina House for cheating at cards. Shot and killed by members of an opposing faction who surrounded his home, in Harrison County (part now in Marion County), Tex., March 2, 1842 (age about 42 years). Original interment at a private or family graveyard, Marion County, Tex.; reinterment in 1928 at Texas State Cemetery.
      Potter County, Tex. is named for him.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Richard Ellis (1781-1846) — Born in Virginia, February 14, 1781. Delegate to Alabama state constitutional convention, 1819; associate justice of Alabama state supreme court, 1819; delegate to Texas Republic Republic constitutional convention from District of Red River, 1836; signer, Texas Declaration of Independence, 1836; member of Texas Republic Senate from District of Red River, 1836-39. Reportedly "came to his death suddenly by his clothes taking fire", at his home in Bowie County, Tex., December 20, 1846 (age 65 years, 309 days). Original interment in private or family graveyard; reinterment in 1929 at Texas State Cemetery.
      Ellis County, Tex. is named for him.
      William Gordon Cooke (1808-1847) — of Texas. Born in Fredericksburg, Va., March 26, 1808. Served in the Texas Army during the Texas War of Independence; member of Texas Republic House of Representatives, 1844-45; Texas Republic Secretary of War and Marine, 1845-46; candidate for U.S. Representative from Texas, 1846; Adjutant General of Texas, 1846-47; died in office 1847. Member, Freemasons. Died of tuberculosis, at Seguin, Guadalupe County, Tex., December 24, 1847 (age 39 years, 273 days). Original interment somewhere in Geronimo, Tex.; reinterment in 1937 at Texas State Cemetery.
      Relatives: Nephew by marriage of José Antonio Navarro (1795-1871).
      Political family: Navarro family of San Antonio, Texas.
      Cooke County, Tex. is named for him.
      Cooke Avenue, in San Antonio, Texas, is named for him.
      Edward Burleson (1798-1851) — of Texas. Born in Buncombe County, N.C., December 15, 1798. Served in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812; delegate to Texas Convention of 1833 from District of Mina, 1833; delegate to Texas Consultation of 1835 from District of Mina, 1835; general in the Texas Army during the Texas War of Independence; member of Texas Republic House of Representatives, 1837-38; member of Texas Republic Senate from District of Bastrop, Gonzales and Fayette, 1838-39; Vice President of the Texas Republic, 1841-44; candidate for President of the Texas Republic, 1844; member of Texas state senate, 1846-51; died in office 1851. Methodist. Member, Freemasons. Died of pneumonia, in Austin, Travis County, Tex., December 26, 1851 (age 53 years, 11 days). Interment at Texas State Cemetery.
      Relatives: Father of Edward Burleson, Jr.; grandfather of Albert Sidney Burleson (1863-1937).
      Political family: Burleson family of Austin, Texas.
      Burleson County, Tex. is named for him.
      Albert Sidney Johnston (1803-1862) — of Texas. Born in Washington, Mason County, Ky., February 2, 1803. Served in the U.S. Army during the Black Hawk War; served in the Texas Army during the Texas War of Independence; wounded in a duel with Texas Gen. Felix Huston, Februay 7, 1837; Texas Republic Secretary of War, 1838-40; general in the Confederate Army during the Civil War. Shot and killed while leading his forces at the Battle of Shiloh, Hardin County, Tenn., April 6, 1862 (age 59 years, 63 days). He was the highest-ranking officer on either side killed during the war. Original interment at St. Louis Cemetery No. 1, New Orleans, La.; reinterment in 1867 at Texas State Cemetery; statue at South Mall.
      Relatives: Son of Dr. John Johnston and Abigail (Harris) Johnston; half-brother of Josiah Stoddard Johnston; married 1829 to Henrietta Preston (sister of William Preston); married 1843 to Eliza Griffin; grandfather of Henrietta Preston Johnston (who married Henry St. George Tucker (1853-1932)).
