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American Philosophical Society Politicians

Very incomplete list!

  Hugh Gardner Ackley (1915-1998) — also known as H. Gardner Ackley — of Ann Arbor, Washtenaw County, Mich. Born in Indianapolis, Marion County, Ind., June 30, 1915. University professor; economist; chair, U.S. Council of Economic Advisors, 1964-68; U.S. Ambassador to Italy, 1968-69. Scottish ancestry. Member, Kappa Delta Pi; Tau Kappa Alpha; Phi Kappa Phi; Trilateral Commission; American Economic Association; American Philosophical Society; American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Died, from complications of Alzheimer's disease, in Huron Woods nursing home, Superior Township, Washtenaw County, Mich., February 12, 1998 (age 82 years, 227 days). Cremated.
  Relatives: Son of Hugh M. Ackley and Margaret (McKenzie) Ackley; married, September 18, 1937, to Bonnie A. Lowry.
  See also Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier
  Harlan Page Amen (1853-1913) — also known as Harlan P. Amen — of Exeter, Rockingham County, N.H. Born in Sinking Spring, Highland County, Ohio, April 14, 1853. Republican. School teacher; principal, Phillips Exeter Academy, Exeter, N.H., from 1895; alternate delegate to Republican National Convention from New Hampshire, 1912. Member, American Philosophical Society; American Historical Association. Died November 9, 1913 (age 60 years, 209 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Daniel Amen and Sarah J. (Barber) Amen.
  William Wallace Atterbury (1866-1935) — also known as William W. Atterbury; "The Railroad General" — of Radnor, Delaware County, Pa. Born in New Albany, Floyd County, Ind., January 31, 1866. Republican. Railroad superintendent; president, American Railway Association; during World War I, he was called on to organize organized U.S. military railroad operations in France; he was designated Director-General of Transportation for the American Expeditionary Forces; delegate to Republican National Convention from Pennsylvania, 1920; President, Pennsylvania Railroad, 1925-35. Member, American Philosophical Society; American Academy of Political and Social Science. Died, of apoplexy, in Radnor, Delaware County, Pa., September 20, 1935 (age 69 years, 232 days). Interment at Old St. David's Church Cemetery, Radnor, Pa.
  Relatives: Son of John G. Atterbury and Catharine (Larned) Atterbury.
  Camp Atterbury, a military training camp in Johnson County, Indiana, is named for him.  — Atterbury Army Air Base, Columbus, Indiana, later known as Bakalar Air Force Base, and since 1970 as Columbus Municipal Airport, was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Charles Montague Bakewell (1867-1957) — also known as Charles M. Bakewell — of New Haven, New Haven County, Conn. Born in Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, Pa., April 24, 1867. Republican. University professor; member of Connecticut state senate 8th District, 1921-24; delegate to Republican National Convention from Connecticut, 1932 (alternate), 1936 (member, Committee to Notify Presidential Nominee); U.S. Representative from Connecticut at-large, 1933-35; defeated, 1934. Member, Beta Theta Pi; Freemasons; Elks; American Philosophical Society. Died in New Haven, New Haven County, Conn., September 19, 1957 (age 90 years, 148 days). Interment at Grove Street Cemetery, New Haven, Conn.
  Relatives: Son of Thomas Bakewell and Josephine Alden (Maitland) Bakewell; married, December 21, 1899, to Madeline Palmer (died 1947).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Simeon Eben Baldwin (1840-1927) — also known as Simeon E. Baldwin — of New Haven, New Haven County, Conn. Born in New Haven, New Haven County, Conn., February 5, 1840. Democrat. Lawyer; candidate for Connecticut state senate 4th District, 1867; law professor; justice of Connecticut state supreme court, 1897-1907; chief justice of Connecticut Supreme Court, 1907-10; Governor of Connecticut, 1911-15; candidate for Democratic nomination for President, 1912; candidate for U.S. Senator from Connecticut, 1914. Congregationalist. Member, Phi Beta Kappa; American Bar Association; American Historical Association; American Political Science Association; American Philosophical Society; American Antiquarian Society. Died January 30, 1927 (age 86 years, 359 days). Interment at Grove Street Cemetery, New Haven, Conn.
  Relatives: Son of Roger Sherman Baldwin and Emily (Perkins) Baldwin (1796-1874); brother of Henrietta Perkins (who married Dwight Foster); married, October 19, 1865, to Susan Mears Winchester (1840-1931); uncle of Edward Baldwin Whitney; grandson of Simeon Baldwin; great-grandson of Roger Sherman; fifth great-grandnephew of Thomas Welles; first cousin once removed of Sherman Day, Ebenezer Rockwood Hoar, William Maxwell Evarts and George Frisbie Hoar; second cousin of Roger Sherman Greene, Rockwood Hoar, Sherman Hoar, Maxwell Evarts, Arthur Outram Sherman (1864-?), Thomas Day Thacher and Roger Kent; second cousin once removed of Roger Sherman Hoar; second cousin twice removed of Samuel Gager and Archibald Cox; third cousin once removed of Samuel R. Gager, Samuel Austin Gager, Chauncey Mitchell Depew and John Frederick Addis; third cousin twice removed of Josiah Cowles and John Stanley Addis; fourth cousin of John Adams Dix; fourth cousin once removed of James Doolittle Wooster, Daniel Upson, Walter Booth, George Bailey Loring, Charles Page, Ernest Harvey Woodford and Clement Phineas Kellogg.
  Political families: Sherman family of Connecticut; Sewall-Adams-Cony family of Maine; Hoar-Sherman family of Massachusetts; Baldwin-Greene-Upson-Hoar family of Connecticut (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Cross-reference: Edwin Stark Thomas
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Wharton Barker (1846-1921) — of Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa. Born in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., May 1, 1846. Served in the Union Army during the Civil War; financier; People's candidate for President of the United States, 1900. Member, American Philosophical Society. Died in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., April 9, 1921 (age 74 years, 343 days). Interment at Laurel Hill Cemetery, Philadelphia, Pa.
  Relatives: Son of Abraham Barker (1821-1906) and Sarah (Wharton) Barker (1821-1866); married 1867 to Margaret Corlies; first cousin four times removed of Benjamin Franklin; third cousin of George Benjamin Starbuck; third cousin once removed of Thomas Mott Osborne (1859-1926); third cousin twice removed of Richard Bache, Jr., Charles Devens Osborne and Lithgow Osborne; fourth cousin of Charles James Folger.
