PoliticalGraveyard.com
The Political Graveyard: A Database of American History
The Internet's Most Comprehensive Source of U.S. Political Biography
(or, The Web Site that Tells Where the Dead Politicians are Buried)
Created and maintained by Lawrence Kestenbaum

Namesake Politicians: Airports

in alphabetical order

  William Wallace Atterbury (1866-1935) — also known as William W. Atterbury; "The Railroad General" — of Radnor, Delaware County, Pa. Born in New Albany, Floyd County, Ind., January 31, 1866. Republican. Railroad superintendent; president, American Railway Association; during World War I, he was called on to organize organized U.S. military railroad operations in France; he was designated Director-General of Transportation for the American Expeditionary Forces; delegate to Republican National Convention from Pennsylvania, 1920; President, Pennsylvania Railroad, 1925-35. Member, American Philosophical Society; American Academy of Political and Social Science. Died, of apoplexy, in Radnor, Delaware County, Pa., September 20, 1935 (age 69 years, 232 days). Interment at Old St. David's Church Cemetery, Radnor, Pa.
  Relatives: Son of John G. Atterbury and Catharine (Larned) Atterbury.
  Camp Atterbury, a military training camp in Johnson County, Indiana, is named for him.  — Atterbury Army Air Base, Columbus, Indiana, later known as Bakalar Air Force Base, and since 1970 as Columbus Municipal Airport, was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Robert R. Blacker (1845-1931) — of Manistee, Manistee County, Mich. Born in 1845. Democrat. Lumber business; mayor of Manistee, Mich.; elected 1889; secretary of state of Michigan, 1891-92; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Michigan, 1896. Died in 1931 (age about 86 years). Burial location unknown.
  Manistee County Blacker Airport, Manistee, Michigan, is named for him.
  Charles M. Brown (1903-1995) — also known as Charlie Brown — of Atlanta, Fulton County, Ga. Born in 1903. Fulton County Commissioner, 1941-48, 1966-79; member of Georgia state senate, 1957-64. Died in 1995 (age about 92 years). Burial location unknown.
  Charlie Brown Field (Fulton County general aviation airport), Atlanta, Georgia, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article
  Asa Griggs Candler (1851-1929) — also known as Asa G. Candler — of Atlanta, Fulton County, Ga. Born in Villa Rica, Carroll County, Ga., December 30, 1851. Druggist; founder of the Coca-Cola beverage company; mayor of Atlanta, Ga., 1917-19. Suffered a stroke in 1926, did not recover, and died in Wesley Memorial Hospital, Atlanta, Fulton County, Ga., March 12, 1929 (age 77 years, 72 days). Interment at Westview Cemetery, Atlanta, Ga.
  Relatives: Son of Samuel Charles Candler and Martha Bernetta (Beall) Candler (1819-1897); brother of Milton Anthony Candler (1837-1909) and John Slaughter Candler; married, January 15, 1878, to Lucy Elizabeth Howard (1859-1919); married 1923 to May Little Ragin; nephew of Daniel Gill Candler and Ezekiel Slaughter Candler; uncle of Charles Murphey Candler and Ezekiel Samuel Candler Jr.; granduncle of George Scott Candler; great-grandson of William Candler; first cousin of Allen Daniel Candler and William Ezekiel Candler; first cousin once removed of Thomas Slaughter Candler.
  Political family: Candler family of Georgia.
  Candler Field airport (opened 1925; now the Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport), in Fulton County, Georgia, was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about Asa G. Candler: Kathryn W. Kemp, God's Capitalist: Asa Candler of Coca-Cola — Charles Howard Candler, Asa Griggs Candler: Founder of Coca-Cola
John D. Dingell John David Dingell Jr. (1926-2019) — also known as John D. Dingell; "Big John"; "The Truck" — of Detroit, Wayne County, Mich.; Trenton, Wayne County, Mich.; Dearborn, Wayne County, Mich. Born in Colorado Springs, El Paso County, Colo., July 8, 1926. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army during World War II; lawyer; U.S. Representative from Michigan, 1955-2003 (15th District 1955-65, 16th District 1965-2003, 15th District 2003); delegate to Democratic National Convention from Michigan, 1956, 1960, 1968, 1984, 1988, 1996, 2000, 2004, 2008. Catholic. Polish and Scotch-Irish ancestry. Member, Polish Legion of American Veterans; Veterans of Foreign Wars; American Legion; Knights of Columbus; National Rifle Association. Died, from prostate cancer, in Dearborn, Wayne County, Mich., February 7, 2019 (age 92 years, 214 days). Interment at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Va.
  Relatives: Son of Grace Blossom (Bigler) Dingell (1894-1962) and John David Dingell; married 1952 to Helen Henebry (1927-2016); married 1981 to Deborah Ann Insley; father of Christopher D. Dingell (born c.1954).
  Political family: Dingell family of Detroit, Michigan.