      Political families: Marshall-Harrison-Randolph-Cabell family of Virginia; Johnston-Preston family of Kentucky and Virginia (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      Politician named for him: Albert S. J. Lehr
      See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
      George Washington Smyth (1803-1866) — also known as George W. Smyth — of Jasper, Jasper County, Tex. Born in North Carolina, May 16, 1803. Democrat. Delegate to Texas Republic Republic constitutional convention from District of Jasper, 1836; signer, Texas Declaration of Independence, 1836; member of Texas Republic House of Representatives, 1844-45; delegate to Texas state constitutional convention, 1845; U.S. Representative from Texas 1st District, 1853-55; served in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; delegate to Texas state constitutional convention, 1866. Died in session of state constitutional convention in Austin, Travis County, Tex., February 21, 1866 (age 62 years, 281 days). Interment at Texas State Cemetery.
      Presumably named for: George Washington
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      John Alexander Greer (1802-1855) — of Texas. Born in Shelbyville, Bedford County, Tenn., July 18, 1802. Member of Texas Republic Senate from District of San Augustine, 1838-45; Texas Republic Secretary of the Treasury, 1845-46; Lieutenant Governor of Texas, 1847-51. Member, Freemasons. Died while campaigning for the governorship, July 4, 1855 (age 52 years, 351 days). Original interment in private or family graveyard; reinterment in 1929 at Texas State Cemetery.
      Greer County, Okla. is named for him.
      Guy Morrison Bryan (1821-1901) — also known as Guy M. Bryan — of Galveston, Galveston County, Tex. Born in Herculaneum, Jefferson County, Mo., January 12, 1821. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army during the Mexican War; member of Texas state house of representatives, 1847-53, 1873, 1879, 1887; member of Texas state senate, 1853-57; U.S. Representative from Texas 2nd District, 1857-59; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Texas, 1860; major in the Confederate Army during the Civil War. Died in Austin, Travis County, Tex., June 4, 1901 (age 80 years, 143 days). Interment at Texas State Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Bailey Hardeman (1795-1836) — of Texas. Born near Nashville, Davidson County, Tenn., February 26, 1795. Served in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812; delegate to Texas Republic Republic constitutional convention from District of Matagorda, 1836; signer, Texas Declaration of Independence, 1836; Texas Republic Secretary of the Treasury, 1836. Died in Caney Creek, Matagorda County, Tex., October 12, 1836 (age 41 years, 229 days). Original interment somewhere in Matagorda County, Tex.; reinterment in 1936 at Texas State Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Thomas Hardeman (1750-1833) and Mary (Perkins) Hardeman (1754-1798); brother of Thomas Jones Hardeman; fourth cousin of John Wayles Eppes and John Randolph of Roanoke; fourth cousin once removed of Benjamin William Sheridan Cabell (1793-1862), Francis Wayles Eppes, Benjamin Franklin Randolph, Meriwether Lewis Randolph and George Wythe Randolph.
      Political families: Marshall-Harrison-Randolph-Cabell family of Virginia; Breckinridge-Preston-Cabell-Henry family of Virginia; Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York; Walker-Bolling family of Huntsville, Alabama (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      Hardeman County, Tex. is named partly for him.
      William Houston Jack (1806-1844) — of Alabama; Texas. Born in Wilkes County, Ga., April 12, 1806. Member of Alabama state legislature, 1829; Texas Republic Secretary of State, 1836; member of Texas Republic House of Representatives, 1839-40; member of Texas Republic Senate from District of Brazoria, 1842-44; died in office 1844. Died of yellow fever in Brazoria County, Tex., August 20, 1844 (age 38 years, 130 days). Original interment in private or family graveyard; subsequent interment at Lakeview Cemetery, Galveston, Tex.; reinterment at Texas State Cemetery.
      Relatives: Brother of Patrick Churchill Jack (1808-1844).
      Jack County, Tex. is named partly for him.
