PoliticalGraveyard.com
The Political Graveyard: A Database of American History
Politicians Killed by Gunshot

Very incomplete list!

in chronological order

  Francis Nash (1742-1777) — of Hillsborough, Orange County, N.C. Born in Prince Edward County, Va., 1742. Member of North Carolina state legislature, 1764; general in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War. Welsh ancestry. During the Battle of Germanown, he was hit by cannonball and musket shot, was mortally wounded, and died soon after, in Montgomery County, Pa., October 7, 1777 (age about 35 years). Interment at Towamencin Mennonite Churchyard, Near Lansdale, Montgomery County, Pa.
  Relatives: Son of Abner Nash (1685-1732) and Elizabeth (Hinton) Nash (1688-1711); brother of Abner Nash (1740-1786); married to Sally Moore.
  Nash County, N.C. is named for him.
  The city of Nashville, Tennessee, is named for him.  — The town of Nashville, North Carolina, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
Alexander Hamilton Alexander Hamilton (1757-1804) — also known as "Alexander the Coppersmith" — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in Charles Town, Nevis, January 11, 1757. Delegate to Continental Congress from New York, 1782; member of New York state assembly from New York County, 1786-87; member, U.S. Constitutional Convention, 1787; delegate to New York convention to ratify U.S. constitution from New York County, 1788; U.S. Secretary of the Treasury, 1789-95. Episcopalian. Scottish and French ancestry. Member, Freemasons; Society of the Cincinnati. Elected to the Hall of Fame for Great Americans in 1915. Shot and mortally wounded in a duel with Aaron Burr, on July 11, 1804, and died the next day in New York, New York County, N.Y., July 12, 1804 (age 47 years, 183 days). Interment at Trinity Churchyard, Manhattan, N.Y.; statue at Treasury Building Grounds, Washington, D.C.; statue at Commonwealth Avenue Mall, Boston, Mass.
  Relatives: Son of James Hamilton and Rachel (Faucette) Hamilton; married, December 14, 1780, to Elizabeth Schuyler (1757-1854; daughter of Philip John Schuyler; sister of Philip Jeremiah Schuyler); father of Alexander Hamilton, Jr., James Alexander Hamilton (1788-1878) and William Stephen Hamilton; great-grandfather of Robert Ray Hamilton; second great-grandfather of Laurens M. Hamilton; ancestor *** of Robert Hamilton Woodruff.
  Political families: Livingston-Schuyler family of New York; VanRensselaer family of Albany, New York (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Cross-reference: Nathaniel Pendleton — Robert Troup — John Tayler — William P. Van Ness
  Hamilton counties in Fla., Ill., Ind., Kan., Neb., N.Y., Ohio and Tenn. are named for him.
  The city of Hamilton, Ohio, is named for him.  — Hamilton Hall (dormitory, built 1926), at Harvard University Business School, Boston, Massachusetts, is named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: Alexander H. BuellAlexander H. HolleyHamilton FishAlexander H. StephensAlexander H. BullockAlexander H. BaileyAlexander H. RiceAlexander Hamilton JonesAlexander H. WatermanAlexander H. CoffrothAlexander H. DudleyAlexander H. RevellAlexander Hamilton HargisAlexander Hamilton PhillipsAlex Woodle
  Coins and currency: His portrait appears on the U.S. $10 bill; from the 1860s to the 1920s, his portrait also appeared on U.S. notes and certificates of various denominations from $2 to $1,000.
  Personal motto: "Do it better yet."
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about Alexander Hamilton: Richard Brookhiser, Alexander Hamilton, American — Forrest McDonald, Alexander Hamilton: A Biography — Gertrude Atherton, Conqueror : Dramatized Biography of Alexander Hamilton — Ron Chernow, Alexander Hamilton — Thomas Fleming, Duel: Alexander Hamilton, Aaron Burr, and the Future of America — Arnold A. Rogow, A Fatal Friendship: Alexander Hamilton and Aaron Burr — Willard Sterne Randall, Alexander Hamilton: A Life — John Harper, American Machiavelli : Alexander Hamilton and the Origins of U.S. Foreign Policy — Stephen F. Knott, Alexander Hamilton and the Persistence of Myth — Charles Cerami, Young Patriots: The Remarkable Story of Two Men. Their Impossible Plan and The Revolution That Created The Constitution — Donald Barr Chidsey, Mr. Hamilton and Mr. Jefferson
  Critical books about Alexander Hamilton: Thomas DiLorenzo, Hamilton's Curse : How Jefferson's Arch Enemy Betrayed the American Revolution -- and What It means for Americans Today
  Image source: U.S. postage stamp (1957)
  Meriwether Lewis (1774-1809) — of Missouri. Born near Ivy, Albemarle County, Va., August 18, 1774. Governor of Louisiana (Missouri) Territory, 1807-09; died in office 1809. English and Welsh ancestry. Member, Freemasons. Commanded expedition with William Clark to Oregon, 1803-04. Died from gunshot wounds under mysterious circumstances (murder or suicide?) at Grinder's Stand, an inn on the Natchez Trace near Hohenwald, Lewis County, Tenn., October 11, 1809 (age 35 years, 54 days). Interment at Meriwether Lewis Park, Near Hohenwald, Lewis County, Tenn.
  Relatives: Son of William Lewis (1733-1779) and Lucy (Meriwether) Lewis (1852-1837); first cousin once removed of John Walker, David Meriwether (1755-1822), James Meriwether (1755-1817), Francis Walker and George Rockingham Gilmer; first cousin five times removed of Arthur Sidney Demarest; second cousin of James Meriwether (1788-1852), David Meriwether (1800-1893) and James Archibald Meriwether; second cousin once removed of George Washington, Thomas Walker Gilmer and Reuben Handy Meriwether; second cousin thrice removed of Hubbard T. Smith; second cousin four times removed of Archer Woodford; third cousin of Theodorick Bland, Robert Brooke, Bushrod Washington, George Madison and Richard Aylett Buckner; third cousin once removed of John Randolph of Roanoke, Henry St. George Tucker, John Thornton Augustine Washington, Zachary Taylor and Aylette Buckner; third cousin twice removed of John Strother Pendleton, Albert Gallatin Pendleton, Aylett Hawes Buckner and Nathaniel Beverly Tucker; third cousin thrice removed of James Francis Buckner, Key Pittman and Vail Montgomery Pittman.
  Political families: Demarest-Meriwether family of New Jersey; Marshall-Harrison-Randolph-Cabell family of Virginia; Meriwether-Kellogg-Tyler family of Virginia and Connecticut (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Cross-reference: George F. Shannon
  Lewis counties in Idaho, Ky., Mo., Tenn. and Wash. are named for him; Lewis and Clark County, Mont. is named partly for him.
  Other politicians named for him: Meriwether Lewis RandolphMeriwether Lewis Walker
  Coins and currency: His portrait appeared (along with Clark's) on the $10 U.S. Note from 1898 to 1927.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Books about Meriwether Lewis: Thomas C. Danisi, Uncovering the Truth About Meriwether Lewis — Donald Barr Chidsey, Lewis and Clark: The Great Adventure
  Joseph Hamilton Daviess (1774-1811) — also known as Joe Daviess — of Danville, Boyle County, Ky.; Lexington, Fayette County, Ky. Born in Bedford County, Va., March 4, 1774. Lawyer; U.S. Attorney for Kentucky, 1800-06; major in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812. Welsh ancestry. Member, Freemasons. Around 1801, he served as a second to John Rowan in his duel with James Chambers; after Chambers was killed, he fled to avoid prosecution as accomplice to murder, and became a fugitive, but when Rowan was arrested, he returned to act as Rowan's legal counsel. Shot and killed in the Battle of Tippecanoe, in what is now Tippecanoe County, Ind., November 7, 1811 (age 37 years, 248 days). Interment at Tippecanoe Battlefield Park, Battle Ground, Ind.
  Relatives: Brother-in-law of John Marshall (1755-1835).
  Political families: Lee-Randolph family of Maryland and Virginia; Marshall-Harrison-Randolph-Cabell family of Virginia; Biddle-Randolph family of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Anderson-Marshall family of Ohio and West Virginia; Pendleton-Lee family (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Daviess counties in Ind., Ky. and Mo., and Jo Daviess County, Ill., are named for him.
  David Ramsay (1749-1815) — of South Carolina. Born in Lancaster County, Pa., April 2, 1749. Physician; author; member of South Carolina state house of representatives, 1776-83; served in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; Delegate to Continental Congress from South Carolina, 1782-83, 1785-86; member of South Carolina state senate, 1801-15. Shot and mortally wounded by a crazed patient, and died two days later, in Charleston, Charleston County, S.C., May 8, 1815 (age 66 years, 36 days). Interment at Circular Congregational Church Burying Ground, Charleston, S.C.
  Relatives: Son of James Rufus Ramsay (1705-1786) and Jane (Montgomery) Ramsay (1711-1755); brother of Nathaniel Ramsey (1741-1817); married to Martha Laurens (1759-1811; daughter of Henry Laurens).
  Political family: Pinckney-Middleton-Laurens family of Charleston, South Carolina (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  James Blair (1786-1834) — of South Carolina. Born in The Waxhaws, Lancaster County, S.C., September 26, 1786. Democrat. Planter; sheriff; U.S. Representative from South Carolina, 1821-22, 1829-34 (9th District 1821-22, 8th District 1829-34); resigned 1822; died in office 1834; in 1832, he assaulted newspaper editor Duff Green, breaking some bones, and fined $350. Scotch-Irish ancestry. Died from a self-inflicted gunshot, in Washington, D.C., April 1, 1834 (age 47 years, 187 days). Interment at Congressional Cemetery, Washington, D.C.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Lucius Quintus Cincinnatus Lamar (1797-1834) — also known as Lucius Q. C. Lamar — of Georgia. Born July 15, 1797. Lawyer; superior court judge in Georgia, 1830-34. When he learned that a man he had sentenced to death for murder was not guilty, he killed himself by gunshot, July 4, 1834 (age 36 years, 354 days). Interment at Memory Hill Cemetery, Milledgeville, Ga.
  Relatives: Brother of Mirabeau Buonaparte Lamar (1798-1859); father of Lucius Quintus Cincinnatus Lamar.
  Political family: Lamar family of Georgia.
  See also Wikipedia article
  Ira J. Westover (d. 1836) — Delegate to Texas Consultation of 1835 from District of Goliad, 1835; served in the Texas Army during the Texas War of Independence. Following the Battle of Coleto, during the Texas War of Independence, he was among those taken prisoner by the Mexican Army; a few days later, he and almost 400 other prisoners were shot to death, an incident now known as the Goliad Massacre, in Goliad, Goliad County, Tex., March 27, 1836. Cremated.
  Henry Seymour (1780-1837) — of Onondaga County, N.Y. Born in Litchfield, Litchfield County, Conn., May 30, 1780. Member of New York state senate Western District, 1815-19, 1821-22; member of New York state assembly from Onondaga County, 1819-20. Financially ruined in the Panic of 1837, he died from a self-inflicted gunshot, in Utica, Oneida County, N.Y., August 26, 1837 (age 57 years, 88 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Moses Seymour and Molly (Marsh) Seymour (1752-1826); brother of Horatio Seymour (1778-1857); married, January 1, 1807, to Mary Ledyard Forman (1785-1859; first cousin once removed of Edwin Barber Morgan and Christopher Morgan); father of Horatio Seymour (1810-1886) and Julia Catherine Seymour (1827-1893; who married Roscoe Conkling); uncle of Origen Storrs Seymour and George Seymour; grandfather of Horatio Seymour, Jr. and Helen Lincklaen (1846-1931; who married Charles Stebbins Fairchild); granduncle of Edward Woodruff Seymour, Joseph Battell and Morris Woodruff Seymour; first cousin once removed of McNeil Seymour and Henry William Seymour; first cousin twice removed of Norman Alexander Seymour; second cousin once removed of Thomas Seymour and Hezekiah Cook Seymour; second cousin twice removed of William Pitkin, Silas Seymour, William Chapman Williston and Augustus Sherrill Seymour; second cousin thrice removed of Orlo Erland Wadhams; second cousin four times removed of Dalton G. Seymour; third cousin once removed of Josiah Cowles, Daniel Pitkin, David Lowrey Seymour and Thomas Henry Seymour; third cousin twice removed of Caleb Seymour Pitkin; fourth cousin of Timothy Pitkin, Orsamus Cook Merrill and Timothy Merrill; fourth cousin once removed of Farrand Fassett Merrill (1814-1859), John Robert Graham Pitkin and William Sheffield Cowles.
  Political families: Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York; Woodruff-Hornblower-Seymour-Wadsworth family of Connecticut; Murphy-Merrill family of Harbor Beach, Michigan (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Peter William Grayson (1788-1838) — also known as Peter W. Grayson; Peter Wagener Grayson — of Texas. Born in Bardstown, Nelson County, Ky., 1788. Delegate to Texas Consultation of 1835 from District of Goliad, 1835; Attorney General of the Texas Republic, 1836, 1837; candidate for President of the Texas Republic, 1838. Died from self-inflicted gunshot, at Bean Station, Grainger County, Tenn., July 9, 1838 (age about 50 years). Interment at Eastern Cemetery, Louisville, Ky.
  Relatives: Son of Benjamin Grayson (1761-1833) and Caroline Malinda (Taylor) Grayson (1765-1830); brother of Frederick William Spence Grayson and Mary Elizabeth Grayson (1795-1830; who married James Douglas Breckinridge (1781-1849)).
  Political families: Breckinridge-Preston-Cabell-Henry family of Virginia; Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York; Grayson-Breckinridge-Smallwood family of Virginia and Kentucky (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Grayson County, Tex. is named for him.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  William Harris Wharton (1802-1839) — of Texas. Born in Virginia, 1802. Delegate to Texas Convention of 1832 from District of Victoria, 1832; delegate to Texas Convention of 1833 from District of Victoria, 1833; delegate to Texas Consultation of 1835 from District of Columbia, 1835; member of Texas Republic Senate from District of Brazoria, 1836, 1837-39; died in office 1839. Killed when he accidentally shot himself while dismounting from his horse, near Hempstead, Waller County, Tex., March 14, 1839 (age about 36 years). Interment at Restwood Memorial Park, Clute, Tex.
  Relatives: Brother of John Austin Wharton (1806-1838).
  Wharton County, Tex. is named partly for him.
  Robert Potter (c.1800-1842) — of Oxford, Granville County, N.C. Born near Williamsboro, Vance County, N.C., about 1800. Member of North Carolina house of commons from Granville County, 1828, 1834; U.S. Representative from North Carolina 6th District, 1829-31; delegate to Texas Republic Republic constitutional convention from District of Nacogdoches, 1836; signer, Texas Declaration of Independence, 1836; Texas Republic Secretary of the Navy, 1836; member of Texas Republic Senate from District of Red River and Fannin, 1840-42; died in office 1842. Resigned from the U.S. Congress in 1831 after maiming two men in a jealous rage; convicted, and sentenced to six months in prison. Expelled in 1834 from the North Carolina House for cheating at cards. Shot and killed by members of an opposing faction who surrounded his home, in Harrison County (part now in Marion County), Tex., March 2, 1842 (age about 42 years). Original interment at a private or family graveyard, Marion County, Tex.; reinterment in 1928 at Texas State Cemetery, Austin, Tex.
  Potter County, Tex. is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Thomas Reynolds (1796-1844) — of Missouri. Born March 12, 1796. Governor of Missouri, 1840-44; died in office 1844. Died of a self-inflicted gunshot wound, in Jefferson City, Cole County, Mo., February 9, 1844 (age 47 years, 334 days). Interment at Woodland Cemetery, Jefferson City, Mo.
  Relatives: Brother of John Reynolds (1788-1865).
  Thomas Walker Gilmer (1802-1844) — of Virginia. Born in Gilmerton, Albemarle County, Va., April 6, 1802. Lawyer; member of Virginia state house of delegates, 1829-36, 1838-39; Speaker of the Virginia State House of Delegates, 1838-39; Governor of Virginia, 1840-41; U.S. Representative from Virginia, 1841-44 (12th District 1841-43, 5th District 1843-44); U.S. Secretary of the Navy, 1844; died in office 1844. Among those killed in the explosion when a cannon accidentally burst on board the U.S.S. Princeton, on the Potomac River near Fort Washington, Prince George's County, Md., February 28, 1844 (age 41 years, 328 days). Originally entombed at Congressional Cemetery, Washington, D.C.; reinterment at a private or family graveyard, Albemarle County, Va.
  Relatives: Son of George Gilmer (1778-1836) and Elizabeth Anderson (Hudson) Gilmer (1784-1820); married to Anne Elizabeth Baker (1809-1874); nephew of Mildred Gilmer (1772-1799; who married William Wirt); grandnephew of John Walker and Francis Walker; second cousin once removed of Meriwether Lewis (1774-1809); second cousin twice removed of Aylett Hawes; third cousin once removed of Robert Brooke, George Madison, Richard Aylett Buckner, Richard Hawes and Albert Gallatin Hawes; third cousin twice removed of Hubbard T. Smith; third cousin thrice removed of Archer Woodford; fourth cousin of Zachary Taylor, Aylette Buckner and Aylett Hawes Buckner; fourth cousin once removed of John Strother Pendleton, Albert Gallatin Pendleton and Harry Bartow Hawes.
  Political families: Pendleton-Lee family; Demarest-Meriwether family of New Jersey; Marshall-Harrison-Randolph-Cabell family of Virginia; Meriwether-Kellogg-Tyler family of Virginia and Connecticut; Washington family; Clay family of Kentucky (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Gilmer County, W.Va. is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Abel Parker Upshur (1790-1844) — of Virginia. Born in Northampton County, Va., June 17, 1790. Member of Virginia state house of delegates, 1812-13, 1824-27; state court judge in Virginia, 1826-41; delegate to Virginia state constitutional convention, 1829-30; U.S. Secretary of the Navy, 1841-43; U.S. Secretary of State, 1843-44; died in office 1844. Episcopalian. Among those killed in the explosion when a cannon accidentally burst on board the U.S.S. Princeton, on the Potomac River near Fort Washington, Prince George's County, Md., February 28, 1844 (age 53 years, 256 days). Originally entombed at Congressional Cemetery, Washington, D.C.; later interred in 1874 at Oak Hill Cemetery, Washington, D.C.
  Relatives: Son of Littleton Upshur (1760?-?).
  Upshur counties in Tex. and W.Va. are named for him.
  The World War II Liberty ship SS Abel Parker Upshur (built 1942, scrapped 1966) was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Virgil Maxcy (1785-1844) — of Maryland. Born in Attleboro, Bristol County, Mass., May 5, 1785. Lawyer; member of Maryland state executive council, 1815; member of Maryland state house of delegates, 1820; member of Maryland state senate, 1820; U.S. Charge d'Affaires to Belgium, 1837-42. Among those killed in the explosion when a cannon accidentally burst on board the U.S.S. Princeton, on the Potomac River near Fort Washington, Prince George's County, Md., February 28, 1844 (age 58 years, 299 days). Originally entombed at Congressional Cemetery, Washington, D.C.; reinterment at a private or family graveyard, Anne Arundel County, Md.
  Relatives: Son of Levi Maxcy and Ruth (Newell) Maxcy; married to Mary Galloway.
  See also U.S. State Dept career summary
  David Gardiner (1784-1844) — of New York. Born in East Hampton, Suffolk County, Long Island, N.Y., May 29, 1784. Member of New York state senate 1st District, 1824-27. Among those killed in the explosion when a cannon accidentally burst on board the U.S.S. Princeton, on the Potomac River near Fort Washington, Prince George's County, Md., February 28, 1844 (age 59 years, 275 days). Originally entombed at Congressional Cemetery, Washington, D.C.; later interred at South End Cemetery, East Hampton, Long Island, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Phebe Gardiner and Abraham Gardiner (1763-1796); married to Juliana MacLachlan (1799-1864); father of Julia Gardiner (1820-1889; who married John Tyler); grandfather of David Gardiner Tyler; third cousin thrice removed of John Lee Saltonstall; fourth cousin of Jonas Mapes; fourth cousin once removed of David Parshall Mapes (1798-1890).
  Political families: Mapes-Jennings-Denby-Neuman family of New York and Arizona; Tyler-Mapes family of New York (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Joseph Roffignac (1766-1846) — also known as Louis Philippe Joseph de Rouffignac — of New Orleans, Orleans Parish, La. Born in Angoulême, France, 1766. Fled France in 1789 to escape the guillotine, presumably over disloyalty to the revolutionary regime; mayor of New Orleans, La., 1820-28. French ancestry. Suffered a stroke, and dropped the gun he was holding, which accidentally discharged, shooting him in the head and killing him, in Périgueux, France, 1846 (age about 80 years). Burial location unknown.
  Alexander Keith McClung (1809-1855) — also known as Alexander K. McClung; "The Black Knight of the South" — of Mississippi. Born in Virginia, 1809. Lawyer; colonel in the U.S. Army during the Mexican War; U.S. Charge d'Affaires to Bolivia, 1849-51. Killed his opponents in a number of duels. Died from a self-inflicted gunshot, with a dueling pistol, in a hotel room at Jackson, Hinds County, Miss., March 23, 1855 (age about 45 years). Interment at Friendship Cemetery, Columbus, Miss.
  Relatives: Son of William McClung (1758-1811); nephew of John Marshall.
  Political family: Marshall-Harrison-Randolph-Cabell family of Virginia (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also U.S. State Dept career summary — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Anson Jones (1798-1858) — of Texas. Born in Great Barrington, Berkshire County, Mass., January 20, 1798. Physician; served in the Texas Army during the Texas War of Independence; member of Texas Republic Senate from District of Brazoria, 1839-41; Texas Republic Secretary of State, 1841-44; President of the Texas Republic, 1844-45. Member, Freemasons; Odd Fellows. Died from self-inflicted gunshot, in the Rice Hotel, Houston, Harris County, Tex., January 9, 1858 (age 59 years, 354 days). Interment at Glenwood Cemetery, Houston, Tex.; cenotaph at Church on the Hill Cemetery, Lenox, Mass.
  Relatives: Son of Solomon Jones and Mary (Strong) Jones; married, May 23, 1840, to Mary Smith.
  Jones County, Tex. is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Philip Barton Key (1818-1859) — of Washington, D.C. Born in Georgetown, Washington, D.C., April 5, 1818. U.S. Attorney for the District of Columbia, 1853-59; died in office 1859. Shot and killed by Daniel E. Sickles, in retaliation for Key's affair with his wife Teresa, at Lafayette Park, Washington, D.C., February 27, 1859 (age 40 years, 328 days). Interment at Oak Hill Cemetery, Washington, D.C.; cenotaph at Westminster Burying Ground, Baltimore, Md.
  Relatives: Son of Francis Scott Key and Mary Tayloe (Lloyd) Key (1784-1859); brother of Mary Alicia 'Alice' Key (1824-1886; who married George Hunt Pendleton (1825-1889)); married, November 18, 1845, to Ellen Swan; nephew of Anne Phoebe Charlton Key (who married Roger Brooke Taney); uncle of Francis Key Pendleton; grandnephew of Philip Barton Key; first cousin twice removed of Philip Key; fourth cousin once removed of Vinson Martlow Whitley.
  Political families: Pendleton-Lee family; Key family of Maryland (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Robert Simpson Neighbors (1815-1859) — of Texas. Born in Virginia, November 3, 1815. Served in the Texas Army during the Texas War of Independence; member of Texas state house of representatives, 1852-53; Federal Superintendent of Indians. Shot and killed by Edward Cornett, at Fort Belknap (now Belknap), Young County, Tex., September 14, 1859 (age 43 years, 315 days). Interment at Fort Belknap Civilian Cemetery, Belknap, Tex.
  John C. Bell (c.1831-1860) — of El Dorado County, Calif. Born about 1831. Member of California state assembly 18th District, 1860; died in office 1860. During an argument just outside the Assembly session in the California State Capitol, was shot and stabbed by Dr. W. H. Stone, mortally wounded, and died four days later, in Sacramento, Sacramento County, Calif., April 15, 1860 (age about 29 years). Interment at Sacramento City Cemetery, Sacramento, Calif.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Francis Stebbins Bartow (1816-1861) — also known as Francis S. Bartow — of Georgia. Born in Savannah, Chatham County, Ga., September 6, 1816. Lawyer; candidate for U.S. Representative from Georgia 1st District, 1856; delegate to Georgia secession convention, 1861; Delegate from Georgia to the Confederate Provisional Congress, 1861; died in office 1861; colonel in the Confederate Army during the Civil War. Killed by rifle shot, while rallying his men on the Henry House Hill, during the first battle of Manassas, Va., July 21, 1861 (age 44 years, 318 days). Interment at Laurel Grove North Cemetery, Savannah, Ga.
  Relatives: Son of Theodosius Bartow (1775-1856) and Frances Louisa (Stebbins) Bartow (1792-1873); married, April 18, 1844, to Louisa Green Berrien (1827-1913; daughter of John Macpherson Berrien); first cousin twice removed of Theodosia Bartow (1746-1794; who married Aaron Burr (1756-1836)).
  Political families: Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York; Sherman family of Connecticut; Appleton family of Massachusetts; Keeler-Floyd-Sherman-Bangs family of New York; Floyd-Woodbridge-Edwards family of New York; Cornell-Schilplin-Washburn-Burr family of New York; Berrien-Burr-Bartow-Biddle family of Pennsylvania; Hamlin-Bemis-Stowell-Appleton family of Bangor, Maine (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Bartow County, Ga. is named for him.
  The city of Bartow, Florida, is named for him.  — The town of Bartow, Georgia, is named for him.  — The community of Bartow, West Virginia, is named for him.  — Bartow Elementary School (now Otis J. Brock Elementary School), in Savannah, Georgia, was formerly named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS Francis S. Bartow (built 1944, scrapped 1971) was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  George Nixon Briggs (1796-1861) — also known as George N. Briggs — of Lanesborough, Berkshire County, Mass. Born in Adams, Berkshire County, Mass., April 12, 1796. Lawyer; Berkshire County Register of Deeds, 1824-31; U.S. Representative from Massachusetts, 1831-43 (9th District 1831-33, 7th District 1833-43); Governor of Massachusetts, 1844-51; defeated (American), 1859; common pleas court judge in Massachusetts, 1851-56; delegate to Massachusetts state constitutional convention, 1853. Killed by the accidental discharge of a "fowling piece" (shotgun), in Pittsfield, Berkshire County, Mass., September 11, 1861 (age 65 years, 152 days). Interment at Pittsfield Cemetery, Pittsfield, Mass.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Benjamin Franklin Terry (1821-1861) — also known as Frank Terry — Born in Russellville, Logan County, Ky., February 18, 1821. Planter; in 1844, he was attacked by two rebellious slaves with knives and axes; railroad builder; delegate to Texas secession convention, 1861; colonel in the Confederate Army during the Civil War. Shot and killed in action while leading Terry's Texas Rangers at the battle of Woodsonville (also called Rowlett's Station), in Hart County, Ky., December 17, 1861 (age 40 years, 302 days). Original interment at a private or family graveyard, Fort Bend County, Tex.; reinterment in 1880 at Glenwood Cemetery, Houston, Tex.
  Presumably named for: Benjamin Franklin
  Relatives: Son of Joseph Royal Terry (1792-1877) and Sarah David (Smith) Terry (1793-1837); brother of David Smith Terry (1823-1889); married, October 12, 1841, to Mary Bingham (1821-1876).
  Political family: Runnels-Terry family of Houston, Texas.
  Terry County, Tex. is named for him.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  George W. Johnson (1811-1862) — of Georgetown, Scott County, Ky. Born in 1811. Lawyer; delegate to Kentucky secession convention, 1861; Confederate Governor of Kentucky, 1861-62. Shot during a Civil War battle, and died soon after, 1862 (age about 51 years). Interment somewhere in Georgetown, Ky.
  Relatives: Father of Henry V. Johnson (1852-?).
  Political family: Johnson family of Georgetown, Kentucky.
  Felix Kirk Zollicoffer (1812-1862) — also known as Felix K. Zollicoffer — of Nashville, Davidson County, Tenn. Born in Bigbyville, Maury County, Tenn., May 19, 1812. Member of Tennessee state senate, 1849; fought a pistol duel with rival editor John L. Martin, in Nashville, Tenn., 1852; U.S. Representative from Tennessee 8th District, 1853-59; general in the Confederate Army during the Civil War. Shot and killed in a Civil War battle near Mill Springs, Wayne County, Ky., January 19, 1862 (age 49 years, 245 days). Interment at Nashville City Cemetery, Nashville, Tenn.; cenotaph at Zollicoffer Park Cemetery, Near Nancy, Pulaski County, Ky.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Albert Sidney Johnston (1803-1862) — of Texas. Born in Washington, Mason County, Ky., February 2, 1803. Served in the U.S. Army during the Black Hawk War; served in the Texas Army during the Texas War of Independence; wounded in a duel with Texas Gen. Felix Huston, Februay 7, 1837; Texas Republic Secretary of War, 1838-40; general in the Confederate Army during the Civil War. Shot and killed while leading his forces at the Battle of Shiloh, Hardin County, Tenn., April 6, 1862 (age 59 years, 63 days). He was the highest-ranking officer on either side killed during the war. Original interment at St. Louis Cemetery No. 1, New Orleans, La.; reinterment in 1867 at Texas State Cemetery, Austin, Tex.; statue at South Mall, University of Texas, Austin, Tex.