  Political families: Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York; Sherman family of Connecticut; Keeler-Floyd-Sherman-Bangs family of New York; Bache-Dallas family of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  James Montgomery Beck (1861-1936) — also known as James M. Beck — of Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa.; Washington, D.C. Born in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., July 9, 1861. Republican. Lawyer; U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania, 1896-1900; U.S. Solicitor General, 1921-25; U.S. Representative from Pennsylvania, 1927-34 (1st District 1927-33, 2nd District 1933-34); resigned 1934. Member, American Philosophical Society; Sons of the Revolution. Died in Washington, D.C., April 12, 1936 (age 74 years, 278 days). Interment at Rock Creek Cemetery, Washington, D.C.
  Relatives: Son of James Nathan Beck and Margretta C. (Darling) Beck; married 1890 to Lilla Lawrence Mitchell.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Adolf Augustus Berle, Jr. (1895-1971) — also known as Adolf A. Berle; A. A. Berle — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born in Boston, Suffolk County, Mass., January 29, 1895. Served in the U.S. Army during World War I; lawyer; economist; law professor; member of the "Brain Trust" which advised President Franklin D. Roosevelt; American Labor candidate for delegate to New York state constitutional convention at-large, 1937; U.S. Ambassador to Brazil, 1945-46. Congregationalist. Member, American Academy of Arts and Sciences; Council on Foreign Relations; American Philosophical Society; Phi Beta Kappa. Died, from a stroke, in Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., February 17, 1971 (age 76 years, 19 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Adolf Augustus Berle (born 1866; clergyman) and Augusta (Wright) Berle; married, December 17, 1927, to Beatrice Bend Bishop; father of Peter A. A. Berle (1929?-).
  See also Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — Internet Movie Database profile
  Books by Adolf A. Berle: Latin America : Diplomacy and Reality (1962) — American Economic Republic (1963) — Power Without Property : A New Development in American Political Economy (1959) — Navigating the Rapids, 1918-1971 (1973) — Power (1969) — Tides of Crisis : A Primer of Foreign Relations (1957) — The Twentieth-Century Capitalist Revolution (1954) — The Modern Corporation and Private Property (1933)
  Books about Adolf A. Berle: Jordan A. Schwarz, Liberal : Adolf A. Berle and the Vision of an American Era
David Blackwell David Harold Blackwell (1919-2010) — also known as David Blackwell — of Washington, D.C.; Berkeley, Alameda County, Calif. Born in Centralia, Marion County, Ill., April 24, 1919. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Navy during World War II; university professor; delegate to Democratic National Convention from California, 1972. African ancestry. Member, American Statistical Association; American Philosophical Society. Died, in a hospital at Berkeley, Alameda County, Calif., July 8, 2010 (age 91 years, 75 days). Burial location unknown.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: American Statistical Association
  James MacGregor Burns (b. 1918) — also known as James M. Burns — of Williamstown, Berkshire County, Mass. Born in Melrose, Middlesex County, Mass., August 3, 1918. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army during World War II; college professor; author; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Massachusetts, 1952 (alternate), 1956, 1960, 1964; candidate for U.S. Representative from Massachusetts 1st District, 1958. Member, American Philosophical Society; American Historical Association; American Civil Liberties Union; American Legion; Phi Beta Kappa; Delta Sigma Rho. Received Pulitzer Prize in history, 1971. Presumed deceased. Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Robert Arthur Burns and Mildred Curry (Bunce) Burns; married 1942 to Janet Rose Dismorr Thompson; married 1969 to Joan Simpson Meyers.
Nicholas Murray Butler Nicholas Murray Butler (1862-1947) — of Paterson, Passaic County, N.J.; Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born in Elizabeth, Union County, N.J., April 2, 1862. Republican. University professor; alternate delegate to Republican National Convention from New Jersey, 1888; President of Columbia University, 1901-45; delegate to Republican National Convention from New York, 1904, 1912, 1916, 1920, 1924, 1928 (speaker), 1932; candidate for Vice President of the United States, 1912; candidate for Republican nomination for President, 1920, 1928; co-recipient of Nobel Peace Prize in 1931; elected (Wet) delegate to New York convention to ratify 21st amendment 1933, but did not serve; blind in his later years. Episcopalian. Member, American Philosophical Society; American Historical Association; Psi Upsilon; Phi Beta Kappa. Died, of bronchio-pneumonia, in St. Luke's Hospital, Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., December 7, 1947 (age 85 years, 249 days). Interment at Cedar Lawn Cemetery, Paterson, N.J.
  Relatives: Son of Henry L. Butler and Mary J. (Murray) Butler; married 1887 to Susanna Edwards Schuyler (died 1903); married, March 5, 1907, to Kate La Montagne (sister-in-law of Francis Key Pendleton (1850-1930)).
  Political families: Pendleton-Lee family; Key family of Maryland (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Cross-reference: Thomas Burke
  Campaign slogan (1920): "Pick Nick as President for a Picnic in November."
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: American Monthly Review of Reviews, February 1902
  Joseph Hodges Choate (1832-1917) — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born in Salem, Essex County, Mass., January 24, 1832. Lawyer; delegate to New York state constitutional convention at-large, 1894; U.S. Ambassador to Great Britain, 1899-1905. English ancestry. Member, American Philosophical Society; American Bar Association; Union League. Died, of a heart attack, in Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., May 14, 1917 (age 85 years, 110 days). Interment at Stockbridge Cemetery, Stockbridge, Mass.
  Relatives: Son of George Choate (1796-1880) and Margaret Manning (Hodges) Choate; brother of William Gardner Choate; married, October 16, 1861, to Caroline Dutcher Sterling; nephew of Rufus Choate; grandson of George Choate (1760?-?).
  Political family: Choate family of Salem, Massachusetts.
  Cross-reference: William Phillips
  See also Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier
  Warren Minor Christopher (1925-2011) — also known as Warren Christopher; "The Cardinal" — of Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, Calif. Born in Scranton, Bowman County, N.Dak., October 27, 1925. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Navy during World War II; lawyer; law clerk to U.S. Supreme Court Justice William O. Douglas, 1949-50; special counsel to Gov. Edmund G. Brown, 1959; deputy U.S. Attorney General, 1967-69; deputy U.S. Secretary of State, 1977-81; delegate to Democratic National Convention from California, 1964; U.S. Secretary of State, 1993-97. Methodist. Member, American Bar Association; Order of the Coif; Council on Foreign Relations; American Philosophical Society. Received the Presidential Medal of Freedom on January 16, 1981. Died, from kidney and bladder cancer, in Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, Calif., March 18, 2011 (age 85 years, 142 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Ernest William Christopher and Catharine (Lemen) Christopher; married, December 21, 1956, to Marie Josephine Wyllis.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile
  Books by Warren Christopher: Chances of a Lifetime : A Memoir (2001)
  Joseph Sill Clark, Jr. (1901-1990) — also known as Joseph S. Clark, Jr. — of Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa. Born in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., October 21, 1901. Democrat. Lawyer; delegate to Pennsylvania convention to ratify 21st amendment, 1933; served in the U.S. Army Air Force in World War II; mayor of Philadelphia, Pa., 1952-56; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Pennsylvania, 1952 (member, Committee on Rules and Order of Business), 1956, 1960, 1964; U.S. Senator from Pennsylvania, 1957-69; defeated, 1968. Unitarian. Member, Americans for Democratic Action; American Legion; Veterans of Foreign Wars; Lions; American Bar Association; United World Federalists; Phi Beta Kappa; American Philosophical Society. Died in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., January 12, 1990 (age 88 years, 83 days). Cremated; ashes scattered.