      Robert Alton Gammage (1938-2012) — also known as Bob Gammage — of Llano, Llano County, Tex. Born in Houston, Harris County, Tex., March 13, 1938. Democrat. Member of Texas state legislature, 1970; U.S. Representative from Texas 22nd District, 1977-79; defeated, 1976, 1978; alternate delegate to Democratic National Convention from Texas, 2008. Died in Llano, Llano County, Tex., September 10, 2012 (age 74 years, 181 days). Interment at Texas State Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Ashbel Smith (1805-1886) — also known as "The Father of Texas Medicine" — of Salisbury, Rowan County, N.C.; Galveston, Galveston County, Tex.; Houston, Harris County, Tex. Born in Hartford, Hartford County, Conn., August 13, 1805. Democrat. Texas Republic Charge d'Affaires to England and France, 1842-44; Texas Republic Secretary of State, 1845; served in the U.S. Army during the Mexican War; member of Texas state house of representatives, 1855, 1866, 1879; colonel in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Texas, 1872, 1876 (member, Resolutions Committee). Member, Phi Beta Kappa. Physician. Negotiated the Smith-Cuevas treaty in 1845, in which Mexico recognized Texas independence. Died in Harris County, Tex., January 21, 1886 (age 80 years, 161 days). Interment at Texas State Cemetery.
      Claude Pollard (1874-1942) — of Carthage, Panola County, Tex.; Kingsville, Kleberg County, Tex.; Houston, Harris County, Tex. Born in Carthage, Panola County, Tex., February 14, 1874. Lawyer; Panola County Attorney, 1895-98; Texas state attorney general, 1927-29; attorney for railroads; general counsel for the Railway General Managers Association of Texas. Died in Austin, Travis County, Tex., November 25, 1942 (age 68 years, 284 days). Interment at Texas State Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Hamilton Pollard (1822-1897) and Sarah Jane (Davis) Pollard (1838-1894); married, December 27, 1897, to Julia Samuella Newton (1878-1965); third cousin once removed of David Aris Pollard (1866-1952).
      See also Find-A-Grave memorial
      Stephen Heard Darden (1816-1902) — of Wharton, Wharton County, Tex. Born in Fayette, Jefferson County, Miss., November 18, 1816. Member of Texas state senate, 1850; served in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; Representative from Texas in the Confederate Congress, 1864-65. Died in Wharton, Wharton County, Tex., May 16, 1902 (age 85 years, 179 days). Interment at Texas State Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Washington Darden (1781-1830) and Ann (Sharley) Darden (1786-1833); married, February 28, 1837, to Mary Matilda Goff (1821-1847); married, March 24, 1862, to Katherine R. Mayes (born 1836); first cousin twice removed of George Washington Darden (1865-?).
      Thomas Hawthorne Phillips (1914-1975) — of Texas. Born in Marlin, Falls County, Tex., December 30, 1914. District judge in Texas, 1950; justice of Texas state supreme court, 1960. Died in Austin, Travis County, Tex., October 23, 1975 (age 60 years, 297 days). Interment at Texas State Cemetery.
      Crawford Collins Martin — also known as Crawford C. Martin — of Hillsboro, Hill County, Tex. Democrat. Member of Texas state senate, 1950; Texas state attorney general, 1967-72. Interment at Texas State Cemetery.
      Jewel Preston Lightfoot — Texas state attorney general, 1910-12. Interment at Texas State Cemetery.
      Robert Bullock (1929-1999) — also known as Bob Bullock — of Texas. Born in Hillsboro, Hill County, Tex., July 10, 1929. Democrat. Member of Texas state house of representatives; elected 1956, 1958; secretary of state of Texas, 1971-72; Texas state comptroller, 1975-90; Lieutenant Governor of Texas, 1991-99. Investigated by a grand jury in 1978, but no indictment resulted. Died in Austin, Travis County, Tex., June 18, 1999 (age 69 years, 343 days). Interment at Texas State Cemetery.
      Byron M. Tunnell (c.1926-2000) — of Texas. Born about 1926. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Navy during World War II; lawyer; member of Texas state house of representatives, 1956-64; Speaker of the Texas State House of Representatives, 1963-64; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Texas, 1964; Texas railroad commissioner, 1965-73. Died, of cancer, in Tyler, Smith County, Tex., March 7, 2000 (age about 74 years). Interment at Texas State Cemetery.