  Relatives: Son of Dr. John Johnston and Abigail (Harris) Johnston; half-brother of Josiah Stoddard Johnston; married 1829 to Henrietta Preston (sister of William Preston); married 1843 to Eliza Griffin; grandfather of Henrietta Preston Johnston (who married Henry St. George Tucker (1853-1932)).
  Political families: Marshall-Harrison-Randolph-Cabell family of Virginia; Johnston-Preston family of Kentucky and Virginia (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Politician named for him: Albert S. J. Lehr
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  W. H. L. Wallace (d. 1862) — of Ottawa, La Salle County, Ill. Republican. Delegate to Republican National Convention from Illinois, 1856; general in the Union Army during the Civil War. Shot and killed while leading troops at the Civil War battle of Shiloh near Pittsburg Landing, Hardin County, Tenn., April 6, 1862. Interment a private or family graveyard, La Salle County, Ill.
  Richardson A. Scurry (1811-1862) — of Texas. Born in Gallatin, Sumner County, Tenn., November 11, 1811. Democrat. Served in the Texas Army during the Texas War of Independence; judge of Texas Republic, 1840-41; member of Texas Republic House of Representatives, 1842-44; U.S. Representative from Texas 1st District, 1851-53; general in the Confederate Army during the Civil War. Accidentally shot himself in the foot while hunting, in August 1854; the wound never healed and became infected; though his leg was later amputated, he died as a result in Hempstead, Waller County, Tex., April 9, 1862 (age 50 years, 149 days). Interment at Hempstead Cemetery, Hempstead, Tex.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Robert Eden Scott (1808-1862) — of Virginia. Born in Warrenton, Fauquier County, Va., April 23, 1808. Member of Virginia state house of delegates, 1835-42, 1845-52; delegate to Virginia state constitutional convention, 1850-51; delegate to Virginia secession convention, 1861; Delegate from Virginia to the Confederate Provisional Congress, 1861-62. Shot and killed, in a Civil War skirmish with a band of Union deserters, in Fauquier County, Va., May 3, 1862 (age 54 years, 10 days). Interment a private or family graveyard, Fauquier County, Va.
  George Taliaferro Ward (c.1810-1862) — also known as George T. Ward — of Leon County, Fla. Born in Fayette County, Ky., about 1810. Whig. Member Florida territorial council, 1833-34; delegate to Florida state constitutional convention from Leon County, 1838-39; candidate for Delegate to U.S. Congress from Florida Territory, 1841; candidate for Governor of Florida, 1852; delegate to Florida secession convention, 1861; Delegate from Florida to the Confederate Provisional Congress, 1861-62; candidate for Senator from Florida in the Confederate Congress, 1861; colonel in the Confederate Army during the Civil War. Shot and killed while leading his regiment in the Civil War battle at Williamsburg, Va., May 5, 1862 (age about 52 years). Interment at Episcopal Cemetery, Williamsburg, Va.
  William T. Casto (1824-1862) — Born January 24, 1824. Lawyer; mayor of Maysville, Ky., 1850; arrested in 1861 and imprisoned for allegedly aiding the Confederacy; released in 1862. Blamed Col. Leonidas Metcalfe (son of Gov. Thomas Metcalfe) for his imprisonment; challenged him to a duel; the weapons were Colt rifles at 60 yards; Casto was shot and killed on the first fire, in Bracken County, Ky., May 8, 1862 (age 38 years, 104 days). Interment at Maysville Cemetery, Maysville, Ky.
  Relatives: Son of Abijah Casto.
  Epitaph: "A Patriot, his Country's firm unwavering friend, he was willing to die for his Principles and as a man of Honor nobly fell a Veteran of the sacred and invincible right of personal liberty."
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  William McPherson McIntosh (1815-1862) — of Georgia. Born in Elbert County, Ga., February 14, 1815. Democrat. Lawyer; planter; member of Georgia state house of representatives, 1846-47; member of Georgia state senate, 1855-56; Presidential Elector for Georgia, 1860; general in the Confederate Army during the Civil War. Died from gunshot wounds received at the Civil War battle at Garnett's Farm, Henrico County, Va., June, 1862 (age 47 years, 0 days). Interment at Heard Cemetery, Elberton, Ga.
  Relatives: Married, January 27, 1842, to Maria Louisa Allen (1824-1885; daughter of Singleton Walthall Allen; aunt by marriage of Willis B. Adams); father of Jessie McIntosh (who married Peyton M. Hawes) and Anna Cassandra McIntosh (who married Budd Clay Wall (1847-1930)); grandfather of Julia May Cade (who married Albert Sidney Hawes); great-grandfather of Peyton Samuel Hawes.
  Political family: Heard family of Elberton, Georgia.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Joshua Chilton (1818-1862) — of Shannon County, Mo. Born in Wayne County, Tenn., September 28, 1818. Democrat. Member of Missouri state house of representatives from Shannon County, 1846-55; member of Missouri state senate 24th District, 1860-61. Member, Freemasons. Arrested by Union troops as an alleged Southern sympathizer, and while a prisoner, was shot and killed, near Rolla, Phelps County, Mo., August 28, 1862 (age 43 years, 334 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Thomas Boggs Chilton (1782-1865) and Susannah (Inman) Chilton (1785-1827); married to Elizabeth Chilton (1822-1899); father of Commodore Perry Chilton; uncle of Shadrach Chilton; first cousin twice removed of John Smith (1750-1836); second cousin of Thomas Chilton and William Parish Chilton; second cousin twice removed of Horace George Chilton and Arthur Bounds Chilton.
  Political family: Chilton family of Missouri.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Isaac Ingalls Stevens (1818-1862) — of Washington. Born in North Andover, Essex County, Mass., March 25, 1818. Major in the U.S. Army during the Mexican War; Governor of Washington Territory, 1853-57; Delegate to U.S. Congress from Washington Territory, 1857-61; general in the Union Army during the Civil War. Shot and killed at the Civil War battle of Chantilly, Fairfax County, Va., September 1, 1862 (age 44 years, 160 days). Interment at Island Cemetery, Newport, R.I.
  Relatives: Cousin *** of Charles Abbot Stevens (1816-1892) and Moses Tyler Stevens.
  Political family: Stevens family of North Andover, Massachusetts.
  Stevens County, Wash. is named for him.
  Fort Stevens (established 1863; decomissioned 1947; now a state park) in Warrenton, Oregon, was named for him.
  Epitaph: "Who gave to the service of his country a quick and comprehensive mind, a warm and generous heart, a firm will, and a strong arm, and who fell while rallying his command, with the flag of the Republic in his dying grasp, at the battle of Chantilly, Va."
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about Isaac Ingalls Stevens: Joseph Taylor Hazard, Companion of Adventure: A Biography of Isaac Ingalls Stevens, First Governor of Washington
  George Watson Pratt (1830-1862) — also known as George W. Pratt — of Kingston, Ulster County, N.Y. Born in Prattsville, Greene County, N.Y., April 18, 1830. Leather manufacturer; member of New York state senate 10th District, 1858-59; colonel in the Union Army during the Civil War. Shot and wounded at the Second Battle of Bull Run, Va., August 30, 1862, and died as a result, in Albany, Albany County, N.Y., September 11, 1862 (age 32 years, 146 days). Interment at Albany Rural Cemetery, Menands, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Zadock Pratt and Abigail (Watson) Pratt (1807-1834); brother of Julia Harriet Pratt (1832-1898; who married Colin Macrae Ingersoll); married 1855 to Anna Attwood Tibbs (1833-1921); uncle of George Pratt Ingersoll (1861-1927).
  Political family: Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  James Streshly Jackson (1823-1862) — of Kentucky. Born in Fayette County, Ky., September 27, 1823. U.S. Representative from Kentucky 2nd District, 1861; general in the Union Army during the Civil War. Killed by rifle shot in the Battle of Perryville, Boyle County, Ky., October 8, 1862 (age 39 years, 11 days). Interment at Riverside Cemetery, Hopkinsville, Ky.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Charles Tillinghast James (1805-1862) — also known as Charles T. James — of Providence, Providence County, R.I. Born in West Greenwich Center, West Greenwich, Kent County, R.I., September 15, 1805. U.S. Senator from Rhode Island, 1851-57. Died of wounds that he received from the accidental explosion of a cannon shell of his own manufacture, with which he was experimenting, at Sag Harbor, Suffolk County, Long Island, N.Y., October 17, 1862 (age 57 years, 32 days). Interment at Swan Point Cemetery, Providence, R.I.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Thomas Reade Rootes Cobb (1823-1862) — of Georgia. Born in Jefferson County, Ga., April 10, 1823. Delegate from Georgia to the Confederate Provisional Congress, 1861-62; general in the Confederate Army during the Civil War. Shot and killed in the battle of Fredericksburg, Stafford County, Va., December 13, 1862 (age 39 years, 247 days). Interment at Oconee Hill Cemetery, Athens, Ga.
  Relatives: Brother of Howell Cobb; father-in-law of Hoke Smith (1855-1931).
  Political family: Cobb family of Athens, Georgia.
  Maxcy Gregg (1814-1862) — of Columbia, Richland District (now Richland County), S.C. Born in Columbia, Richland District (now Richland County), S.C., August 1, 1814. Lawyer; major in the U.S. Army during the Mexican War; delegate to South Carolina secession convention from Richland, 1860-62; general in the Confederate Army during the Civil War. During the Battle of Fredericksburg, he was shot in the spine, mortally wounded, and died two days later, in Fredericksburg, Va., December 15, 1862 (age 48 years, 136 days). Interment at Elmwood Cemetery, Columbia, S.C.
  Relatives: Son of James Gregg (1787-1852) and Cornelia Manning (Maxcy) Gregg (1792-1862).
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Jacob Babbitt (1809-1862) — of Bristol, Bristol County, R.I. Born in Bristol, Bristol County, R.I., May 9, 1809. Democrat. Banker; cotton manufacturer; member of Rhode Island state house of representatives, 1850; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Rhode Island, 1860; major in the Union Army during the Civil War. Shot and wounded (in a "friendly fire" accident) during the Civil War battle of Fredericksburg, Va., and died ten days later, in Mansion House Hospital, Alexandria, Va., December 23, 1862 (age 53 years, 228 days). Interment at Juniper Hill Cemetery, Bristol, R.I.
  Relatives: Son of Jacob Babbitt (1769-1850) and Bathsheba (Stoddard) Babbitt (1773-1852); married, October 7, 1826, to Abby Eliza Briggs (1808-1882); first cousin once removed of Elijah Babbitt (1795-1887) and George Henry Babbitt; first cousin twice removed of Francis Sanford Babbitt.
  Political families: Pendleton family of Connecticut; Greene family of Providence, Rhode Island; Starkweather-Pendleton family of Preston, Connecticut; Beakes-Greene-Jennings family of Michigan; Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Epitaph: "Know this, if I fall, it will be in defense of our beloved Constitution."
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  George M. Carhart (d. 1863) — of California. Member of California state assembly 21st District, 1853-54. Accidentally shot and killed while sleeping in Skinner's Saloon, Bannock, Beaverhead County, Mont., May 17, 1863. Burial location unknown.
  Langdon Cheves, Jr. (1814-1863) — Born in Pennsylvania, 1814. Engineer; delegate to South Carolina secession convention from St. Peter's, 1860-62; served in the Confederate Army during the Civil War. Hit by a shell, and killed, while defending the Confederate-held battery on Morris Island, Charleston, Charleston County, S.C., July 10, 1863 (age about 49 years). Interment at Magnolia Cemetery, Charleston, S.C.
  Relatives: Son of Langdon Cheves and Mary Elizabeth (Dulles) Cheves (1789-1836); married to Charlotte Lorain McCord (1819-1879); granduncle of Lewis Wardlaw Haskell (1868-1938); first cousin twice removed of John Foster Dulles and Allen Welsh Dulles.
  Political family: Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Henry Marchmore Shaw (1819-1864) — also known as Henry M. Shaw — of Indiantown (now Shawboro), Currituck County, N.C. Born in Newport, Newport County, R.I., November 20, 1819. Democrat. Physician; U.S. Representative from North Carolina 1st District, 1853-55, 1857-59; colonel in the Confederate Army during the Civil War. Scotch-Irish ancestry. While assembling with other Confederate troops for an expedition, he was shot and killed, near New Bern, Craven County, N.C., February 1, 1864 (age 44 years, 73 days). Interment at Shawboro Cemetery, Shawboro, N.C.
  Relatives: Son of John Allen Shaw and Betty (Marchmore) Shaw.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Peter Augustus Porter (1827-1864) — also known as Peter A. Porter — of Niagara Falls, Niagara County, N.Y. Born in Black Rock (now part of Buffalo), Erie County, N.Y., July 17, 1827. Member of New York state assembly from Niagara County 2nd District, 1862; colonel in the Union Army during the Civil War. Episcopalian. Killed by enemy gunshot while leading troops in battle, Cold Harbor, Hanover County, Va., June 3, 1864 (age 36 years, 322 days). Interment at Oakwood Cemetery, Niagara Falls, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Peter Buell Porter and Letitia Preston (Breckinridge) Porter (1786-1831); married, March 30, 1852, to Mary Cabell Breckinridge (1826-1854; granddaughter of John Breckinridge); married, November 9, 1859, to Josephine Morris (1832-1892); father of Peter Augustus Porter; nephew of Augustus Seymour Porter (1769-1849), Joseph Cabell Breckinridge and Robert Jefferson Breckinridge; great-grandnephew of William Preston and William Cabell; first cousin of Augustus Seymour Porter (1798-1872), Peter Buell Porter, Jr., John Cabell Breckinridge, Robert Jefferson Breckinridge, Jr. and William Campbell Preston Breckinridge; first cousin once removed of James Douglas Breckinridge, Benjamin William Sheridan Cabell (1793-1862), Clifton Rodes Breckinridge, Levin Irving Handy, Desha Breckinridge and Henry Skillman Breckinridge; first cousin twice removed of William Cabell, Jr., Francis Smith Preston, William Henry Cabell and James Patton Preston; second cousin of Carter Henry Harrison, William Lewis Cabell and George Craighead Cabell; second cousin once removed of William Campbell Preston, James McDowell, John Buchanan Floyd, John Smith Preston, George Rogers Clark Floyd, Edward Carrington Cabell, Ulysses Simpson Grant, Benjamin Earl Cabell and Carter Henry Harrison II; second cousin twice removed of Frederick Dent Grant, Ulysses Simpson Grant, Jr. and Earle Cabell; second cousin thrice removed of Benjamin Huntington; third cousin of John William Leftwich; third cousin once removed of John Davenport, Joshua Coit, James Davenport, Henry Huntington, Gurdon Huntington, Samuel Lathrop and Abel Huntington; third cousin twice removed of Samuel Huntington, Henry Scudder, Asa H. Otis and Alvred Bayard Nettleton; third cousin thrice removed of Daniel Frederick Webster, Lovel Davis Parmelee and Theron Ephron Catlin; fourth cousin of Ebenezer Huntington, Gaylord Griswold, Benjamin Trumbull, Parmenio Adams, Elisha Phelps, Lancelot Phelps, Theodore Davenport, Abijah Blodget and Benjamin Nicoll Huntington; fourth cousin once removed of Samuel H. Huntington, Jabez Williams Huntington, Abiel Case, Samuel George Andrews, Harrison Blodget, John Hall Brockway, Jairus Case, Lorenzo Burrows, Norman A. Phelps, Anson Levi Holcomb, George Smith Catlin, Waitman Thomas Willey, Lyman Trumbull, William Dean Kellogg, John Smith Phelps, William Gleason, Jr., Almon Case, James Phelps, Robert Coit, Jr., Samuel Lathrop Bronson, Abial Lathrop, Roger Wolcott and Allen Jacob Holcomb.
  Political families: Marshall-Harrison-Randolph-Cabell family of Virginia; Breckinridge-Preston-Cabell-Henry family of Virginia; Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York; Walker-Bolling family of Huntsville, Alabama (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  William Allison Owens (1833-1864) — also known as William A. Owens — of Charlotte, Mecklenburg County, N.C. Born September 19, 1833. Mayor of Charlotte, N.C., 1861-62; colonel in the Confederate Army during the Civil War. Shot and wounded at the Civil War battle of Snicker's Gap, and died the next day, July 19, 1864 (age 30 years, 304 days). Interment at Settler's Cemetery, Charlotte, N.C.
  Williamson Robert Winfield Cobb (1807-1864) — also known as Williamson R. W. Cobb — of Bellefonte, Jackson County, Ala. Born in Rhea County, Tenn., June 8, 1807. Democrat. Member of Alabama state house of representatives, 1845; U.S. Representative from Alabama, 1847-61 (6th District 1847-53, 8th District 1853-55, 6th District 1855-61); Representative from Alabama in the Confederate Congress 3rd District; defeated, 1861; elected 1863. Killed by the accidental discharge of his own pistol, while putting up a fence on his plantation near Bellefonte, Jackson County, Ala., November 1, 1864 (age 57 years, 146 days). Interment a private or family graveyard, Madison County, Ala.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Alfred Walker Bethea (1816-1865) — also known as Alfred W. Bethea — of Reedy Creek, Marion District (now Dillon County), S.C. Born November 12, 1816. Physician; delegate to South Carolina secession convention from Marion, 1860-62. Shot and killed by a deserter, February 18, 1865 (age 48 years, 98 days). Interment at Sweet Swamp Cemetery, Dillon County, S.C.
  Relatives: Son of John Bethea (1787-1827) and Hannah (Walker) Bethea (1788-1865); married to Flora Jane Bethea (1822-1897).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  John Milton (1807-1865) — of Marianna, Jackson County, Fla. Born near Louisville, Jefferson County, Ga., April 20, 1807. Democrat. Lawyer; Presidential Elector for Florida, 1848; member of Florida state senate, 1848-49; member of Florida state house of representatives, 1850; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Florida, 1860; Governor of Florida, 1861-65; died in office 1865. At the end of the Civil War, believing that "death would be preferable to reunion," he killed himself by gunshot, Marianna, Jackson County, Fla., April 1, 1865 (age 57 years, 346 days). Interment at St. Luke's Episcopal Cemetery, Marianna, Fla.
  Relatives: Son of Homer Virgil Milton (1781-1822) and Elizabeth (Robinson) Milton; married, December 9, 1826, to Susan Cobb; married 1844 to Caroline Howze; grandson of John Milton; grandfather of William Hall Milton and Susie Cobb Milton (who married William Yates Atkinson (1854-1899)).
  Political family: Milton family of Georgia.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
Abraham Lincoln Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865) — also known as "Honest Abe"; "Old Abe"; "The Rail-Splitter"; "The Illinois Baboon" — of New Salem, Menard County, Ill.; Springfield, Sangamon County, Ill. Born in a log cabin, Hardin County (part now in Larue County), Ky., February 12, 1809. Republican. Served in the U.S. Army during the Black Hawk War; postmaster; lawyer; member of Illinois state house of representatives, 1834-41; U.S. Representative from Illinois 7th District, 1847-49; candidate for Republican nomination for Vice President, 1856; candidate for U.S. Senator from Illinois, 1858; President of the United States, 1861-65; died in office 1865; His election as president in 1860 precipitated the Civil War; determined to preserve the Union, he led the North to victory on the battlefield, freed the slaves in the conquered states, and in doing this, redefined American nationhood. He was. English ancestry. Elected in 1900 to the Hall of Fame for Great Americans. Shot by the assassin John Wilkes Booth, during a play at Ford's Theater, in Washington, D.C., April 14, 1865; died at Peterson's Boarding House, across the street, the following day, April 15, 1865 (age 56 years, 62 days). Interment at Oak Ridge Cemetery, Springfield, Ill.; memorial monument at National Mall, Washington, D.C.; statue erected 1868 at Judiciary Park, Washington, D.C.
  Relatives: Son of Thomas Lincoln (1778-1851) and Nancy (Hanks) Lincoln (1784-1818); married, November 4, 1842, to Mary Ann Todd (1818-1882; sister-in-law of Ninian Wirt Edwards (1809-1889); half-sister-in-law of N. H. R. Dawson; aunt of Martha Dee Todd; grandniece of David Rittenhouse Porter); father of Robert Todd Lincoln; second cousin four times removed of Richard Henry Lee, Francis Lightfoot Lee and Arthur Lee; third cousin twice removed of Levi Lincoln; third cousin thrice removed of Thomas Sim Lee, Henry Lee, Charles Lee, Edmund Jennings Lee and Zachary Taylor; fourth cousin once removed of Levi Lincoln, Jr. and Enoch Lincoln.
  Political families: Lincoln-Lee family; Edwards-Cook family of Illinois and Nebraska (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Cross-reference: Clement Claiborne Clay, Jr. — Isham N. Haynie — William M. Stone — John Pitcher — Stephen Miller — John T. Stuart — William H. Seward — Henry L. Burnett — Judah P. Benjamin — Robert Toombs — Richard Taylor Jacob — George W. Jones — James Adams — John G. Nicolay — Edward Everett — Stephen T. Logan — Francis P. Blair — John Hay — Henry Reed Rathbone — James A. Ekin — Frederick W. Seward — John H. Surratt — John H. Surratt, Jr. — James Shields
  Lincoln counties in Ark., Colo., Idaho, Kan., La., Minn., Miss., Mont., Neb., Nev., N.M., Okla., Ore., Wash., W.Va., Wis. and Wyo. are named for him.
  The city of Lincoln, Nebraska, is named for him.  — Lincoln Memorial University, in Harrogate, Tennessee, is named for him.  — Lincoln University, in Jefferson City, Missouri, is named for him.  — Lincoln University, near Oxford, Pennsylvania, is named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: Abraham L. KeisterAbraham L. TuckerAbraham L. BrickAbraham L. KelloggAbraham Lincoln BernsteinA. Lincoln ReileyA. L. HelmickAbraham L. SuttonA. Lincoln AckerAbraham L. OsgoodAbraham L. WitmerAbraham L. PhillipsAbraham L. PaytonA. L. AuthA. Lincoln MooreA. Lincoln NiditchAbraham L. RubensteinAbraham L. Davis, Jr.Abraham L. FreedmanA. L. MarovitzLincoln GordonAbraham L. BannerAbraham Lincoln Tosti
  Coins and currency: His portrait has appeared on the U.S. penny (one cent coin) since 1909, and on the $5 bill since 1913. From the 1860s until 1927, his portrait also appeared on U.S. notes and certificates of various denominations from $1 to $500.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about Abraham Lincoln: David Herbert Donald, Lincoln — George Anastaplo, Abraham Lincoln : A Constitutional Biography — G. S. Boritt, ed., The Lincoln Enigma : The Changing Faces of an American Icon — Albert J. Beveridge, Abraham Lincoln 1809-1858 — Geoffrey Perret, Lincoln's War : The Untold Story of America's Greatest President as Commander in Chief — David Herbert Donald, We Are Lincoln Men : Abraham Lincoln and His Friends — Edward Steers, Jr., Blood on the Moon: The Assassination of Abraham Lincoln — Mario Cuomo, Why Lincoln Matters : Today More Than Ever — Michael W. Kauffman, American Brutus : John Wilkes Booth and the Lincoln Conspiracies — Doris Kearns Goodwin, Team of Rivals : The Political Genius of Abraham Lincoln — Joshua Wolf Shenk, Lincoln's Melancholy : How Depression Challenged a President and Fueled His Greatness — John Channing Briggs, Lincoln's Speeches Reconsidered — Ronald C. White, Jr., The Eloquent President : A Portrait of Lincoln Through His Words — Harold Holzer, Lincoln at Cooper Union : The Speech That Made Abraham Linco ln President — Michael Lind, What Lincoln Believed : The Values and Convictions of America's Greatest President — Doris Kearns Goodwin, Team of Rivals : The Political Genius of Abraham Lincoln — Michael Burlingame, ed., Abraham Lincoln: The Observations of John G. Nicolay and John Hay — Thomas J. Craughwell, Stealing Lincoln's Body — Roy Morris, Jr., The Long Pursuit: Abraham Lincoln's Thirty-Year Struggle with Stephen Douglas for the Heart and Soul of America — John Stauffer, Giants: The Parallel Lives of Frederick Douglass and Abraham Lincoln — Karen Judson, Abraham Lincoln (for young readers) — Maira Kalman, Looking at Lincoln (for young readers)
  Critical books about Abraham Lincoln: Thomas J. DiLorenzo, The Real Lincoln : A New Look at Abraham Lincoln, His Agenda, and an Unnecessary War
  Fiction about Abraham Lincoln: Gore Vidal, Lincoln: A Novel
  Image source: Portrait & Biographical Album of Washtenaw County (1891)
  James Henry Lane (1814-1866) — also known as James H. Lane; "Liberator of Kansas"; "Fighting Jim" — of Lawrenceburg, Dearborn County, Ind.; Lawrence, Douglas County, Kan. Born in Lawrenceburg, Dearborn County, Ind., June 22, 1814. Served in the U.S. Army during the Mexican War; Lieutenant Governor of Indiana, 1849-53; U.S. Representative from Indiana 4th District, 1853-55; delegate to Kansas state constitutional convention, 1855, 1857; Kansas Democratic state chair, 1855; U.S. Senator from Kansas, 1861-66; died in office 1866; general in the Union Army during the Civil War. Member, Freemasons. Deranged, and charged with financial irregularities, he was mortally wounded by a self-inflicted gunshot on July 1, 1866, and died ten days later, near Fort Leavenworth, Leavenworth County, Kan., July 11, 1866 (age 52 years, 19 days). Interment at Oak Hill Cemetery, Lawrence, Kan.
  Relatives: Son of Amos Lane (1778-1849) and Mary (Foote) Lane; brother of George W. Lane; married 1842 to Mary E. Baldridge (granddaughter of Arthur St. Clair).
  Political family: Lane family of Lawrenceburg, Indiana.
  Lane County, Kan. is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Almon Case (1819-1867) — of Obion County, Tenn. Born in Aurora, Portage County, Ohio, January 6, 1819. Member of Tennessee state senate, 1867; died in office 1867. Shot and killed, on his horse, by an unknown assailant, reportedly in retaliation for his advocacy of voting rights for ex-slaves, in Obion County, Tenn., January 11, 1867 (age 48 years, 5 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Gideon Case (1779-1822) and Persis (Seward) Case (1786-1874); married, February 21, 1844, to Clarissa Pease (1823-1854); married, August 6, 1860, to Mary A. Powell; second cousin once removed of Hezekiah Case; second cousin twice removed of Allen Jacob Holcomb; third cousin of Parmenio Adams (1776-1832); third cousin once removed of Asahel Pierson Case and Hiram Bidwell Case; third cousin twice removed of Noah Phelps, Pierpont Edwards, Augustus Seymour Porter (1769-1849), Peter Buell Porter, Nelson Platt Wheeler, William Egbert Wheeler, Joseph Wells Holcomb and William Lucius Case; third cousin thrice removed of Oliver Ellsworth, Edmond Alfred Holcomb, Alexander Royal Wheeler and Leonard Leach Case; fourth cousin of Abiel Case, Jairus Case, Anson Levi Holcomb, William Dean Kellogg, William Gleason, Jr. and Edwin Carpenter Pinney; fourth cousin once removed of John Davenport, Aaron Burr, James Davenport, Theodore Dwight, Benjamin Trumbull, Henry Waggaman Edwards, Elisha Phelps, Lancelot Phelps, Abijah Blodget, Augustus Seymour Porter (1798-1872), Peter Buell Porter, Jr., Oliver Dwight Filley, Peter Augustus Porter, James Levi Hotchkiss, Lafayette Blanchard Gleason and Claude Carpenter Pinney.
  Political family: Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Elijah Hise (1802-1867) — of Russellville, Logan County, Ky. Born in Allegheny County, Pa., July 4, 1802. Democrat. Lawyer; member of Kentucky state house of representatives, 1829; candidate for Lieutenant Governor of Kentucky, 1836; U.S. Charge d'Affaires to Guatemala, 1848-49; U.S. Representative from Kentucky 3rd District, 1866-67; died in office 1867. German ancestry. Died by a self-inflicted pistol shot, in Russellville, Logan County, Ky., May 8, 1867 (age 64 years, 308 days). He left a note declaring that he had "lost all hope of . saving the country from the impending disasters and ruin in which despotic and unconstitutional rule has involved her." However, later news reports disclosed that he had been about to be indicted for perjury and tax evasion, based on his statements as a candidate. Interment at Maple Grove Cemetery, Russellville, Ky.; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery, Washington, D.C.
