PoliticalGraveyard.com
The Political Graveyard: A Database of American History
The Internet's Most Comprehensive Source of U.S. Political Biography
(or, The Web Site that Tells Where the Dead Politicians are Buried)
Created and maintained by Lawrence Kestenbaum

Politicians Portrayed on Money
(U.S. or Confederate coins or currency)

in alphabetical order

  Judah Philip Benjamin (1811-1884) — also known as Judah P. Benjamin; Philippe Benjamin; "Poo Bah of the Confederacy" — of New Orleans, Orleans Parish, La.; London, England; Paris, France. Born in Christiansted, St. Croix, Virgin Islands, August 6, 1811. Lawyer; member of Louisiana state house of representatives, 1842-44; delegate to Louisiana state constitutional convention, 1845; Presidential Elector for Louisiana, 1848; U.S. Senator from Louisiana, 1853-61; Confederate Attorney General, 1861; Confederate Secretary of War, 1861-62; Confederate Secretary of State, 1862-65. Jewish. He fled to Europe in 1865 to avoid arrest by Union forces; he was suspected of involvement in the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln. Fell from a tram car about 1880, and suffered multiple injuries; also developed kidney and heart problems, and died in Paris, France, May 6, 1884 (age 72 years, 274 days). Interment at Père la Chaise Cemetery, Paris, France.
  Relatives: Son of Philip Benjamin and Rebecca (de Mendes) Benjamin; married 1833 to Natalie St. Martin; cousin *** of Henry Michael Hyams (1806-1875).
  Coins and currency: His portrait appeared on the Confederate States $2 note in 1861-64.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  Books about Judah P. Benjamin: Robert Douthat Meade, Judah P. Benjamin: Confederate Statesman — Eli N. Evans, Judah P. Benjamin : The Jewish Confederate
Thomas Hart Benton Thomas Hart Benton (1782-1858) — also known as "Old Bullion" — of Franklin, Williamson County, Tenn.; St. Louis, Mo. Born near Hillsborough, Orange County, N.C., March 14, 1782. Lawyer; newspaper editor; member of Tennessee state senate, 1809; U.S. Senator from Missouri, 1821-51; U.S. Representative from Missouri 1st District, 1853-55; Benton Democrat candidate for Governor of Missouri, 1856. Fought a duel with Andrew Jackson, who later became a political ally. In April, 1850, he caused a scandal with his attempt to assault Sen. Henry Stuart Foote, of Mississippi, during debate on the Senate floor; he was restrained by other senators. Foote had a cocked pistol in his hand and undoubtedly would have shot him. Died in Washington, D.C., April 10, 1858 (age 76 years, 27 days). Interment at Bellefontaine Cemetery, St. Louis, Mo.
  Relatives: Son of Jesse Benton and Ann (Gooch) Benton; married 1821 to Elizabeth McDowell (1794-1854; sister of James McDowell); father of Jessie Benton (who married John Charles Frémont); uncle of Thomas Hart Benton, Jr. (1816-1879); granduncle of Maecenas Eason Benton.
  Political family: Benton family (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Benton counties in Ark., Ind., Iowa, Minn., Ore. and Wash. are named for him.
  Coins and currency: His portrait appeared on the U.S. $100 gold certificate in the 1880s to 1920s.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Image source: The South in the Building of the Nation (1909)
John C. Calhoun John Caldwell Calhoun (1782-1850) — also known as John C. Calhoun — of Pickens District (now Pickens County), S.C. Born in Abbeville District (part now in McCormick County), S.C., March 18, 1782. Member of South Carolina state house of representatives, 1808; U.S. Representative from South Carolina 6th District, 1811-17; U.S. Secretary of War, 1817-25; Vice President of the United States, 1825-32; U.S. Senator from South Carolina, 1832-43, 1845-50; died in office 1850; U.S. Secretary of State, 1844-45. Scotch-Irish ancestry. Died in Washington, D.C., March 31, 1850 (age 68 years, 13 days). Interment at St. Philip's Churchyard, Charleston, S.C.; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery, Washington, D.C.; memorial monument at Marion Park, Charleston, S.C.
