PoliticalGraveyard.com
The Political Graveyard: A Database of American History
The Internet's Most Comprehensive Source of U.S. Political Biography
(or, The Web Site that Tells Where the Dead Politicians are Buried)
Created and maintained by Lawrence Kestenbaum

Namesake Politicians: Military Installations

in alphabetical order

  William Wallace Atterbury (1866-1935) — also known as William W. Atterbury; "The Railroad General" — of Radnor, Delaware County, Pa. Born in New Albany, Floyd County, Ind., January 31, 1866. Republican. Railroad superintendent; president, American Railway Association; during World War I, he was called on to organize organized U.S. military railroad operations in France; he was designated Director-General of Transportation for the American Expeditionary Forces; delegate to Republican National Convention from Pennsylvania, 1920; President, Pennsylvania Railroad, 1925-35. Member, American Philosophical Society; American Academy of Political and Social Science. Died, of apoplexy, in Radnor, Delaware County, Pa., September 20, 1935 (age 69 years, 232 days). Interment at Old St. David's Church Cemetery, Radnor, Pa.
  Relatives: Son of John G. Atterbury and Catharine (Larned) Atterbury.
  Camp Atterbury, a military training camp in Johnson County, Indiana, is named for him.  — Atterbury Army Air Base, Columbus, Indiana, later known as Bakalar Air Force Base, and since 1970 as Columbus Municipal Airport, was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Edward Dickinson Baker (1811-1861) — also known as Edward D. Baker — of Springfield, Sangamon County, Ill.; Galena, Jo Daviess County, Ill.; San Francisco, Calif.; Oregon City, Clackamas County, Ore. Born in London, England, February 24, 1811. Lawyer; member of Illinois state house of representatives, 1837-40; member of Illinois state senate, 1841-45; U.S. Representative from Illinois, 1845-46, 1849-51 (7th District 1845-46, 6th District 1849-51); resigned 1846; colonel in the U.S. Army during the Mexican War; U.S. Senator from Oregon, 1860-61; died in office 1861; general in the Union Army during the Civil War. Killed in battle at Balls Bluff, Loudoun County, Va., October 21, 1861 (age 50 years, 239 days). Interment at San Francisco National Cemetery, San Francisco, Calif.
  Relatives: Married, April 27, 1831, to Mary A. Lee.
  Baker County, Ore. is named for him.
  The city of Baker City, Oregon, is named for him.  — Fort Baker (previously, Lime Point Military Reservation; renamed Fort Baker in 1897; now part of Golden Gate National Recreation Area), in Marin County, California, is named for him.  — Baker Street, in San Francisco, California, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Edward Fitzgerald Beale (1822-1893) — Born in Washington, D.C., February 4, 1822. Surveyor; explorer; served in the U.S. Army during the Mexican War; led the experiment to use camels in the U.S. Army; during the Mexican War, made six trips between Washington, D.C. and the Pacific coast, relaying military information; thought to be the courier who brought news to Washington of the discovery of gold in California; Superintendent of Indian Affairs for California and Nevada, 1853-56; U.S. Minister to Austria-Hungary, 1876-77. Died in Washington, D.C., April 22, 1893 (age 71 years, 77 days). Interment at Chester Rural Cemetery, Chester, Pa.
  Relatives: Son of George Dixon Beale (1792-1835) and Emily (Truxton) Beale (1798-1885); married 1849 to Mary Edwards (1827-1902; daughter of Samuel Edwards); father of Truxtun Beale (1856-1936).
  Political families: Beale-Blaine-Edwards family of Chester, Pennsylvania; Dewey-Blaine-Coit-Huntington family of Connecticut (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Beale Air Force Base, near Marysville, California, is named for him.  — Beale Street, in San Francisco, California, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Henry Louis Benning (1814-1875) — also known as Henry L. Benning; "Old Rock" — of Columbus, Muscogee County, Ga. Born in Columbia County, Ga., April 2, 1814. Democrat. Lawyer; justice of Georgia state supreme court, 1853-59; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Georgia, 1860; delegate to Georgia secession convention, 1861; general in the Confederate Army during the Civil War. Died in Columbus, Muscogee County, Ga., July 10, 1875 (age 61 years, 99 days). Interment at Linwood Cemetery, Columbus, Ga.
  Relatives: Son of Pleasant Moon Benning (1783-1845) and Malinda Meriwether (White) Benning (1789-1864); married, August 12, 1839, to Mary Howard Jones (1817-1868; daughter of Seaborn Jones (1788-1864)).