  Relatives: Son of Frederick Hise and Nancy (Eckstein) Hise.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary
  Caleb Claiborne Herbert (c.1814-1867) — of Texas. Born in Goochland County, Va., about 1814. Member of Texas state senate, 1857-59; Representative from Texas in the Confederate Congress, 1862-65. Shot and killed outside a saloon in Columbus, Colorado County, Tex., July 5, 1867 (age about 53 years). Interment a private or family graveyard, Colorado County, Tex.
  Daniel Mace (1811-1867) — of Lafayette, Tippecanoe County, Ind. Born in Pickaway County, Ohio, September 5, 1811. Lawyer; member of Indiana state house of representatives, 1836; U.S. Attorney for Indiana, 1845-48; U.S. Representative from Indiana 8th District, 1851-57; postmaster at Lafayette, Ind., 1866-67. Suffered a stroke in 1866, never completely recovered, and became depressed over his condition; killed himself by gunshot, in the post office at Lafayette, Tippecanoe County, Ind., July 26, 1867 (age 55 years, 324 days). Interment at Greenbush Cemetery, Lafayette, Ind.
  Relatives: Son of Elizabeth Mace (1775-1842) and Edward Mace (1776-1846).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Damien Marchessault (1818-1868) — also known as Damien Marchesseau — of Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, Calif. Born in Saint-Antoine-sur-Richelieu, Quebec, April 1, 1818. Democrat. Mayor of Los Angeles, Calif., 1859-60, 1861-65, 1867. French Canadian ancestry. Died, from a self-inflicted gunshot wound, in the Council Room of Los Angeles City Hall, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, Calif., January 20, 1868 (age 49 years, 294 days). Burial location unknown.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  George W. Ashburn (c.1814-1868) — of Muscogee County, Ga. Born about 1814. Hotelier; cotton broker; colonel in the Union Army during the Civil War; opposed to secession, and led a regiment of Southern loyalists; delegate to Georgia state constitutional convention, 1867. Shot and killed by a group of masked men, in a boarding house at Columbus, Muscogee County, Ga., March 31, 1868 (age about 54 years). Interment at Rose Hill Cemetery, Macon, Ga.
  Relatives: Married 1847 to Martha Ann Smith.
  Cross-reference: W. D. Chipley
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  James Hinds (1833-1868) — of Arkansas. Born near Salem, Washington County, N.Y., December 5, 1833. Republican. U.S. Representative from Arkansas 2nd District, 1868; died in office 1868. Shot and killed by George A. Clark, who was drunk at the time, near Indian Bay, Monroe County, Ark., October 22, 1868 (age 34 years, 322 days). Interment somewhere in East Norwich, Long Island, N.Y.; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery, Washington, D.C.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Thomas Haughey (1826-1869) — of Elyton (now part of Birmingham), Jefferson County, Ala.; Decatur, Morgan County, Ala. Born in Glasgow, Scotland, 1826. Republican. Physician; surgeon; delegate to Alabama state constitutional convention, 1867; U.S. Representative from Alabama 6th District, 1868-69. While making a political speech, he was assaulted by A. B. Collins, who shot and mortally wounded him; he died six days later, in Courtland, Lawrence County, Ala., August 5, 1869 (age about 43 years). Interment at Green Cemetery, Pinson, Ala.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Edward Dexter Holbrook (1836-1870) — also known as Edward D. Holbrook — of Idaho City, Boise County, Idaho. Born in Elyria, Lorain County, Ohio, May 6, 1836. Lawyer; Delegate to U.S. Congress from Idaho Territory, 1865-69. Censured by the House of Representatives in 1869 for use of unparliamentary language. Shot and mortally wounded by Charles H. Douglas, and died the next day, in Idaho City, Boise County, Idaho, June 18, 1870 (age 34 years, 43 days). Interment at Masonic Burial Ground, Idaho City, Idaho.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Alexander Parker Crittenden (1816-1870) — also known as Alexander P. Crittenden — of Santa Clara County, Calif.; San Francisco, Calif.; Virginia City, Storey County, Nev. Born in Lexington, Fayette County, Ky., January 14, 1816. Lawyer; went to California for the 1849 Gold Rush; member of California state assembly, 1849-51, 1852-53 (Los Angeles District 1849-51, 5th District 1852-53). Shot and mortally wounded by his ex-lover, Laura D. Fair, on board a ferry boat in San Francisco Bay, and died two days later, in San Francisco, Calif., November 5, 1870 (age 54 years, 295 days). Fair was tried, found guilty, and sentenced to death, but the state supreme court ordered a new trial, and she was acquitted. Interment at Cypress Lawn Memorial Park, Colma, Calif.
  Relatives: Son of Thomas Turpin Crittenden (1788-1832) and Mary Wilson (Parker) Crittenden (1792-1869); brother of Thomas Turpin Crittenden (1825-1905; Union general); married to Clara Churchill (1820-1881); nephew of John Jordan Crittenden and Robert Crittenden; grandson of John Crittenden (1754-1806); first cousin of Thomas Leonidas Crittenden and Thomas Theodore Crittenden; first cousin once removed of Thomas Theodore Crittenden, Jr.; first cousin thrice removed of Thomas Jefferson; second cousin twice removed of Dabney Carr; third cousin once removed of Francis Wayles Eppes, Dabney Smith Carr, Benjamin Franklin Randolph, Meriwether Lewis Randolph and George Wythe Randolph; fourth cousin of Thomas Jefferson Coolidge and Frederick Madison Roberts; fourth cousin once removed of John Gardner Coolidge.
  Political family: Lee-Randolph family of Maryland and Virginia (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Lewis Holmes Kenan (1833-1871) — of Georgia. Born in Milledgeville, Baldwin County, Ga., 1833. Member of Georgia state senate 20th District, 1867-68. Shot and killed in Milledgeville, Baldwin County, Ga., 1871 (age about 38 years). Interment somewhere in Milledgeville, Ga.
  Relatives: Son of Augustus Holmes Kenan (1805-1870); nephew of Augustus A. Alston; grandnephew of Willis Alston; first cousin of Robert Augustus Alston.
  Political family: Walker-Alston family of North Carolina.
  Clement Laird Vallandigham (1820-1871) — also known as Clement L. Vallandigham — of Ohio. Born in New Lisbon (now Lisbon), Columbiana County, Ohio, July 29, 1820. Democrat. Lawyer; member of Ohio state house of representatives, 1845-46; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Ohio, 1856, 1864, 1868; U.S. Representative from Ohio 3rd District, 1858-63; defeated, 1852, 1854, 1862; candidate for Governor of Ohio, 1863. Leader of the pro-Southern "Copperheads" during the Civil War; arrested by the Union military authorities in 1863 for treasonable utterances, and banished to the Confederate States; returned to the North by way of Canada. Accidentally shot himself, while practicing a courtroom demonstration he planned as part of a defense in a murder trial (not actually in court at the time, contrary to legend), and died of his wound the next day, in the Lebanon House hotel, Lebanon, Warren County, Ohio, June 17, 1871 (age 50 years, 323 days). Interment at Woodland Cemetery, Dayton, Ohio.
  Relatives: Uncle of John A. McMahon (1833-1923).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  James Holt Clanton (1827-1871) — also known as James H. Clanton — of Alabama. Born in Columbia County, Ga., January 8, 1827. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army during the Mexican War; lawyer; member of Alabama state house of representatives, 1850; Presidential Elector for Alabama, 1860; general in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Alabama, 1868. In a hostile encounter with attorney David Nelson, son of T. A. R. Nelson, on Gay Street in front of the Lamar House Hotel and the St. Nicholas Saloon, Knoxville, Knox County, Tenn., Nelson, who was intoxicated, shot and killed him, September 27, 1871 (age 44 years, 262 days). Nelson was charged with murder, but a jury found not guilty. Interment at Oakwood Cemetery, Montgomery, Ala.
  Relatives: Son of Nathaniel Holt Clanton.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  O. C. Maxwell (1837-1871) — of Ohio. Born in Franklin, Warren County, Ohio, February 7, 1837. Republican. Colonel in the Union Army during the Civil War; wounded in the leg at Perryville, and crippled for life; delegate to Republican National Convention from Ohio, 1868. Died, in a state of desperation from financial difficulties, from a self-inflicted gunshot, in Dayton, Montgomery County, Ohio, December 5, 1871 (age 34 years, 301 days). Interment at Lebanon Cemetery, Lebanon, Ohio.
  Joseph R. Waldrop (1825-1872) — of Alabama. Born in Mississippi, 1825. Served in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; member of Alabama state house of representatives, 1869. Methodist. Member, Ku Klux Klan. Shot and killed while getting off his horse in front of a boarding house in Escatawpa, Washington County, Ala., 1872 (age about 47 years). Interment at Old Escatawpa Cemetery, Escatawpa, Ala.
  Edwin Stanton McCook (1837-1873) — Born in Carrollton, Carroll County, Ohio, March 26, 1837. General in the Union Army during the Civil War; secretary of Dakota Territory, 1872-73; died in office 1873. Member, Freemasons. Shot and killed by Peter P. Wintermute, a banker and political adversary, at a saloon in Yankton, Yankton County, Dakota Territory (now S.Dak.), September 11, 1873 (age 36 years, 169 days). Interment at Spring Grove Cemetery, Cincinnati, Ohio.
  Relatives: Brother of George Wythe McCook; first cousin of Edward Moody McCook (1833-1909) and Anson George McCook.
  Political family: McCook family of Steubenville, Ohio.
  McCook County, S.Dak. is named for him.
  Thomas Neel Stilwell (1830-1874) — also known as Thomas N. Stilwell — of Anderson, Madison County, Ind. Born in Stilwell, Butler County, Ohio, August 29, 1830. Republican. Lawyer; banker; member of Indiana state house of representatives, 1856; served in the Union Army during the Civil War; U.S. Representative from Indiana 11th District, 1865-67; U.S. Minister to Venezuela, 1867-68. During an argument over financial matters, he drew his pistol and fired at John E. Corwin, wounding him in the leg; Corwin then shot Stilwell in the head, killing him, in Anderson, Madison County, Ind., January 14, 1874 (age 43 years, 138 days). Interment at Maplewood Cemetery, Anderson, Ind.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Harvey Myers (1828-1874) — of Kentucky. Born February 10, 1828. Lawyer; candidate for U.S. Representative from Kentucky 6th District, 1872. Shot and killed by Col. William G. Terrell, whose wife he had represented in a divorce case, in the Stevenson & Myers law office, Greer Building, Covington, Kenton County, Ky., March 28, 1874 (age 46 years, 46 days). Interment at Highland Cemetery, Fort Mitchell, Ky.
  Harrison Cockrill (1826-1876) — of Owsley County, Ky. Born in Breathitt County, Ky., June 18, 1826. Member of Kentucky state senate, 1863-65, 1869-73; county judge in Kentucky, 1860; Presidential Elector for Kentucky, 1868; candidate for U.S. Representative from Kentucky 9th District, 1874. Member, Freemasons. Died of a (probably) self-inflicted gunshot wound, in Estill County, Ky., May 22, 1876 (age 49 years, 339 days). Interment at Cockrell Family Cemetery, Ravenna, Ky.
  Relatives: Son of Simon Cockrell (1771-1856) and Mary (Smith) Cockrell; brother of Elisha Logan Cockrell; married 1848 to Fannie Sewell; nephew of Moses Cockrell; grandson of Simon Cockrell (1745-1839); granduncle of Egbert Railey Cockrell and James Harris Baldwin (1876-1944); cousin by marriage of Jeremiah Weldon South; first cousin of Jeremiah Vardaman Cockrell and Francis Marion Cockrell; first cousin once removed of John T. Crisp and Ewing Cockrell; first cousin twice removed of South Trimble, Jerry Curtis South and John Glover South; first cousin thrice removed of South Strong and Eleanor Hume Offutt.
  Political family: Cockrell-South family of Kentucky.
  See also NNDB dossier
  John Doyle Lee (1812-1877) — also known as John D. Lee — Born in Kaskaskia, Randolph County, Ill., September 6, 1812. Member of Utah territorial House of Representatives, 1858. Mormon. Involved in the Mountain Meadows massacre on September 11, 1857, when a Mormon militia and Paiute Indian tribesmen slaughtered about 120 settlers who had been traveling through Utah by wagon train; indicted for murder almost twenty years later, and tried in 1875; the first trial ended in a hung jury; retried in 1876; convicted and sentenced to death; released for a time in order to settle his business affairs; executed by firing squad, at Mountain Meadows, Washington County, Utah, March 23, 1877 (age 64 years, 198 days). Interment at Panguitch Cemetery, Panguitch, Utah.
  Relatives: Grandfather of Louise Lee (1893-1974; who married Levi Stewart Udall) and Lela Lee (1895-1976; who married Jesse Addison Udall); great-grandfather of Stewart Lee Udall, Morris King Udall, Lee Kenyon Udall and Rex E. Lee; second great-grandfather of Milan Dale Smith, Jr. (1942-), Thomas Stewart Udall, Mark E. Udall, Gordon Harold Smith and Mike Lee.
  Political family: Udall family of Arizona.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Robert Augustus Alston (1832-1879) — also known as Robert A. Alston — of DeKalb County, Ga. Born in Milledgeville, Baldwin County, Ga., 1832. Lawyer; farmer; newspaper publisher; served in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; member of Georgia state house of representatives, 1878-79; died in office 1879. Methodist. A farmer named Ed Cox, angry over the sale of a prison labor lease which Alston had negotiated, armed himself, announced he would kill Alston, sought him in the Georgia state capitol building, and found him in the State Treasurer's office. Both men drew their pistols. Alston was mortally wounded by a shot to the head, and died later that day, in Atlanta, Fulton County, Ga., March 11, 1879 (age about 46 years). Cox was also shot and injured, but recovered, was convicted of murder, and sentenced to life imprisonment. Interment at Decatur Cemetery, Decatur, Ga.
  Relatives: Married to Mary Charlotte Magill (1839-1884); nephew of Augustus A. Alston and Thomas Coke Howard; grandnephew of Willis Alston; first cousin of Lewis Holmes Kenan (1833-1871).
  Political family: Walker-Alston family of North Carolina.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  John Milton Elliott (1820-1879) — also known as John M. Elliott — of Prestonsburg, Floyd County, Ky. Born in Scott County, Va., May 20, 1820. Democrat. Member of Kentucky state house of representatives, 1847, 1860-61; U.S. Representative from Kentucky 6th District, 1853-59; Delegate from Kentucky to the Confederate Provisional Congress, 1861-62; Representative from Kentucky in the Confederate Congress, 1862-65; circuit judge in Kentucky, 1868-74; Judge, Kentucky Court of Appeals, 1876-79; died in office 1879. Expelled from the Kentucky legislature in 1861 for supporting the Confederacy. Shot and killed by Col. Thomas Buford, in front of the ladies' entrance to the Capitol Hotel, in Frankfort, Franklin County, Ky., March 26, 1879 (age 58 years, 310 days). Interment at Frankfort Cemetery, Frankfort, Ky.; statue at Boyd County Courthouse Grounds, Catlettsburg, Ky.
  Relatives: Son of John Elliott and Jane Elliott.
  Elliott County, Ky. is named for him.
  Epitaph: "Assassinated, for having done his duty as a Judge."
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
James A. Garfield James Abram Garfield (1831-1881) — also known as James A. Garfield — of Hiram, Portage County, Ohio. Born in a log cabin near Orange, Cuyahoga County, Ohio, November 19, 1831. Republican. Lawyer; college professor; president, Eclectic University (now Hiram College); member of Ohio state senate, 1859-61; general in the Union Army during the Civil War; U.S. Representative from Ohio 19th District, 1863-81; President of the United States, 1881; died in office 1881. Disciples of Christ. English ancestry. Member, Freemasons; Delta Upsilon. Shot by the assassin Charles J. Guiteau, in the Baltimore & Potomac Railroad Station, Washington, D.C., July 2, 1881, and died from the effects of the wound and infection, in Elberon, Monmouth County, N.J., September 19, 1881 (age 49 years, 304 days). Interment at Lake View Cemetery, Cleveland, Ohio; statue erected 1887 at Garfield Circle, Washington, D.C.; statue at Golden Gate Park, San Francisco, Calif.
  Relatives: Son of Abram Garfield (1799-1833) and Elizabeth (Ballou) Garfield (1801-1888); married, November 11, 1858, to Lucretia "Crete" Rudolph (1832-1918); father of James Rudolph Garfield; fourth cousin of Eli Thayer; fourth cousin once removed of John Alden Thayer (1857-1917).
  Political families: Conger-Hungerford family; Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Cross-reference: William S. Maynard
  Garfield counties in Colo., Mont., Neb., Okla., Utah and Wash. are named for him.
  Garfield Mountain, in the Cascade Range, King County, Washington, is named for him.  — The city of Garfield, New Jersey, is named for him.
  Politician named for him: James G. Stewart
  Coins and currency: His portrait appeared on the U.S. $20 gold certificate in 1898-1905.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Books about James A. Garfield: Allan Peskin, Garfield: A Biography — Justus D. Doenecke, The Presidencies of James A. Garfield and Chester A. Arthur
  Image source: James G. Blaine, Twenty Years of Congress, vol. 2 (1886)
  Henry Clay Cole (1838-1881) — also known as Henry C. Cole — of Kokomo, Howard County, Ind. Born in Ripley County, Ind., 1838. Physician; mayor of Kokomo, Ind., 1881; died in office 1881. Shot and killed by a sheriff's posse, allegedly while he was attempting to rob and burn a grist mill, in Kokomo, Howard County, Ind., September 19, 1881 (age about 43 years). The shooters were personal enemies of his, so some suspected a conspiracy. Four members of the posse were indicted for manslaughter by a grand jury, but the charges were later dismissed. Interment at Crown Point Cemetery, Kokomo, Ind.
  Presumably named for: Henry Clay
  Relatives: Son of Jesse Cole and Elizabeth (Roberts) Cole.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Alonzo William Slayback (1838-1882) — also known as Alonzo W. Slayback; A. W. Slayback — of St. Louis, Mo. Born July 4, 1838. Democrat. Lawyer; colonel in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Missouri, 1876; candidate for U.S. Representative from Missouri 2nd District, 1876. Member, Elks. Shot and killed by John Cockerill, editor of the Post-Dispatch newspaper, in St. Louis, Mo., October 13, 1882 (age 44 years, 101 days). Cockerill pleaded self-defense and was not indicted by the grand jury. Interment at Machpelah Cemetery, Lexington, Mo.
  Thomas James Roberson Swafford (1849-1884) — also known as Thomas J. R. Swafford — Born December 27, 1849. Democrat. Member of Tennessee state senate, 1884; died in office 1884; shot through his arm by Jeff Dibrell, brother of George G. Dibrell; injured in several other gun and knife fights, in one of which he wounded two attackers and accidentally killed his father-in-law. Shot and killed during an armed confrontation with Monroe Hudson, shopkeeper, who had ordered him to leave his store, in Sparta, White County, Tenn., October 17, 1884 (age 34 years, 295 days). Interment at Old Sparta Cemetery, Sparta, Tenn.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Jacques J. Stillwell (1827-1884) — also known as J. J. Stillwell — of Gravesend (now part of Brooklyn), Kings County, N.Y. Born in 1827. Member of New York state assembly from Kings County 12th District, 1881-82. While suffering from an overdose of chloral hydrate, and fearing the onset of insanity, he shot himself, and died several days later, in Gravesend (now part of Brooklyn), Kings County, N.Y., December 14, 1884 (age about 57 years). Interment at Green-Wood Cemetery, Brooklyn, N.Y.
  John B. Bowman (1832-1885) — of East St. Louis, St. Clair County, Ill. Born in Germany, 1832. Republican. Civil engineer; lawyer; real estate business; mayor of East St. Louis, Ill., 1865-66, 1868, 1872-74, 1877-78. German ancestry. Shot and killed by an unknown assailant, in front of his home, in East St. Louis, St. Clair County, Ill., November 21, 1885 (age about 53 years). Two East St. Louis policemen were later charged with his murder, but they were never tried. Interment at Bellefontaine Cemetery, St. Louis, Mo.
  Theodore P. Rich (c.1848-1886) — of New York, New York County, N.Y.; Cobleskill, Schoharie County, N.Y. Born in New York, about 1848. Democrat. Candidate for New York state assembly from New York County 13th District, 1876. Pursued his estranged wife to Minnesota; killed her, and then, perhaps to avoid prosecution, killed himself, by gunshot, in the Astoria House hotel, St. Paul, Ramsey County, Minn., February 27, 1886 (age about 38 years). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Married 1876 to Fannie (Smith) Trimble (daughter of Henry Smith (1827?-?)).
  Claiborne Hooper Phillips (1847-1886) — of Nashville, Davidson County, Tenn. Born in 1847. Mayor of Nashville, Tenn., 1883-86. Accidentally shot and killed while on a hunting trip, near Britton, Marshall County, Dakota Territory (now S.Dak.), September 10, 1886 (age about 39 years). Burial location unknown.
  John C. Niglutsch (d. 1887) — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Clerk at Castle Garden; organist; member of New York state assembly from New York County 10th District, 1882. Suffered a self-inflicted gunshot wound, apparently while in a paranoid state, and died soon after, in Bellevue Hospital, New York, New York County, N.Y., November 8, 1887. Interment at Green-Wood Cemetery, Brooklyn, N.Y.
  Joseph Castle J. C. Eversole (1853-1888) — also known as J. C. Eversole — of Hazard, Perry County, Ky. Born in Perry County, Ky., July 26, 1853. Republican. Lawyer; merchant; delegate to Republican National Convention from Kentucky, 1884. Shot and killed, during the "French-Eversole War", in Perry County, Ky., April 15, 1888 (age 34 years, 264 days). Interment at Combs-Eversole Graveyard, Hazard, Ky.
  Relatives: Son of Nancy (Duff) Eversole (1828-1900) and John C. Eversole (1830-1864); married to Susan Combs.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  William Wirt Adams (1819-1888) — also known as Wirt Adams — of Jackson, Hinds County, Miss. Born in Frankfort, Franklin County, Ky., March 22, 1819. Democrat. Member of Mississippi state house of representatives, 1858-60; general in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; postmaster at Jackson, Miss., 1885-88. Shot and killed in a street encounter with John H. Martin, a newspaper editor with whom he had quarreled, in Jackson, Hinds County, Miss., May 1, 1888 (age 69 years, 40 days). Martin was also killed. Interment at Greenwood Cemetery, Jackson, Miss.; cenotaph at Confederate Cemetery, Okolona, Miss.
  Presumably named for: William Wirt
  Relatives: Son of George Adams (1784-1844) and Anna (Weisiger) Adams.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  John M. Lingle (1843-1889) — of Webb City, Jasper County, Mo. Born in Pennsylvania, April 2, 1843. Democrat. Newspaper publisher; postmaster at Webb City, Mo., 1885-89. After being threatened with criminal prosecution for allegedly misappropriating funds as postmaster, he stepped out the back door of the post office, and killed himself by gunshot, in Webb City, Jasper County, Mo., January 4, 1889 (age 45 years, 277 days). Interment at Webb City Cemetery, Webb City, Mo.
  Relatives: Married 1870 to Avaline Eizabeth McCutcheon (1847-1919).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  David Smith Terry (1823-1889) — also known as David S. Terry — of Galveston, Galveston County, Tex.; San Francisco, Calif.; Stockton, San Joaquin County, Calif. Born in Christian County (part now in Todd County), Ky., March 8, 1823. Lawyer; went to California for the 1849 Gold Rush; advocated the extension of slavery to California; justice of California state supreme court, 1855-59; chief justice of California state supreme court, 1857-59; killed U.S. Senator David C. Broderick in a duel near San Francisco in 1859; tried for murder, but acquitted; served in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; delegate to California state constitutional convention, 1878-79; candidate for Presidential Elector for California, 1880; his wife Sarah Althea Hill claimed to be the widow and heir of wealthy U.S. Senator William Sharon; in September, 1888, when her claim was finally rejected by U.S. Supreme Court Justice Stephen J. Field (acting as a Court of Appeals judge for California), she and Terry caused an altercation in the courtroom and were jailed six months for contempt of court. Five months after his release from jail, he encountered Justice Field and slapped him in the face; he was then shot through the heart and killed by U.S. Deputy Marshal David Neagle, the justice's bodyguard, in the train station dining room at Lathrop, San Joaquin County, Calif., August 14, 1889 (age 66 years, 159 days). Neagle was arrested by local authorities, but later released on the demand of the U.S. government. Interment at Stockton Rural Cemetery, Stockton, Calif.
  Relatives: Son of Joseph Royal Terry (1792-1877) and Sarah David (Smith) Terry (1793-1837); brother of Benjamin Franklin Terry (1821-1861); married, November 26, 1852, to Cornelia Runnels (1829-1884; niece of Hardin Richard Runnels); married, January 7, 1886, to Sarah Althea Hill (1857-1937).
  Political family: Runnels-Terry family of Houston, Texas.
  Cross-reference: Peter Singleton Wilkes
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  William Cassius Goodloe (1841-1889) — also known as W. Cassius Goodloe — of Lexington, Fayette County, Ky. Born in Madison County, Ky., June 27, 1841. Republican. Lawyer; newspaper publisher; delegate to Republican National Convention from Kentucky, 1868, 1872 (delegation chair), 1884, 1888; member of Kentucky state house of representatives, 1871; defeated, 1867; member of Republican National Committee from Kentucky, 1872-; member of Kentucky state senate, 1873; candidate for Kentucky state attorney general, 1875; U.S. Minister to Belgium, 1878-80. Episcopalian. Member, Loyal Legion. During a violent encounter in the lobby of the Lexington Post Office, he repeatedly stabbed and ultimately killed a political enemy, Col. Armistead Swope, who meanwhile shot and badly wounded him; before any prosecution could ensue, he died of his own wounds two days later, in the Phoenix Hotel, Lexington, Fayette County, Ky., November 8, 1889 (age 48 years, 134 days). Interment at Lexington Cemetery, Lexington, Ky.
  Relatives: Son of David Short Goodloe (1811-1881) and Sally Anne Lewis Clay (Smith) Goodloe (1818-1875); brother of Green Clay Goodloe (son-in-law of James Burnie Beck (1822-1890)); married 1865 to Mary Elizabeth Mann (1845-1920); nephew of Cassius Marcellus Clay; grandfather of William Cassius Goodloe III.
  Political family: Wilson-Dunn-Goodloe family of Indiana (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also U.S. State Dept career summary — Find-A-Grave memorial
  William Preston Taulbee (1851-1890) — also known as William P. Taulbee — of Salyersville, Magoffin County, Ky. Born in Morgan County, Ky., October 22, 1851. Democrat. Ordained minister; lawyer; U.S. Representative from Kentucky 10th District, 1885-89. Shot and mortally wounded, by Charles E. Kincaid, a journalist with whom he had quarreled, in the U.S. Capitol Building, and died eleven days later at Providence Hospital, Washington, D.C., March 11, 1890 (age 38 years, 140 days). Kincaid pleaded self-defense and was found not guilty of murder in 1891. Interment a private or family graveyard, Morgan County, Ky.
  Relatives: Son of William Harrison Taulbee (1824-1905) and Mary Ann (Wilson) Taulbee (1831-1916); married to Lou Emma Oney (1852-1903).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
William L. Couch William Lewis Couch (1850-1890) — also known as William L. Couch — of Wichita, Sedgwick County, Kan.; Oklahoma City, Oklahoma County, Okla. Born in Wilkes County, N.C., November 20, 1850. Grocer; hardware business; horse and mule dealer; mayor of Oklahoma City, Okla., 1889; resigned 1889. Shot in the leg in dispute over a land claim; the wound probably became infected, and he subsequently died, in Oklahoma, April 21, 1890 (age 39 years, 152 days). Interment at Fairlawn Cemetery, Oklahoma City, Okla.
  Relatives: Son of Meshach H. Couch (1828-1895) and Mary 'Polly' (Bryan) Couch (1828-1908); married to Cynthia Gordon (1843-1918).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: City of Oklahoma City
  Lucien Wells Sperry (1820-1890) — also known as Lucien W. Sperry — of New Haven, New Haven County, Conn. Born in Woodbridge, New Haven County, Conn., March 8, 1820. Coal dealer; insurance agent; mayor of New Haven, Conn., 1866-69; member of Connecticut state senate 4th District, 1869-70. Unable to account for money entrusted to him, and likely to be arrested as an embezzler, he died from a self-inflicted gunshot, in New Haven, New Haven County, Conn., June 26, 1890 (age 70 years, 110 days). Interment at Evergreen Cemetery, New Haven, Conn.