  Relatives: Son of James Patrick Calhoun (1727-1795) and Martha (Caldwell) Calhoun (1750-1802); married, December 27, 1809, to Floride Bonneau (1792-1866); father of Anna Maria Calhoun (1817-1875; who married Thomas Green Clemson (1807-1888)); uncle of John Alfred Calhoun and Martha Catherine Calhoun (1809-1869; who married Armistead Burt); great-granduncle of John Temple Graves; first cousin of John Ewing Colhoun and Joseph Calhoun; first cousin once removed of Andrew Pickens; first cousin twice removed of Francis Wilkinson Pickens; second cousin once removed of Sarah Ann Calhoun (1811-1892; who married Alexander Henry Brown); second cousin twice removed of William Francis Calhoun.
  Political family: Calhoun-Pickens family of South Carolina (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Calhoun counties in Ala., Ark., Fla., Ga., Ill., Iowa, Mich., Miss., S.C., Tex. and W.Va. are named for him.
  The John C. Calhoun State Office Building (opened 1926), in Columbia, South Carolina, is named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: John C. JohnsonJohn Calhoun NichollsJohn Calhoun CookJohn C. SheppardJohn C. BellJohn C. C. MayoJohn C. Phillips
  Coins and currency: His portrait appeared on Confederate States $1,000 notes (1861) and $100 notes (1862).
  Campaign slogan: "Liberty dearer than union."
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about John C. Calhoun: Margaret L. Coit, John C. Calhoun : American Portrait — Clyde N. Wilson, John C. Calhoun — Merrill D. Peterson, The Great Triumvirate: Webster, Clay, and Calhoun — Warren Brown, John C. Calhoun (for young readers)
  Image source: James Smith Noel Collection, Louisiana State University in Shreveport
Salmon P. Chase Salmon Portland Chase (1808-1873) — also known as Salmon P. Chase; "Old Mr. Greenbacks" — of Cincinnati, Hamilton County, Ohio. Born in Cornish, Sullivan County, N.H., January 13, 1808. Republican. Liberty candidate for U.S. Representative from Ohio 1st District, 1846; U.S. Senator from Ohio, 1849-55, 1861; Governor of Ohio, 1856-60; candidate for Republican nomination for President, 1856, 1860; U.S. Secretary of the Treasury, 1861-64; Chief Justice of U.S. Supreme Court, 1864-73; died in office 1873. Episcopalian. Died in New York, New York County, N.Y., May 7, 1873 (age 65 years, 114 days). Original interment at Oak Hill Cemetery, Washington, D.C.; reinterment at Spring Grove Cemetery, Cincinnati, Ohio.
  Relatives: Son of Ithamar Chase (1762-1817) and Janette Chase (1777-1832); married to Eliza Ann Smith (1821-1845); father of Katherine Jane 'Kate' Chase (1840-1899; who married William Sprague (1830-1915)); nephew of Dudley Chase; cousin *** of Dudley Chase Denison.
  Political families: Sprague family of Providence, Rhode Island; Chase family of Vermont (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Chase County, Kan. is named for him.
  Chase Hall (dormitory, built 1926), at Harvard University Business School, Boston, Massachusetts, is named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS Salmon P. Chase (built 1942, scrapped 1960) was named for him.
  Politician named for him: Chase S. Osborn
  Coins and currency: His portrait appeared on various U.S. currency, including $1 and $10 notes in the 1860s, and the $10,000 bill from 1918 to 1946.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Books about Salmon P. Chase: Frederick J. Blue, Salmon P. Chase : A Life in Politics — John Niven, Salmon P. Chase : A Biography — Albert B. Hart, Salmon P. Chase — Doris Kearns Goodwin, Team of Rivals : The Political Genius of Abraham Lincoln
  Image source: Life and Work of James G. Blaine (1893)
  William Clark (1770-1838) — of Missouri. Born in Caroline County, Va., August 1, 1770. Governor of Missouri Territory, 1813-20; candidate for Governor of Missouri, 1820. Episcopalian. Member, Freemasons. Commanded expedition with Meriwether Lewis to Oregon, 1803-04. Died in St. Louis, Mo., September 1, 1838 (age 68 years, 31 days). Interment at Bellefontaine Cemetery, St. Louis, Mo.
  Relatives: Grandfather-in-law of Edgar Parks Rucker (1861-1908).
  Cross-reference: George F. Shannon
  Clark counties in Ark., Mo. and Wash. are named for him; Lewis and Clark County, Mont. is named partly for him.
  Coins and currency: His portrait appeared (along with Lewis's) on the U.S. $10 note (1898-1927).