  Fort Benning, in Chattahoochee County, Georgia and Russell County, Alabama, is named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS Henry L. Benning (built 1943 at Baltimore, Maryland; scrapped 1967) was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Leonard Covington (1768-1813) — of Maryland. Born in Aquasco, Prince George's County, Md., October 30, 1768. Democrat. U.S. Representative from Maryland at-large, 1805-07; member of Maryland state senate, 1807-09; general in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812. Slaveowner. Mortally wounded in the Battle of Chrysler's Field, and died in Frenchs Mills (now Fort Covington), Franklin County, N.Y., November 14, 1813 (age 45 years, 15 days). Original interment somewhere in Fort Covington, N.Y.; reinterment in 1820 at Mt. Covington, Sackets Harbor, N.Y.; cenotaph at Military Post Cemetery, Sackets Harbor, N.Y.
  Covington counties in Ala. and Miss. are named for him.
  The city of Covington, Kentucky, is named for him.  — The city of Covington, Georgia, is named for him.  — The town of Covington, New York, is named for him.  — Fort Covington (early 19th century blockhouse) and the town of Fort Covington, New York, were named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Henry Dearborn (1751-1829) — of Massachusetts. Born in North Hampton, Rockingham County, N.H., February 23, 1751. Democrat. U.S. Representative from Massachusetts, 1793-97 (4th District 1793-95, 1st District 1795-97); U.S. Secretary of War, 1801-09; U.S. Minister to Portugal, 1822-24. Member, Freemasons. Died in Roxbury, Norfolk County (now part of Boston, Suffolk County), Mass., June 6, 1829 (age 78 years, 103 days). Original interment in unknown location; subsequent interment in 1834 at Mt. Auburn Cemetery, Cambridge, Mass.; reinterment in 1848 at Forest Hills Cemetery, Jamaica Plain, Boston, Mass.
  Relatives: Father of Henry Alexander Scammell Dearborn (1783-1851).
  Dearborn County, Ind. is named for him.
  The city of Dearborn, Michigan, is named for him.  — The Dearborn River, in Lewis & Clark and Cascade counties, Montana, is named for him.  — Mount Dearborn, a former military arsenal on an island in the Catawba River, Chester County, South Carolina, is named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS Henry Dearborn (built 1942 at Portland, Oregon; scrapped 1959) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary
  John Adams Dix (1798-1879) — also known as John A. Dix — of Cooperstown, Otsego County, N.Y.; Albany, Albany County, N.Y.; New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in Boscawen, Merrimack County, N.H., July 24, 1798. Democrat. Secretary of state of New York, 1833-39; member of New York state assembly from Albany County, 1842; U.S. Senator from New York, 1845-49; postmaster at New York City, N.Y., 1860-61; U.S. Secretary of the Treasury, 1861; general in the Union Army during the Civil War; U.S. Minister to France, 1866-69; Governor of New York, 1873-75; defeated, 1848, 1874; candidate for mayor of New York City, N.Y., 1876. Died in New York, New York County, N.Y., April 21, 1879 (age 80 years, 271 days). Interment at Trinity Cemetery, Manhattan, N.Y.
  Presumably named for: John Adams
  Relatives: Son-in-law of John Jordan Morgan; son of Col. Timothy Dix, Jr. (1770-1813) and Abigail (Wilkins) Dix; married to Catharine Waine Morgan (1802-1884); first cousin thrice removed of Roger Sherman; second cousin once removed of Nathan Read; third cousin once removed of Roger Sherman Baldwin, Sherman Day, Ebenezer Rockwood Hoar, William Maxwell Evarts, George Frisbie Hoar, John Hill Walbridge and Henry E. Walbridge; third cousin twice removed of Aaron Kellogg and Charles Kirk Tilden; fourth cousin of Simeon Eben Baldwin, Rockwood Hoar, Sherman Hoar, Maxwell Evarts and Arthur Outram Sherman; fourth cousin once removed of Abel Merrill, Samuel Laning, Orsamus Cook Merrill, Amariah Kibbe Jr., John Lanning, Timothy Merrill (1781-1836), Daniel Putnam Tyler, Chauncey Mitchell Depew, John Frederick Addis and Roger Sherman Hoar.