      Jesse James (1904-1977) — of Texas. Born October 10, 1904. Member of Texas state house of representatives, 1930; Texas state treasurer, 1941-77. Died September 29, 1977 (age 72 years, 354 days). Interment at Texas State Cemetery.
      John Coyle White (1924-1995) — also known as John C. White — of Wichita Falls, Wichita County, Tex. Born near Newport, Clay County, Tex., November 26, 1924. Democrat. Texas commissioner of agriculture, 1951-77; candidate for U.S. Senator from Texas, 1957; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Texas, 1964; Chairman of Democratic National Committee, 1977-81. Died, of a heart ailment, at Georgetown University Hospital, Washington, D.C., January 20, 1995 (age 70 years, 55 days). Interment at Texas State Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Ed White.
      John Ray Harrison, Sr. (1930-2001) — of Pasadena, Harris County, Tex. Born in Abilene, Taylor County, Tex., August 2, 1930. Democrat. Lawyer; member of Texas state house of representatives; elected 1964; defeated, 1998; mayor of Pasadena, Tex., 1973-78, 1985-93; district judge in Texas, 1978-80. Methodist. Member, American Bar Association. Died, of complications following laminectomy surgery, December 22, 2001 (age 71 years, 142 days). Interment at Texas State Cemetery.
      Elizabeth Richards Andujar (1912-1997) — also known as Betty Andujar; Elizabeth Richards — of Fort Worth, Tarrant County, Tex. Born in Harrisburg, Dauphin County, Pa., November 6, 1912. Republican. Delegate to Republican National Convention from Texas, 1968, 1976; member of Texas state senate, 1973-82; member of Republican National Committee from Texas, 1976-82. Female. Presbyterian. First woman member of the Texas Senate; first Republican member of the Texas Senate since Reconstruction. Died June 8, 1997 (age 84 years, 214 days). Interment at Texas State Cemetery.
      Relatives: Married 1935 to John Jose Andujar (1912-2003; physician).
      See also Find-A-Grave memorial
    Irma Rangel Irma Lerma Rangel (1931-2003) — also known as Irma Rangel — of Kingsville, Kleberg County, Tex. Born in Kingsville, Kleberg County, Tex., May 15, 1931. Democrat. School teacher; lawyer; member of Texas state house of representatives, 1977-2003 (49th District 1977-82, 37th District 1983-92, 35th District 1993-2002, 43rd District 2003); died in office 2003. Female. Mexican ancestry. In 1976, was the first Mexican-American woman elected to the Texas House. Died, of brain cancer, in Brackinridge Hospital, March 18, 2003 (age 71 years, 307 days). Interment at Texas State Cemetery.
      Relatives: Daughter of P. M. Rangel and Herminia L. Rangel.
      See also Texas Legislators Past & Present
      Image source: Texas Legislative Reference Library
      Donald Campbell (1830-1871) — of Texas. Born in Alabama, March 25, 1830. State court judge in Texas, 1868; delegate to Texas state constitutional convention, 1868-69; member of Texas state senate, 1870; Lieutenant Governor of Texas, 1870-71; died in office 1871. Member, Freemasons. Died in Austin, Travis County, Tex., November 8, 1871 (age 41 years, 228 days). Interment at Texas State Cemetery.
      Sterling Clack Robertson (1785-1842) — also known as Sterling C. Robertson — of Texas. Born in Giles County, Tenn., October 2, 1785. Served in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812; delegate to Texas Republic Republic constitutional convention from District of Milam, 1836; signer, Texas Declaration of Independence, 1836; served in the Texas Army during the Texas War of Independence; member of Texas Republic Senate from District of Milam, 1836-38. Died in Nashville, Milam County, Tex., March 4, 1842 (age 56 years, 153 days). Original interment at Nashville Cemetery, Nashville, Tex.; reinterment in 1936 at Texas State Cemetery.
      Relatives: Father of Elijah Sterling Clack Robertson (1820-1879).