  See also NNDB dossier
  Books about William Clark: Jay H. Buckley, William Clark: Indian Diplomat — Donald Barr Chidsey, Lewis and Clark: The Great Adventure
  Clement Claiborne Clay, Jr. (1816-1882) — of Huntsville, Madison County, Ala. Born in Huntsville, Madison County, Ala., December 13, 1816. Democrat. Member of Alabama state house of representatives, 1842; state court judge in Alabama, 1846; U.S. Senator from Alabama, 1853-61; Senator from Alabama in the Confederate Congress, 1862-64. Suspected of conspiring with other Confederates to assassinate President Abraham Lincoln, he was imprisoned for nearly a year after the war. Died near Gurley, Madison County, Ala., January 3, 1882 (age 65 years, 21 days). Interment at Maple Hill Cemetery, Huntsville, Ala.
  Relatives: Son of Clement Comer Clay; married, February 1, 1843, to Virginia Caroline Tunstall (1825-1915; who later married David Clopton (1820-1892)); second cousin twice removed of Matthew Clay (1754-1815) and Green Clay; third cousin once removed of Henry Clay (1777-1852), Porter Clay, Matthew Clay (1795?-1827), Brutus Junius Clay (1808-1878) and Cassius Marcellus Clay; fourth cousin of Thomas Hart Clay, James Brown Clay and Brutus Junius Clay (1847-1932); fourth cousin once removed of Henry Clay (1849-1884).
  Political families: Clay family of Kentucky; Ligon-Clay-Clopton family of Montgomery and Tuskegee, Alabama (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Coins and currency: His portrait appeared on Confederate States $1 notes in 1862-64.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
Henry Clay Henry Clay (1777-1852) — also known as "The Sage of Ashland"; "The Great Compromiser" — of Lexington, Fayette County, Ky. Born in Hanover County, Va., April 12, 1777. Member of Kentucky state house of representatives, 1803; U.S. Senator from Kentucky, 1806-07, 1810-11, 1831-42, 1849-52; died in office 1852; U.S. Representative from Kentucky, 1811-14, 1815-21, 1823-25 (5th District 1811-13, at-large 1813-14, 2nd District 1815-21, 3rd District 1823-25); Speaker of the U.S. House, 1811-14, 1815-20, 1823-25; candidate for President of the United States, 1824, 1832 (National Republican), 1844 (Whig); U.S. Secretary of State, 1825-29; candidate for Whig nomination for President, 1839. Member, Freemasons. In 1809, he fought a duel with Humphrey Marshall, in which both men were wounded. Elected to the Hall of Fame for Great Americans in 1900. Died in Washington, D.C., June 29, 1852 (age 75 years, 78 days). Interment at Lexington Cemetery, Lexington, Ky.; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery, Washington, D.C.
  Relatives: Son of John Clay and Elizabeth (Hudson) Clay (1750-1829); brother of Porter Clay; married, April 11, 1799, to Lucretia (Hart) Erwin (1781-1864); father of Thomas Hart Clay, Henry Clay, Jr. and James Brown Clay; grandfather of Henry Clay; granduncle of Ellen Hart Ross (who married James Reily (1811-1863)); first cousin once removed of Matthew Clay (1754-1815) and Green Clay; second cousin of Matthew Clay (1795?-1827), Brutus Junius Clay (1808-1878) and Cassius Marcellus Clay; second cousin once removed of Brutus Junius Clay (1847-1932); second cousin thrice removed of Oliver Carroll Clay; second cousin four times removed of Archer Woodford; third cousin of Clement Comer Clay; third cousin once removed of Clement Claiborne Clay, Jr..
  Political family: Clay family of Kentucky (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Clay counties in Ala., Fla., Ga., Ill., Ind., Kan., Minn., Miss., Mo., Neb., N.C., S.Dak., Tenn., Tex. and W.Va. are named for him.