  Cross-reference: Doug Ross
  John Dingell Drive, in Detroit Metro Airport, Romulus, Michigan, is named for him.  — The John D. Dingell VA Medical Center, in Detroit, Michigan, is named for him.  — The John D. Dingell Jr. Memorial Bridges, which take Stadium Boulevard over State Street and the Ann Arbor Railroad tracks, in Ann Arbor, Michigan, are named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Ballotpedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: Michigan Manual 1957-58
  Ben Elbert Douglas, Sr. (1894-1982) — also known as Ben E. Douglas — of Charlotte, Mecklenburg County, N.C. Born in Scotts Crossroad, Iredell County, N.C., September 3, 1894. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army during World War I; fur merchant; mayor of Charlotte, N.C., 1935-41; delegate to Democratic National Convention from North Carolina, 1940, 1956. Died in 1982 (age about 87 years). Interment at Elmwood Cemetery, Charlotte, N.C.
  Douglas Municipal Airport (now Charlotte Douglas International Airport), in Charlotte, North Carolina, is named for him.
John Foster Dulles John Foster Dulles (1888-1959) — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born in Washington, D.C., February 25, 1888. Republican. Lawyer; major in the U.S. Army during World War I; delegate to Republican National Convention from New York, 1944; U.S. Senator from New York, 1949; defeated, 1949; U.S. Secretary of State, 1953-59. Presbyterian. Member, Phi Beta Kappa; Phi Delta Phi; Council on Foreign Relations. Received the Medal of Freedom in 1959. Died of cancer and pneumonia, in Washington, D.C., May 24, 1959 (age 71 years, 88 days). Interment at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Va.
  Relatives: Son of Allen Macy Dulles (1854-1930) and Edith F. (Foster) Dulles (1863-1941); brother of Allen Welsh Dulles; married, June 26, 1912, to Janet Pomeroy Avery (1891-1969); grandson of John Watson Foster; great-grandnephew of John Welsh; third great-grandnephew of Joshua Coit; first cousin twice removed of Langdon Cheves Jr.; first cousin six times removed of Benjamin Huntington; second cousin once removed of Samuel Welsh; second cousin thrice removed of Robert Coit Jr.; second cousin four times removed of John Davenport, James Davenport, Henry Huntington, Gurdon Huntington and Abel Huntington; second cousin five times removed of Samuel Huntington; third cousin of Lewis Wardlaw Haskell; third cousin twice removed of Alonzo Mark Leffingwell and William Brainard Coit; third cousin thrice removed of Ebenezer Huntington, William Woodbridge, Zina Hyde Jr., Isaac Backus, Theodore Davenport, Henry Titus Backus (1809-1877) and Benjamin Nicoll Huntington; fourth cousin once removed of John Leffingwell Randolph.
  Political families: Kellogg-Adams-Seymour-Chapin family of Connecticut and New York; Saltonstall-Davis-Frelinghuysen-Appleton family of Massachusetts; Waterman-Huntington family of Connecticut; Wolcott-Wadsworth family of Connecticut (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Cross-reference: Edward Corsi
  Washington Dulles International Airport (opened 1962), in Loudoun and Fairfax counties, Virginia, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial — Arlington National Cemetery unofficial website
  Image source: Time Magazine, August 13, 1951
Gerald R. Ford Gerald Rudolph Ford Jr. (1913-2006) — also known as Gerald R. Ford; Jerry Ford; Leslie Lynch King Jr.; "Passkey" — of Grand Rapids, Kent County, Mich.; Rancho Mirage, Riverside County, Calif. Born in Omaha, Douglas County, Neb., July 14, 1913. Republican. Lawyer; served in the U.S. Navy during World War II; delegate to Republican National Convention from Michigan, 1948, 1960, 1964; U.S. Representative from Michigan 5th District, 1949-73; resigned 1973; member, President's Commission on the Assassination of President KNDY, 1963-64; Vice President of the United States, 1973-74; President of the United States, 1974-77; defeated, 1976. Episcopalian. English and Scottish ancestry. Member, Freemasons; Scottish Rite Masons; Shriners; American Legion; Veterans of Foreign Wars; Amvets; Sons of the American Revolution; Forty and Eight; Jaycees; Delta Kappa Epsilon; Phi Delta Phi; Humane Society; Elks; American Bar Association. Shot at in two separate incidents in San Francisco in September 1975. On September 5, Lynette 'Squeaky' Fromme, follower of murderous cult leader Charles Manson, got close to the President with a loaded pistol, and squeezed the trigger at close range; the gun misfired. On September 22, Sara Jane Moore fired a shot at him, but a bystander deflected her aim. Both women were convicted and sentenced to life in prison. Received the Medal of Freedom in 1999. Died in Rancho Mirage, Riverside County, Calif., December 26, 2006 (age 93 years, 165 days). Interment at Gerald R. Ford Museum, Grand Rapids, Mich.
  Relatives: Step-son of Gerald Rudolph Ford, Sr. (1890-1962); son of Leslie Lynch King, Sr. (1884-1941) and Dorothy Ayer (Gardner) King Ford (1892-1967); half-brother of Thomas G. Ford Sr. (1918-1995); married, October 15, 1948, to Betty Warren.
  Political family: Ford family of Grand Rapids, Michigan.