  Political families: Kellogg-Adams-Seymour-Chapin family of Connecticut and New York; Hoar-Sherman family of Massachusetts; Murphy-Merrill family of Harbor Beach, Michigan (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Fort Dix (established 1917 as Camp Dix; later Fort Dix; now Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst), a U.S. Army post in Burlington County, New Jersey, is named for him.  — Dix Mountain, in the Ardirondack Mountains, Essex County, New York, is named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS John A. Dix (built 1942-43 at South Portland, Maine; sold 1947, scrapped 1968) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Henry Dodge (1782-1867) — of Ste. Genevieve County, Mo.; Michigan; Dodgeville, Iowa County, Wis. Born near Vincennes, Knox County, Ind., October 12, 1782. Democrat. General in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812; delegate to Missouri state constitutional convention from Ste. Genevieve County, 1820; member Michigan territorial council 7th District, 1832-33; Governor of Wisconsin Territory, 1836-41, 1845-48; Delegate to U.S. Congress from Wisconsin Territory, 1841-45; U.S. Senator from Wisconsin, 1848-57. Slaveowner. Died in Burlington, Des Moines County, Iowa, June 19, 1867 (age 84 years, 250 days). Interment at Aspen Grove Cemetery, Burlington, Iowa.
  Relatives: Son of Nancy Ann (Hunter) Dodge and Israel Dodge (1760-1806); half-brother of Lewis Fields Linn; married 1800 to Christiana McDonald; father-in-law of James Clarke (1812-1850); father of Augustus Caesar Dodge; third cousin once removed of Augustus Sabin Chase (1828-1896); third cousin twice removed of Irving Hall Chase; third cousin thrice removed of Augustus Sabin Chase (1897-1970); fourth cousin once removed of David Lane Dodge.
  Political family: Polk family (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Dodge counties in Minn. and Wis., and Henry County, Iowa, are named for him.
  Fort Dodge (military installation, 1850-53), and the city of Fort Dodge, Iowa, were named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS Henry Dodge (built 1943 at Richmond, California; sold and renamed SS Alheli; sank during a storm in the North Atlantic Ocean, 1968) was originally named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  John Fairfield (1797-1847) — of Saco, York County, Maine. Born in Saco, York County, Maine, January 30, 1797. Democrat. Lawyer; U.S. Representative from Maine, 1835-38 (3rd District 1835-37, 4th District 1837-38); resigned 1838; Governor of Maine, 1839-41, 1842-43; defeated, 1840; U.S. Senator from Maine, 1843-47; died in office 1847. Died in Washington, D.C., December 24, 1847 (age 50 years, 328 days). Interment at Laurel Hill Cemetery, Saco, Maine; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery, Washington, D.C.
  Fort Fairfield (old military installation), and the town of Fort Fairfield, Maine, were named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS John Fairfield (built 1943 at South Portland, Maine; scrapped 1968) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Henry Leavenworth (1783-1834) — of Delaware County, N.Y. Born in New Haven, New Haven County, Conn., December 10, 1783. Lawyer; served in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812; member of New York state assembly from Delaware County, 1815-16. Died July 21, 1834 (age 50 years, 223 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Jesse Leavenworth and Catharine (Conklin) Leavenworth.
  Leavenworth County, Kan. is named for him.
  Fort Leavenworth (U.S. Army installation) and the city of Leavenworth, Kansas, are named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article
John A. Logan John Alexander Logan (1826-1886) — also known as John A. Logan; "Black Jack"; "Black Eagle of Illinois" — of Benton, Franklin County, Ill.; Chicago, Cook County, Ill. Born in Murphysboro, Jackson County, Ill., February 9, 1826. Member of Illinois state house of representatives, 1852; Presidential Elector for Illinois, 1856; U.S. Representative from Illinois, 1859-62, 1867-71 (9th District 1859-62, at-large 1867-71); general in the Union Army during the Civil War; delegate to Republican National Convention from Illinois, 1868, 1880; U.S. Senator from Illinois, 1871-77, 1879-86; died in office 1886; candidate for Republican nomination for President, 1884; Republican candidate for Vice President of the United States, 1884. Member, Freemasons. Conceived the idea of Memorial Day and inaugurated the observance in May 1868. Died in Washington, D.C., December 26, 1886 (age 60 years, 320 days). Entombed at U.S. Soldiers' & Airmen's Home National Cemetery, Washington, D.C.
  Relatives: Son of John Logan (born c.1800).
  Logan counties in Colo., Kan., Neb., N.Dak. and Okla. are named for him.
  Fort Logan (established 1887, closed 1946), and Fort Logan National Cemetery (established 1950 on part of the same site) in Denver, Colorado, were named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS John A. Logan (built 1942-43 at Richmond, California; renamed USS Alnitah; scrapped 1961) was originally named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about John A. Logan: James Pickett Jones, John A. Logan : Stalwart Republican from Illinois
  Image source: Life and Work of James G. Blaine (1893)
James Madison James Madison (1751-1836) — also known as "Father of the Constitution and the Bill of Rights" — of Virginia. Born in Port Conway, King George County, Va., March 16, 1751. Democrat. Served in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; member of Virginia state legislature, 1776; Delegate to Continental Congress from Virginia, 1780-83, 1787-88; member, U.S. Constitutional Convention, 1787; U.S. Representative from Virginia, 1789-97 (at-large 1789-91, 5th District 1791-93, 15th District 1793-97); U.S. Secretary of State, 1801-09; President of the United States, 1809-17. Episcopalian. English ancestry. He was elected in 1905 to the Hall of Fame for Great Americans. Slaveowner. Died in Montpelier, Orange County, Va., June 28, 1836 (age 85 years, 104 days). Interment at Montpelier Plantation, Montpelier Station, Va.