      Martin Parmer (1778-1850) — of Missouri; Texas. Born in Virginia, June 4, 1778. Member of Missouri state senate, 1824-25; delegate to Texas Consultation of 1835 from District of Tenaha, 1835; delegate to Texas Republic Republic constitutional convention from District of San Augustine, 1836; signer, Texas Declaration of Independence, 1836. Died in Jasper County, Tex., March 2, 1850 (age 71 years, 271 days). Interment at Texas State Cemetery.
      Parmer County, Tex. is named for him.
      Jesse Grimes (1788-1866) — of Texas. Born in Duplin County, N.C., February 6, 1788. Delegate to Texas Convention of 1833 from District of Washington, 1833; delegate to Texas Consultation of 1835 from District of Washington, 1835; delegate to Texas Republic Republic constitutional convention from District of Washington, 1836; signer, Texas Declaration of Independence, 1836; member of Texas Republic Senate, 1836-37, 1844-45; member of Texas Republic House of Representatives, 1841-43. Died March 15, 1866 (age 78 years, 37 days). Original interment at John McGinty Cemetery, Near Navasota, Grimes County, Tex.; reinterment in 1929 at Texas State Cemetery.
      Grimes County, Tex. is named for him.
      Andrew Briscoe (1810-1849) — of Texas. Born in Claiborne County, Miss., November 25, 1810. Served in the Texas Army during the Texas War of Independence; delegate to Texas Republic Republic constitutional convention from District of Harrisburg, 1836; signer, Texas Declaration of Independence, 1836. Died October 4, 1849 (age 38 years, 313 days). Interment at Texas State Cemetery.
      Briscoe County, Tex. is named for him.
      William Christian Menefee — also known as William Menefee — Delegate to Texas Convention of 1832 from District of Lavaca, 1832; delegate to Texas Consultation of 1835 from District of San Felipe de Austin, 1835; delegate to Texas Republic Republic constitutional convention from District of Colorado, 1836; signer, Texas Declaration of Independence, 1836. Interment at Texas State Cemetery.
      Oliver Jones (1794-1866) — of Texas. Born in New York City (unknown county), N.Y., 1794. Served in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812; member of Texas Republic House of Representatives, 1837-38; member of Texas Republic Senate, 1838-40, 1842-43 (District of Austin and Colorado 1838-40, District of Austin, Colorado and Fort Bend 1842-43). Died in Houston, Harris County, Tex., September 17, 1866 (age about 72 years). Original interment at Episcopal and Masonic Cemetery, Houston, Tex.; reinterment in 1930 at Texas State Cemetery.
      George Clarence Moffett (1895-1972) — also known as George Moffett — of Quanah, Hardeman County, Tex.; Chillicothe, Hardeman County, Tex. Born in Chillicothe, Hardeman County, Tex., November 20, 1895. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army Air Corps in World War I; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Texas, 1928 (alternate), 1932 (alternate), 1940, 1964; member of Texas state house of representatives, 1931-38; member of Texas state senate, 1939-50. Member, Freemasons; Lions; Elks; Woodmen of the World. Died in 1972 (age about 76 years). Interment at Texas State Cemetery.
      James Charles Wilson (1818-1860) — of Texas. Born in Yorkshire, England, August 21, 1818. Served in the Texas Army during the Texas War of Independence; member of Texas state house of representatives, 1849-50; member of Texas state senate, 1851-53. Methodist. Volunteer on the Somervell Expedition in 1842; captured at Mier, Mexico, and held at Perote Prison until his escape in 1843; famed orator in support of Texas annexation to the U.S. and, later, secession to join the Confederacy. Died of tuberculosis, at Gonzales, Gonzales County, Tex., February 7, 1860 (age 41 years, 170 days). Original interment at Askey Cemetery, Gonzales, Tex.; reinterment in 1936 at Texas State Cemetery.
      Wilson County, Tex. is named for him.
      Wayne Warren Wagonseller (1921-1955) — also known as Wayne W. Wagonseller — of Texas. Born in Montague County, Tex., February 1, 1921. Democrat. Member of Texas state house of representatives, 1947-50; member of Texas state senate, 1951-55; candidate for U.S. Representative from Texas 13th District, 1951. Established a national marathon filibuster record in March, 1955. Died August 13, 1955 (age 34 years, 193 days). Interment at Texas State Cemetery.