  Cross-reference: Richard M. Nixon — L. William Seidman
  The Gerald R. Ford Freeway (I-196), in Kent, Ottawa, and Allegan counties, Michigan, is named for him.  — The Gerald R. Ford International Airport (opened 1963, given present name 1999), near Grand Rapids, Michigan, is named for him.  — The Gerald R. Ford Federal Building and U.S. Courthouse, in Grand Rapids, Michigan, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Books by Gerald R. Ford: A Time to Heal: The Autobiography of Gerald R. Ford (1983)
  Books about Gerald R. Ford: John Robert Greene, The Presidency of Gerald R. Ford — Edward L. Schapsmeier, Gerald R. Ford's Date With Destiny: A Political Biography — James Cannon, Time and Chance : Gerald Ford's Appointment With History — Douglas Brinkley, Gerald R. Ford
  Image source: Michigan Manual 1957-58
  John Herschel Glenn Jr. (1921-2016) — also known as John Glenn — of New Concord, Muskingum County, Ohio; Columbus, Franklin County, Ohio. Born in Cambridge, Guernsey County, Ohio, July 18, 1921. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Marine Corps during World War II; Astronaut; in February 1962, first American to orbit the earth; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Ohio, 1964, 1996, 2004, 2008; U.S. Senator from Ohio, 1975-99; candidate for Democratic nomination for President, 1984; received the Medal of Freedom in 2012; also inducted to the International Air & Space Hall of Fame, the National Aviation Hall of Fame, the International Space Hall of Fame, and the U.S. Astronaut Hall of Fame. Presbyterian. Member, Freemasons; Scottish Rite Masons. Died in Columbus, Franklin County, Ohio, December 8, 2016 (age 95 years, 143 days). Interment at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Va.
  Relatives: Married 1943 to Anna Margaret Castor.
  The John Glenn Columbus International Airport (Port Columbus International Airport until 2016), in Columbus, Ohio, is named for him.  — John Glenn High School, in New Concord, Ohio, is named for him.  — John Glenn High School, in Westland, Michigan, is named for him.  — John Glenn High School, in Bay City, Michigan, is named for him.  — John Glenn High School, in Walkerton, Indiana, is named for him.  — John Glenn High School, in Norwalk, California, is named for him.  — John Glenn Middle School, in San Angelo, Texas, is named for him.  — Colonel Glenn Road, in Little Rock, Arkansas, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile
  Books by John Glenn: John Glenn: A Memoir (1999)
  Books about John Glenn: Robert Green, John Glenn : Astronaut and U.S. Senator (for young readers)
  Clarence Eugene Hancock (1885-1948) — also known as Clarence E. Hancock — of Syracuse, Onondaga County, N.Y. Born in Syracuse, Onondaga County, N.Y., February 13, 1885. Republican. Lawyer; served in the U.S. Army on the Mexican border; served in the U.S. Army during World War I; U.S. Representative from New York, 1927-47 (35th District 1927-45, 36th District 1945-47); alternate delegate to Republican National Convention from New York, 1928. Presbyterian. Member, Phi Beta Kappa; Phi Delta Phi; Alpha Delta Phi. Died in a hospital at Washington, D.C., January 3, 1948 (age 62 years, 324 days). Interment at Woodlawn Cemetery, Syracuse, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Theodore E. Hancock (1847-1916) and Martha B. (Connelly) Hancock; married, October 4, 1912, to Emily W. Shonk.
  Syracuse Hancock International Airport (opened 1949 as Clarence E. Hancock Airport), in Syracuse, New York, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
William B. Hartsfield William Berry Hartsfield (1890-1971) — also known as William B. Hartsfield — of Atlanta, Fulton County, Ga. Born in Atlanta, Fulton County, Ga., March 1, 1890. Mayor of Atlanta, Ga., 1937-41, 1942-62. Died in Atlanta, Fulton County, Ga., February 22, 1971 (age 80 years, 358 days). Interment at Westview Cemetery, Atlanta, Ga.
  Relatives: Son of Charles Green Hartsfield (1849-1918) and Victoria (Dagnall) Hartsfield (1853-1936); married 1913 to Pearl Williams (1886-1972); married 1962 to Tollie Starr Bedenbaugh (1922-1984); fourth cousin of John Frederick Hartsfield (1884-1953).
  Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport (opened 1925 as Candler Field; renamed 1942 as Atlanta Municipal Airport; renamed 1971 as William B. Hartsfield Atlanta Airport; renamed 2003 as Hartfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport), in Fulton and Clayton counties, Georgia, is partly named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about William B. Hartsfield: Harold H. Martin, William Berry Hartsfield : Mayor of Atlanta
  Image source: Library of Congress
  William Rowland Hopkins (1869-1961) — also known as W. R. Hopkins; "Chautauqua Bill" — of Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, Ohio. Born in Johnstown, Cambria County, Pa., July 26, 1869. Republican. Lawyer; industrial real estate developer; promoter of Cleveland Short Line Railroad; delegate to Republican National Convention from Ohio, 1916; city manager of Cleveland, Ohio, 1924-30; he was fascinated by aviation, in 1925, he successfully advocated purchase of land for an airport, the first municipal airport in the United States. Died in Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, Ohio, February 9, 1961 (age 91 years, 198 days). Interment at Lake View Cemetery, Cleveland, Ohio.
  Relatives: Son of David J. Hopkins and Mary (Jeffreys) Hopkins; married 1903 to Ellen Louise Cozad (divorced 1923).