  Relatives: Son of Enoch K. Sperry (1787-1856) and Mary Atlanta (Sperry) Sperry (1795-1864); brother of Nehemiah Day Sperry (1827-1911).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Evan E. Swearengin (1840-1890) — also known as Van Swearengin — of Concordia, Cloud County, Kan. Born in Indiana, January 17, 1840. Served in the Union Army during the Civil War; member of Kansas state senate, 1889-90; died in office 1890. Died from self-inflicted gunshot, in Concordia, Cloud County, Kan., October 12, 1890 (age 50 years, 268 days). Interment at Pleasant Hill Cemetery, Concordia, Kan.
  Relatives: Married 1864 to Alice Udell.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Frank B. Arnold (1839-1890) — also known as Michael Edwards; Benjamin Franklin Arnold — of Unadilla, Otsego County, N.Y. Born in County Clare, Ireland, March 29, 1839. Republican. School teacher; lawyer; member of New York state assembly from Otsego County 2nd District, 1885-87; member of New York state senate 23rd District, 1888-89; candidate for U.S. Representative from New York 24th District, 1890, 1890. Irish ancestry. Died from a self-inflicted gunshot, in his law office, Unadilla, Otsego County, N.Y., December 11, 1890 (age 51 years, 257 days). Interment at St. Matthew's Cemetery, Unadilla, N.Y.
  Presumably named for: Benjamin Franklin
  Relatives: Married 1873 to Clarissa Mygatt Sands (1845-1881).
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Charles A. Binder (1857-1891) — also known as John Roth — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in New York, New York County, N.Y., November 2, 1857. Lawyer; member of New York state assembly from New York County 10th District, 1884, 1886; accused in 1891 of embezzling $20,000 from the estate of Barbara Hausman; fled and became a fugitive, traveling under the alias "John Roth". German ancestry. Wounded by self-inflicted gunshot, in his room at the Sheridan House Hotel, and died there early the next morning, in Elizabeth, Union County, N.J., May 17, 1891 (age 33 years, 196 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Margaret Binder.
  See also Wikipedia article
  John Adam Henneman (1835-1891) — also known as J. A. Henneman — of Spartanburg, Spartanburg County, S.C. Born in Kronach, Bavaria (now Germany), 1835. Served in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; jeweler; mayor of Spartanburg, S.C., 1891; died in office 1891. German ancestry. Shot and killed by John Williams, in Spartanburg, Spartanburg County, S.C., September 27, 1891 (age about 56 years). Williams was hanged for the murder on October 7, 1892. Interment at Oakwood Cemetery, Spartanburg, S.C.
  Relatives: Married to Louisa Rate (1838-1909).
  R. D. McCotter (d. 1892) — of Pamlico County, N.C. Member of North Carolina state senate, 1892; died in office 1892. Shot and killed from ambush near his home, purportedly by the "White Caps", in Pamlico County, N.C., May 20, 1892. Burial location unknown.
  Francis Spies, Jr. (1840-1893) — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y., May 10, 1840. Democrat. Served in the Union Army during the Civil War; commission merchant; Portland cement importer; Vice-Consul for Honduras in New York, N.Y., 1887-93. Member, Grand Army of the Republic; Tammany Hall. Died from a self-inflicted gunshot, in New York, New York County, N.Y., June 21, 1893 (age 53 years, 42 days). Interment at Green-Wood Cemetery, Brooklyn, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Francis Spies (1810-1860) and Amanda Maria (Harding) Spies (1811-1870); married 1869 to Amelia L. Schwarzwaelder (1840-1904).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Carter Henry Harrison (1825-1893) — of Chicago, Cook County, Ill. Born near Lexington, Fayette County, Ky., February 15, 1825. Democrat. U.S. Representative from Illinois 2nd District, 1875-79; mayor of Chicago, Ill., 1879-87, 1893; died in office 1893; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Illinois, 1880, 1884; candidate for Governor of Illinois, 1884. Shot and killed at his home, by Patrick Eugene Prendergast, in Chicago, Cook County, Ill., October 28, 1893 (age 68 years, 255 days). Prendergast, who was defended by famed trial lawyer Clarence Darrow, was tried for murder, convicted, sentenced to death, and hanged. Interment at Graceland Cemetery, Chicago, Ill.
  Relatives: Son of Carter Henry Harrison (1796-1825) and Caroline Evaline (Russell) Harrison (1797-1875); married to Sophonisba Grayson Preston (1833-1876; great-grandniece of William Smallwood); father of Carter Henry Harrison II; grandson of William Russell (1758-1825); great-grandson of William Russell (1735-1793); great-grandnephew of Benjamin Harrison (1726-1791) and William Cabell; second great-grandnephew of Richard Randolph; first cousin once removed of Joseph Cabell Breckinridge, Benjamin William Sheridan Cabell (1793-1862) and Robert Jefferson Breckinridge; first cousin twice removed of Thomas Jefferson, Carter Bassett Harrison, William Cabell, Jr., William Henry Cabell and William Henry Harrison (1773-1841); first cousin thrice removed of Richard Bland, Peyton Randolph (1721-1775) and Robert Carter Nicholas (1729-1780); second cousin of John Cabell Breckinridge, Peter Augustus Porter (1827-1864), William Lewis Cabell, Robert Jefferson Breckinridge, Jr., William Campbell Preston Breckinridge and George Craighead Cabell; second cousin once removed of Dabney Carr, John Scott Harrison, Edward Carrington Cabell, Clifton Rodes Breckinridge, Peter Augustus Porter (1853-1925), Benjamin Earl Cabell, Levin Irving Handy, Desha Breckinridge and Henry Skillman Breckinridge; second cousin twice removed of Theodorick Bland, Edmund Jenings Randolph, George Nicholas, Beverley Randolph, Wilson Cary Nicholas, John Nicholas, John Randolph of Roanoke and Earle Cabell; third cousin of Francis Wayles Eppes, Dabney Smith Carr, Benjamin Franklin Randolph, Meriwether Lewis Randolph, George Wythe Randolph, John William Leftwich and Benjamin Harrison (1833-1901); third cousin once removed of John Marshall, Henry Lee, Charles Lee, James Markham Marshall, Thomas Mann Randolph, Jr., Alexander Keith Marshall, Edmund Jennings Lee, Peyton Randolph (1779-1828), Henry St. George Tucker, Robert Carter Nicholas (1787-1857), Stanley Matthews, Thomas Jefferson Coolidge, Russell Benjamin Harrison and Frederick Madison Roberts; third cousin twice removed of Burwell Bassett, John Gardner Coolidge and William Henry Harrison (1896-1990); third cousin thrice removed of Charles Carroll of Carrollton; fourth cousin of Thomas Marshall, James Keith Marshall, Peter Myndert Dox, Edmund Randolph and Nathaniel Beverly Tucker; fourth cousin once removed of John Wayles Eppes, Fitzhugh Lee, Connally Findlay Trigg, John Augustine Marshall, Richard Evelyn Byrd, Harry Bartow Hawes, William Welby Beverley and James Harlan Cleveland, Jr..
  Political families: Marshall-Harrison-Randolph-Cabell family of Virginia; Breckinridge-Preston-Cabell-Henry family of Virginia; Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York; Walker-Bolling family of Huntsville, Alabama (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Cross-reference: Robert E. Burke
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  Datus Ensign Coon (1831-1893) — also known as Datus E. Coon — of Osage, Mitchell County, Iowa; Mason City, Cerro Gordo County, Iowa; Selma, Dallas County, Ala.; San Diego, San Diego County, Calif. Born in DeRuyter, Madison County, N.Y., February 20, 1831. Republican. Newspaper publisher; colonel in the Union Army during the Civil War; delegate to Alabama state constitutional convention, 1868; member of Alabama state senate, 1870; member of Alabama state house of representatives, 1870; delegate to Republican National Convention from Alabama, 1872; U.S. Commercial Agent (Consul) in Baracoa, 1879-85. Accidentally shot, and died soon after, in San Diego, San Diego County, Calif., December 17, 1893 (age 62 years, 300 days). Interment at Mt. Hope Cemetery, San Diego, Calif.
  Relatives: Married 1855 to Hattie A. Cummins; married 1865 to Jennie (Ells) Bailey.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Thomas McKee Bayne (1836-1894) — also known as Thomas M. Bayne — of Allegheny (now part of Pittsburgh), Allegheny County, Pa.; Washington, D.C. Born in Bellevue, Allegheny County, Pa., June 14, 1836. Republican. Lawyer; colonel in the Union Army during the Civil War; Allegheny County District Attorney, 1870-74; U.S. Representative from Pennsylvania 23rd District, 1877-91; defeated, 1874; delegate to Republican National Convention from Pennsylvania, 1884, 1888. Alarmed about a tuberculosis-related lung hemorrhage, he killed himself, by gunshot to the head, in Washington, D.C., June 16, 1894 (age 58 years, 2 days). Interment at Uniondale Cemetery, Pittsburgh, Pa.
  Epitaph: "Eternal rest give unto him oh Lord, and let perpetual light shine upon him. May he rest in peace."
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Alson Bailey Abbott (1844-1894) — also known as Alson B. Abbott — of Queensbury, Warren County, N.Y.; Glens Falls, Warren County, N.Y. Born in Andover, Essex County, Mass., November 3, 1844. Served in the Union Army during the Civil War; lawyer; member of New York state assembly from Warren County, 1878; president, Canton Bridge Company. While cleaning a shotgun for hunting, it accidentally discharged, killing him, in Glens Falls, Warren County, N.Y., August 27, 1894 (age 49 years, 297 days). Interment at Pineview Cemetery, Queensbury, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of William F. Abbott (1814-1896) and Sarah Job (Abbott) Abbott (1818-1863); married 1873 to Sarah Morgan.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Peter R. Morrissey (1859-1895) — of St. Louis, Mo. Born in St. Louis County, Mo., August 14, 1859. Democrat. Saloon keeper; arrested in December 1886 on federal charges of vote fraud; found guilty in April 1887, but released because the indictment did not specify that the ballots were for a federal office; indicted again soon after, but the charges were dropped in November; indicted for naturalization fraud in 1889, but not convicted; member of Missouri state senate 31st District, 1893-95; died in office 1895. Catholic. Irish ancestry. While in bed, he was shot twice with his own pistol, and killed, by his mistress, Maud Lewis, in her "house of ill repute", in St. Louis, Mo., May 13, 1895 (age 35 years, 272 days). After a dramatic and highly publicized trial, Maud Lewis was convicted of second degree murder and sentenced to fifteen years in prison; she was pardoned by Gov. Lon Vest Stephens in January 1901. Interment at Calvary Cemetery, St. Louis, Mo.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Michael Daniel Harter (1846-1896) — also known as Michael D. Harter — of Mansfield, Richland County, Ohio. Born in Canton, Stark County, Ohio, April 6, 1846. Democrat. U.S. Representative from Ohio, 1891-95 (15th District 1891-93, 14th District 1893-95). Lutheran. Killed by self-inflicted gunshot, in Fostoria, Seneca County, Ohio, February 22, 1896 (age 49 years, 322 days). Interment at Mansfield Cemetery, Mansfield, Ohio.
  Relatives: Son of Isaac Harter; married 1869 to Mary Brown; grandson of Robert Moore (1778-1831).
  Political family: Moore family of Beaver, Pennsylvania.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Charles Henry Voorhis (1833-1896) — also known as Charles H. Voorhis — of New Jersey. Born in Spring Valley (now Paramus), Bergen County, N.J., March 13, 1833. Republican. Lawyer; banker; delegate to Republican National Convention from New Jersey, 1864; U.S. Representative from New Jersey 5th District, 1879-81. Indicted in 1881 for bank fraud over his actions as president of two banks, which later became insolvent; tried and found not guilty. Fearing oncoming total blindness, he died from a self-inflicted gunshot, in his office at the Davidson Building, Jersey City, Hudson County, N.J., April 15, 1896 (age 63 years, 33 days). Original interment at Bayview - New York Bay Cemetery, Jersey City, N.J.; reinterment at Hackensack Cemetery, Hackensack, N.J.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Caleb Dorsey (1833-1896) — of Pike County, Mo.; Stanislaus County, Calif. Born in Patapsco, Anne Arundel County, Md., September 7, 1833. Colonel in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; livestock raiser; bank director; member of California state assembly 5th District, 1877-80. Member, Freemasons. Shot and killed by his mining partner, J. T. Newcomer, at Snell Mine, near Columbia, Tuolumne County, Calif., April 21, 1896 (age 62 years, 227 days). Newcomer claimed self-defense, but was convicted of murder and sentenced to prison. Interment at Stockton Rural Cemetery, Stockton, Calif.
  Relatives: Son of Edward Worthington Dorsey (1793-1858) and Eleanor Elizabeth (Brown) Dorsey (1804-1892); nephew of Thomas Beale Dorsey (1780-1855); first cousin once removed of George Riggs Gaither, Jr.; second cousin once removed of Daniel Dorsey and Andrew Dorsey; third cousin once removed of Richard Ridgely, Alexander Warfield and Clement F. Dorsey; third cousin thrice removed of Leonard Franklin Poffenbarger; fourth cousin once removed of Joseph Maull, Richard Yates and Alexander Warfield Dorsey.
  Political families: Dorsey-Poffenbarger family of Maryland; Maull family of Lewes, Delaware; Livingston-Schuyler family of New York (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Abram S. Cassedy (d. 1896) — of Newburgh, Orange County, N.Y. Lawyer; mayor of Newburgh, N.Y., 1880-82. Distressed over business losses, he shot himself, and died later that day, in in Newburgh, Orange County, N.Y., April 29, 1896. Burial location unknown.
  Frazier B. Baker (c.1857-1898) — of Lake City, Florence County, S.C. Born about 1857. Republican. School teacher; postmaster at Lake City, S.C., 1897-98; his appointment as postmaster aroused strenuous opposition among white residents; U.S. Senators Ben Tillman and John L. McLaurin, and U.S. Rep. James Norton all demanded his removal from office "because of his color"; many violent incidents followed. African ancestry. Late at night, a mob of armed white men surrounded his home and post office, and set it on fire; when the family awoke and attempted to escape, they were met with a hail of bullets; Baker was shot and killed, in Lake City, Florence County, S.C., February 22, 1898 (age about 41 years). Federal prosecutors pressed charges against eleven men, none of whom were convicted. Burial location unknown.
  See also Wikipedia article
  John J. Boyle (c.1843-1898) — of New Castle, New Castle County, Del. Born about 1843. Democrat. Merchant; Delaware State Sealer of Weights and Measures. Killed himself by self-inflicted gunshot, April 6, 1898 (age about 55 years). Burial location unknown.
  Charles Fenton Collier (1817-1899) — also known as Charles F. Collier — of Petersburg, Va. Born in Petersburg, Va., September 27, 1817. Democrat. Lawyer; member of Virginia state legislature, 1852; Representative from Virginia in the Confederate Congress, 1862-64; mayor of Petersburg, Va., 1866-68, 1888-92; president, Southern Railroad. Presbyterian. Died, from a self-inflicted gunshot, attributed to "insomnia, melancholia, and nervous prostration," in Petersburg, Va., June 29, 1899 (age 81 years, 275 days). Interment at Blandford Cemetery, Petersburg, Va.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  James Balbirnie (1838-1899) — of Muskegon, Muskegon County, Mich. Born in Ontario, 1838. Republican. Merchant; mayor of Muskegon, Mich., 1899; died in office 1899. Scottish ancestry. Shot and killed by John W. Tayer, who had been ousted as city poor director, in his store in his store at Muskegon, Muskegon County, Mich., June 29, 1899 (age about 60 years). Tayer died by suicide at the scene; he shot himself, then swallowed carbolic acid. Interment at Evergreen Cemetery, Muskegon, Mich.
  Relatives: Married to Ellen T. Watson (1847-1900).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Herbert Best Fellows (1860-1899) — also known as Herbert B. Fellows — of Scarsdale, Westchester County, N.Y. Born in Clifton Park, Saratoga County, N.Y., November 20, 1860. Democrat. Express agent; postmaster at Scarsdale, N.Y., 1894-99. shot, killed, and robbed, in Scarsdale, Westchester County, N.Y., December 4, 1899 (age 39 years, 14 days). A 19-year-old named Edgar C. Burnz confessed to the crime, was arrested, and held at the county jail in White Plains, where, in July 1900, he led about 100 prisoners in an unsuccessful escape attempt. Burnz smoked as many as eighty cigarettes a day, and the press dubbed him the "Cigarette Boy Murderer". At his murder trial in December 1900, his defense was that cigarette smoking had made him insane. He was convicted, sentenced to life in prison, but released about 1920, and became an Episcopal minister. Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of John Fellows and Sarah Catherine (Best) Fellows; married, September 21, 1889, to Amenia C. Fellows (1863-1953).
  William Justus Goebel (1856-1900) — also known as William J. Goebel; "Boss Bill"; "The Kenton King"; "William the Conqueror" — of Kentucky. Born in Sullivan County, Pa., January 4, 1856. Democrat. Lawyer; member of Kentucky state senate, 1887-99; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Kentucky, 1888; delegate to Kentucky state constitutional convention, 1890-91; Governor of Kentucky, 1900; died in office 1900. In 1895, he killed a factional rival, John Stanford, in a political quarrel; never tried. While contesting the outcome of a gubernatorial election, was shot and mortally wounded in front of the old Kentucky State Capitol; he was declared elected and sworn in as Governor before he died four days later, in Frankfort, Franklin County, Ky., February 3, 1900 (age 44 years, 30 days). Interment at Frankfort Cemetery, Frankfort, Ky.; statue at Old State Capitol Grounds, Frankfort, Ky.
  Relatives: Brother of Justus Goebel (1872?-?).
  Cross-reference: William S. Taylor — Caleb Powers — Charles Finley
  See also NNDB dossier
  Joseph Flesheim (1848-1900) — of South Haven, Van Buren County, Mich.; Menominee, Menominee County, Mich. Born in Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, Ohio, April 8, 1848. Republican. Insurance business; president, Menominee Electric Company, manufacturer of telephone switchboards and equipment; mayor of Menominee, Mich., 1888; member of Michigan state senate, 1891-94 (31st District 1891-92, 30th District 1893-94). German ancestry. Member, Freemasons. Facing the failure of his business enterprises, he died by self-inflicted gunshot, in Menominee, Menominee County, Mich., February 26, 1900 (age 51 years, 324 days). Interment at Riverside Cemetery, Menominee, Mich.
  Relatives: Son of Samuel Flesheim and Babette (Straus) Flesheim; married, February 25, 1875, to Delia Isabella 'Belle' Stephenson.
  William H. Mattox (1836-1900) — of Elbert County, Ga. Born in Elbert County, Ga., 1836. Planter; merchant; served in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; member of Georgia state house of representatives, 1865-66; delegate to Georgia state constitutional convention, 1877; member of Georgia state senate, 1880-81. Shot and killed by his son-in-law J. B. Jones, Jr., during a gunfight, in Elbert County, Ga., November 17, 1900 (age about 64 years). Interment at Elmhurst Cemetery, Elberton, Ga.
  Relatives: Married to Rebecca Allen (daughter of Singleton Walthall Allen; niece of George Washington Heard, Barnard Carroll Heard and Thomas Jefferson Heard; aunt by marriage of Willis B. Adams (1861-1913); granddaughter of Stephen Heard).
  Political family: Heard family of Elberton, Georgia.
  Louis Stern (c.1856-1901) — of St. Paul, Ramsey County, Minn. Born in Germany, about 1856. Democrat. Naturalized U.S. citizen; newspaper reporter; U.S. Commercial Agent (Consul) in Bamberg, 1893-1901. Jewish. Arrested and fined in Kissingen, Germany, 1895, for insulting the Baron von Thuengen; also charged with misrepresenting his 15-year-old son as being twelve in order to get cheaper passage to Europe for him on a steamship; the U.S. Consul General in Berlin asserted that Mr. Stern was "very harshly and unjustly treated". Depressed over financial problems and perceived anti-Semitism, he began neglecting his work; he was recalled as commercial agent in 1901, but remained at Bamberg; his failure to return money he had collected on behalf of U.S. citizens led to a judgement against him for 2,000 marks, which he was unable to pay; he died by self-inflicted gunshot, in the public gardens at Bamberg, Germany, June 10, 1901 (age about 45 years). Burial location unknown.
William McKinley William McKinley, Jr. (1843-1901) — also known as "Idol of Ohio" — of Canton, Stark County, Ohio. Born in Niles, Trumbull County, Ohio, January 29, 1843. Republican. Major in the Union Army during the Civil War; lawyer; U.S. Representative from Ohio, 1877-84, 1885-91 (17th District 1877-79, 16th District 1879-81, 17th District 1881-83, 18th District 1883-84, 20th District 1885-87, 18th District 1887-91); delegate to Republican National Convention from Ohio, 1884, 1888; Governor of Ohio, 1892-96; President of the United States, 1897-1901; died in office 1901. Methodist. Scotch-Irish ancestry. Member, Loyal Legion; Freemasons; Grand Army of the Republic; Knights of Pythias; Sigma Alpha Epsilon. Shot by the assassin Leon Czolgosz, at a reception in the Temple of Music, at the Pan American Exposition in Buffalo, N.Y., September 6, 1901, and died eight days later, in Buffalo, Erie County, N.Y., September 14, 1901 (age 58 years, 228 days). Original interment at West Lawn Cemetery, Canton, Ohio; reinterment in 1907 at McKinley Monument, Canton, Ohio; statue at Lucas County Courthouse Grounds, Toledo, Ohio.
  Relatives: Son of William McKinley (1807-1892) and Nancy Campbell (Allison) McKinley (1809-1897); married, January 25, 1871, to Ida Saxton (1847-1907); first cousin of William McKinley Osborne; fourth cousin once removed of Henry Prather Fletcher (1873-1959).
  Political family: McKinley-Osborne-Fletcher-Allison family of Ohio.
  Cross-reference: Albert Halstead — Loran L. Lewis — George B. Cortelyou — John Goodnow
  McKinley County, N.M. is named for him.
  Mount McKinley (the highest peak in North America, now known by its traditional name, Denali), in Denali Borough, Alaska, was named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: William McKinley ThomasWilliam McKinley ThomasWilliam M. BellWilliam M. Branch
  Coins and currency: His portrait appeared on the U.S. $500 bill in 1928-46.
  Campaign slogan (1896): "The Full Dinner Pail."
  Campaign slogan (1896): "The Advance Agent of Prosperity."
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about William McKinley: Lewis L. Gould, The Presidency of William McKinley — Kevin Phillips, William McKinley — H. Wayne Morgan, William McKinley and His America
  Image source: American Monthly Review of Reviews, October 1901
  William Van Slooten (c.1857-1901) — also known as "The Mysterious Van Slooten" — of Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y. Born in New Orleans, Orleans Parish, La., about 1857. Democrat. Mining engineer; candidate for New York state senate 5th District, 1893. Died, from a self-inflicted gunshot, in Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y., December 14, 1901 (age about 44 years). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of John Van Slooten.
  David Todd Gillmor (1837-1902) — also known as David T. Gillmor — of Paterson, Passaic County, N.J. Born in Connecticut, January 25, 1837. Republican. Dry goods merchant; mayor of Paterson, N.J., 1881-82. Died from a self-inflicted gunshot, while suffering from Bright's disease, in Paterson, Passaic County, N.J., August 17, 1902 (age 65 years, 204 days). Interment at Cedar Lawn Cemetery, Paterson, N.J.
  Relatives: Son of Frederick Gillmor (1807-1887) and Maria (Bogert) Gillmor (1810-1871).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
Hale Johnson Hale Johnson (1847-1902) — of Newton, Jasper County, Ill. Born in Montgomery County, Ind., August 21, 1847. Served in the Union Army during the Civil War; lawyer; mayor of Newton, Ill.; Prohibition candidate for Vice President of the United States, 1896. Disciples of Christ. While attempting to collect a debt from a farmer, the debtor, Harry Harris, shot and killed him, in Bogota, Jasper County, Ill., November 4, 1902 (age 55 years, 75 days). Harris was arrested that day, but poisoned himself on the way to jail. Interment at Riverside Cemetery, Newton, Ill.
  Relatives: Son of John B. Johnson; married 1871 to Mary E. Loofbourrow (1848-1944).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: The Parties and The Men (1896)
  James Buchanan Marcum (1858-1903) — also known as J. B. Marcum — of Kentucky. Born January 9, 1858. Republican. Kentucky Republican state chair, 1903. Shot and killed, by Curtis Jett and Tom White, at the behest of county judge James H. Hargis, on the steps of the Breathitt County Courthouse, Jackson, Breathitt County, Ky., May 4, 1903 (age 45 years, 115 days). Interment at Sewell Cemetery, Jackson, Ky.
  Presumably named for: James Buchanan
  Relatives: Nephew by marriage of Thomas Frazier Hargis (1842-1903).
  Political family: Cockrell-South family of Kentucky.
  Andrew Haswell Green (1820-1903) — also known as Andrew H. Green; "Father of Greater New York"; "Handy Andy" — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Born near Worcester, Worcester County, Mass., October 6, 1820. Democrat. Delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1880; delegate to New York state constitutional convention 13th District, 1894. Protestant. Guided creation of Central Park in New York, and Niagara State Preserve (first state park in the U.S.); led crusade to consolidate the five boroughs into today's New York City; helped create the New York Public Library, the Bronx Zoo, and other cultural institutions. Shot and killed, by a murderer who mistook him for someone else, in front of his home, on Park Avenue, Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., November 13, 1903 (age 83 years, 38 days). Interment at Worcester Rural Cemetery, Worcester, Mass.
  Green Island, in the Niagara River, at Niagara Falls, New York, is named for him.
  Robert Milligan McLane (1867-1904) — also known as Robert M. McLane — of Baltimore, Md. Born in Baltimore, Md., November 20, 1867. Democrat. Lawyer; mayor of Baltimore, Md., 1903-04; died in office 1904. Died from a self-inflicted gunshot, in Baltimore, Md., May 30, 1904 (age 36 years, 192 days). Interment at Green Mount Cemetery, Baltimore, Md.
  Relatives: Son of James Latimer McLane (1834-1923) and Fanny (King) McLane (1836-1905); married, May 14, 1904, to Mary (Lusby) Van Bibber; nephew of Robert Milligan McLane (1815-1898); grandson of Louis McLane.
  Political family: McLane family of Baltimore, Maryland (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  William H. Stuart (c.1857-1906) — Born about 1857. Not U.S. citizen; shipbroker; exporter; U.S. Vice Consul in Batum, 1904-06, died in office 1906. Shot and killed, by an unknown perpetrator, in Batum, Russia (now Georgia), May 20, 1906 (age about 49 years). Burial location unknown.
  Robert Adams, Jr. (1849-1906) — also known as Bertie Adams — of Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa. Born in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., February 26, 1849. Republican. Member of Pennsylvania state senate 6th District, 1883-86; U.S. Minister to Brazil, 1889-90; U.S. Representative from Pennsylvania 2nd District, 1893-1906; died in office 1906; drafted and introduced the declaration of war against Spain, 1898. Member, Society of the Cincinnati; Sons of the Revolution; Sons of the War of 1812; Society of Colonial Wars. Despondent over heavy losses in stock speculation and the prospect of defeat at the polls, he killed himself by pistol shot, in his rooms at the Metropolitan Club, and died soon after in Emergency Hospital, Washington, D.C., June 1, 1906 (age 57 years, 95 days). Interment at Laurel Hill Cemetery, Philadelphia, Pa.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Arthur Brown (1843-1906) — of Kalamazoo, Kalamazoo County, Mich.; Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Utah. Born in Schoolcraft, Kalamazoo County, Mich., March 8, 1843. Republican. Lawyer; U.S. Senator from Utah, 1896-97; delegate to Republican National Convention from Utah, 1896 (member, Committee on Permanent Organization; speaker). Shot and killed, in his room at the Raleigh Hotel, by his former mistress Annie Bradley, in Washington, D.C., December 12, 1906 (age 63 years, 279 days). Interment at Mt. Olivet Cemetery, Salt Lake City, Utah.
  Relatives: Son of Asa Briggs Brown (1808-1887) and Lephia Olympia (Brown) Brown (1811-1900); married to Isabel Cameron (1842-1905); nephew of Ebenezer Lakin Brown; first cousin of Addison Makepeace Brown (1859-1931); first cousin twice removed of Calvin Coolidge and Garry Eldridge Brown; second cousin twice removed of Bradford R. Lansing.