  Mount Clay (also called Mount Reagan), in the White Mountains, Coos County, New Hampshire, is named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: Henry Clay LongneckerHenry Clay DeanH. Clay DickinsonHenry C. BrockmeyerH. Clay CockerillHenry Clay EwingHenry Clay CaldwellHenry Clay HallHenry Clay GoodingHenry Clay NaillHenry C. MyersHenry C. ColeH. Clay HarrisHenry C. MinerHenry C. WarmothHenry Clay ClevelandH. Clay EvansHenry C. PayneHenry C. BatesH. Clay FosterHenry C. McCormickHenry C. IdeHenry Clay WilliamsHenry C. SimmsHenry Clay FergusonHenry C. GloverH. Clay ParkHenry C. HansbroughHenry C. SnodgrassH. Clay MaydwellHenry C. GleasonHenry C. LoudenslagerH. Clay Van VoorhisHenry C. ClippingerH. Clay CrawfordH. Clay BascomH. Clay MichieH. Clay ChisolmH. Clay HowardHenry C. HallHenry Clay McDowellH. Clay JonesH. Clay DayHenry Clay HinesH. Clay HeatherHenry Clay MeachamHenry Clay CallowayH. Clay SuterH. Clay WarthHenry Clay ElwoodH. Clay KennedyH. Clay DavisH. Clay NeedhamHenry Clay EthertonH. Clay MaceH. Clay ArmstrongH. Clay BaldwinH. Clay HaynesH. Clay BurkholderMrs. H. Clay KauffmanH. Clay BentleyHenry C. GreenbergH. Clay Gardenhire, Jr.Henry Clay CoxH. Clay Myers, Jr.H. Clay Johnson
  Coins and currency: His portrait appeared on some U.S. currency issued in the 19th and early 20th centuries.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Books about Henry Clay: Robert Vincent Remini, Henry Clay: Statesman for the Union — Maurice G. Baxter, Henry Clay the Lawyer — Richard B. Cheney & Lynne V. Cheney, Kings Of The Hill : How Nine Powerful Men Changed The Course of American History — Merrill D. Peterson, The Great Triumvirate: Webster, Clay, and Calhoun — Scott Farris, Almost President: The Men Who Lost the Race but Changed the Nation — David S. Heidler & Jeanne T. Heidler, Henry Clay: The Essential American — Fergus M. Bordewich, America's Great Debate: Henry Clay, Stephen A. Douglas, and the Compromise That Preserved the Union
  Image source: James Smith Noel Collection, Louisiana State University in Shreveport
Grover Cleveland Grover Cleveland (1837-1908) — also known as Stephen Grover Cleveland; "Uncle Jumbo"; "The Veto Mayor"; "Grover The Good"; "The Sage of Princeton"; "Dumb Prophet"; "Buffalo Hangman"; "The Veto President"; "Beast of Buffalo"; "Big Steve" — of Buffalo, Erie County, N.Y.; Princeton, Mercer County, N.J.; Tamworth, Carroll County, N.H. Born in Caldwell, Essex County, N.J., March 18, 1837. Democrat. Lawyer; Erie County Sheriff, 1870-73; mayor of Buffalo, N.Y., 1882; Governor of New York, 1883-85; President of the United States, 1885-89, 1893-97; defeated, 1888. Presbyterian. Member, Sigma Chi. Elected to the Hall of Fame for Great Americans in 1935. Died in Princeton, Mercer County, N.J., June 24, 1908 (age 71 years, 98 days). Interment at Princeton Cemetery, Princeton, N.J.; statue at City Hall Grounds, Buffalo, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Rev. Richard Falley Cleveland (1804-1853) and Anne (Neal) Cleveland (1806-1882); married, June 2, 1886, to Frances Folsom (1864-1947); father of Richard Folsom Cleveland (1897-1974) (son-in-law of Thomas Frank Gailor; brother-in-law of Frank Hoyt Gailor); first cousin once removed of Francis Landon Cleveland; second cousin of James Harlan Cleveland; second cousin once removed of James Harlan Cleveland, Jr.; second cousin twice removed of Jonathan Usher and Joseph Wheeler Bloodgood; third cousin once removed of John Palmer Usher and Robert Cleveland Usher; third cousin thrice removed of Ephraim Safford and Isaiah Kidder; fourth cousin once removed of Samuel Lord and Rollin Usher Tyler.
  Political families: Kidder family of Connecticut; Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Cross-reference: Henry T. Ellett — Wilson S. Bissell — David King Udall — Edward S. Bragg — Thomas F. Grady — Lyman K. Bass — George B. Cortelyou
  Cleveland counties in Ark. and Okla. are named for him.