  Relatives: Son of James Madison (1723-1801) and Eleanor Rose (Conway) Madison (1731-1829); brother of William Taylor Madison; married, September 15, 1794, to Dolley Todd (sister-in-law of Richard Cutts and John George Jackson); first cousin once removed of George Madison; first cousin twice removed of Edmund Pendleton; second cousin of Zachary Taylor; second cousin once removed of John Penn, John Pendleton Jr., Nathaniel Pendleton and Coleby Chew; second cousin twice removed of Henry Gaines Johnson, John Strother Pendleton, Albert Gallatin Pendleton and Samuel Bullitt Churchill; second cousin thrice removed of George Cassety Pendleton, Hubbard T. Smith, Charles M. Pendleton, Elliot Woolfolk Major, Edgar Bailey Woolfolk and Daniel Micajah Pendleton; second cousin four times removed of Charles Sumner Pendleton and Sidney Fletcher Taliaferro; third cousin of Clement F. Dorsey, Philip Clayton Pendleton, Edmund Henry Pendleton and Nathanael Greene Pendleton; third cousin once removed of Gabriel Slaughter, Andrew Dorsey, Philip Coleman Pendleton, George Hunt Pendleton and Joseph Henry Pendleton; third cousin twice removed of Robert Pryor Henry, John Flournoy Henry, Gustavus Adolphus Henry, David Shelby Walker, Alexander Warfield Dorsey, William Barret Pendleton, Francis Key Pendleton, Charles Rittenhouse Pendleton and John Overton Pendleton; third cousin thrice removed of Charles Rice Slaughter (1819-1862), James David Walker, David Shelby Walker Jr. and Eli Huston Brown Jr.; fourth cousin once removed of Charles Willing Byrd.
  Political families: Blackburn-Slaughter-Buckner-Madison family of Kentucky; Pendleton-Lee family of Maryland (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Madison counties in Ala., Ark., Fla., Ga., Idaho, Ill., Ind., Iowa, Ky., La., Miss., Mo., Mont., Neb., N.Y., N.C., Ohio, Tenn., Tex. and Va. are named for him.
  The city of Madison, Wisconsin, is named for him.  — Mount Madison, in the White Mountains, Coos County, New Hampshire, is named for him.  — Fort Madison (1808-13), and the subsequent city of Fort Madison, Iowa, were named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS James Madison (built 1942 at Houston, Texas; scrapped 1966) was named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: James Madison BroomJames Madison Hite BealeJames Madison PorterJames M. BuchananJames Madison GreggJ. Madison WellsJames M. TarletonJames Madison HughesJames M. MarvinJames Madison GaylordJames M. LeachJames TurnerJames M. HarveyJames M. SeymourJames Madison BarkerJames Madison MullenJames M. CandlerJames Madison McKinneyJames M. MortonJames Madison Barrett, Sr.James M. Gudger, Jr.James Madison Morton, Jr.James Madison WoodardJames M. Waddell, Jr.
  Coins and currency: His portrait appeared on the U.S. $5,000 bill in 1915-46.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Books about James Madison: Ralph Louis Ketcham, James Madison : A Biography — Garry Wills, James Madison — Robert Allen Rutland, The Presidency of James Madison — Charles Cerami, Young Patriots: The Remarkable Story of Two Men. Their Impossible Plan and The Revolution That Created The Constitution — Samuel Kernell, ed., James Madison: The Theory and Practice of Republican Government — Kevin R. C. Gutzman, James Madison and the Making of America
  Image source: Portrait & Biographical Album of Washtenaw County (1891)
  Robert Bruce McCoy (1867-1926) — also known as Robert McCoy — of Sparta, Monroe County, Wis. Born in Kenosha, Kenosha County, Wis., September 5, 1867. Democrat. Lawyer; newspaper publisher; Monroe County Judge; served in the U.S. Army during the Spanish-American War; served in the U.S. Army on the Mexican border; served in the U.S. Army during World War I; candidate for Governor of Wisconsin, 1920. Died, of pernicious anemia, in Sparta, Monroe County, Wis., January 5, 1926 (age 58 years, 122 days). Interment at Woodlawn Cemetery, Sparta, Wis.