  Relatives: Son of Joseph S. Clark and Kate Richardson (Avery) Clark; married to Noel Hall.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
  James Bryant Conant (1893-1978) — also known as James B. Conant — Born in Dorchester, Boston, Suffolk County, Mass., March 26, 1893. Major in the U.S. Army during World War I; chemist; university professor; President of Harvard University, 1933-53; U.S. Ambassador to Germany, 1955-57. Member, American Academy of Arts and Sciences; Phi Beta Kappa; Sigma Xi; Alpha Chi Sigma; American Philosophical Society; Council on Foreign Relations. Died in Hanover, Grafton County, N.H., February 11, 1978 (age 84 years, 322 days). Interment at Mt. Auburn Cemetery, Cambridge, Mass.
  Relatives: Son of James Scott Conant and Jennett Orr (Bryant) Conant; married to Patty Thayer Reynolds and Grace Richards.
  See also U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Wilbur Lucius Cross (1862-1948) — also known as Wilbur L. Cross — of New Haven, New Haven County, Conn. Born in Mansfield, Tolland County, Conn., April 10, 1862. Democrat. University professor; Governor of Connecticut, 1931-39; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Connecticut, 1932, 1936, 1940, 1944; candidate for U.S. Senator from Connecticut, 1946. Member, American Philosophical Society; Society of the Cincinnati; Sons of the American Revolution; Phi Beta Kappa; Society of Colonial Wars. Died in New Haven, New Haven County, Conn., October 5, 1948 (age 86 years, 178 days). Interment at Evergreen Cemetery, New Haven, Conn.
  Relatives: Son of Samuel Cross and Harriet M. (Gurley) Cross; married, July 17, 1889, to Helen B. Avery.
  Wilbur Cross Parkway (built 1939-47), in New Haven County, Connecticut, is named for him.  — Wilbur L. Cross Elementary School, in Bridgeport, Connecticut, is named for him.
  Personal motto: "Always do right. This will gratify some people and astonish the rest."
  See also NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Lewis Williams Douglas (1894-1974) — also known as Lewis W. Douglas — of Phoenix, Maricopa County, Ariz.; Sonoita, Santa Cruz County, Ariz. Born in Bisbee, Cochise County, Ariz., July 2, 1894. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army during World War I; member of Arizona state house of representatives, 1923-25; U.S. Representative from Arizona at-large, 1927-33; director of the U.S. Budget, 1933-34; vice-president and director, American Cyanamid Co., 1934-38; president, Mutual Life Insurance Company of New York, 1940-47; U.S. Ambassador to Great Britain, 1947-50. Episcopalian. Member, American Philosophical Society; Council on Foreign Relations. Died in Tucson, Pima County, Ariz., March 7, 1974 (age 79 years, 248 days). Cremated.
  Relatives: Son of James Stuart Douglas and Josephine Leah (Williams) Douglas.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier
  Paul Howard Douglas (1892-1976) — also known as Paul H. Douglas — of Chicago, Cook County, Ill. Born in Salem, Essex County, Mass., March 26, 1892. Democrat. University professor; economist; served in the U.S. Marine Corps during World War II; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Illinois, 1948, 1952, 1956, 1960, 1964, 1968; U.S. Senator from Illinois, 1949-67; defeated, 1942, 1966. Unitarian or Quaker. Member, American Legion; Veterans of Foreign Wars; Elks; Americans for Democratic Action; American Economic Association; American Philosophical Society; Phi Beta Kappa; Delta Upsilon. Died in Washington, D.C., September 24, 1976 (age 84 years, 182 days). Cremated; ashes scattered.
  Relatives: Son of James Howard Douglas and Annie (Smith) Douglas; married 1915 to Dorothy S. Wolff (divorced 1930); married 1931 to Emily Taft (1899-1994).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Books about Paul H. Douglas: Roger Biles, Crusading Liberal: Paul H. Douglas of Illinois
  Pierre Samuel du Pont (1870-1954) — also known as Pierre S. du Pont — of Wilmington, New Castle County, Del. Born in Wilmington, New Castle County, Del., January 15, 1870. President (1915-19) and director of the Du Pont chemical company; chairman (1915-29) and president (1920-23) of General Motors; director, Pennsylvania Railroad; member of Delaware state board of education, 1919-21; delegate to Delaware convention to ratify 21st amendment, 1933; Delaware Liquor Commissioner, 1933-38. Member, American Philosophical Society; Phi Kappa Sigma. Died in 1954 (age about 84 years). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Lammot du Pont (1831-1884) and Mary (Belin) du Pont; brother of William Kemble du Pont (1874-1907; who married Ethel Fleet Hallock); married, October 6, 1915, to Alice Belin (sister of Ferdinand Lammot Belin); uncle of Henry Belin du Pont, Jr., Lammot du Pont Copeland and Reynolds du Pont; grandnephew of Henry DuPont; granduncle of Pierre Samuel du Pont IV; first cousin of Thomas Coleman du Pont and Alfred Irénée du Pont; first cousin once removed of Henry Algernon du Pont and Francis Victor du Pont; first cousin twice removed of Charles Irénée du Pont and Eleuthere Irenee du Pont; second cousin of Francis Irenee du Pont, Edward Green Bradford, Jr., Elizabeth Bradford du Pont Bayard and Eugene Lammot; second cousin once removed of Thomas Francis Bayard III and Alexis Irenee du Pont Bayard (1918-1985); second cousin twice removed of Richard Henry Bayard.