  Political family: Lansing family of New York (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
  William J. Donohue (1873-1907) — of Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y. Born in 1873. Republican. Member of New York state assembly from Kings County 14th District, 1907; defeated, 1903; died in office 1907. Shot and killed himself, or was murdered, in the lavatory of a saloon in Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y., January 31, 1907 (age about 33 years). Interment at Calvary Cemetery, Woodside, Queens, N.Y.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  George Wallace Delamater (1849-1907) — also known as George W. Delamater — of Meadville, Crawford County, Pa. Born in Meadville, Crawford County, Pa., March 31, 1849. Republican. Lawyer; banker; mayor of Meadville, Pa., 1877; chair of Crawford County Republican Party, 1878; Presidential Elector for Pennsylvania, 1880; member of Pennsylvania state senate 50th District, 1887-90; candidate for Governor of Pennsylvania, 1890. Died from a self-inflicted gunshot wound, in his office at the Diamond Banking Building, Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, Pa., August 7, 1907 (age 58 years, 129 days). Interment at Greendale Cemetery, Meadville, Pa.
  Relatives: Son of Susan (Town) Delamater (1820-1916) and George Benjamin Delamater (1821-1907).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Paul Charles Barth (1858-1907) — also known as Paul C. Barth — of Louisville, Jefferson County, Ky. Born in Germany, December, 1858. Mayor of Louisville, Ky., 1905-07; removed from office over alleged vote fraud, 1907. Killed himself by gunshot, in the lavatory of his office, Louisville, Jefferson County, Ky., August 21, 1907 (age 48 years, 0 days). Interment at St. Louis Catholic Cemetery, Louisville, Ky.
  Relatives: Son of Jacob Frederick Barth (1819-1864) and Louisa A. (Barth) Barth (1821-1869); married to Jewel Small (1869-1903).
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Athelston Gaston (1838-1907) — of Meadville, Crawford County, Pa. Born in Castile, Wyoming County, N.Y., April 24, 1838. Democrat. Mayor of Meadville, Pa., 1891; U.S. Representative from Pennsylvania 26th District, 1899-1901. Accidentally hit by gunshot while on a hunting trip at Lake Edward, Quebec, September 23, 1907 (age 69 years, 152 days). Interment at Greendale Cemetery, Meadville, Pa.
  Relatives: Married to Thankful C. Hammond (1836-1903).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
  James Henderson Hargis (1862-1908) — also known as James H. Hargis; "Big Jim" — of Jackson, Breathitt County, Ky. Born in Jackson, Breathitt County, Ky., October 13, 1862. Democrat. County judge in Kentucky, 1890; member of Kentucky Democratic State Central Committee, 1899-1907. Tried and acquitted for the 1902-03 murders of J. B. Marcum and two others, but found liable for plotting the killings in a 1904 civil suit for money damages by surviving family members. Shot and killed by his son, Beech Hargis, in the Hargis Brothers general store, Jackson, Breathitt County, Ky., February 6, 1908 (age 45 years, 116 days). Interment at Hargis Family Cemetery, Jackson, Ky.
  Relatives: Son of John Seldon Hargis; brother of Alexander Hamilton Hargis (1859-1943); grandnephew of John Louis Hargis; first cousin of Thomas Frazier Hargis.
  Political family: Cockrell-South family of Kentucky.
  Silas Clark McFarland (1859-1908) — also known as Silas C. McFarland — of Marshalltown, Marshall County, Iowa. Born in Mt. Pleasant, Henry County, Iowa, June 3, 1859. Republican. Newspaper editor and publisher; alternate delegate to Republican National Convention from Iowa, 1888; U.S. Consul in Nottingham, 1899-1902; Reichenberg, 1902-07; U.S. Consul General in SAINT Gall, 1907. Killed himself, by gunshot, in his compartment on the Hamburg-Berlin express train, near Ludwigslust, Germany, October 24, 1908 (age 49 years, 143 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Samuel McFarland and Mary A. (Woolson) McFarland; married, September 1, 1886, to Marie Eiboeck.
  Edward Ward Carmack (1858-1908) — also known as Edward W. Carmack — of Memphis, Shelby County, Tenn. Born near Castalian Springs, Sumner County, Tenn., November 5, 1858. Democrat. Lawyer; member of Tennessee state house of representatives, 1885; editor of newspapers, including the Nashville American, the Memphis Commercial, and the Nashville Tennesseean; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Tennessee, 1896, 1904; U.S. Representative from Tennessee 10th District, 1897-1901; U.S. Senator from Tennessee, 1901-07; candidate for Governor of Tennessee, 1908. Member, Freemasons. Shot and killed by Robin J. Cooper, whose father, Col. Duncan B. Cooper, had been ridiculed in the Tennesseean, in Nashville, Davidson County, Tenn., November 9, 1908 (age 50 years, 4 days). Robin and Duncan Cooper were convicted of second-degree murder and sentenced to prison, but Duncan Cooper was pardoned, and Robin Cooper's conviction was overturned on appeal; in 1919, Robin Cooper was himself murdered in an apparent robbery. Interment at Rose Hill Cemetery, Columbia, Tenn.; statue (now gone) at State Capitol Grounds, Nashville, Tenn.
  Relatives: Married 1890 to Elizabeth Cobey Dunnington.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  William C. Mains (c.1872-1909) — of Mt. Vernon, Westchester County, N.Y. Born about 1872. Republican. Lawyer; crusader against saloons in Mt. Vernon, N.Y.; member of New York state assembly from Westchester County 1st District, 1901. Died, from a self-inflicted gunshot wound, in his office at Mt. Vernon, Westchester County, N.Y., January 23, 1909 (age about 37 years). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Rev. George P. Mains.
  Charles Fred Jewett (1836-1909) — also known as C. F. Jewett — Born in Sidney, Kennebec County, Maine, August 19, 1836. Farmer; member of Iowa state house of representatives, 1880; member of Iowa state senate, 1890. Died from a self-inflicted rifle shot, in Kensett, Worth County, Iowa, May 17, 1909 (age 72 years, 271 days). Interment at Kensett Cemetery, Kensett, Iowa.
  Relatives: Married to Cordelia Arethusa Bliss (1839-1911).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  John T. Carmody (1861-1909) — of Cedar Rapids, Linn County, Iowa. Born in Ireland, December, 1861. Foundry owner; mayor of Cedar Rapids, Iowa, 1909; died in office 1909. Shot and badly wounded in the abdomen by a burglar on May 23, and subsequently died, probably due to infection, in Cedar Rapids, Linn County, Iowa, August 7, 1909 (age 47 years, 0 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Married 1892 to Mary E. Buckingham (1868-1913; third cousin of Ellzy Van Buren Buckingham (1839-1922)).
  Constantine Fernow Brunn (1858-1909) — also known as Constantine F. Brunn — of Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y.; South Woodstock, Woodstock, Windham County, Conn. Born in Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y., October 24, 1858. Vice-Consul for Portugal in New York, N.Y., 1893-96. German and Irish ancestry. According to published reports, in a sudden fit of rage, perhaps angered because he wasn't able to reach his wife by telephone, he shot and killed his sister, Freda Brunn, and his brother, Dr. Armin Brunn, and then shot himself, in South Woodstock, Woodstock, Windham County, Conn., September 29, 1909 (age 50 years, 340 days). Interment a private or family graveyard, Windham County, Conn.
  Relatives: Son of Julius William Brunn (1833-1907) and Charlotte Elizabeth (Going) Brunn; brother of Armin Ernest Brunn (1860-1909).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Armin Ernest Brunn (1860-1909) — also known as Armin E. Brunn — of South Woodstock, Woodstock, Windham County, Conn. Born in Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y., December 18, 1860. Republican. Physician; member of Connecticut state house of representatives from Woodstock; elected 1906. German and Irish ancestry. Shot by his brother, Constantine F. Brunn, mortally wounded, and died the next day, in South Woodstock, Woodstock, Windham County, Conn., September 30, 1909 (age 48 years, 286 days). His sister, Freda Brunn, was also shot, and died immediately; Constantine shot and killed himself at the scene. Interment at Fair Lawn Memorial Cemetery, Fair Lawn, N.J.
  Relatives: Son of Julius William Brunn (1833-1907) and Charlotte Elizabeth (Going) Brunn; brother of Constantine Fernow Brunn (1858-1909).
  John E. Mullally (1875-1912) — of San Francisco, Calif. Born in 1875. Saloon keeper; member of California state assembly 30th District, 1911-12; died in office 1912. Catholic. Irish ancestry. Attacked by three masked holdup men in his saloon, shot, mortally wounded, and died soon after, in Central Emergency Hospital, San Francisco, Calif., January 15, 1912 (age about 36 years). Interment at Holy Cross Catholic Cemetery, Colma, Calif.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Archibald B. Lingo (1871-1912) — also known as Archie B. Lingo — of Sussex County, Del. Born March 6, 1871. Republican. Merchant; postmaster; member of Delaware state senate from Sussex County 4th District, 1905-08. Killed by accidental gunshot, in Trinity, Sussex County, Del., July 13, 1912 (age 41 years, 129 days). Interment at Millsboro Cemetery, Millsboro, Del.
  Relatives: Son of John Alvin Lingo and Hettie Jane (Baker) Lingo (1846-1936); brother of Rufus D. Lingo, Jr., John Alvin Lingo, Jr. and Charles Dale Lingo; second cousin of Asher H. Lingo; second cousin once removed of Carlton Leroy Lingo and Joseph W. Prettyman (1917-1995).
  Political family: Lingo family of Millsboro, Delaware.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  William Bruce MacMaster, Jr. (1875-1912) — also known as William B. MacMaster, Jr. — of New York. Born, of American parents, in Colombia, June 28, 1875. Rancher; U.S. Vice Consul in Cartagena, 1904-08; U.S. Vice & Deputy Consul in Cartagena, 1908-12, died in office 1912; stabbed by two Colombians in the summer of 1909; pressed charges against his attackers, one of whom was an influential newspaper editor; arrested by Colombian authorities in June 1910 on charges that, years earlier, he shot a a Colombian citizen, in what he said was self-defense; initially acquitted, then found guilty, then exonerated by a higher court. While hunting alone, was shot multiple times and killed by an unknown assassin, near Cartagena, Colombia, August 11, 1912 (age 37 years, 44 days). Interment at Church and Convent of Santo Domingo, Cartagena, Colombia.
  Relatives: Son of William Bruce MacMaster (1838-1891).
  Hayward Augustus Harvey (1870-1914) — also known as Hayward A. Harvey — of Orange, Essex County, N.J. Born in Orange, Essex County, N.J., November 3, 1870. Republican. Steel manufacturer; mining business; member of New Jersey state house of assembly from Essex County, 1896. Presbyterian. Killed by self-inflicted gunshot, in the Lackawanna Railroad station, Orange, Essex County, N.J., February 25, 1914 (age 43 years, 114 days). Interment at Rosedale Cemetery, Orange, N.J.
  Relatives: Son of Hayward A. Harvey; married to Maude E. Prindle (1877-1934).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Harry Woods (d. 1914) — of Illinois. Democrat. Secretary of state of Illinois, 1913-14; died in office 1914. Died from a self-inflicted gunshot, in the garage at the rear of his home, in Springfield, Sangamon County, Ill., October 11, 1914. Burial location unknown.
  John Miller Faison (1862-1915) — also known as John M. Faison — of Faison, Duplin County, N.C. Born near Faison, Duplin County, N.C., April 17, 1862. Democrat. Physician; farmer; U.S. Representative from North Carolina 3rd District, 1911-15. In failing health, he died by self-inflicted gunshot, in Faison, Duplin County, N.C., April 21, 1915 (age 53 years, 4 days). Interment at Faison Cemetery, Faison, N.C.
  Relatives: Married 1887 to Eliza F. DeVane.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  George Riddell (1860-1915) — of Grand Rapids, Itasca County, Minn. Born September 14, 1860. Mayor of Grand Rapids, Minn., 1915; died in office 1915. Died from a self-inflicted gunshot, in Grand Rapids, Itasca County, Minn., July 7, 1915 (age 54 years, 296 days). Interment at Itasca Calvary Cemetery, Grand Rapids, Minn.
  Relatives: Married to Iva Anderson (1878-1919).
Paul O. Husting Paul Oscar Adolph Husting (1866-1917) — also known as Paul O. Husting — of Mayville, Dodge County, Wis. Born in Fond du Lac, Fond du Lac County, Wis., April 25, 1866. Democrat. Lawyer; Dodge County District Attorney, 1903-06; member of Wisconsin state senate 13th District, 1907-14; U.S. Senator from Wisconsin, 1915-17; died in office 1917; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Wisconsin, 1916 (member, Platform and Resolutions Committee). French, Luxemburgian, and Menominee Indian ancestry. Accidentally shot in the back by his brother Gustave, when he stood up in his boat while duck hunting on Rush Lake, and died soon after in a nearby farmhouse, near Pickett, Winnebago County, Wis., October 21, 1917 (age 51 years, 179 days). Interment at Graceland Cemetery, Mayville, Wis.
  Relatives: Son of John P. Husting and Mary M. (Juneau) Husting; grandson of Solomon Juneau (1793-1856).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  Image source: Library of Congress
  Charles Harrington (c.1859-1919) — of Essex, Middlesex County, Conn. Born in Essex, Middlesex County, Conn., about 1859. Democrat. Postmaster at Essex, Conn., 1888-92, 1896-1900, 1915-19. Member, Freemasons; Royal Arch Masons; Ancient Order of United Workmen. After a shortage of $1,250 was discovered in his post office accounts, he died from self-inflicted gunshot, in Essex, Middlesex County, Conn., September 24, 1919 (age about 60 years). Burial location unknown.
  Warren Jay Terhune (1869-1920) — also known as Warren J. Terhune — of Hackensack, Bergen County, N.J. Born in Midland Park, Bergen County, N.J., May 3, 1869. Served in the U.S. Navy during the Spanish-American War; U.S. Navy commander; Governor of American Samoa; died in office 1920. Three days before he was to face an inquiry into charges against his administration, he shot himself in the heart, in a bathroom of the Executive Mansion, Utulei, American Samoa, November 3, 1920 (age 51 years, 184 days); later, the Navy exonerated him; his accuser, Lieutenant Commander Creed H. Boucher, was courtmartialed and found guilty of fomenting unrest among the Samoans. Interment at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Va.
  Relatives: Married to Josephine Lee Smith (1868-1955).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  William Henry Clark (1859-1921) — also known as William H. Clark; "Senator Bill" — of McKee, Jackson County, Ky. Born in Clay County, Ky., December 19, 1859. Lawyer; member of Kentucky state senate, 1900. Member, Freemasons; Odd Fellows. Shot and killed by William Pearson, reportedly at a poker game, near McKee, Jackson County, Ky., November 6, 1921 (age 61 years, 322 days). Interment at McKee Cemetery, McKee, Ky.
  Relatives: Son of Henry Jackson Clark (1815-1890) and Patience (Bledsoe) Clark (1821-1899); married 1883 to Demanda 'Demie' McQuire (1861-1951).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Raymond Schofield Curtice (1887-1922) — also known as Raymond S. Curtice — of Saltsburg, Indiana County, Pa. Born in Middlefield Center, Middlefield, Middlesex County, Conn., October 31, 1887. U.S. Vice Consul in Seoul, as of 1916-17; U.S. Consul in Nagasaki, as of 1921. Killed himself by gunshot, in his room at the Hotel duPont, Wilmington, New Castle County, Del., February 15, 1922 (age 34 years, 107 days). Interment at Greenfield Cemetery, Uniondale, Long Island, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Sara Comstock (Schofield) Curtice (1857-1930) and Rev. Saul Ober Curtice (1860-1931); married, June 3, 1914, to Marian Fitch Scranton; second cousin five times removed of Aaron Kitchell (1744-1820).
  Political families: Condit family of Orange, New Jersey; Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York; DuPont family of Wilmington, Delaware (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Hillyer Rudisill (1875-1923) — of Macon, Bibb County, Ga. Born in Forsyth, Monroe County, Ga., April 26, 1875. Republican. Postmaster at Macon, Ga., 1922-23 (acting, 1922). Died from a self-inflicted gunshot, in the post office at Macon, Bibb County, Ga., February 16, 1923 (age 47 years, 296 days). A shortage of about $86,000 was discovered after his death. Interment at Forsyth Cemetery, Forsyth, Ga.
  Relatives: Son of Benjamin Franklin Rudisill (1834-1901) and Antoinette Vashti (Smith) Rudisill (1847-1891); married, November 9, 1899, to Frances Lane (1878-1903).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  W. Wallace Greene (1871-1923) — of Kansas City, Jackson County, Mo. Born near Raytown, Jackson County, Mo., October 13, 1871. Democrat. Lawyer; member of Missouri state senate 7th District, 1909-20. Shot and killed by Ross Richardson, in the basement garage of his home, in Kansas City, Jackson County, Mo., June 30, 1923 (age 51 years, 260 days). Richardson was convicted of murder and sentenced to 99 years in prison. Interment at Forest Hill Cemetery, Kansas City, Mo.
  Relatives: Son of Thaddeus Greene and Eliza Greene; married, July 22, 1903, to Edna L. Coleman.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Walter M. Taussig (1862-1923) — of Yonkers, Westchester County, N.Y. Born in St. Louis, Mo., June 10, 1862. Democrat. President, Wiesbuch & Hilger, hardware exporters; vice-president, American Chain Company; president, Challenge Cutlery Company; mayor of Yonkers, N.Y., 1922-23; defeated, 1923; died in office 1923. Shot himself in the head, in the garage of his home, and died forty minutes later, in St. John's Hospital, Yonkers, Westchester County, N.Y., November 21, 1923 (age 61 years, 164 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Dr. William Taussig; brother of Frank William Taussig and Jennie Taussig (sister-in-law of Louis Dembitz Brandeis (1856-1941)).
  Political family: Taussig family of St. Louis, Missouri.
  Jean Baptiste Adoue (1846-1924) — of Dallas, Dallas County, Tex. Born in Aurignac, France, October 24, 1846. Merchant; banker; Consular Agent for France in Dallas, Tex., 1897-1907. French ancestry. Member, Freemasons; Shriners. Suffered an apoplectic stroke, and fearing that he would become an invalid, he killed himself, by self-inflicted gunshot, in Dallas, Dallas County, Tex., June 20, 1924 (age 77 years, 240 days). Interment at Grove Hill Memorial Park, Dallas, Tex.
  Presumably named for: John the Baptist
  Relatives: Son of Jean Marie Adoue and Paule (Dorleac) Adoue; married to Mary Neosha Simpson (1854-1932); father of Jean Baptiste Adoue, Jr. (1884-1956) and Bertrand Adoue (1889-1919; World War I casualty).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Leonard Pikaart (1866-1924) — of Paterson, Passaic County, N.J. Born in Paterson, Passaic County, N.J., July 19, 1866. Republican. Carpenter; architect; lawyer; member of New Jersey state house of assembly from Passaic County, 1910-12. Dutch ancestry. Member, Grange; Junior Order. While repairing a chicken coop, he was accidentally shot in the heart, and killed, by a rifle held by 12-year-old Edward Kupetz, in Hopewell Junction, Dutchess County, N.Y., October 26, 1924 (age 58 years, 99 days). Interment at Cedar Lawn Cemetery, Paterson, N.J.
  Relatives: Married to Amelia Lotharia 'Millie' Halliwell (1873-1942).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Wyatt Tate Brady (1870-1925) — also known as W. Tate Brady — of Tulsa, Tulsa County, Okla. Born in Forest City, Holt County, Mo., January 20, 1870. Democrat. Hotelier; member of Democratic National Committee from Oklahoma, 1907. Member, Ku Klux Klan; Sons of Confederate Veterans. Died from a self-inflicted gunshot wound, in Tulsa, Tulsa County, Okla., August 29, 1925 (age 55 years, 221 days). Interment at Oaklawn Cemetery, Tulsa, Okla.
  Relatives: Son of Henry Harrison Brady (1841-1917) and Minerva Anne (Snyder) Brady (1842-1911); married 1895 to Rachel Cassandra Davis (1875-1962).
  Brady Street (now Reconciliation Way), in Tulsa Oklahoma, was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  William Boggs Whitt (1867-1926) — also known as William B. Whitt — of Ashland, Boyd County, Ky. Born in Carter County, Ky., September 17, 1867. Democrat. Grocer; member of Kentucky state senate, 1910; mayor of Ashland, Ky., 1926; died in office 1926. Died from a self-inflicted gunshot, in Ashland, Boyd County, Ky., December 19, 1926 (age 59 years, 93 days). Interment a private or family graveyard, Boyd County, Ky.
  Relatives: Son of John Parsons Whitt (1840-1916) and Missouri (Cox) Whitt (1846-1928); married to Bertola Jarvis.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Albert Edward Bogdon (1891-1927) — also known as Albert E. Bogdon — of Denver, Colo. Born in Mahanoy City, Schuylkill County, Pa., 1891. Republican. Lawyer; member of Colorado state senate 1st District, 1925-27; died in office 1927. While visiting his mistress, (scandalous behavior at the time), he was shot and killed by her estranged husband, Joseph S. Minter, in Denver, Colo., June 10, 1927 (age about 35 years). Entombed in mausoleum at Crown Hill Cemetery, Wheat Ridge, Colo.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
John F. Parrish John Festus Parrish (1887-1928) — also known as John F. Parrish; Jaddo Parrish — of Lamar, Prowers County, Colo. Born in Colorado, July 8, 1887. Republican. Alternate delegate to Republican National Convention from Colorado, 1928. Shot and killed, along with his father Amos N. Parrish, by the Fleagle Gang, who were robbing the First National Bank, in Lamar, Prowers County, Colo., May 23, 1928 (age 40 years, 320 days). The gang members were captured in 1929, tried, convicted, sentenced to death and excuted. Interment at Fairmount Cemetery, Lamar, Colo.
  Relatives: Son of Amos Newton Parrish and May (Labrick) Parrish; third cousin of Harry Wayne Hamilton, Sr. (1897-1966).
  Political family: Parrish family of Lamar, Colorado.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: The Fleagle Gang: Betrayed by a Fingerprint
Amos N. Parrish Amos Newton Parrish (1851-1928) — also known as A. Newton Parrish — of Lamar, Prowers County, Colo. Born in Missouri, April 2, 1851. Republican. Rancher; banker; member of Colorado state house of representatives, 1890; delegate to Republican National Convention from Colorado, 1908 (alternate), 1912. Shot and killed, along with his son, John F. Parrish, by the Fleagle Gang, who were robbing the First National Bank, in Lamar, Prowers County, Colo., May 23, 1928 (age 77 years, 51 days). The gang members were captured in 1929, tried, convicted, sentenced to death and excuted. Interment at Fairmount Cemetery, Lamar, Colo.
  Relatives: Son of John Comley Parrish (1819-1854) and Mary Ann (Prichard) Parrish; married to May Labrick; father of John Festus Parrish (1887-1928); second cousin once removed of Harry Wayne Hamilton, Sr..
  Political family: Parrish family of Lamar, Colorado.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: The Fleagle Gang: Betrayed by a Fingerprint
  John Christopher Cutler (1846-1928) — of Utah. Born in Sheffield, England, February 5, 1846. Salt Lake County Clerk, 1884-90; Governor of Utah, 1905-09; banker. Mormon. Found in the garage of his home, with a self-inflicted gunshot wound in his head, and died soon after in a hospital at Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Utah, July 30, 1928 (age 82 years, 176 days). Interment at Salt Lake City Cemetery, Salt Lake City, Utah.
  Relatives: Married 1871 to Sarah Elizabeth Taylor.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  David Fulton Rice (1889-1929) — of Centerville, Appanoose County, Iowa. Born near Exline, Appanoose County, Iowa, September 13, 1889. Democrat. Lawyer; served in the U.S. Army during World War I; member of Iowa state house of representatives, 1925. Methodist. Member, Knights of Pythias; Freemasons; American Legion. Shot and killed by a disgruntled law client, George Domyancich, as he was leaving the Appanoose County Courthouse, Centerville, Appanoose County, Iowa, February 28, 1929 (age 39 years, 168 days). Interment at Oakland Cemetery, Centerville, Iowa.
  J. O. Stricklin (1872-1930) — of Yazoo City, Yazoo County, Miss. Born July 9, 1872. Mayor of Yazoo City, Miss., 1929-30; died in office 1930. Indicted by a Yazoo County grand jury in 1929 for stealing a cow; details of the case were printed in the Yazoo Sentinel newspaper, leading to a feud between Stricklin and the Sentinel's editor, Frank R. Birdsall; a year later, on Main Street in front of the Sentinel office, Stricklin was talking with Dr. R. E. Hawkins, his opponent in the last election, when Birdsall approached; Stricklin pulled out a pistol, shot Birdsall three times (he died the next day), and shot at, but missed, Dr. Hawkins; he then went to his son's funeral parlor, where he died by a self-inflicted gunshot, in Yazoo City, Yazoo County, Miss., April 1, 1930 (age 57 years, 266 days). Interment at Glenwood Cemetery, Yazoo City, Miss.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Motley H. Flint (1864-1930) — of Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, Calif. Born in Somerville, Middlesex County, Mass., February 19, 1864. Republican. Postmaster at Los Angeles, Calif., 1904-10; banker; provided critical support for the Warner Brothers Movie studio in its early years; one of the promoters of Julian Petroleum Corporation, a Ponzi scheme which collapsed in 1927; about 40,000 investors lost their money; tainted by the scandal, he moved to Europe for a time. Member, Freemasons. Called as a witness in a civil suit involving David O. Selznick; after his testimony, as he returned to the audience section of the courtroom, in Los Angeles City Hall, he was shot and killed by Frank Keaton, in Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, Calif., July 14, 1930 (age 66 years, 145 days). Keaton, who had lost his money in Julian Petroleum, was immediately arrested, and subsequently tried, convicted, and hanged. Entombed in mausoleum at Forest Lawn Memorial Park, Glendale, Calif.
  Relatives: Son of Francis Eaton Flint (1823-1887) and Althea Louise (Hewes) Flint (1841-1930); brother of Frank Putnam Flint; fourth cousin once removed of Benjamin Dexter Sprague (1827-1893).
  Political families: Bache-Dallas family of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Flint-Bache family (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Edward James Dennis (c.1876-1930) — also known as E. J. Dennis — of Berkeley County, S.C. Born about 1876. Member of South Carolina state senate from Berkeley County, 1911-14, 1927-30; died in office 1930. Tried and acquitted in 1929 for conspiracy to violate the alcohol prohibition law. Shot and mortally wounded by W. L. Thornley, on the street in front of the post office in Moncks Corner, S.C., and died the next day in a hospital at Charleston, Charleston County, S.C., July 25, 1930 (age about 54 years). Burial location unknown.
  Edward Irving Edwards (1863-1931) — also known as Edward I. Edwards — of Jersey City, Hudson County, N.J. Born in Bergen town (now part of Jersey City), Hudson County, N.J., December 1, 1863. Democrat. General contractor; banker; New Jersey state comptroller, 1911-17; member of New Jersey state senate from Hudson County, 1919; Governor of New Jersey, 1920-23; candidate for Democratic nomination for President, 1920; U.S. Senator from New Jersey, 1923-29; defeated, 1928; delegate to Democratic National Convention from New Jersey, 1924 (member, Committee on Permanent Organization), 1928. Episcopalian. Welsh and English ancestry. Member, American Bankers Association; Zeta Psi; Freemasons; Elks; Moose; Eagles. Depressed over political and financial misfortunes, the deaths of those close to him, and his own poor health, he shot and killed himself, in Jersey City, Hudson County, N.J., January 26, 1931 (age 67 years, 56 days). Interment at Bayview - New York Bay Cemetery, Jersey City, N.J.
  Relatives: Son of William W. Edwards and Emma J. (Nation) Edwards; brother of William D. Edwards (1853?-1916); married, November 14, 1888, to Jule Blanche Smith (died 1928).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
Robert L. Henry Robert Lee Henry (1864-1931) — also known as Robert L. Henry — of Texarkana, Bowie County, Tex.; Waco, McLennan County, Tex. Born in Linden, Cass County, Tex., May 12, 1864. Democrat. Lawyer; mayor of Texarkana, Tex., 1890-91; U.S. Representative from Texas, 1897-1917 (7th District 1897-1903, 1st District 1903-05, 11th District 1905-17); delegate to Democratic National Convention from Texas, 1912 (member, Committee on Rules and Order of Business; speaker). Died from the accidental discharge of a pistol, in Houston, Harris County, Tex., July 9, 1931 (age 67 years, 58 days). Interment at Rose Hill Cemetery, Texarkana, Tex.
  Relatives: Third great-grandson of Patrick Henry (1736-1799).