  Cleveland Hopkins International Airport, in Cleveland, Ohio, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article
  William Washington Howes (1887-1962) — also known as W. W. Howes — of Wolsey, Beadle County, S.Dak.; Huron, Beadle County, S.Dak. Born in Tomah, Monroe County, Wis., February 16, 1887. Democrat. Lawyer; member of South Dakota state senate 22nd District, 1917-18; candidate for Governor of South Dakota, 1920; South Dakota Democratic state chair, 1923; member of Democratic National Committee from South Dakota, 1924-40; delegate to Democratic National Convention from South Dakota, 1924 (member, Committee on Rules and Order of Business), 1940; First Assistant U.S. Postmaster General; resigned in protest in 1940 when President Franklin D. Roosevelt sought an unprecedented third term. Died in Washington, D.C., January 15, 1962 (age 74 years, 333 days). Interment at Oak Hill Cemetery, Washington, D.C.
  W. W. Howes Airport (now Huron Regional Airport), in Huron, South Dakota, was named for him.
  John Birdwell Isbell (1872-1960) — also known as John B. Isbell — of Fort Payne, DeKalb County, Ala. Born in Asbury, Marshall County, Ala., April 16, 1872. Republican. Lawyer; delegate to Republican National Convention from Alabama, 1920 (alternate), 1932; candidate for U.S. Representative from Alabama, 1930; U.S. Attorney for the Northern District of Alabama, 1931-33. Died in Fort Payne, DeKalb County, Ala., September 5, 1960 (age 88 years, 142 days). Interment at Glenwood Cemetery, Fort Payne, Ala.
  Relatives: Son of Elijah Miller Isbell and Elizabeth Jane (Dowdy) Isbell; brother of Arthur Levi Isbell (1883-1964) and Leander Isbell; married to Arizona Melissa Berry (1877-1964).
  Political family: Isbell family of Asbury, Alabama.
  Isbell Field Airport, at Fort Payne, Alabama, is named for him.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Cyril Emmanuel King (1921-1978) — also known as Cyril E. King — Born in St. Croix, Virgin Islands, April 7, 1921. Served in the U.S. Army during World War II; aide and staff member to U.S. Sen. Hubert Humphrey, 1949-61; secretary of the U.S. Virgin Islands, 1961; Governor of U.S. Virgin Islands, 1969, 1975-78; died in office 1978; member of Virgin Islands legislature, 1973-74. African ancestry. Died in St. Thomas, Virgin Islands, January 2, 1978 (age 56 years, 270 days). Interment at King's Hill Cemetery, St. Croix, Virgin Islands.
  Relatives: Son of Martin King and Melvina King; married to Agnes Agatha Schuster.
  The Cyril E. King Airport (Harry S. Truman Airport until 1984), in SAINT Thomas, Virgin Islands, is named for him.
  See also National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article
  Fiorello Henry LaGuardia (1882-1947) — also known as Fiorello H. LaGuardia; "The Little Flower" — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born in New York, New York County, N.Y., December 11, 1882. Republican. U.S. Consular Agent in Fiume, 1904-06; interpreter; lawyer; U.S. Representative from New York, 1917-19, 1923-33 (14th District 1917-19, 20th District 1923-33); defeated, 1914 (14th District), 1932 (20th District); major in the U.S. Army during World War I; delegate to Republican National Convention from New York, 1920, 1928 (alternate), 1932 (alternate); mayor of New York City, N.Y., 1934-45; defeated, 1921, 1929. Episcopalian. Italian and Jewish ancestry. Member, Freemasons. Died of pancreatic cancer, in Bronx, Bronx County, N.Y., September 20, 1947 (age 64 years, 283 days). Interment at Woodlawn Cemetery, Bronx, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Achille Luigi Carlo La Guardia and Irene Coen; married 1919 to Thea Almerigotti; married, February 28, 1929, to Marie Fisher.
  Cross-reference: Vito Marcantonio — Clendenin Ryan
  LaGuardia Airport, in Queens, New York, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Books about Fiorello LaGuardia: H. Paul Jeffers, The Napoleon of New York : Mayor Fiorello LaGuardia — Thomas Kessner, Fiorello H. LaGuardia and the Making of Modern New York — Mervyn D. Kaufman, Fiorello LaGuardia — Alyn Brodsky, The Great Mayor : Fiorello La Guardia and the Making of the City of New York
  Edward Lawrence Logan (1875-1939) — also known as Edward L. Logan — of Boston, Suffolk County, Mass. Born in Boston, Suffolk County, Mass., January 20, 1875. Served in the U.S. Army during the Spanish-American War; lawyer; member of Massachusetts state house of representatives, 1901-02; member of Massachusetts state senate Sixth Suffolk District, 1906; colonel in the U.S. Army during World War I. Member, American Legion. Died in Boston, Suffolk County, Mass., July 6, 1939 (age 64 years, 167 days). Interment at Mt. Calvary Cemetery, Roslindale, Boston, Mass.; statue at Logan International Airport Grounds, Boston, Mass.
  Relatives: Son of Lawrence J. Logan and Catherine M. (O'Connor) Logan.