  Political families: DuPont family of Wilmington, Delaware; Livingston-Schuyler family of New York; Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also Wikipedia article
Benjamin Franklin Benjamin Franklin (1706-1790) — also known as "Silence Dogood"; "Anthony Afterwit"; "Poor Richard"; "Alice Addertongue"; "Polly Baker"; "Harry Meanwell"; "Timothy Turnstone"; "Martha Careful"; "Benevolus"; "Caelia Shortface" — of Pennsylvania. Born in Boston, Suffolk County, Mass., January 17, 1706. Delegate to Continental Congress from Pennsylvania, 1775; U.S. Postmaster General, 1775-76; signer, Declaration of Independence, 1776; delegate to Pennsylvania state constitutional convention, 1776; U.S. Minister to France, 1778-85; Sweden, 1782-83; President of Pennsylvania, 1785-88; member, U.S. Constitutional Convention, 1787. Deist. Member, Freemasons; American Philosophical Society; American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Famed for his experiments with electricity; invented bifocal glasses and the harmonica. Elected to the Hall of Fame for Great Americans in 1900. Died in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., April 17, 1790 (age 84 years, 90 days). Interment at Christ Church Burial Ground, Philadelphia, Pa.; statue erected 1856 at Old City Hall Grounds, Boston, Mass.; statue at La Arcata Court, Santa Barbara, Calif.
  Relatives: Son of Josiah Franklin (1657-1745) and Abiah Lee (Folger) Franklin (1667-1752); married, September 1, 1730, to Deborah Read; father of Sarah 'Sally' Franklin (1743-1808; who married Richard Bache); uncle of Franklin Davenport; grandfather of Richard Bache, Jr. and Deborah Franklin Bache (1891-1863; who married William John Duane); great-grandfather of Alexander Dallas Bache (1806-1867; physicist), Mary Blechenden Bache (1808-1873; who married Robert John Walker) and Sophia Arabella Bache (1815-1904; who married William Wallace Irwin); second great-grandfather of Robert Walker Irwin; fifth great-grandfather of Daniel Baugh Brewster and Elise du Pont; first cousin four times removed of Charles James Folger, Benjamin Dexter Sprague and Wharton Barker (1846-1921); first cousin six times removed of Thomas Mott Osborne; first cousin seven times removed of Charles Devens Osborne and Lithgow Osborne; second cousin five times removed of George Hammond Parshall.
  Political families: Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York; Bache-Dallas family of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Franklin counties in Ala., Ark., Fla., Ga., Ill., Ind., Iowa, Kan., Ky., La., Maine, Mass., Miss., Mo., Neb., N.Y., N.C., Ohio, Pa., Tenn., Vt., Va. and Wash. are named for him.
  Mount Franklin, in the White Mountains, Coos County, New Hampshire, is named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: Benjamin F. ButlerBenjamin F. WadeBenjamin Franklin WallaceBenjamin Cromwell FranklinBenjamin Franklin PerryBenjamin Franklin RobinsonBenjamin F. RandolphBenjamin Franklin MasseyBenjamin F. RawlsBenjamin Franklin LeiterBenjamin Franklin ThomasBenjamin F. HallBenjamin F. AngelBenjamin Franklin RossBenjamin F. FlandersBenjamin F. BomarBenjamin F. MudgeBenjamin F. ButlerBenjamin F. LoanBenjamin F. SimpsonBenjamin Franklin TerryBenjamin Franklin JunkinBenjamin F. PartridgeB. F. LangworthyBenjamin F. HardingBenjamin MebaneB. F. WhittemoreBenjamin Franklin BradleyBenjamin Franklin ClaypoolBenjamin F. CoatesB. Franklin MartinBenjamin Franklin HoweyBenjamin F. MartinBenjamin Franklin RiceBenjamin F. RandolphBenjamin F. HopkinsBenjamin F. TracyBenjamin F. GradyBenjamin F. FarnhamBenjamin F. MeyersBenjamin Franklin WhiteBenjamin Franklin PrescottBenjamin F. JonasB. Franklin FisherBenjamin Franklin PottsBenjamin F. FunkBenjamin F. MarshFrank B. ArnoldBenjamin F. HeckertBenjamin F. BradleyBenjamin F. HowellBenjamin F. MahanBen Franklin CaldwellBenjamin Franklin TilleyBenjamin F. HackneyB. F. McMillanBenjamin F. ShivelyB. Frank HiresB. Frank MebaneB. Frank MurphyBenjamin F. StarrBenjamin Franklin Jones, Jr.Benjamin F. WeltyBenjamin F. JonesBenjamin Franklin BoleyBen Franklin LooneyBenjamin F. BledsoeBenjamin Franklin WilliamsBenjamin Franklin KelleyBenjamin Franklin ButlerBenjamin F. JamesFrank B. HeintzlemanBenjamin F. FeinbergB. Franklin BunnBen F. CameronBen F. BlackmonB. Frank WhelchelB. F. Merritt, Jr.Ben F. HornsbyBen Dillingham II
  Coins and currency: His portrait appears on the U.S. $100 bill, and formerly on the U.S. half dollar coin (1948-63).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial — Early American Foreign Service Database
  Books by Benjamin Franklin: The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin — An Account of the Newly Invented Pennsylvanian Fire-Place (1744)
  Books about Benjamin Franklin: H. W. Brands, The First American: The Life and Times of Benjamin Franklin — Edmund S. Morgan, Benjamin Franklin — Stacy Schiff, A Great Improvisation : Franklin, France, and the Birth of America — Gordon S. Wood, The Americanization of Benjamin Franklin — Walter Isaacson, Benjamin Franklin : An American Life — Carl Van Doren, Benjamin Franklin — Philip Dray, Stealing God's Thunder : Benjamin Franklin's Lightning Rod and the Invention of America
  Image source: Library of Congress
  John Kenneth Galbraith (1908-2006) — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y.; Cambridge, Middlesex County, Mass. Born in Iona Station, Ontario, October 15, 1908. Democrat. Naturalized U.S. citizen; economist; university professor; U.S. Ambassador to India, 1961-63; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Massachusetts, 1972. Scottish ancestry. Member, Americans for Democratic Action; American Economic Association; American Academy of Arts and Sciences; American Philosophical Society. Received the Medal of Freedom in 1946, and again in 2000. Died, of pneumonia, in Mt. Auburn Hospital, Cambridge, Middlesex County, Mass., April 29, 2006 (age 97 years, 196 days). Interment at Indian Hill Cemetery, Middletown, Conn.
  Relatives: Son of William Archibald 'Archie' Galbraith and Catherine (Kendall) Galbraith; married, September 17, 1937, to Catherine 'Kitty' Atwater; father of Peter Woodard Galbraith (1950-) and James Kenneth Galbraith.
  Political family: Galbraith family of Massachusetts and Vermont.