      Forbes N. Britton (d. 1861) — of Texas. Member of Texas state senate, 1850. Died February 14, 1861. Interment at Texas State Cemetery.
      Relatives: Father-in-law of Edmund Jackson Davis (1827-1883).
      Donley C. Kennard (1929-2011) — also known as Don Kennard — of Fort Worth, Tarrant County, Tex. Born in Houston, Harris County, Tex., May 6, 1929. Member of Texas state house of representatives, 1953-63; member of Texas state senate 10th District, 1963-73. Died March 17, 2011 (age 81 years, 315 days). Interment at Texas State Cemetery.
      Relatives: Married to Jackie Porterfield; married 1974 to Mary Jo (Kederis) Williams.
      See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
      William Lockhart Hunter (1809-1886) — of Texas. Born in Tinkling Spring, Augusta County, Va., June 5, 1809. Member of Texas Republic House of Representatives, 1839; member of Texas Republic Senate, 1843-44. Member, Freemasons. Died October 28, 1886 (age 77 years, 145 days). Interment at Texas State Cemetery.
      Patrick Churchill Jack (1808-1844) — also known as Patrick C. Jack — of Texas. Born in Wilkes County, Ga., 1808. Delegate to Texas Convention of 1832 from District of Liberty, 1832; delegate to Texas Convention of 1833 from District of Liberty, 1833; member of Texas Republic House of Representatives, 1837-38; judge of Texas Republic, 1841-44. Died of yellow fever in Houston, Harris County, Tex., August 4, 1844 (age about 36 years). Original interment in private or family graveyard; subsequent interment at Lakeview Cemetery, Galveston, Tex.; reinterment at Texas State Cemetery.
      Relatives: Brother of William Houston Jack (1806-1844).
      Jack County, Tex. is named partly for him.
      Thomas Jones Hardeman (1788-1854) — of Texas. Born near Nashville, Davidson County, Tenn., January 31, 1788. Served in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812; member of Texas Republic House of Representatives, 1837-39; judge of Texas Republic, 1843; member of Texas state legislature, 1847-51. Episcopalian. Member, Freemasons. Died in Bastrop County, Tex., January 15, 1854 (age 65 years, 349 days). Original interment in private or family graveyard; reinterment in 1937 at Texas State Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Thomas Hardeman (1750-1833) and Mary (Perkins) Hardeman (1754-1798); brother of Bailey Hardeman (1795-1836); married 1814 to Mary Ophelia Polk (1785-1835; aunt of James Knox Polk and William Hawkins Polk); married, October 26, 1836, to Eliza DeWitt (1809-1863); fourth cousin of John Wayles Eppes and John Randolph of Roanoke; fourth cousin once removed of Benjamin William Sheridan Cabell, Francis Wayles Eppes, Benjamin Franklin Randolph, Meriwether Lewis Randolph and George Wythe Randolph.
      Political family: Marshall-Harrison-Randolph-Cabell family of Virginia (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      Hardeman County, Tenn. is named for him; Hardeman County, Tex. is named partly for him.
      See also Find-A-Grave memorial
      Moseley Baker (1802-1848) — of Montgomery, Montgomery County, Ala.; San Felipe, Austin County, Tex.; Galveston County, Tex.; Harris County, Tex. Born in Norfolk, Va., September 20, 1802. Lawyer; member of Alabama state house of representatives, 1829; served in the Texas Army during the Texas War of Independence; member of Texas Republic House of Representatives, 1836, 1838-39; defeated, 1841; candidate for Texas Republic Senate, 1842. Died, of yellow fever, in Houston, Harris County, Tex., November 4, 1848 (age 46 years, 45 days). Original interment somewhere in Houston, Tex.; reinterment at Texas State Cemetery.