  Political families: Breckinridge-Preston-Cabell-Henry family of Virginia; Marshall-Harrison-Randolph-Cabell family of Virginia (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Image source: Autobiographies and Portraits of the President, Cabinet, etc. (1899)
  Edward Coke Mann (1880-1931) — of South Carolina. Born in Lowndesville, Abbeville County, S.C., November 21, 1880. Democrat. U.S. Representative from South Carolina 8th District, 1919-21. While returning from a hunting trip, was accidentally shot and killed, near Rowesville, Orangeburg County, S.C., November 11, 1931 (age 50 years, 355 days). Interment at Sunnyside Cemetery, Orangeburg, S.C.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Livingston Davis (1882-1932) — also known as Livy Davis — of Milton, Norfolk County, Mass.; Brookline, Norfolk County, Mass. Born in Worcester, Worcester County, Mass., August 13, 1882. Banker; director of railroads; Consul for Belgium in Boston, Mass., 1930-32. Member, American Antiquarian Society. In ill health for some time, he died from a self-inflicted gunshot, in Brookline, Norfolk County, Mass., January 11, 1932 (age 49 years, 151 days). Interment at Worcester Rural Cemetery, Worcester, Mass.
  Relatives: Son of Edward Livingston Davis and Maria Louisa (Robbins) Davis (1843-1916); married, April 23, 1908, to Alice Gardiner (1885-1963; divorced 1922); married, August 31, 1927, to Georgia Appleton (1891-1976); grandson of Isaac Davis (1799-1883); great-grandnephew of John Davis (1787-1854); first cousin twice removed of John Chandler Bancroft Davis and Horace Davis; second cousin once removed of John Davis (1851-1902); third cousin once removed of John Barnard Fairbank, Henry Cabot Lodge, Jr. and John Davis Lodge; third cousin twice removed of Merton William Fairbank and George Cabot Lodge; fourth cousin once removed of Wilson Henry Fairbank, Alexander Warren Fairbank, Charles Warren Fairbanks and Newton Hamilton Fairbanks.
  Political families: Holden-Davis-Lawrence-Garcelon family of Massachusetts; Davis family; Saltonstall-Davis-Frelinghuysen-Appleton family of Massachusetts (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
George Eastman George Eastman (1854-1932) — of Rochester, Monroe County, N.Y. Born in Waterville, Oneida County, N.Y., July 12, 1854. Republican. Inventor; founder, Eastman Kodak Company; philanthropist; Presidential Elector for New York, 1900, 1916; alternate delegate to Republican National Convention from New York, 1928. English ancestry. Died from a self-inflicted gunshot, in Rochester, Monroe County, N.Y., March 14, 1932 (age 77 years, 246 days). His suicide note was just six words: "My work is done. Why wait?". Interment at Kodak Park, Rochester, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of George Washington Eastman (1815-1862) and Maria (Kilbourn) Eastman (1821-1907); first cousin of Harvey Gridley Eastman (1832-1878); third cousin of Frederick Walker Pitkin; third cousin twice removed of James Kilbourne and Daniel Kellogg (1791-1875); fourth cousin once removed of Silas Condict, Byron H. Kilbourn, Harrison Blodget, George Bradley Kellogg, Daniel Kellogg (1835-1918), Clarence Horatio Pitkin, Carroll Peabody Pitkin, Caleb Seymour Pitkin and Eldred C. Pitkin.
  Political families: Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York; Eastman family (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about George Eastman: Carl W. Ackerman, George Eastman: Founder of Kodak and the Photography Business — Elizabeth Brayer, George Eastman: A Biography — Lynda Pflueger, George Eastman: Bringing Photography to the People (for young readers)
  Image source: Time Magazine, March 31, 1924
  A. J. Rosier (d. 1932) — of Rawlins, Carbon County, Wyo. Lawyer; member of Wyoming state senate, 1932; died in office 1932. Shot and killed by Thomas Lacey, Rawlins, Carbon County, Wyo., April 15, 1932. Lacey, who then killed himself, had been convicted of gambling, and was angered by Rosier's refusal to file a lawsuit on his behalf against county authorities. Burial location unknown.
  William Montross Inglis (1875-1932) — also known as William M. Inglis — of Seattle, King County, Wash. Born in Clyde Township, St. Clair County, Mich., January 7, 1875. Republican. Colonel in the U.S. Army during World War I; delegate to Republican National Convention from Washington, 1924, 1928 (alternate). Killed by a single gunshot behind his ear, under mysterious circumstances, and posthumously accused of attempted murder, in Seattle, King County, Wash., October 22, 1932 (age 57 years, 289 days). The only witness, Mary Nash, who shared the apartment, said that he had been despondent and drinking heavily; that she had hidden his pistol, but he had found it; that without warning, he shot her twice (she was badly injured but survived), and then immediately killed himself; investigators questioned her story, and thought he might have been murdered, but she was not charged. Interment at Lake View Cemetery, Seattle, Wash.
  Relatives: Son of John Jacob Inglis (1848-1908) and Martha Ann (Montross) Inglis (1850-1927); married to Anne Hughes (died 1919).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Samuel Austin Kendall (1859-1933) — also known as Samuel A. Kendall — of Jefferson, Greene County, Iowa; Myersdale, Somerset County, Pa. Born in Greenville Township, Somerset County, Pa., November 1, 1859. Republican. School teacher; superintendent of schools; officer in lumber manufacturing companies; president of two small railroads; vice-president of Citizens National Bank of Myersdale, Pa.; member of Pennsylvania state house of representatives from Somerset County, 1899-1902; alternate delegate to Republican National Convention from Pennsylvania, 1904, 1908, 1912; U.S. Representative from Pennsylvania, 1919-33 (23rd District 1919-23, 24th District 1923-33); died in office 1933. Member, Freemasons; Knights Templar; Shriners. Died of a self-inflicted gunshot wound, in the House Office Building, Washington, D.C., January 8, 1933 (age 73 years, 68 days). Interment at Hochstetler Cemetery, Greenville Township, Somerset County, Pa.
  Relatives: Married, September 22, 1883, to Minnie Edith Wiley.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — NNDB dossier
  Anton Joseph Cermak (1873-1933) — also known as Anton J. Cermak; "Pushcart Tony" — of Chicago, Cook County, Ill. Born in Kladno, Bohemia (now Czechia), May 9, 1873. Democrat. Delegate to Democratic National Convention from Illinois, 1924, 1928, 1932; candidate for U.S. Senator from Illinois, 1928; mayor of Chicago, Ill., 1931-33; died in office 1933. Bohemian ancestry. On February 15, 1933, while he was standing on the running board of an open car from which president-elect Franklin D. Roosevelt had just given a speech, was shot and badly wounded by Italian-American bricklayer Guiseppe Zangara, who had aimed for Roosevelt; over the next month, the wound became infected, and he died, in Jackson Memorial Hospital, Miami, Dade County (now Miami-Dade County), Fla., March 6, 1933 (age 59 years, 301 days). Entombed at Bohemian National Cemetery, Chicago, Ill.
  Relatives: Father of Helena I. Cermak (who married Otto Kerner, Jr. (1908-1976)) and Lillian Cermak (who married Richey V. Graham).
  Political family: Kerner-Cermak family of Chicago, Illinois.
  Cermak Road (formerly 22nd Street), from Chicago to Oak Brook, Illinois, is named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS A. J. Cermak (built 1943, scrapped 1964) was named for him.
  Epitaph: "I Am Glad It Was Me, Instead of You."
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Edwin S. Norton (1864-1933) — also known as Ed S. Norton — of Varna, Marshall County, Ill.; Pomona, Los Angeles County, Calif.; Riverside, Riverside County, Calif. Born in Illinois, 1864. Democrat. Dry goods merchant; shoe merchant; candidate for California state assembly, 1932. Died from a self-inflicted gunshot, in the back room of his shoe store, Riverside, Riverside County, Calif., June 23, 1933 (age about 68 years). Burial location unknown.
Edward J. Brundage Edward Jackson Brundage (1869-1934) — also known as Edward J. Brundage — of Chicago, Cook County, Ill.; Lake Forest, Lake County, Ill. Born in Campbell, Steuben County, N.Y., May 13, 1869. Republican. Lawyer; member of Illinois state house of representatives 6th District, 1899-1900, 1903-04; delegate to Republican National Convention from Illinois, 1916, 1928 (alternate); Illinois state attorney general, 1917-25; corporate counsel, Chicago, Milwaukee, and St. Paul Railway. Protestant. Member, Freemasons; Scottish Rite Masons; Knights Templar; Knights of Pythias; Royal League. Died from a self-inflicted gunshot wound, in Lake Forest, Lake County, Ill., January 20, 1934 (age 64 years, 252 days). Interment at Rosehill Cemetery, Chicago, Ill.
  Relatives: Son of Victor D. Brundage and Maria L. (Armstrong) Brundage; married, December 17, 1913, to Germaine Vernier (1886-1967).
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: Illinois Blue Book 1919
  Melville Clyde Kelly (1883-1935) — also known as M. Clyde Kelly; "Father of Air Mail" — of Edgewood, Allegheny County, Pa. Born in Bloomfield, Muskingum County, Ohio, August 4, 1883. Republican. Newspaper editor and publisher; member of Pennsylvania state house of representatives, 1910-13; U.S. Representative from Pennsylvania, 1913-15, 1917-35 (30th District 1913-15, 1917-23, 33rd District 1923-33, 31st District 1933-35). Presbyterian. Member, Sons of the American Revolution. On returning from a frog hunting trip, was injured when a rifle he was cleaning accidentally fired; he died one week later, in a hospital at Punxsutawney, Jefferson County, Pa., April 29, 1935 (age 51 years, 268 days). Interment at Mahoning Union Cemetery, Marchand, Pa.
  Relatives: Son of William B. Kelly and Mary C. (Clark) Kelly; married 1917 to Vida Ruth Clementson.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  George Charles Hanson (1883-1935) — also known as George C. Hanson — of Bridgeport, Fairfield County, Conn. Born in Bridgeport, Fairfield County, Conn., October 11, 1883. Engineer; U.S. Deputy Consul General in Shanghai, 1911-12; U.S. Vice & Deputy Consul in Chefoo, 1912-13; Dalny, 1913-14; Newchwang, 1914; U.S. Vice & Deputy Consul General in Tientsin, 1914-15; U.S. Consul in Swatow, 1915-17; Chungking, 1917-18; Foochow, 1918-21; Harbin, 1921-31; U.S. Consul General in Harbin, 1931-33; Moscow, 1934-35; Salonika, 1935, died in office 1935. Presbyterian. Member, Alpha Delta Sigma; Delta Tau Delta; American Academy of Political and Social Science. Killed by a self-inflicted gunshot, aboard the steamship President Polk, en route from Marseilles to New York, in the North Atlantic Ocean, September 2, 1935 (age 51 years, 326 days). Interment somewhere in Fairfield, Conn.
  Relatives: Son of Charles C. Hanson (c.1844-1934) and Josephine (Stegkemper) Hanson.
Huey P. Long Huey Pierce Long (1893-1935) — also known as Huey P. Long; Hugh Pierce Long; "The Kingfish" — of Shreveport, Caddo Parish, La.; New Orleans, Orleans Parish, La. Born near Winnfield, Winn Parish, La., August 30, 1893. Democrat. Lawyer; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Louisiana, 1928; Governor of Louisiana, 1928-32; member of Democratic National Committee from Louisiana, 1928; impeached by the Louisiana House in 1929 over multiple charges including his attempt to impose an oil tax and his unauthorized demolition of the governor's mansion, but not convicted by the Senate; U.S. Senator from Louisiana, 1932-35; died in office 1935. Baptist. Member, Elks. Shot and mortally wounded by Dr. Carl Weiss (who was immediately killed at the scene), in the Louisiana State Capitol Building, September 8, 1935, and died two days later at Our Lady of the Lake Hospital, Baton Rouge, East Baton Rouge Parish, La., September 10, 1935 (age 42 years, 11 days). Interment at State Capitol Grounds, Baton Rouge, La.
  Relatives: Son of Hugh Pierce Long (1852-1937) and Caledonia Palestine (Tison) Long (1860-1913); brother of George Shannon Long and Earl Kemp Long (1895-1960) (who married Blanche B. Revere); married, April 12, 1913, to Rose McConnell; father of Russell Billiu Long; second cousin once removed of Gillis William Long and Speedy Oteria Long.
  Political family: Long family of Louisiana.
  Cross-reference: Cecil Morgan — John H. Overton — Harvey G. Fields — Gerald L. K. Smith
  The Huey P. Long - O.K. Allen Bridge (opened 1940), which carries U.S. Highway 190 and a rail line over the Mississippi River, between East Baton Rouge Parish and West Baton Rouge Parish, Louisiana, is partly named for him.  — Senador Huey Pierce Long, a street in Asunsion, Paraguay, is named for him.
  Campaign slogan: "Every Man a King."
  Campaign slogan: "Share Our Wealth."
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile
  Books by Huey P. Long: Every Man a King : The Autobiography of Huey P. Long
  Books about Huey P. Long: T. Harry Williams, Huey Long — Harnett T. Kane, Huey Long's Louisiana Hayride: The American Rehearsal for Dictatorship 1928-1940 — Richard D. White, Kingfish: The Reign of Huey P. Long — David R. Collins, Huey P. Long : Talker and Doer (for young readers)
  Image source: KnowLA Encyclopedia of Louisiana
  John W Martin (c.1890-1935) — of Mena, Polk County, Ark. Born about 1890. Postmaster at Mena, Ark., 1933-35. Shot and killed during an apparent robbery of the post office, in Mena, Polk County, Ark., November 24, 1935 (age about 45 years). Burial location unknown.
  Thomas Putnam Chapman (1875-1936) — also known as Thomas P. Chapman — of Fairfax, Va. Born in Plattsmouth, Cass County, Neb., December 31, 1875. Real estate and insurance business; mayor of Fairfax, Va., 1936; died in office 1936. Died from a self-inflicted gunshot wound in the Fairfax firehouse, Fairfax, Va., February 25, 1936 (age 60 years, 56 days). Interment at Fairfax City Cemetery, Fairfax, Va.
  Relatives: Son of Samuel Matthews Chapman (1839-1907) and Sarah (Putnam) Chapman (1846-1880); married to Estelle F. Inzer (1875-1952).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
J. Henry Roraback John Henry Roraback (1870-1937) — also known as J. Henry Roraback — of North Canaan, Litchfield County, Conn. Born in Sheffield, Berkshire County, Mass., April 5, 1870. Republican. Lawyer; member of Connecticut Republican State Central Committee, 1901; delegate to Republican National Convention from Connecticut, 1908, 1912, 1916, 1920, 1924 (speaker), 1928, 1932, 1936 (member, Arrangements Committee); Connecticut Republican state chair, 1912-37; member of Republican National Committee from Connecticut, 1924-32; president, Connecticut Light and Power Co., 1925-37; Vice-Chair of Republican National Committee, 1932-36. With his health compromised and activities limited by a severe streptococcus infection, he killed himself by gunshot, while sitting in his car near his hunting lodge, in Harwinton, Litchfield County, Conn., May 19, 1937 (age 67 years, 44 days). Interment at Mountain View Cemetery, North Canaan, Conn.
  Relatives: Son of John Christian Roraback (1818-1893) and Maria L. (Hoysdradt) Roraback (1826-1904); brother of Alberto T. Roraback; married 1896 to Mary Louise Parsons; first cousin of Willard Andrew Roraback (1860-1928); first cousin thrice removed of Andrew W. Roraback; fourth cousin once removed of Emory Rasmussen Roraback.
  Political family: Roraback family of Connecticut.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: Official Report of the 21st Republican National Convention (1936)
  Henry Herman Denhardt (1876-1937) — also known as Henry H. Denhardt — of Bowling Green, Warren County, Ky. Born in Bowling Green, Warren County, Ky., March 8, 1876. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army during the Spanish-American War; served in the U.S. Army during World War I; Lieutenant Governor of Kentucky, 1923-27; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Kentucky, 1924; shot and injured on Election Day 1931.; his girlfriend, Mrs. Verna Garr Taylor, was found shot to death in November 1936; he was charged with murder and tried in New Castle, Ky.; the jury could not reach a verdict. Before he could be tried a second time, he was shot and killed, at the Armstrong Hotel, Shelbyville, Shelby County, Ky., September 20, 1937 (age 61 years, 196 days). Interment at Fairview Cemetery, Bowling Green, Ky.
  Relatives: Son of Margaret (Geiger) Denhardt (1838-1901) and William Denhardt (1845-1900).
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  James Theodore Marriner (1892-1937) — also known as J. Theodore Marriner; Ted Marriner — Born in Portland, Cumberland County, Maine, May 17, 1892. U.S. Consul General in Beirut, 1935-37, died in office 1937. Member, Phi Beta Kappa. Shot and killed by Mejardich Karayan, an Armenian who thought he had been denied a U.S. visa, in Beirut, Syria (now Lebanon), October 12, 1937 (age 45 years, 148 days). The killer was sentenced to death and hanged soon after. Interment at Evergreen Cemetery, Portland, Maine.
  Relatives: Son of Harriet Cram (Thorpe) Marriner.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Coleman W. Avery (1880-1938) — of Cincinnati, Hamilton County, Ohio. Born in Cincinnati, Hamilton County, Ohio, February 22, 1880. Democrat. Lawyer; justice of Ohio state supreme court, 1920; appointed 1920; defeated, 1920. According to published reports, he murdered his wife, Sara, by shooting her in the head, and then shot himself; he was found and taken to General Hospital, where he died without regaining consciousness, in Cincinnati, Hamilton County, Ohio, March 14, 1938 (age 58 years, 20 days). Interment at Spring Grove Cemetery, Cincinnati, Ohio.
  Relatives: Son of William Ledyard Avery (1833-1898) and Johanna (Ummethun) Avery (1843-1909); married 1904 to Elinor Coates Baer (1882-1929); married 1934 to Sara Loving (1893-1938).
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
Julius S. Berg Julius S. Berg (1895-1938) — of Bronx, Bronx County, N.Y. Born in New York, New York County, N.Y., July 15, 1895. Democrat. Lawyer; served in the U.S. Army during World War I; injured in combat and lost a leg; member of New York state assembly from Bronx County 3rd District, 1923-30; member of New York state senate 22nd District, 1931-38; died in office 1938. Jewish. Member, American Legion; Jewish War Veterans; Veterans of Foreign Wars; Disabled American Veterans; Freemasons; Elks; Knights of Pythias. Indicted on charges of receiving money for his aid in procuring liquor licenses and arranging for concessions at the New York World's Fair; that same day, he killed himself by gunshot, in his law office, Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., July 20, 1938 (age 43 years, 5 days). Interment at Mt. Ararat Cemetery, East Farmingdale, Long Island, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Morris Berg and Celia (Weinstein) Berg; married, June 20, 1920, to Rose Schram.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: New York Red Book 1936
  James Montgomery Burlingame, Jr. (1868-1938) — also known as James M. Burlingame — of Great Falls, Cascade County, Mont. Born in Owatonna, Steele County, Minn., June 6, 1868. Republican. Member of Montana state senate, 1911-21; delegate to Republican National Convention from Montana, 1916, 1920 (alternate). Died of a self-inflicted gunshot wound at his home in Great Falls, Cascade County, Mont., December 28, 1938 (age 70 years, 205 days). Interment at Old Highland Cemetery, Great Falls, Mont.
  Relatives: Son of James Montgomery Burlingame and Mary Louie (Grant) Burlingame (1846-1929); married to Amy Gregg (1866-1903); fourth cousin of Alvah Waterman Burlingame, Jr.; fourth cousin once removed of Joel Burlingame (1800-1883).
  Political families: Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York; Burlingame family of Vermont; Greene family of Providence, Rhode Island (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Eugene P. Booze (c.1880-1939) — of Mound Bayou, Bolivar County, Miss. Born in Mississippi, about 1880. Republican. Farmer; delegate to Republican National Convention from Mississippi, 1920, 1924, 1928, 1932, 1936. Shot by an unknown assailant as he was leaving his office, and died the next day in a hospital at Greenville, Washington County, Miss., November 7, 1939 (age about 59 years). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Married 1901 to Mary C. Booze (1878-1955) (daughter of Isaiah T. Montgomery).
  Political family: Booze family of Mound Bayou, Mississippi.
  Louis F. Edwards (c.1892-1939) — of Long Beach, Nassau County, Long Island, N.Y. Born about 1892. Democrat. Haberdashery business; paint manufacturer; mayor of Long Beach, N.Y., 1938-39; died in office 1939. Shot and killed by disgruntled police patrolman Alvin Dooley, in Long Beach, Nassau County, Long Island, N.Y., November 15, 1939 (age about 47 years). Burial location unknown.
  Joseph Augustus Tolbert (1891-1940) — also known as Joseph A. Tolbert — of Greenville, Greenville County, S.C. Born in South Carolina, October 8, 1891. Republican. Lawyer; U.S. Attorney for the Western District of South Carolina, 1923-33; delegate to Republican National Convention from South Carolina, 1924, 1928 (member, Credentials Committee), 1936; candidate for U.S. Senator from South Carolina, 1936; candidate for Governor of South Carolina, 1938. Died from a self-inflicted gunshot, in Greenville, Greenville County, S.C., March 22, 1940 (age 48 years, 166 days). Interment a private or family graveyard, Abbeville County, S.C.
  Relatives: Son of Robert Red Tolbert (1863-1938) and Lucy (Collins) Tolbert.
  Political family: Tolbert family of Greenwood, South Carolina.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Frederick W. Kavanaugh (1871-1940) — also known as Fred W. Kavanaugh — of Waterford, Saratoga County, N.Y. Born in Waterford, Saratoga County, N.Y., September 10, 1871. Republican. Knit goods manufacturer; hotel owner; banker; delegate to Republican National Convention from New York, 1908 (alternate), 1936; Saratoga County Sheriff; member of New York state senate 32nd District, 1921-24; chair of Saratoga County Republican Party, 1924-29. Member, Freemasons; Shriners; Elks; Redmen. Died from a self-inflicted gunshot, in the garage adjoining his home, in Waterford, Saratoga County, N.Y., December 2, 1940 (age 69 years, 83 days). Entombed at Oakwood Cemetery, Troy, N.Y.
  Relatives: Brother of George W. Kavanaugh (1863?-?); married to Lillian Le Roy.
  Herschel L. Carnahan (c.1879-1941) — also known as H. L. Carnahan — of Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, Calif. Born in Aledo, Mercer County, Ill., about 1879. Republican. Alternate delegate to Republican National Convention from California, 1920; Lieutenant Governor of California, 1928-31; candidate for Presidential Elector for California, 1940. Suffered a self-inflicted gunshot wound in the head, at his downtown law office and died shortly afterward, at Georgia Street Receiving Hospital, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, Calif., March 13, 1941 (age about 62 years). Entombed in mausoleum at Evergreen Memorial Park, Riverside, Calif.
  Anna Lou P. Boettcher (1903-1941) — also known as Anna Lou Pigott — of Denver, Colo. Born in Helena, Lewis and Clark County, Mont., October 29, 1903. Delegate to Colorado convention to ratify 21st amendment, 1933. Female. Died from a self-inflicted gunshot, in Denver, Colo., September 17, 1941 (age 37 years, 323 days). Entombed in mausoleum at Fairmount Cemetery, Denver, Colo.
  Relatives: Daughter of Harry Hale Pigott (1868-1954) and Anna (Frizell) Pigott (1874-1956); married 1926 to Charles Boettcher II (1901-1963; son of Claudius Kedzie Boettcher; grandson of Charles Boettcher (1852-1948)); niece of William Trigg Pigott.
  Political family: Boettcher family of Denver, Colorado.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  James Crosby Hobbs (1879-1942) — also known as J. Crosby Hobbs — of Camden, Knox County, Maine. Born in Hope, Knox County, Maine, September 24, 1879. Democrat. Knox County Commissioner, 1907-12; alternate delegate to Democratic National Convention from Maine, 1908, 1936; Knox County Sheriff. Died, from a self-inflicted gunshot wound, February 18, 1942 (age 62 years, 147 days). Interment somewhere in Camden, Maine.
  Relatives: Son of James Philbrick Hobbs (1835-1904) and Nancy Maria (Miller) Hobbs (1843-1907); married, October 8, 1910, to Annie Stewart Johnson.
  Thaddeus Franklin Daniel (1900-1942) — also known as T. Franklin Daniel — of Lynchburg, Va. Born in Brunswick County, Va., February 25, 1900. Democrat. Member of Virginia state house of delegates from Lynchburg city, 1934-42; died in office 1942. Methodist. Member, Phi Beta Kappa; Tau Kappa Alpha. Shot and killed, along with the Lynchburg city attorney, by Warren Guy Myers, in his office, in Lynchburg, Va., June 30, 1942 (age 42 years, 125 days). Myers was judged to be insane, committed to the Southwestern State Hospital, and died in 1963. Interment at Macedonia United Methodist Church Cemetery, Brunswick County, Va.
  Relatives: Son of Lee Andrew Daniel (1865-1950) and Susan (Pritchett) Daniel (1870-1958).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial — Virginia House History
  Paul Ranous Greever (1891-1943) — also known as Paul R. Greever — of Wyoming. Born in Lansing, Leavenworth County, Kan., September 28, 1891. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army during World War I; lawyer; mayor of Cody, Wyo., 1930-32; U.S. Representative from Wyoming at-large, 1935-39; defeated, 1938. Killed accidentally, while cleaning his shotgun, in Cody, Park County, Wyo., February 16, 1943 (age 51 years, 141 days). Interment at Riverside Cemetery, Cody, Wyo.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Warren Green Hooper (1904-1945) — also known as Warren G. Hooper — of Albion, Calhoun County, Mich. Born in Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, Calif., May 2, 1904. Republican. Newspaper reporter; member of Michigan state house of representatives from Calhoun County 1st District, 1939-44; member of Michigan state senate 9th District, 1945; died in office 1945. Episcopalian. Member, Theta Kappa Nu; Freemasons; Knights Templar. During a grand jury investigation, admitted to taking bribes and was given immunity from prosecution in return for his testimony against others; however, four days before the hearing, he was shot and killed in his car, alongside highway M-99, near Springport, Jackson County, Mich., January 11, 1945 (age 40 years, 254 days). Interment at Riverside Cemetery, Albion, Mich.
  Relatives: Married, May 23, 1936, to Callienetta Cobb; second great-grandson of William Hooper (1742-1790).
  Cross-reference: William Green — Frank D. McKay
  Epitaph: "With Honesty He Lived; For Honesty he was Taken."
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Alan Nathaniel Steyne (1896-1946) — also known as Alan N. Steyne — Born in New York, New York County, N.Y., November 19, 1896. Served in the U.S. Army during World War I; in metal export business in China, 1928-29; U.S. Vice Consul in Montreal, 1929-31; Hamburg, 1932. Suffered a self-inflicted gunshot, and died soon after, in Emergency Hospital, Washington, D.C., May 22, 1946 (age 49 years, 184 days). Interment at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Va.
  Epitaph: "Until the day break, and the shadows flee away."
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Raymond L. Jaegers (1903-1946) — of New Albany, Floyd County, Ind. Born in New Albany, Floyd County, Ind., June 23, 1903. Republican. Floyd County Sheriff, 1939-42; mayor of New Albany, Ind., 1943-46; died in office 1946. Baptist. Member, Freemasons; Order of the Eastern Star. Died from a self-inflicted gunshot, in his City Hall office, New Albany, Floyd County, Ind., September 5, 1946 (age 43 years, 74 days). Interment at Fairview Cemetery, New Albany, Ind.