  Logan International Airport, in Boston, Massachusetts, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Chester Trent Lott (b. 1941) — also known as Trent Lott — of Pascagoula, Jackson County, Miss.; Jackson, Hinds County, Miss. Born in Grenada, Grenada County, Miss., October 9, 1941. Republican. Lawyer; administrative assistant to U.S. Rep. William M. Colmer, 1968-72; U.S. Representative from Mississippi 5th District, 1973-89; U.S. Senator from Mississippi, 1989-; delegate to Republican National Convention from Mississippi, 2004, 2008. Baptist. Member, Freemasons; Sons of Confederate Veterans; American Bar Association; Sigma Nu; Phi Alpha Delta. Still living as of 2021.
  Relatives: Son of Chester P. Lott and Iona (Watson) Lott; married, December 27, 1964, to Patricia E. Thompson.
  Cross-reference: Thomas H. Anderson, Jr. — Charles W. Pickering — Roger F. Wicker
  Trent Lott International Airport, in Moss Point, Mississippi, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile
  Books by Trent Lott: Master of the Game : Tales from a Republican Revolutionary (2004) — Herding Cats: A Life in Politics (2005)
  Patrick Anthony McCarran (1876-1954) — also known as Patrick A. McCarran; Pat McCarran — of Elko, Elko County, Nev.; Reno, Washoe County, Nev. Born in Reno, Washoe County, Nev., August 8, 1876. Democrat. Farmer; lawyer; member of Nevada state legislature, 1903; justice of Nevada state supreme court, 1913; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Nevada, 1924 (member, Credentials Committee), 1936, 1940, 1944 (member, Platform and Resolutions Committee), 1952; U.S. Senator from Nevada, 1933-54; died in office 1954. Catholic. Died September 28, 1954 (age 78 years, 51 days). Interment at Mountain View Cemetery, Reno, Nev.
   — McCarran International Airport, in Las Vegas, Nevada, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — NNDB dossier
  Critical books about Patrick McCarran: Michael Ybarra, Washington Gone Crazy : Senator Pat McCarran and the Great American Communist Hunt
  Edward Howard McNamara (1926-2006) — also known as Edward H. McNamara; "Big Mac" — of Livonia, Wayne County, Mich. Born in Detroit, Wayne County, Mich., September 21, 1926. Democrat. Candidate for Michigan state senate 14th District, 1965; mayor of Livonia, Mich., 1970-86; candidate for Lieutenant Governor of Michigan, 1970; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Michigan, 1976, 1996, 2000; Wayne County Executive, 1987-2002. Died, of heart failure and cancer, in Harper Hospital, Detroit, Wayne County, Mich., February 19, 2006 (age 79 years, 151 days). Interment at Parkview Memorial Cemetery, Livonia, Mich.
  Relatives: Son of Andrew Carsena Thomas McNamara (1892-1978) and Ellen Gertrude (Bennett) McNamara (1897-1976); father of Colleen M. McNamara (born1949).
  McNamara Terminal, at Detroit Metro Airport, in Romulus, Michigan, is named for him.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  José Luis Alberto Muñoz Marin (1898-1980) — also known as Luis Muñoz Marin; "Father of Modern Puerto Rico" — Born in Old San Juan, San Juan Municipio, Puerto Rico, February 18, 1898. Author; Governor of Puerto Rico, 1949-65. Puerto Rican ancestry. Died in San Juan, San Juan Municipio, Puerto Rico, April 30, 1980 (age 82 years, 72 days). Entombed at Mausoleo Luis Muñoz Rivera, Barranquitas, Puerto Rico.
  Relatives: Son of Luis Muñoz Rivera and Amalia Marin Castilla; married, July 1, 1919, to Muna Lee (1895-1965; writer); father of Victoria Melo Muñoz (born c.1952).
  Political family: Munoz family.
  The Luis Muñoz Marín International Airport (opened 1955 as Puerto Rico International Airport, renamed 1985), in Carolina, Puerto Rico, is named for him.  — Luis Muñoz Marín High School, in Barranquitas, Puerto Rico, is named for him.
  See also National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Jacqueline Cochran Odlum (1906-1980) — also known as Jacqueline C. Odlum; Jackie Odlum; Bessie Lee Pittman; Jacqueline Cochran — Born in Muscogee, Escambia County, Fla., May 11, 1906. Republican. Beautician; airplane pilot; during World War II, she trained many women pilots for duty ferrying supplies; she was the first woman ever to take off and land on an aircraft carrier, the first woman pilot ever to break the sound barrier, and to exceed Mach 2; in 1952, she was one of the leaders of the "Draft Ike" movement to nominate Dwight D. Eisenhower for president; candidate for U.S. Representative from California 29th District, 1956; elected to Aviation Hall of Fame, 1971. Female. Died in Indio, Riverside County, Calif., August 7, 1980 (age 74 years, 88 days). Interment at Coachella Valley Public Cemetery, Coachella, Calif.
  Relatives: Daughter of Ira Pittman and Mary (Grant) Pittman; married 1936 to Floyd Odlum (chairman, RKO movie studios).