  See also Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books by John Kenneth Galbraith: Ambassador's Journal : A Personal Account of the Kennedy Years (1969) — The Affluent Society (1958) — The Great Crash : 1929 (1954) — A Short History of Financial Euphoria — Money : Whence it Came, Where it Went (1975) — A Tenured Professor (1990) — Name-Dropping : From FDR On (1999) — A Life In Our Times (1981) — The New Industrial State (1967)
  Books about John Kenneth Galbraith: Richard Parker, John Kenneth Galbraith : His Life, His Politics, His Economics
  Walter Sherman Gifford (1885-1966) — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y.; North Castle town, Westchester County, N.Y. Born in Salem, Essex County, Mass., January 10, 1885. U.S. Ambassador to Great Britain, 1950-53. Member, American Philosophical Society. President of American Telephone & Telegraph Co. Died in Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., May 7, 1966 (age 81 years, 117 days). Interment at Middle Patent Rural Cemetery, Bedford, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Nathan Poole Gifford and Harriet Maria (Spinney) Gifford; married, October 28, 1916, to Florence Pitman; married, December 22, 1944, to Augustine Lloyd Perry.
  See also U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Herbert Funk Goodrich (1889-1962) — of Chestnut Hill, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa. Born in Anoka, Anoka County, Minn., July 29, 1889. Democrat. Law professor; Judge of U.S. Court of Appeals for the 3rd Circuit, 1940-62; died in office 1962. Member, American Bar Association; American Philosophical Society; Order of the Coif; Phi Beta Kappa; Delta Sigma Rho; Phi Alpha Delta; Alpha Sigma Phi; Freemasons. Died June 25, 1962 (age 72 years, 331 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of George Herbert Goodrich and Mary Ann (Funk) Goodrich; married to Edith Eastman and Natalie E. Murphy; married, September 23, 1940, to Mary Dern Baxter.
  David Jayne Hill (1850-1932) — also known as David J. Hill — of Lewisburg, Union County, Pa.; Rochester, Monroe County, N.Y.; Washington, D.C. Born in Plainfield, Union County, N.J., June 10, 1850. Historian; president, Bucknell University, 1879-88; president, University of Rochester, 1888-96; U.S. Minister to Switzerland, 1903-05; Netherlands, 1905-08; Luxembourg, 1905-08; U.S. Ambassador to Germany, 1908-11. Member, American Philosophical Society; American Historical Association; Sons of the American Revolution. Died in 1932 (age about 82 years). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Rev. Daniel T. Hill and Lydia Ann (Thompson) Hill; married, June 3, 1886, to Juliet Lewis Packer.
  Cross-reference: Thomas Burke
  See also U.S. State Dept career summary
Thomas Jefferson Thomas Jefferson (1743-1826) — also known as "Apostle of Liberty"; "Sage of Monticello"; "Friend of the People"; "Father of the University of Virginia" — of Albemarle County, Va. Born in Albemarle County, Va., April 13, 1743. Lawyer; Delegate to Continental Congress from Virginia, 1775-76, 1783-84; signer, Declaration of Independence, 1776; Governor of Virginia, 1779-81; member of Virginia state legislature, 1782; U.S. Minister to France, 1785-89; U.S. Secretary of State, 1790-93; Vice President of the United States, 1797-1801; President of the United States, 1801-09; defeated (Democratic-Republican), 1796. Deist. English ancestry. Member, American Philosophical Society; American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He was elected to the Hall of Fame for Great Americans in 1900. Died near Charlottesville, Albemarle County, Va., July 4, 1826 (age 83 years, 82 days). Interment at Monticello Graveyard, Near Charlottesville, Albemarle County, Va.; cenotaph at University of Missouri Quadrangle, Columbia, Mo.; memorial monument at West Potomac Park, Washington, D.C.
  Relatives: Son of Peter Jefferson (1707-1757) and Jane (Randolph) Jefferson (1720-1776); married, January 1, 1772, to Martha Wayles Skelton (1748-1782); father of Martha Jefferson (1772-1836; who married Thomas Mann Randolph, Jr.) and Maria Jefferson (1778-1804; who married John Wayles Eppes); uncle of Dabney Carr; grandfather of Francis Wayles Eppes, Virginia Jefferson Randolph (who married Nicholas Philip Trist), Benjamin Franklin Randolph, Meriwether Lewis Randolph and George Wythe Randolph; grandnephew of Richard Randolph; granduncle of Dabney Smith Carr (1802-1854); great-grandfather of Thomas Jefferson Coolidge and Frederick Madison Roberts; second great-grandfather of John Gardner Coolidge; first cousin once removed of Richard Bland and Peyton Randolph (1721-1775); first cousin twice removed of John Jordan Crittenden, Thomas Turpin Crittenden, Robert Crittenden and Carter Henry Harrison; first cousin thrice removed of Alexander Parker Crittenden, Thomas Leonidas Crittenden, Thomas Theodore Crittenden and Carter Henry Harrison II; first cousin four times removed of Thomas Theodore Crittenden, Jr.; second cousin of Theodorick Bland, Edmund Jenings Randolph, Beverley Randolph and John Randolph of Roanoke; second cousin once removed of John Marshall, Henry Lee, Charles Lee, James Markham Marshall, Alexander Keith Marshall, Edmund Jennings Lee, Peyton Randolph (1779-1828), Henry St. George Tucker and William Segar Archer; second cousin twice removed of Thomas Marshall, James Keith Marshall, Nathaniel Beverly Tucker and Edmund Randolph; second cousin thrice removed of Fitzhugh Lee and John Augustine Marshall; second cousin four times removed of William Marshall Bullitt, Alexander Scott Bullitt and Francis Beverley Biddle; second cousin five times removed of William Welby Beverley; third cousin thrice removed of William Henry Robertson.
  Political families: Lee-Randolph family of Maryland and Virginia; Marshall-Harrison-Randolph-Cabell family of Virginia (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Cross-reference: Jefferson M. Levy — Joshua Fry
  Jefferson counties in Ala., Ark., Colo., Fla., Ga., Idaho, Ill., Ind., Iowa, Kan., Ky., La., Miss., Mo., Mont., Neb., N.Y., Ohio, Okla., Ore., Pa., Tenn., Tex., Wash., W.Va. and Wis. are named for him.
  Mount Jefferson (third highest peak in the Northeast), in Coos County, New Hampshire, is named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: Thomas Jefferson KennardThomas Jefferson CampbellThomas J. GazleyThomas Jefferson WordThomas J. DrakeThomas Jefferson HeardThomas Jefferson GreenThomas J. RuskThomas Jefferson WithersThomas J. ParsonsThomas J. DryerThomas J. FosterThomas J. HenleyThomas J. BarrThomas Jefferson JenningsThomas J. HendersonThomas J. Van AlstyneThomas Jefferson CasonThomas Jefferson BufordT. Jefferson CoolidgeThomas J. MegibbenThomas J. BunnThomas J. HardinThomas J. McLain, Jr.Thomas J. BrownThomas Jefferson SpeerThomas J. BoyntonThomas J. HudsonThomas J. BradyThomas J. SelbyThomas Jefferson DeavittThomas Jefferson MajorsThomas Jefferson WoodT. J. JarrattThomas Jefferson NunnThomas J. StraitThomas J. HumesT. J. AppleyardThomas J. ClunieThomas J. SteeleThomas J. BoyntonThomas J. O'DonnellThomas J. HalseyThomas J. GrahamT. J. MartinThomas Jefferson LillyThomas J. RandolphTom J. TerralT. Jeff BusbyThomas Jefferson MurphyThomas J. HamiltonTom ManganThomas J. RyanTom J. MurrayTom SteedThomas Jefferson Edmonds, Jr.Thomas J. AndersonThomas Jefferson RobertsThomas J. Barlow III
  Coins and currency: His portrait has appeared on the U.S. nickel (five cent coin) since 1938, and on the $2 bill since the 1860s.