  Relatives: Son of Bruce Elisha McCoy; married 1893 to Lillian Riege.
  Fort McCoy (U.S. Army base; was Camp McCoy until 1974), in Monroe County, Wisconsin, is named for him.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
James Monroe James Monroe (1758-1831) — of Spotsylvania County, Va.; Loudoun County, Va. Born in Westmoreland County, Va., April 28, 1758. Colonel in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; lawyer; member of Virginia state house of delegates, 1782, 1786, 1810-11; Delegate to Continental Congress from Virginia, 1783-86; delegate to Virginia convention to ratify U.S. constitution from Spotsylvania County, 1788; U.S. Senator from Virginia, 1790-94; U.S. Minister to France, 1794-96; Great Britain, 1803-07; Governor of Virginia, 1799-1802, 1811; U.S. Secretary of State, 1811-17; U.S. Secretary of War, 1814-15; President of the United States, 1817-25; delegate to Virginia state constitutional convention, 1829. Episcopalian. English ancestry. Member, Freemasons. Elected to the Hall of Fame for Great Americans in 1930. Slaveowner. Died, probably of tuberculosis, in New York, New York County, N.Y., July 4, 1831 (age 73 years, 67 days). Originally entombed at New York Marble Cemetery, Manhattan, N.Y.; subsequently entombed at New York City Marble Cemetery, Manhattan, N.Y.; reinterment in 1858 at Hollywood Cemetery, Richmond, Va.
  Relatives: Son of Andrew Spence Monroe (1727-1774) and Elizabeth (Jones) Monroe (1727-1758); married, February 16, 1786, to Eliza Kortright (1768-1830) and Elizabeth Kortright; father of Eliza Kortright Monroe (1786-1840; who married George Hay (1765-1830)) and Maria Hester Monroe (1803-1850; who married Samuel Laurence Gouverneur); nephew of Joseph Jones; uncle of Thomas Bell Monroe and James Monroe; granduncle of Victor Monroe; great-grandnephew of Douglas Robinson (1855-1918; who married Corinne Roosevelt Robinson); second great-granduncle of Theodore Douglas Robinson and Corinne Robinson Alsop; third great-granduncle of Corinne A. Chubb and John deKoven Alsop; first cousin once removed of William Grayson; second cousin of Alfred William Grayson and Beverly Robinson Grayson; second cousin thrice removed of Carter Henry Harrison II and John Brady Grayson.
  Political family: Monroe-Grayson-Roosevelt-Breckinridge family of Virginia and Kentucky (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Monroe counties in Ala., Ark., Fla., Ga., Ill., Ind., Iowa, Ky., Mich., Miss., Mo., N.Y., Ohio, Pa., Tenn., W.Va. and Wis. are named for him.
  The city of Monrovia, Liberia, is named for him.  — Mount Monroe, in the White Mountains, Coos County, New Hampshire, is named for him.  — Fort Monroe (military installation 1819-2011), at Old Point Comfort, Hampton, Virginia, is named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS James Monroe (built 1942 at Terminal Island, California; scrapped 1970) was named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: James MonroeJames MonroeJames M. PendletonJames M. JacksonJames Monroe LettsJames M. RitchieJames M. RosseJames M. ComlyJames Monroe BufordJames M. SeibertJames M. LownJames M. MillerJames Monroe JonesJames Monroe HaleJames Monroe SpearsJ. M. AlfordJames M. Lown, Jr.James M. Miley
  Coins and currency: His portrait appeared on the U.S. $100 silver certificate in the 1880s and 1890s.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Books about James Monroe: Harry Ammon, James Monroe: The Quest for National Identity
  Image source: Portrait & Biographical Album of Washtenaw County (1891)
  William Moultrie (1730-1805) — of South Carolina. Born in Charleston, Charleston District (now Charleston County), S.C., November 23, 1730. General in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; member of South Carolina state house of representatives, 1783-84; Lieutenant Governor of South Carolina, 1784; Governor of South Carolina, 1785-87, 1792-94; member of South Carolina state senate, 1787-92. Slaveowner. Died in Charleston, Charleston District (now Charleston County), S.C., September 27, 1805 (age 74 years, 308 days). Original interment at Windsor Hill Plantation, North Charleston, S.C.; reinterment in 1977 at Fort Moultrie National Monument, Sullivan's Island, S.C.; cenotaph at St. James Goose Creek Episcopal Churchyard, Goose Creek, S.C.