  Jacqueline Cochran Regional Airport, in Thermal, California, is named for her.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Ronald Wilson Reagan (1911-2004) — also known as Ronald Reagan; "Dutch"; "The Gipper"; "The Great Communicator"; "The Teflon President"; "Rawhide" — of Pacific Palisades, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, Calif.; Bel Air, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, Calif. Born in Tampico, Whiteside County, Ill., February 6, 1911. Republican. Worked as a sports broadcaster in Iowa in the 1930s, doing local radio broadcast of Chicago Cubs baseball games; served in the U.S. Army during World War II; professional actor in 1937-64; appeared in dozens of films including Kings Row, Dark Victory, Santa Fe Trail, Knute Rockne, All American, and The Winning Team; president of the Screen Actors Guild, 1947-52, 1959-60; member of California Republican State Central Committee, 1964-66; delegate to Republican National Convention from California, 1964 (alternate), 1972 (delegation chair); Governor of California, 1967-75; candidate for Republican nomination for President, 1968, 1976; Presidential Elector for California, 1968; President of the United States, 1981-89; on March 30, 1981, outside the Washington Hilton hotel, he and three others were shot and wounded by John Hinkley, Jr.; received the Presidential Medal of Freedom, 1993. Disciples of Christ. Member, Screen Actors Guild; Lions; American Legion; Tau Kappa Epsilon. Died, from pneumonia and Alzheimer's disease, in Bel Air, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, Calif., June 5, 2004 (age 93 years, 120 days). Interment at Ronald Reagan Presidential Library, Simi Valley, Calif.
  Relatives: Son of John Reagan and Nellie (Wilson) Reagan; married, January 25, 1940, to Jane Wyman (actress; divorced 1948); married, March 4, 1952, to Nancy Davis (born 1923; actress) and Nancy Davis (1921-2016); father of Maureen Elizabeth Reagan.
  Political family: Reagan family of Bel Air and Simi Valley, California.
  Cross-reference: Katherine Hoffman Haley — Dana Rohrabacher — Donald T. Regan — Henry Salvatori — L. William Seidman — Christopher Cox — Patrick J. Buchanan — Bay Buchanan — Edwin Meese III
  Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport (opened 1941; renamed 1998), in Arlington, Virginia, is named for him.  — Mount Reagan (officially known as Mount Clay), in the White Mountains, Coos County, New Hampshire, is named for him.  — The Ronald Reagan Building and International Trade Center, in the Federal Triangle, Washington, D.C., is named for him.
  See also National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Books by Ronald Reagan: Ronald Reagan : An American Life
  Books about Ronald Reagan: Lou Cannon, President Reagan : The Role of a Lifetime — Lou Cannon, Governor Reagan : His Rise to Power — Peter Schweizer, Reagan's War : The Epic Story of His Forty-Year Struggle and Final Triumph Over Communism — Lee Edwards, Ronald Reagan: A Political Biography — Paul Kengor, God and Ronald Reagan : A Spiritual Life — Mary Beth Brown, Hand of Providence: The Strong and Quiet Faith of Ronald Reagan — Edmund Morris, Dutch: A Memoir of Ronald Reagan — Peggy Noonan, When Character Was King: A Story of Ronald Reagan — Peter J. Wallison, Ronald Reagan: The Power of Conviction and the Success of His Presidency — Dinesh D'Souza, Ronald Reagan : How an Ordinary Man Became an Extraordinary Leader — William F. Buckley, Jr., Ronald Reagan: An American Hero — Craig Shirley, Reagan's Revolution : The Untold Story of the Campaign That Started It All — Richard Reeves, President Reagan : The Triumph of Imagination — Ron Reagan, My Father at 100 — Newt & Callista Gingrich & David N. Bossie, Ronald Reagan: Rendezvous with Destiny — William F. Buckley, The Reagan I Knew — Chris Matthews, Tip and the Gipper: When Politics Worked
  Critical books about Ronald Reagan: Haynes Johnson, Sleepwalking Through History: America in the Reagan Years — William Kleinknecht, The Man Who Sold the World: Ronald Reagan and the Betrayal of Main Street America
Franklin D. Roosevelt Franklin Delano Roosevelt (1882-1945) — also known as Franklin D. Roosevelt; "F.D.R." — of Hyde Park, Dutchess County, N.Y. Born in Hyde Park, Dutchess County, N.Y., January 30, 1882. Democrat. Lawyer; member of New York state senate 26th District, 1911-13; resigned 1913; U.S. Assistant Secretary of the Navy, 1913-20; candidate for Vice President of the United States, 1920; delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1920, 1924, 1928; speaker, 1944; contracted polio in the early 1920s; as a result, his legs were paralyzed for the rest of his life; Governor of New York, 1929-33; President of the United States, 1933-45; died in office 1945; on February 15, 1933, in Miami, Fla., he and Chicago mayor Anton J. Cermak were shot at by Guiseppe Zangara; Cermak was hit and mortally wounded. Episcopalian. Member, Freemasons; Alpha Delta Phi; Phi Beta Kappa; Elks; Grange; Knights of Pythias. Led the nation through the Depression and World War II. Died of a cerebral hemorrhage, in Warm Springs, Meriwether County, Ga., April 12, 1945 (age 63 years, 72 days). Interment at Roosevelt Home, Hyde Park, N.Y.; memorial monument at Federal Triangle, Washington, D.C.; memorial monument at West Potomac Park, Washington, D.C.