  Personal motto: "Rebellion to tyrants is obedience to God."
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about Thomas Jefferson: Joseph J. Ellis, American Sphinx: The Character of Thomas Jefferson — Willard Sterne Randall, Thomas Jefferson : A Life — R. B. Bernstein, Thomas Jefferson — Joyce Appleby, Thomas Jefferson — Gore Vidal, Inventing A Nation: Washington, Adams, Jefferson — John Ferling, Adams vs. Jefferson: The Tumultuous Election of 1800 — Susan Dunn, Jefferson's Second Revolution : The Election Crisis of 1800 — Andrew Burstein, Jefferson's Secret: Death and Desire at Monticello — Christopher Hitchens, Thomas Jefferson : Author of America — David Barton, The Jefferson Lies: Exposing the myths you've always believed about Thomas Jefferson — David Barton, The Jefferson Lies: Exposing the Myths You've Always Believed About Thomas Jefferson — Donald Barr Chidsey, Mr. Hamilton and Mr. Jefferson
  Critical books about Thomas Jefferson: Joseph Wheelan, Jefferson's Vendetta : The Pursuit of Aaron Burr and the Judiciary
  Image source: Portrait & Biographical Album of Washtenaw County (1891)
Henry Laurens Henry Laurens (1724-1792) — of South Carolina. Born in Charleston, Charleston County, S.C., March 6, 1724. Merchant; planter; Vice-President of South Carolina, 1776-77; Delegate to Continental Congress from South Carolina, 1777-80. Member, Freemasons; American Philosophical Society. Died in Berkeley County, S.C., December 8, 1792 (age 68 years, 277 days). Cremated; ashes interred at Mepkin Abbey, Moncks Corner, S.C.
  Relatives: Son of Jean Samuel Laurens and Esther (Grasset) Laurens; married, July 6, 1750, to Eleanor Delamere Ball (1731-1770); father of John Laurens, Martha Laurens (1759-1811; who married David Ramsay (1749-1815)) and Mary Eleanor Laurens (1770-1794; who married Charles Pinckney); grandfather of Henry Laurens Pinckney.
  Political family: Pinckney-Middleton-Laurens family of Charleston, South Carolina (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Laurens County, S.C. is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: The South in the Building of the Nation (1909)
Seth Low Seth Low (1850-1916) — of Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y.; Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born in Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y., January 18, 1850. Republican. Mayor of Brooklyn, N.Y., 1882-85; president, Columbia University, 1890-1900; mayor of New York City, N.Y., 1902-03; defeated, 1897, 1903; delegate to Republican National Convention from New York, 1908; delegate to New York state constitutional convention at-large, 1915. Member, American Philosophical Society; American Academy of Political and Social Science; Union League. Died in Bedford Hills, Westchester County, N.Y., September 17, 1916 (age 66 years, 243 days). Interment at Green-Wood Cemetery, Brooklyn, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Abiel Abbot Low (1811-1893) and Ellen Almira (Dow) Low (1823-1850); married, December 9, 1880, to Anne Wroe Scollay Curtis (1847-1929; daughter of Benjamin Robbins Curtis); uncle of Seth Low Pierrepont and Abbot Augustus Low; great-granduncle of Jay Pierrepont Moffat and Abbot Low Moffat (1901-1996).
  Political family: White-Moffat-Low family of New York City, New York (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Cross-reference: James B. Reynolds
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Image source: American Monthly Review of Reviews, November 1901
Samuel Osgood Samuel Osgood (1748-1813) — of Andover (part now in North Andover), Essex County, Mass.; New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in Andover (part now in North Andover), Essex County, Mass., February 3, 1748. Colonel in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; delegate to Massachusetts state constitutional convention, 1779-80; member of Massachusetts state senate, 1780; Delegate to Continental Congress from Massachusetts, 1781-84; member of Massachusetts state house of representatives, 1784; U.S. Postmaster General, 1789-91; Presidential Elector for New York, 1792; member of New York state assembly from New York County, 1800-02. Member, American Philosophical Society. Died in New York, New York County, N.Y., August 12, 1813 (age 65 years, 190 days). Original interment at Brick Presbyterian Church, Manhattan, N.Y.; reinterment in 1856 at Green-Wood Cemetery, Brooklyn, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Peter Osgood (1717-1801) and Sarah (Johnson) Osgood (1719-1804); married 1786 to Mary Browne (1754-1814); granduncle of George Bailey Loring; third cousin twice removed of William Crowninshield Endicott (1826-1900).
  Political families: Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York; Roosevelt family; Crowninshield-Adams family of Savannah, Georgia (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: U.S. Postal Museum
George Wharton Pepper George Wharton Pepper (1867-1961) — of Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa.; Devon, Chester County, Pa. Born in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., March 16, 1867. Republican. Lawyer; law professor; orator; U.S. Senator from Pennsylvania, 1922-27; defeated in primary, 1926; member of Republican National Committee from Pennsylvania, 1922-24; delegate to Republican National Convention from Pennsylvania, 1924, 1928, 1940 (member, Resolutions Committee). Episcopalian. Member, American Bar Association; American Philosophical Society. Died May 24, 1961 (age 94 years, 69 days). Interment at Old St. David's Church Cemetery, Radnor, Pa.
  Relatives: Son of George Pepper and Hitty Markoe (Wharton) Pepper; married, November 25, 1890, to Charlotte Root Fisher (daughter of George Park Fisher (historian and theologian)).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Image source: American Review of Reviews, February 1922
  Samuel Powel (1738-1793) — of Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa. Born in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., October 28, 1738. Mayor of Philadelphia, Pa., 1775-76, 1789-90; member of Pennsylvania state senate, 1790-93. Member, American Philosophical Society. Died, from yellow fever, in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., September 29, 1793 (age 54 years, 336 days). Interment at Christ Church Burial Ground, Philadelphia, Pa.