  Relatives: Son of John Moultrie (1702-1771) and Lucretia (Cooper) Moultrie (1704-1747); half-brother of Alexander Moultrie (1750-1807); married 1749 to Elizabeth Damaris de St. Julien (1730-1805).
  Moultrie County, Ill. is named for him.
  Fort Moultrie, in Sullivan's Island, South Carolina, is named for him.
  See also National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Winfield Scott (1786-1866) — also known as "Old Fuss and Feathers" — Born in Dinwiddie County, Va., June 13, 1786. Whig. Served in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812; candidate for Whig nomination for President, 1839, 1844, 1848; general in the U.S. Army during the Mexican War; candidate for President of the United States, 1852. Died in West Point, Orange County, N.Y., May 29, 1866 (age 79 years, 350 days). Interment at United States Military Academy Cemetery, West Point, N.Y.; statue erected 1874 at Scott Circle, Washington, D.C.
  Relatives: Son of William Scott (1747-1789) and Anna (Mason) Scott (1748-1803); married 1817 to Mary D. Mayo (granddaughter of John De Hart); great-granduncle of Philip C. Hanna (1857-1929); first cousin twice removed of Frank Newsum Julian.
  Political family: Scott-DeHart-Hanna family of New Jersey and Alabama.
  Scott County, Iowa is named for him.
  Fort Scott (military installation 1842-73), and the subsequent city of Fort Scott, Kansas, were named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: Winfield S. SherwoodWinfield S. SherwoodWinfield Scott FeatherstonWinfield S. HancockWinfield S. CameronWinfield S. HanfordWinfield S. SmythWinfield S. BirdW. S. BellWinfield S. HoldenWinfield S. HuntleyWinfield Scott NayWinfield S. SmithWinfield S. KerrWinfield Scott MooreWinfield S. LittleWinfield S. ChoateWinfield S. HoltWinfield S. PopeWinfield S. WatsonWinfield S. KeenholtsWinfield Scott SillowayWinfield S. VandewaterWinfield S. BraddockW. S. AllenWinfield S. HammondWinfield S. PhillipsWinfield S. SpencerWinfield S. RoseWinfield S. SchusterWinfield Scott AllisonWinfield S. BoyntonWinfield S. KenyonWinfield S. TibbettsWinfield S. WithrowWinfield S. HarroldWinfield Scott ReedWinfield S. GroveWinfield S. RogersWinfield S. BrownWinfield S. PealerWinfield S. Wallace, Jr.Winfield S. Hinds
  Epitaph: "History records his Eminent Services as a Warrior, Pacificator, and General In Chief of the Armies of the United States. Medals, and an Equestrian Statue ordered by Congress in the Capital of his Country, are his Public Monuments. This stone is a mark of the love and veneration of his Daughters. Requiescat in Pace."
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about Winfield Scott: Timothy D. Johnson, Winfield Scott: The Quest for Military Glory
  John Morris Sheppard (1875-1941) — also known as Morris Sheppard — of Texarkana, Bowie County, Tex. Born in Wheatville, Morris County, Tex., May 28, 1875. Democrat. Lawyer; U.S. Representative from Texas, 1902-13 (4th District 1902-03, 1st District 1903-13); U.S. Senator from Texas, 1913-41; died in office 1941. Methodist. Member, Woodmen of the World; Freemasons; Odd Fellows; Redmen; Elks; Knights of Pythias; Kappa Alpha Order; Phi Beta Kappa. Died, from a brain hemorrhage, in Walter Reed Hospital, Washington, D.C., April 9, 1941 (age 65 years, 316 days). Interment at Hillcrest Cemetery, Texarkana, Tex.
  Relatives: Son of John Levi Sheppard (1852-1902) and Margaret Alice (Eddins) Sheppard (1854-1905); married, December 1, 1909, to Lucile Ferguson Sanderson (1890-1980; who later married Thomas Terry Connally); grandfather of Richard Sheppard Arnold, Connie Mack III and Morris Sheppard Arnold; great-grandfather of Connie Mack IV.
  Political family: Sheppard-Arnold family of Texarkana, Texas.
  Sheppard Air Force Base (opened 1941 as Sheppard Field; runways are shared with the Wichita Falls Regional Airport), in Wichita County, Texas, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Dallas Burton Smith (1883-1936) — also known as Dallas B. Smith — of Opelika, Lee County, Ala. Born in Opelika, Lee County, Ala., March 9, 1883. Republican. Served in the U.S. Army during the Spanish-American War; served in the U.S. Army on the Mexican border; colonel in the U.S. Army during World War I; candidate for Governor of Alabama, 1918; delegate to Republican National Convention from Alabama, 1920; candidate for U.S. Representative from Alabama 3rd District, 1920. Member, Rotary; Freemasons. Died, in the Veterans Hospital, Gulfport, Harrison County, Miss., August 1, 1936 (age 53 years, 145 days). Interment at Rosemere Cemetery, Opelika, Ala.