  Relatives: Son of James Roosevelt (1828-1900) and Sara (Delano) Roosevelt (1854-1941); married, March 17, 1905, to Eleanor Roosevelt (niece of Theodore Roosevelt (1858-1919); first cousin of Corinne Douglas Robinson); father of James Roosevelt (1907-1991), Elliott Roosevelt and Franklin Delano Roosevelt Jr.; half-uncle of Helen Roosevelt Robinson; second great-grandson of Edward Hutchinson Robbins; first cousin of Warren Delano Robbins (1885-1935) and Katharine Price Collier St. George; first cousin once removed of Helen Lloyd Aspinwall (1863-1929; who married Francis Emanuel Shober); first cousin twice removed of Elizabeth Kortright; first cousin four times removed of Ebenezer Huntington; first cousin six times removed of Benjamin Huntington; second cousin of Caroline Astor Drayton (who married William Phillips); second cousin once removed of Samuel Laurence Gouverneur; second cousin thrice removed of Nicholas Roosevelt Jr. and Jabez Williams Huntington; second cousin five times removed of Samuel Huntington, George Washington, Joshua Coit, Henry Huntington, Gurdon Huntington and Samuel Gager; third cousin twice removed of Philip DePeyster and James I. Roosevelt; third cousin thrice removed of Sulifand Sutherland Ross; fourth cousin once removed of Ulysses Simpson Grant, Robert Barnwell Roosevelt, Roger Wolcott and Theodore Roosevelt (1858-1919).
  Political families: Roosevelt family of New York; Kellogg-Adams-Seymour-Chapin family of Connecticut and New York (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Cross-reference: Ross T. McIntire — Milton Lipson — W. W. Howes — Bruce Barton — Hamilton Fish, Jr. — Joseph W. Martin, Jr. — Samuel I. Rosenman — Rexford G. Tugwell — Raymond Moley — Adolf A. Berle — George E. Allen — Lorence E. Asman — Grenville T. Emmet — Eliot Janeway — Jonathan Daniels — Ralph Bellamy — Wythe Leigh Kinsolving
  The Franklin Delano Roosevelt Bridge (opened 1962), over Lubec Narrows, between Lubec, Maine and Campobello Island, New Brunswick, Canada, is named for him.  — The borough of Roosevelt, New Jersey (originally Jersey Homesteads; renamed 1945), is named for him.  — F. D. Roosevelt Airport, on the Caribbean island of Sint Eustatius, is named for him.  — The F. D. Roosevelt Teaching Hospital, in Banská Bystrica, Slovakia, is named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: Frank GarrisonFranklin D. Roosevelt Keesee
  Coins and currency: His portrait appears on the U.S. dime (ten cent coin).
  See also National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Books about Franklin D. Roosevelt: James MacGregor Burns & Susan Dunn, The Three Roosevelts: Patrician Leaders Who Transformed America — Doris Kearns Goodwin, No Ordinary Time : Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt: The Home Front in World War II — Joseph Alsop & Roland Gelatt, FDR : 1882-1945 — Bernard Bellush, Franklin Roosevelt as Governor of New York — Robert H. Jackson, That Man : An Insider's Portrait of Franklin D. Roosevelt — Jonas Klein, Beloved Island : Franklin & Eleanor and the Legacy of Campobello — Conrad Black, Franklin Delano Roosevelt : Champion of Freedom — Charles Peters, Five Days in Philadelphia: The Amazing "We Want Willkie!" Convention of 1940 and How It Freed FDR to Save the Western World — Steven Neal, Happy Days Are Here Again : The 1932 Democratic Convention, the Emergence of FDR--and How America Was Changed Forever — H. W. Brands, Traitor to His Class: The Privileged Life and Radical Presidency of Franklin Delano Roosevelt — Hazel Rowley, Franklin and Eleanor: An Extraordinary Marriage — Alan Brinkley, Franklin Delano Roosevelt — Stanley Weintraub, Young Mr. Roosevelt: FDR's Introduction to War, Politics, and Life — Karen Bornemann Spies, Franklin D. Roosevelt (for young readers)
  Critical books about Franklin D. Roosevelt: Jim Powell, FDR's Folly: How Roosevelt and His New Deal Prolonged the Great Depression — John T. Flynn, The Roosevelt Myth — Burton W. Folsom, New Deal or Raw Deal?: How FDR's Economic Legacy Has Damaged America
  Fiction about Franklin D. Roosevelt: Philip Roth, The Plot Against America: A Novel
  Image source: New York Red Book 1936
  John Morris Sheppard (1875-1941) — also known as Morris Sheppard — of Texarkana, Bowie County, Tex. Born in Wheatville, Morris County, Tex., May 28, 1875. Democrat. Lawyer; U.S. Representative from Texas, 1902-13 (4th District 1902-03, 1st District 1903-13); U.S. Senator from Texas, 1913-41; died in office 1941. Methodist. Member, Woodmen of the World; Freemasons; Odd Fellows; Redmen; Elks; Knights of Pythias; Kappa Alpha Order; Phi Beta Kappa. Died, from a brain hemorrhage, in Walter Reed Hospital, Washington, D.C., April 9, 1941 (age 65 years, 316 days). Interment at Hillcrest Cemetery, Texarkana, Tex.