  Relatives: Son of Samuel Powel (1704-1759) and Mary (Morris) Powel (1713-1759); married, August 7, 1769, to Elizabeth Willing (daughter of Charles Willing; sister of Thomas Willing (1731-1821)); grandson of Anthony Morris (1682?-1763); great-grandson of Anthony Morris (1654-1721).
  Political families: Shippen-Middleton family of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Marshall-Harrison-Randolph-Cabell family of Virginia; Morris-Willing family of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  John Dyneley Prince (1868-1945) — also known as John D. Prince — of Passaic County, N.J.; Ringwood Manor, Passaic County, N.J. Born in New York, New York County, N.Y., April 17, 1868. University professor; member of New Jersey state house of assembly from Passaic County, 1906, 1908-09; Speaker of the New Jersey State House of Assembly, 1909; member of New Jersey state senate from Passaic County, 1910-12; U.S. Minister to Denmark, 1921-26; Serbs, Croats and Slovenes, 1926-29; Yugoslavia, 1929-33. Member, American Philosophical Society; American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Died in 1945 (age about 77 years). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of John Dyneley Prince and Anne Maria (Morris) Prince; married, October 5, 1889, to Adeline Loomis.
  See also U.S. State Dept career summary
  David Rittenhouse (1732-1796) — of Pennsylvania. Born in Germantown (now part of Philadelphia), Philadelphia County, Pa., April 8, 1732. Pennsylvania state treasurer, 1777-89. Member, American Philosophical Society. Astronomer, mathematician, financier, clockmaker, surveyor, first director of the U.S. Mint. Died in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., June 26, 1796 (age 64 years, 79 days). Original interment in unknown location; reinterment at Laurel Hill Cemetery, Philadelphia, Pa.
  Relatives: Son of Matthias Rittenhouse (1702-1792) and Elizabeth (Williams) Rittenhouse (1705-1792); married to Eleanor Coulston and Hannah Jacobs (1735-1799); father of Elizabeth Rittenhouse (1767-1836; who married Jonathan Dickinson Sergeant (1746-1793)); second great-granduncle of Barton Myers; third great-granduncle of Robert Baldwin Myers.
  Political families: Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York; Wise-Sergeant family; Sergeant-Whitehill-Kunkel-Spencer family of Pennsylvania; Myers family of Norfolk, Virginia (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Rittenhouse Square (originally Southwest Square; renamed 1825) in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, is named for him.  — Rittenhouse, a crater on the Moon, about 26 km (16 miles) in diameter, is named for him.
  See also NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
Elihu Root Elihu Root (1845-1937) — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born in Clinton, Oneida County, N.Y., February 15, 1845. Republican. Lawyer; U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York, 1883-85; delegate to New York state constitutional convention at-large, 1894; U.S. Secretary of War, 1899-1904; delegate to Republican National Convention from New York, 1904 (Temporary Chair), 1912; U.S. Secretary of State, 1905-09; U.S. Senator from New York, 1909-15; delegate to New York state constitutional convention at-large, 1915; candidate for Republican nomination for President, 1916; delegate to New York convention to ratify 21st amendment, 1933. Member, Union League; American Society for International Law; American Bar Association; American Philosophical Society; American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize in 1912. Died, of pneumonia, in Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., February 7, 1937 (age 91 years, 358 days). Interment at Hamilton College Cemetery, Clinton, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Prof. Oren Root and Nancy Whitney (Buttrick) Root; married, January 8, 1878, to Clara Wales (died 1928).
  Cross-reference: Willard Bartlett — Thomas Burke
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Books about Elihu Root: Richard William Leopold, Elihu Root and the Conservative Tradition
  Image source: American Monthly Review of Reviews, June 1902
  Benjamin Rush (1746-1813) — also known as "Father of American Psychiatry" — of Pennsylvania. Born in Byberry Township (now part of Philadelphia), Philadelphia County, Pa., January 4, 1746. Physician; Delegate to Continental Congress from Pennsylvania, 1776-77; signer, Declaration of Independence, 1776; served in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War. Member, American Philosophical Society. Died in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., April 19, 1813 (age 67 years, 105 days). Interment at Christ Church Burial Ground, Philadelphia, Pa.
  Relatives: Married, January 2, 1776, to Julia Stockton (1759-1848; daughter of Richard Stockton); father of Richard Rush (1780-1859).
  Political family: Stockton family of Princeton, New Jersey (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Rush County, Ind. is named for him.
  Rush Street, in Chicago, Illinois, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about Benjamin Rush: Alyn Brodsky, Benjamin Rush : Patriot and Physician — David Barton, Benjamin Rush — David Barton, Benjamin Rush: Signer of the Declaration of Independence
  George Frederick Seward (1840-1910) — also known as George F. Seward — of California; Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born in Florida, Orange County, N.Y., November 8, 1840. U.S. Consul in Shanghai, 1861-63; U.S. Consul General in Shanghai, 1863-76; U.S. Minister to China, 1876-80; president, Fidelity and Casualty Company of New York, 1893-1910. Member, American Philosophical Society; American Academy of Political and Social Science. Died in Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., November 28, 1910 (age 70 years, 20 days). Interment at Woodlawn Cemetery, Bronx, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of George Washington Seward (1808-1888) and Temperance Wick (Leddel) Seward (1812-1848); married, August 4, 1870, to Kate Sherman (1850-1934); nephew of William Henry Seward; grandson of Samuel Swayze Seward; first cousin of Frederick William Seward and William Henry Seward, Jr. (1839-1920); first cousin once removed of Frederick Whittlesey Seward, Jr..
  Political family: Seward family of New York (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Adam Seybert (1773-1825) — of Pennsylvania. Born in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., May 16, 1773. Democrat. Physician; U.S. Representative from Pennsylvania 1st District, 1809-15, 1817-19. Member, American Philosophical Society. Died in Paris, France, May 2, 1825 (age 51 years, 351 days). Interment at Père la Chaise Cemetery, Paris, France.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  William Cameron Sproul (1870-1928) — also known as William C. Sproul — of Chester, Delaware County, Pa. Born in Octoraro, Lancaster County, Pa., September 16, 1870. Republican. Farmer; manufacturer; journalist; member of Pennsylvania state senate 9th District, 1897-1919; resigned 1919; delegate to Republican National Convention from Pennsylvania, 1916, 1920, 1924; Governor of Pennsylvania, 1919-23; candidate for Republican nomination for President, 1920. Quaker. Member, American Philosophical Society; Phi Beta Kappa; Sigma Xi; Phi Kappa Psi; Grange; Freemasons; Elks; Union League; Patriotic Order Sons of America. Died March 21, 1928 (age 57 years, 187 days). Interment at Chester Rural Cemetery, Chester, Pa.