  Relatives: Son of Mary Josephine (Bingham) Smith (1844-1905) and Dallas Burton Smith (1844-1913); married to Allie Mitchell (1886-1971); nephew of William Hugh Smith; great-grandson of David Dickson.
  Political family: Smith family of Opelika, Alabama.
  The Dallas B. Smith Armory (now the Dallas B. Smith Building), in Opelika, Alabama, is named for him.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Floyd Davidson Spence (1928-2001) — also known as Floyd Spence — of Lexington, Lexington County, S.C. Born in Columbia, Richland County, S.C., April 9, 1928. Served in the U.S. Army during the Korean conflict; lawyer; member of South Carolina state house of representatives, 1957-62; delegate to Republican National Convention from South Carolina, 1964, 1972 (delegation chair), 1988; member of South Carolina state senate, 1967-70 (22nd District 1967-68, 7th District 1969-70); resigned 1970; U.S. Representative from South Carolina 2nd District, 1971-2001; died in office 2001. Lutheran. Member, Sons of Confederate Veterans; Farm Bureau; American Legion; Veterans of Foreign Wars; Forty and Eight; American Bar Association; American Judicature Society; Association of Trial Lawyers of America; Kappa Alpha Order. Died, following surgery to remove a blood clot from his brain, in St. Dominic-Jackson Memorial Hospital, Jackson, Hinds County, Miss., August 16, 2001 (age 73 years, 129 days). Interment at St. Peters Lutheran Church Cemetery, Lexington, S.C.
  Relatives: Son of James W. Spence (1882-1961) and Addie Jane (Lucas) Spence (1896-1993); married, December 22, 1952, to Lula Hancock Drake (1931-1978).
  Cross-reference: Joe Wilson
  The Floyd Spence Reserve Center, in the Fort Jackson U.S. Army post, Columbia, South Carolina, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Isaac Ingalls Stevens (1818-1862) — also known as Isaac I. Stevens — of Washington. Born in North Andover, Essex County, Mass., March 25, 1818. Major in the U.S. Army during the Mexican War; Governor of Washington Territory, 1853-57; Delegate to U.S. Congress from Washington Territory, 1857-61; general in the Union Army during the Civil War. Shot and killed at the Civil War battle of Chantilly, Fairfax County, Va., September 1, 1862 (age 44 years, 160 days). Interment at Island Cemetery, Newport, R.I.; memorial monument at Ox Hill Battlefield Park, Fairfax County, Va.
  Relatives: Cousin *** of Charles Abbot Stevens (1816-1892) and Moses Tyler Stevens.
  Political family: Stevens-Woodhull family of New York City, New York.
  Stevens counties in Minn. and Wash. are named for him.
  Fort Stevens (established 1863; decomissioned 1947; now a state park) in Warrenton, Oregon, was named for him.  — Fort Stevens (active during the Civil War, 1861-65; site now a park) in Washington, D.C., was named for him.  — The city (and lake) of Lake Stevens, Washington, is named for him.  — The town of Stevensville, Montana, is named for him.  — Stevens Peak (6,838 feet), in Shoshone County, Idaho, is named for him.  — Stevens Peak (5,372 feet), in Bingham County, Idaho, is named for him.  — Upper Stevens Lake, and Lower Stevens Lake, in Shoshone County, Idaho, are named for him.  — The Stevens Hall dormitory, at Washington State University, Pullman, Washington, is named for him.  — Isaac I. Stevens Elementary School (opened 1906, expanded 1928, renovated and reopened 2001), in Seattle, Washington, is named for him.  — Stevens Middle School, in Port Angeles, Washington, is named for him.  — Stevens Junior High School (now Middle School), in Pasco, Washington, is named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS Isaac I. Stevens (built 1943 at Portland, Oregon; scrapped 1967) was named for him.
  Epitaph: "Who gave to the service of his country a quick and comprehensive mind, a warm and generous heart, a firm will, and a strong arm, and who fell while rallying his command, with the flag of the Republic in his dying grasp, at the battle of Chantilly, Va."