  Relatives: Married to Virginia M. Huckeby (1902-1982).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Herbert Livingston Satterlee (1863-1947) — also known as Herbert L. Satterlee — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y.; Greenwich, Fairfield County, Conn. Born in New York, New York County, N.Y., October 31, 1863. Republican. Lawyer; private secretary for U.S. Senator William M. Evarts, 1887-89; served in the U.S. Navy during the Spanish-American War; counsel for Missouri, Kansas & Texas Railroad, 1898-1902; U.S. Assistant Secretary of the Treasury, 1906-07; U.S. Assistant Secretary of the Navy, 1908-09; alternate delegate to Republican National Convention from Maryland, 1920. Episcopalian. Member, American Bar Association; Union League; Navy League; Society of Colonial Wars. Died, from a self-inflicted gunshot, in Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., July 14, 1947 (age 83 years, 256 days). Interment at Trinity Cemetery, Manhattan, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of George LeRoy Bowen Satterlee (1833-1903) and Sarah Bradley (Wilcox) Satterlee (1833-1921); married, November 15, 1909, to Louisa Pierpont Morgan (1866-1946; daughter of J. Pierpont Morgan (1837-1913; financier)); second great-grandnephew of Peter Robert Livingston (1737-1794) and Walter Livingston; third great-grandson of Robert Livingston (1708-1790); third great-grandnephew of Peter Van Brugh Livingston, Philip Livingston and William Livingston; fourth great-grandnephew of John Livingston, Robert Livingston (1688-1775) and Gilbert Livingston; fifth great-grandson of Robert Livingston the Elder and Pieter Van Brugh; fifth great-grandnephew of Pieter Schuyler, Johannes Cuyler and Johannes Schuyler (1668-1747); first cousin thrice removed of Henry Walter Livingston; first cousin four times removed of Philip Peter Livingston and Henry Brockholst Livingston; first cousin five times removed of Robert Gilbert Livingston and Robert R. Livingston (1718-1775); first cousin six times removed of Robert Livingston the Younger, Johannes Schuyler (1697-1746), Cornelis Cuyler and John Cruger, Jr.; first cousin seven times removed of David Davidse Schuyler and Myndert Davidtse Schuyler; second cousin twice removed of Peter Robert Livingston (1789-1859) and Edward Livingston (1796-1840); second cousin thrice removed of Stephen Van Rensselaer, Philip Schuyler Van Rensselaer, Peter Augustus Jay, Rensselaer Westerlo, Edward Philip Livingston, William Jay and Charles Ludlow Livingston (1800-1873); second cousin four times removed of Robert R. Livingston (1746-1813), Pierre Van Cortlandt, Jr. and Edward Livingston (1764-1836); second cousin five times removed of Stephanus Bayard, Philip John Schuyler, Philip P. Schuyler, Stephen John Schuyler and Henry Cruger (1739-1827); third cousin twice removed of Philip Schuyler, Henry Bell Van Rensselaer and John Jay II; third cousin thrice removed of Hamilton Fish; fourth cousin of Charles Ludlow Livingston (1870-?) and Bronson Murray Cutting; fourth cousin once removed of Kiliaen Van Rensselaer, Nicholas Fish, Hamilton Fish, Jr., John Kean, Hamilton Fish Kean and Brockholst Livingston.
  Political family: Livingston-Schuyler family of New York (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  John Gilbert Winant (1889-1947) — also known as John G. Winant — of Concord, Merrimack County, N.H. Born in New York, New York County, N.Y., February 23, 1889. Republican. Member of New Hampshire state house of representatives, 1917-18, 1923-24; served in the U.S. Army during World War I; member of New Hampshire state senate, 1921-22; Governor of New Hampshire, 1925-27, 1931-35; delegate to Republican National Convention from New Hampshire, 1928 (Convention Vice-President; member, Credentials Committee), 1932; U.S. Ambassador to Great Britain, 1941-46. Episcopalian. Died by self-inflicted pistol shot, in Concord, Merrimack County, N.H., November 3, 1947 (age 58 years, 253 days). Interment at St. Paul's School, Concord, N.H.
  Relatives: Son of Frederick Winant and Jeanette L. (Gilbert) Winant; married 1919 to Constance Rivington Russell.
  See also U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier
  Thomas Campbell Wasson (1896-1948) — also known as Thomas C. Wasson — of Newark, Essex County, N.J. Born in Great Falls, Cascade County, Mont., February 8, 1896. Served in the U.S. Army during World War I; U.S. Vice Consul in Melbourne, 1925-29; Puerto Cortes, as of 1932; U.S. Consul in Florence, 1936; Lagos, as of 1938; U.S. Consul General in Jerusalem, 1948, died in office 1948. Shot by an unknown sniper, and died the next day, in Hadassah English Mission Hospital, Jerusalem, Israel, May 23, 1948 (age 52 years, 105 days). Entombed at Washington National Cathedral, Washington, D.C.
  Relatives: Son of Edmund Atwill Wasson and Mary (DeVeny) Wasson.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
Harold A. Bastien Harold A. Bastien (1896-1948) — of Manhattan Beach, Los Angeles County, Calif. Born in 1896. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Navy during World War I; postmaster at Manhattan Beach, Calif., 1941-48 (acting, 1941-42). Despondent over ill health, he shot and killed himself, in the garage of his home, in Manhattan Beach, Los Angeles County, Calif., September 8, 1948 (age about 52 years). Interment at Pacific Crest Cemetery, Redondo Beach, Calif.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: Los Angeles Times, September 9, 1948
  Edward S. Haws (1873-1949) — of Narberth, Montgomery County, Pa. Born in Joanna, Berks County, Pa., May 4, 1873. Democrat. Plastering contractor; postmaster at Narberth, Pa., 1913-22; alternate delegate to Democratic National Convention from Pennsylvania, 1928. Killed himself by rifle shot to the head, in the cellar of his home, Narberth, Montgomery County, Pa., December 26, 1949 (age 76 years, 236 days). Interment at West Laurel Hill Cemetery, Bala Cynwyd, Pa.
  Relatives: Son of John P. Haws and Sarah (McGowan) Haws; married to Ada Louise Ely.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Edward C. Krause (1914-1950) — of La Crosse, La Crosse County, Wis. Born in 1914. Republican. Member of Wisconsin state assembly from La Crosse County 1st District, 1941-46; alternate delegate to Republican National Convention from Wisconsin, 1944. Died from a self-inflicted gunshot, in La Crosse, La Crosse County, Wis., November 20, 1950 (age about 36 years). Interment at Oak Grove Cemetery, La Crosse, Wis.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
Robert M. LaFollette, Jr. Robert Marion LaFollette, Jr. (1895-1953) — also known as Robert M. LaFollette, Jr. — of Madison, Dane County, Wis. Born in Madison, Dane County, Wis., February 6, 1895. Wisconsin Republican state chair, 1925; U.S. Senator from Wisconsin, 1925-47; defeated in Republican primary, 1946; delegate to Republican National Convention from Wisconsin, 1928 (member, Resolutions Committee; speaker), 1932. Protestant. Died of a self-inflicted gunshot wound, in the bathroom of his home, in Washington, D.C., February 24, 1953 (age 58 years, 18 days). Interment at Forest Hill Cemetery, Madison, Wis.
  Relatives: Son of Robert Marion LaFollette and Belle (Case) LaFollette; brother of Philip Fox LaFollette; married, September 17, 1930, to Rachel Wilson Young; father of Bronson Cutting LaFollette (1936-).
  Political family: LaFollette family of Madison, Wisconsin (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about Robert M. LaFollette, Jr.: Roger T. Johnson, Robert M. LaFollette, Jr. and the Decline of the Progressive Party in Wisconsin — Bernard A. Weisberger, The LaFollettes of Wisconsin : Love and Politics in Progressive America — Patrick J. Maney, Young Bob : A Biography of Robert M. LaFollette, Jr.
  Image source: Wisconsin Blue Book 1940
  Clellan S. Forsythe (1895-1953) — of Syracuse, Onondaga County, N.Y. Born in Houtzdale, Clearfield County, Pa., March 6, 1895. Republican. Served in the U.S. Navy during World War I; automobile dealer; member of New York state assembly from Onondaga County 2nd District, 1945-48. Presbyterian. Member, American Legion; Veterans of Foreign Wars; Freemasons. On a hunting trip, he suffered a heart attack while sitting in his Jeep, holding a shotgun, which accidentally discharged, hitting him in the chest and killing him, on Fox Island, Cape Vincent, Jefferson County, N.Y., September 18, 1953 (age 58 years, 196 days). Burial location unknown.
  Allison D. Wade (1902-1954) — of Warren, Warren County, Pa. Born in Warren, Warren County, Pa., September 17, 1902. Republican. District judge in Pennsylvania 37th District, 1942-54; died in office 1954; alternate delegate to Republican National Convention from Pennsylvania, 1944. Shot and killed in his courtroom, in the Warren County Courthouse, by Norman W. Moon, Warren, Warren County, Pa., January 13, 1954 (age 51 years, 118 days). Moon, who attempted suicide at the time of his arrest, believed the judge was involved with his ex-wife, and would personally benefit from ordering payment of alimony. Moon was convicted of first degree murder and sentenced to death; the sentence was commuted to a mental institution by Gov. George M. Leader, and then to life imprisonment. Interment at Oakland Cemetery, Warren, Pa.
  Relatives: Son of Harrison Douglas Wade (1860-1928) and Alice Cary (Jones) Wade (1869-1935); married to Ruth Tillotson.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Albert L. Patterson (c.1891-1954) — of Phenix City, Russell County, Ala. Born about 1891. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army during World War I; lawyer; member of Alabama state senate, 1940; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Alabama, 1952; elected Alabama state attorney general 1954, but died before taking office. Shot and killed in his car, by an unknown assailant, in Phenix City, Russell County, Ala., June 18, 1954 (age about 63 years). Burial location unknown.
  Lester Callaway Hunt (1892-1954) — of Lander, Fremont County, Wyo. Born in Isabel, Edgar County, Ill., July 8, 1892. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army during World War I; dentist; member of Wyoming state house of representatives, 1933-34; secretary of state of Wyoming, 1935-43; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Wyoming, 1940, 1944 (speaker), 1948, 1952; Governor of Wyoming, 1943-49; U.S. Senator from Wyoming, 1949-54; died in office 1954. Member, Tau Kappa Epsilon. In despair over his poor health and threats to expose his son's arrest for homosexual solicitation, he died from self-inflicted rifle shot, at his desk in the Senate Office Building, and died soon after, in Casualty Hospital, Washington, D.C., June 19, 1954 (age 61 years, 346 days). Interment at Beth El Cemetery, Cheyenne, Wyo.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Rubey Mosley Hulen (1894-1956) — also known as Rubey M. Hulen — of Columbia, Boone County, Mo.; St. Louis, Mo. Born in Hallsville, Boone County, Mo., July 9, 1894. Democrat. Lawyer; served in the U.S. Army during World War I; Boone County Prosecuting Attorney, 1920-24; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Missouri, 1940; U.S. District Judge for the Eastern District of Missouri, 1943-56; died in office 1956. Wounded by self-inflicted gunshot, and died soon after, at Barnes Hospital, St. Louis, Mo., July 7, 1956 (age 61 years, 364 days). Burial location unknown.
  See also Wikipedia article
  Clendenin James Ryan (1905-1957) — also known as Clendenin Ryan — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y.; Allamuchy, Warren County, N.J. Born in Suffern, Rockland County, N.Y., July 16, 1905. Republican. Aide to Mayor Fiorello LaGuardia, 1938-39; New York City Commissioner of Commerce, 1939; served in the U.S. Navy during World War II; delegate to Republican National Convention from New Jersey, 1948; Independent Voters candidate for Governor of New Jersey, 1953. Catholic. Died by self-inflicted gunshot, in the same East 70th Street townhouse where his father killed himself in 1939, Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., September 12, 1957 (age 52 years, 58 days). Interment at Culinary Institute of America Grounds, Hyde Park, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Clendenin James Ryan (1882-1939) and Caroline (O'Neil) Ryan (1885-1946); married 1937 to Jean Harder (1915-1991); grandson of Thomas Fortune Ryan (1851-1928).
  Political family: Ryan-Nicoll family of New York City, New York.
  Robert Ralph Young (1897-1958) — also known as Robert R. Young; "Railroad Young"; "Populist of Wall Street"; "The Daring Young Man of Wall Street"; "Maverick of Wall Street" — of Newport, Newport County, R.I. Born in Canadian, Hemphill County, Tex., February 14, 1897. Republican. Stockbroker; financier; assistant treasurer of General Motors; predicted the 1929 stock market crash, and profited by selling stocks short; chairman of the Chesapeake & Ohio Railway, and later the New York Central Railroads; delegate to Republican National Convention from Rhode Island, 1944. Presbyterian. Died from a self-inflicted gunshot, in Palm Beach, Palm Beach County, Fla., January 25, 1958 (age 60 years, 345 days). Interment at St. Mary's Episcopal Cemetery, Portsmouth, R.I.
  Relatives: Son of David John Young (1865-1927) and Mary Arabella (Moody) Young (1869-1910); married, April 27, 1916, to Anita Ten Eyck O'Keeffe (1892-1985; sister of artist Georgia O'Keeffe); father of Eleanor Jane 'Cookie' Young (1918-1941; famed socialite and 'Glamour Girl', killed in plane crash).
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Thomas Alfred Mathis (1869-1958) — also known as Thomas A. Mathis; "Cap'n Tom" — of Tuckerton, Ocean County, N.J.; Toms River, Ocean County, N.J. Born in New Gretna, Burlington County, N.J., June 7, 1869. Republican. Mariner; automobile dealer; member of New Jersey state senate from Ocean County, 1910-11, 1914-15, 1923-31, 1942-46; delegate to Republican National Convention from New Jersey, 1928, 1940, 1944; secretary of state of New Jersey, 1931-41. Indicted for tax evasion by a federal grand jury in 1937. He killed himself, by self-inflicted gunshot, in Toms River, Ocean County, N.J., May 18, 1958 (age 88 years, 345 days). Interment at Riverside Cemetery, Toms River, N.J.
  Relatives: Father of William Steelman Mathis (1898-1981).
  The Thomas A. Mathis Bridge (opened 1950), which carries eastbound Route 37 across Barnegat Bay, from Toms River to Seaside Heights, New Jersey, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Paul Allen Wallace (1901-1958) — also known as Paul A. Wallace — of Wallace, Marlboro County, S.C. Born in Bennettsville, Marlboro County, S.C., July 15, 1901. Democrat. Member of South Carolina state senate from Marlboro County, 1947-58; died in office 1958; delegate to Democratic National Convention from South Carolina, 1956. On the night of the 1958 Democratic primary, he and others gathered in the sheriff's office at the Marlboro County Courthouse to hear election returns on the radio; he had just learned he had won renomination, when Court Clerk Henry A. Rogers entered the room and shot him four times; he died about twenty minutes later, in the emergency room of a nearby hospital, in Bennettsville, Marlboro County, S.C., June 10, 1958 (age 56 years, 330 days). On June 27, Rogers hanged himself in the South Carolina state mental hospital. Interment at Wallace Baptist Church Cemetery, Wallace, S.C.
  Relatives: Son of James Percy Wallace and Lillie (Allen) Wallace; married, May 25, 1920, to Ethelyne Gardner (1900-1986); father of William Paul Wallace (1921-2013).
  Lake Paul Wallace, in Marlboro County, South Carolina, is named for him.
  Epitaph: "With forgetfulness of self, humility of spirit, and nobility of character, he followed in his Master's footsteps in service to his fellowman."
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Melvin Horace Purvis, Jr. (1903-1960) — also known as Melvin H. Purvis; "Little Mel" — of Florence, Florence County, S.C. Born in Timmonsville, Florence County, S.C., October 24, 1903. Democrat. Lawyer; FBI agent; involved in the capture or killing of outlaws in the 1930s, including John Dillinger and Pretty Boy Floyd; delegate to Democratic National Convention from South Carolina, 1940. Member, Kappa Alpha Order. Died, from a self-inflicted gunshot to the head, in Florence, Florence County, S.C., February 29, 1960 (age 56 years, 128 days). Interment at Mt. Hope Cemetery, Florence, S.C.
  Relatives: Son of Melvin Horace Purvis (1869-1938) and Janie Elizabeth (Mims) Purvis (1874-1927); married to Marie Rosanne Willcox (1908-1977); father of Melvin Horace Purvis III (1939-1986).
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Eunice A. Carreau (1901-1963) — also known as Eunice A. Stevens — of Merrick, Nassau County, Long Island, N.Y. Born in Portland, Cumberland County, Maine, September 14, 1901. Democrat. Alternate delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1944. Female. Shot in the throat during a robbery, and died soon after, in Puesto de Emergencia de Salas hospital, Caracas, Venezuela, March 24, 1963 (age 61 years, 191 days). Interment at Long Island National Cemetery, East Farmingdale, Long Island, N.Y.
  Relatives: Married to Rene Armand Carreau (1901-1980).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  John Fitzgerald Kennedy (1917-1963) — also known as John F. Kennedy; "J.F.K."; "Lancer" — of Boston, Suffolk County, Mass. Born in Brookline, Norfolk County, Mass., May 29, 1917. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Navy during World War II; U.S. Representative from Massachusetts 11th District, 1947-53; U.S. Senator from Massachusetts, 1953-60; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Massachusetts, 1956; candidate for Democratic nomination for Vice President, 1956; received a 1957 Pulitzer Prize for his book Profiles in Courage; President of the United States, 1961-63; died in office 1963. Catholic. Irish ancestry. Member, Knights of Columbus; American Legion; Elks. Kennedy was posthumously awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1963. Shot by a sniper, Lee Harvey Oswald, while riding in a motorcade, and died in Parkland Hospital, Dallas, Dallas County, Tex., November 22, 1963 (age 46 years, 177 days). Oswald was shot and killed two days later by Jack Ruby. Interment at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Va.; memorial monument at John F. Kennedy Memorial Plaza, Dallas, Tex.
  Relatives: Son of Joseph Patrick Kennedy, Sr. and Rose (Fitzgerald) Kennedy (1890-1995); step-brother-in-law of Nina Gore Auchincloss (who married Newton Ivan Steers, Jr.); brother of Joseph Patrick Kennedy, Jr., Eunice Mary Kennedy (1921-2009; who married Robert Sargent Shriver, Jr.), Patricia Kennedy Lawford (who married Peter Lawford), Robert Francis Kennedy, Jean Kennedy Smith and Edward Moore Kennedy (who married Virginia Joan Bennett); married, September 12, 1953, to Jacqueline Lee 'Jackie' Bouvier (1929-1994; step-daughter of Hugh Dudley Auchincloss; step-sister of Eugene Luther Gore Vidal, Jr. and Hugh Dudley Auchincloss III); father of John Fitzgerald Kennedy, Jr.; uncle of Maria Owings Shriver (who married Arnold Alois Schwarzenegger), Kathleen Kennedy Townsend, Joseph Patrick Kennedy II, Mark Kennedy Shriver (1964-) and Patrick Joseph Kennedy (1967-); grandson of Patrick Joseph Kennedy (1858-1929) and John Francis Fitzgerald.
  Political family: Kennedy family.
  Cross-reference: John B. Connally — Henry B. Gonzalez — Henry M. Wade — Walter Rogers — Gerry E. Studds — James B. McCahey, Jr. — Mark Dalton — Waggoner Carr — Theodore C. Sorensen — Pierre Salinger — John Bartlow Martin — Abraham Davenport
  The John F. Kennedy Memorial Bridge (opened 1963), which carries southbound I-65 over the Ohio River from Jeffersonville, Indiana, to Louisville, Kentucky, is named for him.
  Coins and currency: His portrait appears on the U.S. half dollar coin.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile
  Books by John F. Kennedy: Profiles in Courage
  Books about John F. Kennedy: Christopher Loviny & Vincent Touze, JFK : Remembering Jack — Robert Dallek, An Unfinished Life : John F. Kennedy, 1917-1963 — Michael O'Brien, John F. Kennedy : A Biography — Sean J. Savage, JFK, LBJ, and the Democratic Party — Thurston Clarke, Ask Not : The Inauguration of John F. Kennedy and the Speech That Changed America — Thomas Reeves, A Question of Character : A Life of John F. Kennedy — Chris Matthews, Jack Kennedy: Elusive Hero — Shelley Sommer, John F. Kennedy : His Life and Legacy (for young readers)
  Critical books about John F. Kennedy: Seymour Hersh, The Dark Side of Camelot — Lance Morrow, The Best Year of Their Lives: Kennedy, Johnson, and Nixon in 1948: Learning the Secrets of Power — Victor Lasky, JFK: the Man and the Myth
  Willis Randolph Lovelace, Jr. (1912-1965) — also known as Willis Lovelace — of Corona, Lincoln County, N.M. Born in El Paso, El Paso County, Tex., February 29, 1912. Republican. Rancher; delegate to Republican National Convention from New Mexico, 1960. Died, from a self-inflicted gunshot, in near Corona, Lincoln County, N.M., August 18, 1965 (age 53 years, 0 days). Interment at Restlawn Memorial Park, El Paso, Tex.
  Relatives: Son of Willis Randolph Lovelace (1869-1956) and Edna Marze (Rountree) Lovelace; married, November 17, 1934, to Frances Alice Holt (1911-1998).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Leo Bernard (1938-1966) — of Detroit, Wayne County, Mich. Born in Detroit, Wayne County, Mich., October 24, 1938. Socialist. Socialist Workers candidate for U.S. Representative from Michigan 17th District, 1964; Socialist Workers candidate for Presidential Elector for Michigan, 1964. Shot and killed, by Edward Waniolek, a former taxicab driver who wanted to "kill some Communists", in the offices of the Socialist Workers Party, Detroit, Wayne County, Mich., May 16, 1966 (age 27 years, 204 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Married, March 13, 1966, to Garlene Boone.
  Cross-reference: Jan Garrett
  George Lincoln Rockwell (1918-1967) — of Arlington, Arlington County, Va. Born in Bloomington, McLean County, Ill., March 9, 1918. Served in the U.S. Navy during World War II; served in the U.S. Navy during the Korean conflict; founder, in 1959, of the National Committee to Free America from Jewish Domination (later known as the American Nazi Party); arrested at various demonstrations during the 1960s; American Nazi candidate for Governor of Virginia, 1965. Shot and killed by a sniper, later identified as John Patler, while driving his car in the parking lot of Dominion Hills Shopping Center, Arlington, Arlington County, Va., August 25, 1967 (age 49 years, 169 days); Patler was convicted of the murder and sentenced to 20 years in prison. Rockwell's funeral procession was not allowed into Culpeper National Cemetery because of Nazi emblems worn by his supporters. Cremated.
  Relatives: Son of George Lovejoy 'Doc' Rockwell (1889-1978; vaudeville and radio comedian) and Claire (Schade) Rockwell; third cousin twice removed of Oliver Morgan Hungerford (1827-1888).
  Political families: Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York; Morris-Ingersoll family of New York and Connecticut; Conger-Hungerford family (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Robert Francis Kennedy (1925-1968) — also known as Robert F. Kennedy; Bobby Kennedy; "R.F.K." — of Boston, Suffolk County, Mass.; Barnstable, Barnstable County, Mass.; Glen Cove, Nassau County, Long Island, N.Y. Born in Boston, Suffolk County, Mass., November 20, 1925. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Navy during World War II; lawyer; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Massachusetts, 1956, 1960; U.S. Attorney General, 1961-64; U.S. Senator from New York, 1965-68; died in office 1968; candidate for Democratic nomination for President, 1968. Catholic. Member, American Bar Association; Veterans of Foreign Wars; American Legion. On June 5, 1968, while running for president, having just won the California presidential primary, was shot and mortally wounded by Sirhan Sirhan, in the Ambassador Hotel, and died the next day in in Good Samaritan Hospital, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, Calif., June 6, 1968 (age 42 years, 199 days). Interment at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Va.
  Relatives: Son of Joseph Patrick Kennedy, Sr. and Rose (Fitzgerald) Kennedy (1890-1995); brother of Joseph Patrick Kennedy, Jr., John Fitzgerald Kennedy, Eunice Mary Kennedy (1921-2009; who married Robert Sargent Shriver, Jr.), Patricia Kennedy Lawford (who married Peter Lawford), Jean Kennedy Smith and Edward Moore Kennedy; married, June 17, 1950, to Ethel Skakel; father of Kathleen Kennedy Townsend, Joseph Patrick Kennedy II and Kerry Kennedy (who married Andrew Mark Cuomo); uncle of John Fitzgerald Kennedy, Jr., Mark Kennedy Shriver (1964-) and Patrick Joseph Kennedy (1967-); grandson of Patrick Joseph Kennedy (1858-1929) and John Francis Fitzgerald.
  Political family: Kennedy family.
  Cross-reference: Benjamin Altman — John Bartlow Martin — Frank Mankiewicz — Paul Schrade
  The Robert F. Kennedy Department of Justice Building (opened 1935, renamed 2001), in Washington, D.C., is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about Robert F. Kennedy: Arthur M. Schlesinger Jr., Robert Kennedy and His Times — Evan Thomas, Robert Kennedy : His Life — Joseph A. Palermo, In His Own Right — Thurston Clarke, The Last Campaign: Robert F. Kennedy and 82 Days That Inspired America — Nicholas deB. Katzenbach, Some of It Was Fun: Working with RFK and LBJ — Bill Eppridge, A Time it Was: Bobby Kennedy in the Sixties
  Critical books about Robert F. Kennedy: Allen Roberts, Robert Francis Kennedy: Biography of a Compulsive Politician — Victor Lasky, RFK: Myth and Man — Darwin Porter & Danforth Prince, The Kennedys: All the Gossip Unfit for Print
  John Gordon Mein (1913-1968) — of Maryland. Born in Cadiz, Trigg County, Ky., September 10, 1913. Foreign Service officer; U.S. Ambassador to Guatemala, 1965-68, died in office 1968. Shot and killed by terrorists who ambushed his limousine, in Guatemala City, Guatemala, August 28, 1968 (age 54 years, 353 days). Interment at Rock Creek Cemetery, Washington, D.C.
  Relatives: Married to Elizabeth Ann Clay.
  See also U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Joseph A. Yablonski (1910-1969) — also known as Jock Yablonski — of East Bethlehem Township, Washington County, Pa. Born in Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, Pa., March 3, 1910. Democrat. Coal miner; district leader for the United Mine Workers, and candidate for union president in 1969; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Pennsylvania, 1956, 1960, 1964. Shot and killed, along with his wife and daughter, by three hit men hired by United Mine Workers President Tony Boyle, in East Bethlehem Township, Washington County, Pa., December 31, 1969 (age 59 years, 303 days). Interment at Washington Cemetery, Washington, Pa.
  Relatives: Married to Margaret Rita Wasicek.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Fred B. Cohen (1913-1970) — of Bremerton, Kitsap County, Wash. Born in Bremerton, Kitsap County, Wash., February 8, 1913. Democrat. Delegate to Democratic National Convention from Washington, 1944 (alternate), 1948; Kitsap County Prosecutor. Shot and killed on his porch by an unknown gunman, in Bremerton, Kitsap County, Wash., January 19, 1970 (age 56 years, 345 days). Entombed at Miller-Woodlawn Cemetery, Bremerton, Wash.
  Leon M. Jordan (1905-1970) — of Kansas City, Jackson County, Mo. Born in Kansas City, Jackson County, Mo., May 6, 1905. Democrat. Police officer; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Missouri, 1960; member of Missouri state house of representatives, 1965-70 (Jackson County 4th District 1965-66, 11th District 1967-70); died in office 1970. Episcopalian. African ancestry. Member, Elks; Kappa Alpha Psi. During his campaign for re-election, was shot and killed while leaving the Green Duck Tavern, which he owned and operated, in Kansas City, Jackson County, Mo., July 15, 1970 (age 65 years, 70 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Married, August 15, 1932, to Orchid Nee Ramsey.
  John W. Peters (c.1921-1970) — of Webster Groves, St. Louis County, Mo. Born about 1921. Republican. Nominated in primary for U.S. Representative from Missouri 2nd District 1970, but died before election. Shot and killed himself, in his campaign office, Brentwood, St. Louis County, Mo., September 27, 1970 (age about 49 years). Burial location unknown.
  Richard Joseph Donovan (1926-1971) — also known as Richard Donovan; Dick Donovan — of Chula Vista, San Diego County, Calif. Born in New Rochelle Hospital, New Rochelle, Westchester County, N.Y., February 24, 1926. Republican. Served in the U.S. Navy during World War II; police officer; lawyer; member of California state assembly, 1965-69; municipal judge in California, 1969-71; died in office 1971. Catholic; later Congregationalist. Member, Elks; Kiwanis; Sons of the American Revolution. Suffered a self-inflicted gunshot wound, and died soon after, in a hospital at Chula Vista, San Diego County, Calif., November 21, 1971 (age 45 years, 270 days). Cremated; ashes interred at Glen Abbey Memorial Park, Bonita, Calif.
  The Richard J. Donovan Correctional Facility, in San Diego County, California, is named for him.
  William Fred Duckworth (1899-1972) — also known as W. Fred Duckworth — of Norfolk, Va. Born in Brevard, Transylvania County, N.C., June 20, 1899. Served in the U.S. Army during World War I; plant manager for Ford Motor Company, 1933-42; automobile dealer; mayor of Norfolk, Va., 1950-62. Member, Freemasons. Shot and killed by an unknown assailant, while walking on Major Avenue, Norfolk, Va., March 4, 1972 (age 72 years, 258 days). Interment at Forest Lawn Cemetery, Norfolk, Va.
  Relatives: Married to Gertrude Summers.
  Silvio Joseph Failla (1910-1972) — also known as Silvio J. Failla; Si Failla — of Hoboken, Hudson County, N.J. Born in New Jersey, May 23, 1910. Democrat. Undertaker; mayor of Hoboken, N.J., 1965; member of New Jersey state house of assembly District 12-C, 1972; died in office 1972. Italian ancestry. According to published reports, he left a bar with a prostitute, Deborah Dell; just outside, he was robbed, shot multiple times, and killed, in Neptune Township, Monmouth County, N.J., September 16, 1972 (age 62 years, 116 days). Dell and an associate were later convicted of first-degree murder and sentenced to life in prison. Entombed in mausoleum at St. Catharine Cemetery, Sea Girt, N.J.