  Relatives: Son of William Hall Sproul and Deborah Dickinson (Slokom) Sproul; married, January 21, 1892, to Emeline Wallace Roach.
  Sproul Hall, a residence hall at Pennsylvania State University, University Park, State College, Pennsylvania, is named for him.  — The Sproul State Forest, in Clinton County, Pennsylvania, is named for him.
  Charlemagne Tower (1848-1923) — of Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa.; Duluth, St. Louis County, Minn. Born in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., April 17, 1848. Republican. Lawyer; president, Duluth & Iron Range Railroad; managing director, Minnesota Iron Co. (mining); U.S. Minister to Austria-Hungary, 1897-99; U.S. Ambassador to Russia, 1899-1902; Germany, 1902-08; alternate delegate to Republican National Convention from Pennsylvania, 1916. Member, American Philosophical Society. Died February 24, 1923 (age 74 years, 313 days). Original interment at West Laurel Hill Cemetery, Bala Cynwyd, Pa.; reinterment at Waterville Cemetery, Waterville, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Charlemagne Tower and Amelia (Bartle) Tower; married, February 8, 1888, to Helen Smith.
  See also U.S. State Dept career summary
  Samuel Matthews Vauclain (1856-1940) — also known as Samuel M. Vauclain — of Rosemont, Montgomery County, Pa. Born in Port Richmond, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., May 18, 1856. Republican. Locomotive manufacturer; inventor; delegate to Republican National Convention from Pennsylvania, 1920. French and Scotch-Irish ancestry. Member, American Society of Civil Engineers; American Society of Mechanical Engineers; American Philosophical Society. Died, of a heart attack, in Rosemont, Montgomery County, Pa., February 4, 1940 (age 83 years, 262 days). Interment at Church of the Redeemer Cemetery, Bryn Mawr, Pa.
  Relatives: Son of Andrew Constant Vauclain and Mary Ann (Campbell) Vauclain; married, April 17, 1879, to Annie Kearney (1854-1923).
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Earl Warren (1891-1974) — also known as "Superchief" — of Oakland, Alameda County, Calif. Born in Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, Calif., March 19, 1891. Republican. Lawyer; served in the U.S. Army during World War I; Alameda County District Attorney, 1925-39; delegate to Republican National Convention from California, 1928 (alternate), 1932; Temporary Chair, 1944; California Republican state chair, 1934-36; member of Republican National Committee from California, 1936-38; California state attorney general, 1939-43; Governor of California, 1943-53; candidate for Presidential Elector for California, 1944; candidate for Vice President of the United States, 1948; Chief Justice of U.S. Supreme Court, 1953-69; chair, President's Commission on the Assassination of President KNDY, 1963-64. Norwegian ancestry. Member, American Bar Association; Freemasons; Shriners; Elks; American Academy of Arts and Sciences; American Philosophical Society; Phi Delta Phi; Sigma Phi; Exchange Club. Awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom posthumously in 1981. Died in Washington, D.C., July 9, 1974 (age 83 years, 112 days). Interment at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Va.
  Relatives: Son of Methias H. Warren and Chrystal (Hernlund) Warren; married, October 14, 1925, to Nina Palmquist Meyers.
  Cross-reference: William S. Mailliard
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile
  Books about Earl Warren: Ed Cray, Chief Justice: A Biography of Earl Warren — G. Edward White, Earl Warren : A Public Life — Bernard Schwartz, Super Chief, Earl Warren and His Supreme Court — Jim Newton, Justice for All: Earl Warren and the Nation He Made
Andrew D. White Andrew Dickson White (1832-1918) — also known as Andrew D. White — of Syracuse, Onondaga County, N.Y.; Ithaca, Tompkins County, N.Y. Born in Homer, Cortland County, N.Y., November 7, 1832. Republican. University professor; member of New York state senate 22nd District, 1864-67; co-founder and first president of Cornell University, 1867-79 and 1881-85; delegate to Republican National Convention from New York, 1872 (alternate), 1884, 1912; Presidential Elector for New York, 1872; U.S. Minister to Germany, 1879-81; Russia, 1892-94; U.S. Ambassador to Germany, 1897-1902. Member, American Historical Association; American Philosophical Society. Died in Ithaca, Tompkins County, N.Y., November 4, 1918 (age 85 years, 362 days). Entombed at Sage Chapel, Cornell University, Ithaca, N.Y.; statue at Arts Quad, Cornell University, Ithaca, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Horace White (1802-1860) and Clara (Dickson) White (1811-1882); married 1859 to Mary A. Outwater (died 1887); married 1890 to Helen Magill; uncle of Horace White (1865-1943); grandson of Andrew Dickson.
  Political family: White family of Syracuse, New York.
  Cross-reference: Albert Henry Washburn
  The World War II Liberty ship SS Andrew D. White (built 1942, scrapped 1962) was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary
  Image source: American Monthly Review of Reviews, December 1902
  Charles Woodruff Yost (1907-1981) — also known as Charles W. Yost — of New York; Washington, D.C. Born in Watertown, Jefferson County, N.Y., November 6, 1907. Foreign Service officer; U.S. Vice Consul in Alexandria, 1931-32; Warsaw, 1932-33; U.S. Charge d'Affaires to Thailand, 1946; U.S. Minister to Laos, 1954-55; U.S. Ambassador to Laos, 1955-56; Syria, 1957-58; Morocco, 1958-61; U.S. Representative to United Nations, 1969-71. Member, Council on Foreign Relations; American Society for International Law; American Academy of Political and Social Science; American Philosophical Society. Died, from cancer, in Georgetown University Hospital, Washington, D.C., May 21, 1981 (age 73 years, 196 days). Interment at Brookside Cemetery, Watertown, N.Y.
  Relatives: Married 1934 to Irena Oldakowska (1915-2006).
  See also Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
"Enjoy the hospitable entertainment of a political graveyard."
Henry L. Clinton, Apollo Hall, New York City, February 3, 1872
The Political Graveyard

The Political Graveyard is a web site about U.S. political history and cemeteries. Founded in 1996, it is the Internet's most comprehensive free source for American political biography, listing 312,576 politicians, living and dead.
  The listings are incomplete; development of the database is a continually ongoing project.  
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Copyright notices: (1) Facts are not subject to copyright; see Feist v. Rural Telephone. (2) Politician portraits displayed on this site are 70-pixel-wide monochrome thumbnail images, which I believe to constitute fair use under applicable copyright law. Where possible, each image is linked to its online source. However, requests from owners of copyrighted images to delete them from this site are honored. (3) Original material, programming, selection and arrangement are © 1996-2019 Lawrence Kestenbaum. (4) This work is also licensed for free non-commercial re-use, with attribution, under a Creative Commons License.
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