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about Isaac Ingalls Stevens: Joseph Taylor Hazard, Companion of Adventure: A Biography of Isaac Ingalls Stevens, First Governor of Washington
Thomas Sumter Thomas Sumter (1734-1832) — of Statesburg, Sumter County, S.C. Born in Hanover County, Va., August 14, 1734. Democrat. General in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; member of South Carolina state senate from District Eastward of Wateree River, 1781-82; U.S. Representative from South Carolina, 1789-93, 1797-1801 (at-large 1789-93, 1797-99, 4th District 1799-1801); U.S. Senator from South Carolina, 1801-10; U.S. Minister to Portugal, 1809-19. Slaveowner. Died near Statesburg, Sumter County, S.C., June 1, 1832 (age 97 years, 292 days). Interment in private or family graveyard.
  Relatives: Grandfather of Thomas De Lage Sumter (1809-1874).
  Fort Sumter (built during 1829-61), in Charleston, South Carolina, is named for him.  — The Sumter National Forest (established 1936), in Oconee, Union, Newberry, McCormick, Edgefield, Abbeville, Laurens, Chester, Fairfield, Greenwood, Saluda counties, South Carolina, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier
  Image source: The South in the Building of the Nation (1909)
  Anthony Wayne (1745-1796) — also known as "Mad Anthony" — of Chester County, Pa.; Chatham County, Ga. Born in Chester County, Pa., January 1, 1745. Surveyor; member of Pennsylvania state house of representatives, 1774-80, 1784; general in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; delegate to Georgia convention to ratify U.S. constitution, 1788; U.S. Representative from Georgia at-large, 1791-92. Member, Society of the Cincinnati. Slaveowner. Died in Fort Presque Isle (now Erie), Erie County, Pa., December 15, 1796 (age 51 years, 349 days). Original interment at Garrison Hill, Erie, Pa.; reinterment in 1809 at Old St. David's Church Cemetery, Radnor, Pa.
  Relatives: Son of Isaac Wayne (1699-1774) and Elizabeth (Eddings) Wayne; married 1766 to Mary Penrose; father of Isaac Wayne (1772-1852).
  Wayne counties in Ga., Ill., Ind., Iowa, Ky., Mich., Miss., Mo., Neb., N.Y., N.C., Ohio, Pa. and Tenn. are named for him.
  Fort Wayne (1794), and the subsequent city of Fort Wayne, Indiana, were named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
Leonard Wood Leonard Wood (1860-1927) — Born in Winchester, Cheshire County, N.H., October 9, 1860. Republican. Physician; received the Medal of Honor in 1898 for his actions during an Indian war in 1886; served in the U.S. Army during the Spanish-American War; commander of the "Rough Riders"; Military Governor of Cuba, 1899-1902; major general in the Philippine-American War, 1902-06; first Army Chief of Staff; candidate for Republican nomination for President, 1920; Governor-General of the Philippine Islands, 1921-27; died in office 1927. English ancestry. Died, following surgery for a brain tumor, in the Peter Bent Brigham Hospital, Boston, Suffolk County, Mass., August 7, 1927 (age 66 years, 302 days). Interment at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Va.
  Relatives: Son of Charles Jewett Wood (1829-1880) and Caroline E. (Hagar) Wood (1836-1915); married 1890 to Louisa Adriana Condit Smith (1869-1943).
  Fort Leonard Wood, in Pulaski County, Missouri, is named for him.
  Politician named for him: Leonard W. Hall
  See also Wikipedia article — Internet Movie Database profile — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: American Monthly Review of Reviews, September 1902
"Enjoy the hospitable entertainment of a political graveyard."
Henry L. Clinton, Apollo Hall, New York City, February 3, 1872
The Political Graveyard

The Political Graveyard is a web site about U.S. political history and cemeteries. Founded in 1996, it is the Internet's most comprehensive free source for American political biography, listing 315,917 politicians, living and dead.
 
  The coverage of this site includes (1) the President, Vice President, members of Congress, elected state and territorial officeholders in all fifty states, the District of Columbia, and U.S. territories; and the chief elected official, typically the mayor, of qualifying municipalities; (2) candidates at election, including primaries, for any of the above; (3) all federal judges and all state appellate judges; (4) certain federal officials, including the federal cabinet, diplomatic chiefs of mission, consuls, U.S. district attorneys, collectors of customs and internal revenue, members of major federal commissions; and political appointee (pre-1971) postmasters of qualifying communities; (5) state and national political party officials, including delegates, alternate delegates, and other participants in national party nominating conventions. Note: municipalities or communities "qualify", for TPG purposes, if they have at least half a million person-years of history, inclusive of predecessor, successor, and merged entities.  
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Site information: The Political Graveyard is created and maintained by Lawrence Kestenbaum, who is solely responsible for its structure and content. — The mailing address is The Political Graveyard, P.O. Box 2563, Ann Arbor MI 48106. — This site is hosted by HDL. — The Political Graveyard opened on July 1, 1996; the last full revision was done on May 10, 2022.

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