  Relatives: Son of John Levi Sheppard (1852-1902) and Margaret Alice (Eddins) Sheppard (1854-1905); married, December 1, 1909, to Lucile Ferguson Sanderson (1890-1980; who later married Thomas Terry Connally); grandfather of Richard Sheppard Arnold, Connie Mack III and Morris Sheppard Arnold; great-grandfather of Connie Mack IV.
  Political family: Sheppard-Arnold family of Texarkana, Texas.
  Sheppard Air Force Base (opened 1941 as Sheppard Field; runways are shared with the Wichita Falls Regional Airport), in Wichita County, Texas, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Marion Eugene Snyder (1928-2007) — also known as Gene Snyder — of Brownsboro Farms, Jefferson County, Ky. Born in Louisville, Jefferson County, Ky., January 26, 1928. Republican. Lawyer; U.S. Representative from Kentucky, 1963-65, 1967-87 (3rd District 1963-65, 4th District 1967-87); defeated, 1964. Lutheran. Member, Optimist Club. Died in Naples, Collier County, Fla., February 16, 2007 (age 79 years, 21 days). Interment at Duncan Memorial, Oldham County, Ky.
  Relatives: Son of Marion Hustavus Snyder and Lois E. Snyder; married 1961 to Mary Louise Hodges (divorced 1974).
  The Gene Snyder U.S. Courthouse and Custom House (opened 1932, renamed 1986), in Louisville, Kentucky, is named for him.  — The Gene Snyder Freeway (I-265 and Ky-841), in Louisville, Kentucky, is named for him.  — The Gene Snyder Airport (general aviation), in Pendleton County, Kentucky, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Theodore Fulton Stevens (1923-2010) — also known as Ted Stevens — of Fairbanks, Fairbanks North Star Borough, Alaska; Girdwood, Anchorage, Alaska. Born in Indianapolis, Marion County, Ind., November 18, 1923. Republican. Served in the U.S. Army Air Force in World War II; lawyer; U.S. Attorney for the 4th District of Alaska Territory, 1954-56; delegate to Republican National Convention from Alaska, 1964, 1972 (delegation chair); member of Alaska state house of representatives, 1965-68; U.S. Senator from Alaska, 1968-2009; defeated, 1962; appointed 1968. Episcopalian. Member, American Bar Association; Rotary; American Legion; Veterans of Foreign Wars. Indicted in July 2008 on federal charges of failing to report gifts from VECO Corporation and its CEO; tried and convicted in October 2008; his conviction was later vacated due to prosecutorial misconduct. Killed in a plane crash, in Bristol Bay Borough, Alaska, August 9, 2010 (age 86 years, 264 days). Interment at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Va.
  Relatives: Married 1952 to Ann Mary Cherrington (killed in plane crash, 1978); father of Ben Stevens (born c.1953).
  Cross-reference: Lesil McGuire
  Mount Stevens, in Matanuska-Susitna Borough, Alaska, is named for him.  — The Ted Stevens Anchorage International Airport, in Anchorage, Alaska, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile
"Enjoy the hospitable entertainment of a political graveyard."
Henry L. Clinton, Apollo Hall, New York City, February 3, 1872
The Political Graveyard

The Political Graveyard is a web site about U.S. political history and cemeteries. Founded in 1996, it is the Internet's most comprehensive free source for American political biography, listing 315,917 politicians, living and dead.
 
  The coverage of this site includes (1) the President, Vice President, members of Congress, elected state and territorial officeholders in all fifty states, the District of Columbia, and U.S. territories; and the chief elected official, typically the mayor, of qualifying municipalities; (2) candidates at election, including primaries, for any of the above; (3) all federal judges and all state appellate judges; (4) certain federal officials, including the federal cabinet, diplomatic chiefs of mission, consuls, U.S. district attorneys, collectors of customs and internal revenue, members of major federal commissions; and political appointee (pre-1971) postmasters of qualifying communities; (5) state and national political party officials, including delegates, alternate delegates, and other participants in national party nominating conventions. Note: municipalities or communities "qualify", for TPG purposes, if they have at least half a million person-years of history, inclusive of predecessor, successor, and merged entities.  
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Copyright notices: (1) Facts are not subject to copyright; see Feist v. Rural Telephone. (2) Politician portraits displayed on this site are 70-pixel-wide monochrome thumbnail images, which I believe to constitute fair use under applicable copyright law. Where possible, each image is linked to its online source. However, requests from owners of copyrighted images to delete them from this site are honored. (3) Original material, programming, selection and arrangement are © 1996-2019 Lawrence Kestenbaum. (4) This work is also licensed for free non-commercial re-use, with attribution, under a Creative Commons License.
Site information: The Political Graveyard is created and maintained by Lawrence Kestenbaum, who is solely responsible for its structure and content. — The mailing address is The Political Graveyard, P.O. Box 2563, Ann Arbor MI 48106. — This site is hosted by HDL. — The Political Graveyard opened on July 1, 1996; the last full revision was done on May 10, 2022.

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