      Joe E. Moreno (1964-2005) — of Denver Harbor, Harris County, Tex. Born in Houston, Harris County, Tex., August 12, 1964. Democrat. Lawyer; member of Texas state house of representatives 143rd District, 1999-2005; died in office 2005. Killed in a car accident in Fayette County, Tex., May 6, 2005 (age 40 years, 267 days). State Rep. Rafael Anchia was injured. Interment at Texas State Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Frank Moreno and Alicia Moreno.
      Benjamin McCulloch (1811-1862) — also known as Ben McCulloch — of Texas. Born November 11, 1811. Member of Texas Republic Congress, 1839; general in the Confederate Army during the Civil War. Killed in the Civil War at Pea Ridge, Benton County, Ark., March 7, 1862 (age 50 years, 116 days). Interment at Texas State Cemetery.
      McCulloch County, Tex. is named for him.
      Robert Ellis Johnson (1929-1995) — also known as Bob Johnson — of Texas. Born in Dallas, Dallas County, Tex., January 15, 1929. Member of Texas state house of representatives, 1957-63. Died of a heart attack, in Temple, Bell County, Tex., March 26, 1995 (age 66 years, 70 days). Interment at Texas State Cemetery.
    Politicians formerly buried here:
      Middleton Tate Johnson (1810-1866) — Born in 1810. Member of Arkansas territorial House of Representatives, 1832; member of Alabama state legislature, 1844; member of Texas Republic Senate, 1845; served in the U.S. Army during the Mexican War; candidate for Lieutenant Governor of Texas, 1849; candidate for Governor of Texas, 1851, 1853, 1855, 1857; delegate to Texas secession convention, 1861; served in the Confederate Army during the Civil War. Died May 15, 1866 (age about 55 years). Original interment at Texas State Cemetery; reinterment at Johnson Plantation Cemetery, Arlington, Tex.
      Johnson County, Tex. is named for him.
    Other politicians who have monuments here:
      James Albert Michener (1907-1997) — also known as James A. Michener — Born in Doylestown, Bucks County, Pa., February 3, 1907. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Navy during World War II; author; received the Pulitzer Prize in Literature, 1948; candidate for U.S. Representative from Pennsylvania 8th District, 1962; received the Medal of Freedom, 1977. Died in Austin, Travis County, Tex., October 16, 1997 (age 90 years, 255 days). Interment at Austin Memorial Park; cenotaph at Texas State Cemetery.
      Relatives: Married 1935 to Patti Koon (divorced 1948); married 1948 to Vange Nord (divorced 1955); married 1955 to Mari Yoriko Sabusawa (1920-1994).
      Epitaph: "Traveler, Citizen, Writer."
      See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial


    South Mall
    University of Texas, Austin, Travis County, Texas

    Politicians who have monuments here:
      Albert Sidney Johnston (1803-1862) — of Texas. Born in Washington, Mason County, Ky., February 2, 1803. Served in the U.S. Army during the Black Hawk War; served in the Texas Army during the Texas War of Independence; wounded in a duel with Texas Gen. Felix Huston, Februay 7, 1837; Texas Republic Secretary of War, 1838-40; general in the Confederate Army during the Civil War. Shot and killed while leading his forces at the Battle of Shiloh, Hardin County, Tenn., April 6, 1862 (age 59 years, 63 days). He was the highest-ranking officer on either side killed during the war. Original interment at St. Louis Cemetery No. 1, New Orleans, La.; reinterment in 1867 at Texas State Cemetery; statue at South Mall.
      Relatives: Son of Dr. John Johnston and Abigail (Harris) Johnston; half-brother of Josiah Stoddard Johnston; married 1829 to Henrietta Preston (sister of William Preston); married 1843 to Eliza Griffin; grandfather of Henrietta Preston Johnston (who married Henry St. George Tucker (1853-1932)).
      Political families: Marshall-Harrison-Randolph-Cabell family of Virginia; Johnston-Preston family of Kentucky and Virginia (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      Politician named for him: Albert S. J. Lehr
      See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial


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    The Political Graveyard

    The Political Graveyard is a web site about U.S. political history and cemeteries. Founded in 1996, it is the Internet's most comprehensive free source for American political biography, listing 312,576 politicians, living and dead.
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