  Relatives: Son of Luigi Failla (1874-1943) and Vittoria 'Victoria' (Candio) Failla (1877-1963); married 1937 to Louise E. Picone (1912-1985).
  See also BillionGraves burial record
  William Oswald Mills (1924-1973) — also known as William O. Mills — of Easton, Talbot County, Md. Born in Bethlehem, Caroline County, Md., August 12, 1924. Republican. Served in the U.S. Army during World War II; U.S. Representative from Maryland 1st District, 1971-73; died in office 1973; delegate to Republican National Convention from Maryland, 1972. Methodist. The Washington Post reported that his campaign was under investigation for receiving $25,000 from secret funds of President Richard Nixon's re-election committee, and failed to report the contribution as required by law; this tied him to the Watergate scandal; a day later, he killed himself, by gunshot, at his Mulberry Hill farm, Talbot County, Md., May 24, 1973 (age 48 years, 285 days). Interment at Hillcrest Cemetery, Federalsburg, Md.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Major B. Coxson (c.1929-1973) — of Camden, Camden County, N.J. Born about 1929. Convicted 10 times on fraud and larceny charges, most related to automobile theft; served 22 months in federal prison; candidate for mayor of Camden, N.J., 1973. African ancestry. Admitted four men to his house, who bound and gagged him and his family, and shot each one, killing him and wounding the others, in Cherry Hill, Camden County, N.J., June 9, 1973 (age about 44 years). Burial location unknown.
  William Fife Knowland (1908-1974) — also known as William F. Knowland — of Oakland, Alameda County, Calif.; Piedmont, Alameda County, Calif. Born in Alameda, Alameda County, Calif., June 26, 1908. Republican. Newspaper publisher; member of California state assembly, 1933-35; member of California state senate, 1935-39; delegate to Republican National Convention from California, 1936 (alternate), 1940 (member, Arrangements Committee), 1948, 1952, 1956 (Temporary Chair; speaker), 1964 (delegation chair), 1968; member of Republican National Committee from California, 1938-42; served in the U.S. Army during World War II; U.S. Senator from California, 1945-59; candidate for Governor of California, 1958. Methodist. Member, Freemasons; Shriners; Eagles; Moose; Elks; Native Sons of the Golden West. Died from a self-inflicted gunshot wound at his summer home near Guerneville, Sonoma County, Calif., February 23, 1974 (age 65 years, 242 days). Cremated; ashes interred at Mountain View Cemetery, Oakland, Calif.
  Relatives: Son of Joseph Russell Knowland (1873-1966); married 1925 to Helen Davis Herrick (divorced 1972); married 1972 to Ann Dickson.
  Campaign slogan (1946): "We will not surrender."
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Books about William F. Knowland: Gayle B. Montgomery & James W. Johnson, One Step from the White House: The Rise and Fall of Senator William F. Knowland
  Francis Edward Meloy, Jr. (1917-1976) — also known as Francis E. Meloy, Jr. — of Washington, D.C. Born in Washington, D.C., March 28, 1917. Served in the U.S. Navy during World War II; Foreign Service officer; U.S. Vice Consul in Dhahran, 1946; personal assistant to Secretary of State Dean Acheson, 1946-53; U.S. Ambassador to Dominican Republic, 1969-73; Guatemala, 1973-76; Lebanon, 1976, died in office 1976. Kidnapped from his car, along with two others, and shot to death, in Beirut, Lebanon, June 16, 1976 (age 59 years, 80 days). Interment at Rock Creek Cemetery, Washington, D.C.
  Relatives: Son of Francis E. Meloy, Sr. and Anne Teresa (Connor) Meloy.
  See also Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  William Monroe Rainach (1913-1978) — also known as William M. Rainach; Willie Rainach; William Odom — of Summerfield, Claiborne Parish, La. Born in Kentwood, Tangipahoa Parish, La., July 31, 1913. Democrat. Member of Louisiana state house of representatives, 1940-48; member of Louisiana state senate, 1948-60; candidate in primary for Governor of Louisiana, 1959; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Louisiana, 1960. Died, from a self-inflicted gunshot wound, in Summerfield, Claiborne Parish, La., January 26, 1978 (age 64 years, 179 days). Interment at Arlington Cemetery, Homer, La.
  Relatives: Adoptive son of Albert Monroe Rainach (1869-1933) and Hannah (Shirey) Rainach (1872-1954); married to Mable Justin Fincher (1915-1995).
  Campaign slogan (1959): "For the sake of our children, elect Rainach governor."
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Bartholomew F. Guida (1914-1978) — also known as Bart Guida — of New Haven, New Haven County, Conn. Born in New Haven, New Haven County, Conn., 1914. Democrat. Real estate and insurance business; mayor of New Haven, Conn., 1970-75; defeated in primary, 1975. Died from an apparently self-inflicted gunshot wound, in New Haven, New Haven County, Conn., April 26, 1978 (age about 63 years). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Fred Guida; married to Caroline Scates.
  See also Wikipedia article
  George Richard Moscone (1929-1978) — also known as George Moscone — of San Francisco, Calif. Born in San Francisco, Calif., November 24, 1929. Democrat. Candidate for California state assembly, 1960; member of California state senate, 1966-75; delegate to Democratic National Convention from California, 1968, 1972; mayor of San Francisco, Calif., 1976-78; died in office 1978. Shot and killed, along with Supervisor Harvey Milk, by Supervisor Dan White, in his office in San Francisco City Hall, San Francisco, Calif., November 27, 1978 (age 49 years, 3 days). Interment at Holy Cross Catholic Cemetery, Colma, Calif.
  Relatives: Son of George Joseph Moscone and Lena Moscone; married 1954 to Gina Bondanza.
  The George R. Moscone Convention Center, in San Francisco, California, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  John Howland Wood, Jr. (1916-1979) — also known as John H. Wood, Jr.; "Maximum John" — of San Antonio, Bexar County, Tex. Born in Rockport, Aransas County, Tex., March 31, 1916. Republican. Lawyer; served in the U.S. Navy during World War II; delegate to Republican National Convention from Texas, 1960; U.S. District Judge for the Western District of Texas, 1970-79; died in office 1979. Shot and killed in San Antonio, Bexar County, Tex., May 29, 1979 (age 63 years, 59 days). The killer was Charles Harrelson, a contract killer who was also the father of actor Woody Harrelson. Burial location unknown.
  The John H. Wood Federal Courthouse, in San Antonio, Texas, is named for him.  — John H. Wood Middle School, in San Antonio, Texas, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article
  Allard Kenneth Lowenstein (1929-1980) — also known as Allard K. Lowenstein — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y.; Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y.; Long Beach, Nassau County, Long Island, N.Y. Born in Newark, Essex County, N.J., January 16, 1929. Democrat. Lawyer; delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1960 (alternate), 1968, 1972; U.S. Representative from New York 5th District, 1969-71; defeated, 1970, 1972 (primary), 1972 (Liberal), 1974, 1976, 1978 (primary). Jewish. Member, Americans for Democratic Action. Shot and mortally wounded by Dennis Sweeney, in his law office in Rockefeller Center, and died about seven hours later, in St. Clare's Hospital, Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., March 14, 1980 (age 51 years, 58 days). Interment at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Va.
  Relatives: Son of Gabriel Abraham Lowenstein and Augusta (Goldberg) Lowenstein; married, November 25, 1966, to Jennifer Lyman.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Books about Allard K. Lowenstein: Richard Cummings, The Pied Piper : Allard K. Lowenstein and the Liberal Dream — William H. Chafe, Never Stop Running
Russell G. Lloyd Russell G. Lloyd, Sr. (1932-1980) — of Evansville, Vanderburgh County, Ind. Born in Kingston, Luzerne County, Pa., March 29, 1932. Republican. Lawyer; mayor of Evansville, Ind., 1972-79; alternate delegate to Republican National Convention from Indiana, 1972. Catholic. Shot and mortally wounded by Julia Van Orden; he died eight hours later, in St. Mary's Hospital, Evansville, Vanderburgh County, Ind., March 21, 1980 (age 47 years, 358 days). His killer was convicted of murder and sentenced to 40 years in prison. Interment at St. Joseph Catholic Cemetery, Evansville, Ind.
  Relatives: Father of Russell G. Lloyd, Jr. (1960?-).
  Image source: City of Evansville
  Marion Price Daniel, Jr. (1941-1981) — of Texas. Born June 8, 1941. Democrat. Lawyer; member of Texas state house of representatives, 1969-78; Speaker of the Texas State House of Representatives, 1973; delegate to Texas state constitutional convention, 1974; candidate in primary for Texas state attorney general, 1978. Shot and killed by his estranged wife, Vickie, near Liberty, Liberty County, Tex., January 19, 1981 (age 39 years, 225 days). She was arrested and indicted for his murder, but found not guilty at trial. Interment a private or family graveyard, Liberty County, Tex.
  Relatives: Son of Marion Price Daniel; married to Vickie Loretha Carroll; nephew of William Partlow Daniel (1915-2006); third great-grandson of Samuel Houston.
  Political family: Daniel-Houston family of Texas.
  John Zuinglius Anderson (1904-1981) — also known as Jack Z. Anderson; "Airplane Ears" — of San Juan Bautista, San Benito County, Calif. Born in Oakland, Alameda County, Calif., March 22, 1904. Republican. Orchardist; U.S. Representative from California 8th District, 1939-53. Protestant. Member, Freemasons; Elks; Native Sons of the Golden West. Died of a self-inflicted gunshot wound, in Hollister, San Benito County, Calif., February 9, 1981 (age 76 years, 324 days). Cremated; ashes scattered.
  Relatives: Son of George Howard Anderson and Susan (Brown) Anderson; married, May 15, 1926, to Frances Giffen.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Gustav J. Akerland (1920-1981) — of Annapolis, Anne Arundel County, Md. Born September 14, 1920. Republican. Mayor of Annapolis, Md., 1981. A month after becoming acting mayor, he was found wounded by a self-inflicted gunshot, on the floor of his office in the Annapolis municipal building, and died a few days later without regaining consciousness, in Anne Arundel General Hospital, Annapolis, Anne Arundel County, Md., April 15, 1981 (age 60 years, 213 days). Burial location unknown.
  Aloysius J. Rumely (c.1911-1982) — of LaPorte, LaPorte County, Ind. Born about 1911. Mayor of LaPorte, Ind., 1982. On May 31, 1982, former city employee Harold Lang shot him and his wife, leading to his death six months later, November 25, 1982 (age about 71 years). Burial location unknown.
  Samuel Jerome Bronson (1930-1986) — also known as S. Jerome Bronson — of Franklin, Oakland County, Mich. Born in Detroit, Wayne County, Mich., March 21, 1930. Democrat. Lawyer; candidate for Michigan state senate 12th District, 1960; Oakland County Prosecuting Attorney, 1965-68; candidate for circuit judge in Michigan 6th Circuit, 1966; Judge, Michigan Court of Appeals 2nd District, 1969-86; died in office 1986. Jewish. Member, American Bar Association. Arrested and charged with soliciting and accepting a bribe of $20,000 for his vote on a pending case; he killed himself by gunshot the same day, in Franklin, Oakland County, Mich., November 14, 1986 (age 56 years, 238 days). Interment at Beth El Memorial Park, Livonia, Mich.
  Cross-reference: James N. Canham
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Robert Budd Dwyer (1939-1987) — also known as R. Budd Dwyer — of Pennsylvania. Born in St. Charles, St. Charles County, Mo., November 21, 1939. Republican. Member of Pennsylvania state house of representatives, 1965-70; member of Pennsylvania state senate 50th District, 1971-81; resigned 1981; Pennsylvania state treasurer, 1981-87; died in office 1987. Baptist. Member, National Education Association; Eagles; Theta Chi; Jaycees. Convicted in December 1986 of bribery and conspiracy in federal court. About to be sentenced, and widely expected to resign from office, he called a press conference; there, in front of spectators and television cameras, he insisted he was not guilty, and then shot and killed himself, in Harrisburg, Dauphin County, Pa., January 22, 1987 (age 47 years, 62 days). Interment at Blooming Valley Cemetery, Blooming Valley, Pa.
  Cross-reference: Robert B. Asher
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile
  Donald Edgar Koster (1937-1987) — also known as Donald E. Koster — of Ann Arbor, Washtenaw County, Mich. Born November 11, 1937. Democrat. Lawyer; candidate for Michigan state house of representatives 53rd District, 1970. Died of a self-inflicted gunshot wound, in the garage of his home, Ann Arbor, Washtenaw County, Mich., April 26, 1987 (age 49 years, 166 days). Cremated.
  Relatives: Son of Willis Koster and Frances (Eck) Koster; married to Marilyn Axelrod.
  Richard Joseph Daronco (1931-1988) — also known as Richard J. Daronco — Born in New York, New York County, N.Y., August 1, 1931. Lawyer; Justice of New York Supreme Court, 1979-87; U.S. District Judge for the Southern District of New York, 1987-88; died in office 1988. Catholic. Italian ancestry. Shot and killed, by Charles L. Koster, in Pelham Heights, Pelham, Westchester County, N.Y., May 21, 1988 (age 56 years, 294 days). Koster, a retired police officer, was angry over ruling the judge had issued two days earlier; he killed himself at the scene. Burial location unknown.
  The Richard J. Daronco Westchester County Courthouse, in White Plains, New York, is named for him.
  See also federal judicial profile — Wikipedia article
  Forrest Howard Anderson (1913-1989) — also known as Forrest Anderson — of Helena, Lewis and Clark County, Mont. Born in Helena, Lewis and Clark County, Mont., January 30, 1913. Democrat. Lawyer; member of Montana state house of representatives, 1943-45; Lewis and Clark County Attorney, 1945-47; justice of Montana state supreme court, 1953-57; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Montana, 1956; Montana state attorney general, 1957-68; Governor of Montana, 1969-73. Methodist. Member, Freemasons; Shriners; Elks; Eagles; Moose; Phi Delta Theta. Died of a self-inflicted gunshot wound, in Helena, Lewis and Clark County, Mont., July 20, 1989 (age 76 years, 171 days). Cremated; ashes interred at Forestvale Cemetery, Helena, Mont.
  Relatives: Son of Oscar A. Anderson and Nora (O'Keefe) Anderson; married, January 24, 1941, to Margaret Evelyn Samson (1914-2001).
  The Forrest H. Anderson Memorial Bridge, which crosses the Missouri River at Craig, Montana, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Gentry Crowell (1932-1989) — of Tennessee. Born in Chestnut Mound, Smith County, Tenn., December 10, 1932. Democrat. Member of Tennessee state house of representatives, 1969-77; secretary of state of Tennessee, 1977-89; died in office 1989. His office was a target of the federal "Operation Rocky Top" investigation into fraudulent charity bingo games; his administrative assistant admitted to longtime embezzlement. Suffered a self-inflicted gunshot wound on December 12, 1989, and died eight days later in Vanderbilt Hospital, Nashville, Davidson County, Tenn., December 20, 1989 (age 57 years, 10 days). Interment at Cedar Grove Cemetery, Lebanon, Tenn.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Ricardo Jerome Bordallo (1927-1990) — also known as Ricardo J. Bordallo; Ricky Bordallo — of Agana (now Hagatna), Guam. Born in Agana (now Hagatna), Guam, December 11, 1927. Democrat. Restaurant owner; automobile dealer; member of Guam legislature, 1956-70; Guam Democratic Party chair, 1960-63, 1971-73; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Guam, 1964; Governor of Guam, 1975-78, 1983-86; defeated, 1970; Convicted in 1987 on corruption charges, including bribery, obstruction of justice, and witness tampering; sentenced to nine years in prison and fined; some of the charges were overturned on appeal in 1988; resentenced to four years in prison in December, 1989. Catholic. Chamorro ancestry. Just before he was to report to prison, he chained himself to a statue of Chief Quipuha, in a busy traffic circle at rush hour; wrapped in a Guam flag and wearing a sign saying "I regret I have but one life to give for my island," he shot and killed himself, in Agana (now Hagatna), Guam, February 1, 1990 (age 62 years, 52 days). Interment at Pigo Catholic Cemetery, Hagatna, Guam.
  Relatives: Son of Baltazar Jeronimo 'B. J.' Bordallo (1900-1984) and Josefina Torres (Pangelinan) Bordallo (1906-1945); brother of Paul Joseph Bordallo (1930-2007); married 1953 to Madeleine Mary Zeien.
  Political family: Bordallo family of Minnesota.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Frank J. Forshee (1896-1991) — of Pittsfield Township, Washtenaw County, Mich.; Dexter, Washtenaw County, Mich. Born in Ann Arbor, Washtenaw County, Mich., June 10, 1896. Democrat. Farmer; candidate for supervisor of Pittsfield Township, Michigan, 1934, 1935, 1937, 1938, 1940. Irish and German ancestry. Died, from a self-inflicted gunshot wound, in Dexter, Washtenaw County, Mich., January 15, 1991 (age 94 years, 219 days). Cremated.
  Relatives: Son of John Henry Forshee (1854-1941) and Virginia (Cowan) Forshee (1857-1933); brother of Ray Louis Forshee; first cousin once removed of David E. Waite (1853-1923).
  Political family: Adams-Waite-Forshee-Cowan family of Dexter, Michigan (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Aris Tee Allen (1910-1991) — also known as Aris T. Allen — of Annapolis, Anne Arundel County, Md. Born in San Antonio, Bexar County, Tex., December 27, 1910. Republican. Physician; member of Maryland state house of delegates, 1967-74, 1991; died in office 1991; delegate to Republican National Convention from Maryland, 1972 (delegation chair); Maryland Republican state chair, 1977-79; candidate for Lieutenant Governor of Maryland, 1978; member of Maryland state senate 30th District, 1979-81. African Methodist Episcopal. African ancestry. Member, Alpha Phi Alpha; American Medical Association; American Legion; NAACP. Following a diagnosis of cancer, he died from a self-inflicted gunshot, in his parked rental car, in Annapolis, Anne Arundel County, Md., February 5, 1991 (age 80 years, 40 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of James Allen and Maryetta (Whitby) Allen; married 1947 to Faye E. Watson.
  Aris T. Allen Boulevard (Maryland Route 665), in Annapolis, Maryland, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  William Vann Rogers, Jr. (1911-1993) — also known as Will Rogers, Jr. — of Culver City, Los Angeles County, Calif. Born in New York, October 20, 1911. Democrat. U.S. Representative from California 16th District, 1943-44; resigned 1944; candidate for U.S. Senator from California, 1946; delegate to Democratic National Convention from California, 1948. Cherokee Indian ancestry. Member, Americans for Democratic Action. Died, from a self-inflicted gunshot, in in Tubac, Santa Cruz County, Ariz., July 9, 1993 (age 81 years, 262 days). Interment at Tubac Cemetery, Tubac, Ariz.
  Relatives: Son of Will Rogers (1879-1935; humorist) and Betty (Blake) Rogers; brother of Jimmy Rogers (1915-2000; actor); married, May 26, 1941, to Collier Connell (died 1976).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Internet Movie Database profile
  Nicholas J. Wasicsko (1959-1993) — of Yonkers, Westchester County, N.Y. Born in Yonkers, Westchester County, N.Y., May 13, 1959. Democrat. Police officer; mayor of Yonkers, N.Y., 1988-89; defeated, 1989. Died, from a self-inflicted gunshot wound, in Oakland Cemetery (near his father's grave), Yonkers, Westchester County, N.Y., October 29, 1993 (age 34 years, 169 days). Interment at Oakland Cemetery, Yonkers, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Nicholas Wasicsko and Anne (Slota) Wasicsko.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Lewis Burwell Puller, Jr. (1945-1994) — of Mt. Vernon, Fairfax County, Va. Born in Jacksonville, Onslow County, N.C., August 18, 1945. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Marine Corps during the Vietnam War; lost both legs in the explosion of an improvised land mine in South Vietnam, 1968; candidate for U.S. Representative from Virginia 1st District, 1978; received a Pulitzer Prize in 1992 for his autobiography, Fortunate Son: The Healing of a Vietnam Vet. Killed by a self-inflicted gunshot, in Mt. Vernon, Fairfax County, Va., May 11, 1994 (age 48 years, 266 days). Interment at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Va.
  Relatives: Son of Lewis Burwell Puller (1898-1971) and Virginia Montague (Evans) Puller (1908-2006); married to Linda Todd Puller (1945-).
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  John D. Gray (c.1928-1995) — of Virginia. Born about 1928. Member of Virginia state house of delegates, 1965-82; circuit judge in Virginia, 1983-95. Died from a self-inflicted gunshot wound, the day after being told his lung cancer was terminal, Hampton, Va., December 10, 1995 (age about 67 years). Burial location unknown.
  Carl Maxey (1924-1997) — of Spokane, Spokane County, Wash. Born June 23, 1924. Democrat. Candidate in primary for U.S. Senator from Washington, 1970. African ancestry. Died of a self-inflicted gunshot wound, in Spokane, Spokane County, Wash., July 17, 1997 (age 73 years, 24 days). Burial location unknown.
  David J. Dwork (c.1941-1997) — of Mahwah, Bergen County, N.J. Born about 1941. Mayor of Mahwah, N.J., 1991-97; died in office 1997. Shot and killed himself in his office in the Town Hall, Mahwah, Bergen County, N.J., August 18, 1997 (age about 56 years). Burial location unknown.
  Tommy Burks (1940-1998) — of near Monterey, Putnam County, Tenn. Born in Cookeville, Putnam County, Tenn., May 22, 1940. Farmer; member of Tennessee state house of representatives, 1971-78; member of Tennessee state senate, 1979-98; died in office 1998. Church of Christ. Member, Lions; Farm Bureau. Shot and killed in his pickup truck by his opponent for re-election, Byron Low Tax Looper, near Monterey, Cumberland County, Tenn., October 19, 1998 (age 58 years, 150 days). Interment at Crestlawn Memorial Cemetery, Cookeville, Tenn.
  Relatives: Son of Walter Fred Burks and Christine Gilliam Burks; married 1960 to Charlotte Rose Gentry (1939?-).
  Cross-reference: McCracken Poston
  Steve Apodaca (c.1951-2001) — of San Clemente, Orange County, Calif. Born in Downey, Los Angeles County, Calif., about 1951. Republican. Insurance broker; political consultant; candidate in primary for California state assembly 73rd District, 1998. Died of a self-inflicted gunshot wound, in San Clemente, Orange County, Calif., April 2, 2001 (age about 50 years). Burial location unknown.
  Colin Riley McMillan (1935-2003) — also known as Colin R. McMillan — of New Mexico. Born July 27, 1935. Republican. Oil executive; member of New Mexico state house of representatives, 1971-82; candidate for U.S. Senator from New Mexico, 1994. Died, of a self-inflicted gunshot wound, in Roswell, Chaves County, N.M., July 24, 2003 (age 67 years, 362 days). Burial location unknown.
  See also NNDB dossier
  Harry E. Claiborne (c.1918-2004) — of Las Vegas, Clark County, Nev. Born in McRae, White County, Ark., about 1918. Democrat. Lawyer; member of Nevada state house of representatives, 1950; candidate in primary for U.S. Senator from Nevada, 1964; U.S. District Judge for Nevada, 1979-86; convicted in 1984 of tax evasion, and sentenced to two years in prison; impeached in 1986 by the U.S. House and convicted (removed from office) by the Senate. Died from a self-inflicted gunshot wound, in Las Vegas, Clark County, Nev., January 19, 2004 (age about 86 years). Burial location unknown.
  Arthur E. Teele (1946-2005) — also known as Art Teele — of Florida. Born in Prince George's County, Md., May 14, 1946. Republican. Served in the U.S. Army during the Vietnam war; lawyer; director, U.S. Urban Mass Transportation Administration, 1981-83; Presidential Elector for Florida, 1992; as Miami city commissioner in 1997-2004, he chaired the Community Redevelopment Agency (CRA); an investigation of corruption in the agency, started in 2003, led to charges that he had accepted $135,000 in kickbacks from two construction companies; as a result, he was removed from office in 2004 by Gov. Jeb Bush; in August, 2004, when he and his wife were under surveillance, he drove his car at a police detective in an attempt to run him over, and also threatened to kill police officers who had been following his wife during the investigation; convicted in March 2005 on charges related to this incident; indicted on July 14, 2005, on federal conspiracy and money laundering charges, over a scheme to fraudulently obtain contracts for electrical work at the Miami International Airport through a "minority-owned" shell company; published police reports revealed that he had put his mistress on the CRA payroll, that he regularly bought and used cocaine, and that he frequently made use of a male prostitute. Church of God in Christ. African ancestry. Member, Kappa Alpha Psi; NAACP; Freemasons. Came to the offices of the Miami Herald newspaper, and shot himself in the head with a semiautomatic pistol; he died two hours later in the trauma unit of Jackson Memorial Hospital, Miami, Miami-Dade County, Fla., July 27, 2005 (age 59 years, 74 days). Interment at Culley's MeadowWood Memorial Park, Tallahassee, Fla.
  Relatives: Married to Stephanie Kerr.
  See also Wikipedia article — OurCampaigns candidate detail
Richard J. Egan Richard John Egan (1936-2009) — also known as Richard J. Egan — Born in Milton, Norfolk County, Mass., February 28, 1936. Republican. Co-founder of EMC Corporation, technology firm; U.S. Ambassador to Ireland, 2001-02. Irish ancestry. Died from self-inflicted gunshot, while suffering from lung cancer, in Boston, Suffolk County, Mass., August 28, 2009 (age 73 years, 181 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Married to Maureen Fitzgerald.
  See also Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier
  Image source: Boston Globe, August 29, 2009
  James Douglas Johnson (1924-2010) — also known as James D. Johnson; Jim Johnson; "Justice Jim" — of Crossett, Ashley County, Ark.; Conway, Faulkner County, Ark. Born in Crossett, Ashley County, Ark., August 20, 1924. Served in the U.S. Marine Corps during World War II; lawyer; member of Arkansas state senate 22nd District, 1950-54; Democratic candidate for Governor of Arkansas, 1956 (primary), 1966; justice of Arkansas state supreme court, 1959-66; candidate in Democratic primary for U.S. Senator from Arkansas, 1968. Methodist. Member, Lambda Chi Alpha; Freemasons; Shriners. Diehard segregationist. Died, from a self-inflicted gunshot wound, in Conway, Faulkner County, Ark., February 13, 2010 (age 85 years, 177 days). Interment at Oak Grove Cemetery, Conway, Ark.
  Relatives: Son of Thomas William Johnson and Maudie Myrtle (Long) Johnson; married, December 21, 1947, to Virginia Lillian Morris (1928-2007).
  See also Wikipedia article
  Robert Lofton Brown (1949-2011) — also known as Robert Brown — of Macon, Bibb County, Ga. Born in Greenville, Meriwether County, Ga., January 30, 1949. Democrat. Member of Georgia state senate 26th District, 1991-2011; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Georgia, 2008; candidate for mayor of Macon, Ga., 2011. African ancestry. Died from a self-inflicted gunshot wound, in Macon, Bibb County, Ga., December 8, 2011 (age 62 years, 312 days). Interment at Middle Georgia Memory Gardens, Jones County, Ga.
  Relatives: Son of Joe Brown and Ruby (Lofton) Brown.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
"Enjoy the hospitable entertainment of a political graveyard."
Henry L. Clinton, Apollo Hall, New York City, February 3, 1872
The Political Graveyard

The Political Graveyard is a web site about U.S. political history and cemeteries. Founded in 1996, it is the Internet's most comprehensive free source for American political biography, listing 312,576 politicians, living and dead.
  The listings are incomplete; development of the database is a continually ongoing project.  
  Information on this page — and on all other pages of this site — is believed to be accurate, but is not guaranteed. Users are advised to check with other sources before relying on any information here.  
  The official URL for this page is: https://politicalgraveyard.com/death/gunshot.html.  
  Links to this or any other Political Graveyard page are welcome, but specific page addresses may sometimes change as the site develops.  
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Copyright notices: (1) Facts are not subject to copyright; see Feist v. Rural Telephone. (2) Politician portraits displayed on this site are 70-pixel-wide monochrome thumbnail images, which I believe to constitute fair use under applicable copyright law. Where possible, each image is linked to its online source. However, requests from owners of copyrighted images to delete them from this site are honored. (3) Original material, programming, selection and arrangement are © 1996-2019 Lawrence Kestenbaum. (4) This work is also licensed for free non-commercial re-use, with attribution, under a Creative Commons License.
Site information: The Political Graveyard is created and maintained by Lawrence Kestenbaum, who is solely responsible for its structure and content. — The mailing address is The Political Graveyard, P.O. Box 2563, Ann Arbor MI 48106. — This site is hosted by HDL. — The Political Graveyard opened on July 1, 1996; the last full revision was done on March 10, 2021.

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