  Mount Cleveland, a volcano on Chuginadak Island, Alaska, is named for him.  — The town of Grover, North Carolina, is named for him.  — The Cleveland National Forest (established 1908), in San Diego, Riverside, Orange counties, California, is named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: Grover C. CookGrover C. MeyrsGrover C. TalbotGrover C. HelmGrover C. RobertsonG. C. CooleyGrover A. WhalenGrover C. TaylorGrover C. WinnGrover C. LukeGrover C. AlbrightGrover Cleveland WelshGrover C. BelknapGrover C. WorrellGrover B. HillGrover C. DillmanGrover C. BrennemanGrover C. GeorgeGrover C. MitchellGrover C. LadnerGrover C. HallGrover C. TyeGrover C. CiselGrover C. HedrickGrover C. HunterGrover C. MontgomeryGrover C. FarwellGrover C. GillinghamGrover C. StudivanGrover C. LayneGrover C. HudsonGrover C. CombsGrover C. SnyderGrover C. GuernseyGrover C. HendersonGrover C. SmithGrover C. JacksonGrover C. HunterGrover C. BowerGrover C. LandGrover C. MoritzGrover C. GreggGrover C. Richman, Jr.Grover C. AndersonGrover C. ChrissGrover C. CriswellGrover C. BrownGrover C. Robinson III
  Coins and currency: His portrait appeared on the U.S. $20 bill (1914-28), and on the $1,000 bill (1928-46).
  Campaign slogan (1884): "We love him for the enemies he has made."
  Opposition slogan (1884): "Ma, Ma, Where's My Pa?"
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about Grover Cleveland: Alyn Brodsky, Grover Cleveland : A Study in Character — H. Paul Jeffers, An Honest President: The Life and Presidencies of Grover Cleveland — Mark Wahlgren Summers, Rum, Romanism, & Rebellion : The Making of a President, 1884 — Henry F. Graff, Grover Cleveland — Jeff C. Young, Grover Cleveland (for young readers)
  Critical books about Grover Cleveland: Matthew Algeo, The President Is a Sick Man: the Supposedly Virtuous Grover Cleveland Survives a Secret Surgery at Sea and Vilifies the Courageous Newspaperman Who Dared Expose the Truth — Charles Lachman, A Secret Life : The Lies and Scandals of President Grover Cleveland
  Image source: New York Red Book 1896
De_Witt Clinton De Witt Clinton (1769-1828) — also known as "Father of the Erie Canal" — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in Napanoch, Ulster County, N.Y., March 2, 1769. Democrat. Lawyer; member of New York state assembly from New York County, 1797-98; member of New York state senate Southern District, 1798-1802, 1805-11; delegate to New York state constitutional convention, 1801; member of New York council of appointment, 1801; U.S. Senator from New York, 1802-03; mayor of New York City, N.Y., 1803-07, 1808-10, 1811-15; Lieutenant Governor of New York, 1811-13; candidate for President of the United States, 1812; Governor of New York, 1817-23, 1825-28; died in office 1828. Member, Freemasons. Chief advocate for the Erie Canal, completed 1825. Died, from heart failure, in Albany, Albany County, N.Y., February 11, 1828 (age 58 years, 346 days). Original interment at Clinton Cemetery, Little Britain, N.Y.; reinterment at Green-Wood Cemetery, Brooklyn, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of James Clinton and Mary (De Witt) Clinton (1737-1795); half-brother of James Graham Clinton; brother of Charles Clinton, George Clinton, Jr., Mary Clinton (1773-1808; who married Ambrose Spencer (1765-1848)) and Katherine Clinton (1778-1837; who married Ambrose Spencer (1765-1848)); married, February 13, 1796, to Maria Franklin (died 1818); married, May 8, 1819, to Catherine Jones; nephew of George Clinton; first cousin of Jacob Hasbrouck DeWitt; first cousin once removed of Charles De Witt; first cousin five times removed of Abraham Owen Smoot III and Isaac Albert Smoot; second cousin once removed of Charles D. Bruyn and Charles Gerrit De Witt; second cousin twice removed of David Miller De Witt.
  Political family: Clinton-DeWitt-Smoot family of New York (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Cross-reference: Peter Gansevoort
  Clinton counties in Ill., Ind., Iowa, Ky., Mich., Mo. and Pa., and DeWitt County, Ill., are named for him.
  The township and city of DeWitt, Michigan, are named for him.  — The city of De Witt, Iowa, is named for him.  — The village of DeWitt, Illinois, is named for him.  — The city of De Witt, Missouri, is named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: De Witt C. StevensDeWitt C. WalkerDe Witt C. StanfordDe Witt C. LittlejohnDe Witt C. GageDeWitt C. ClarkDe Witt C. LeachDewitt C. WestJohn DeWitt Clinton AtkinsDeWitt C. WilsonDe Witt C. MorrisD. C. GiddingsDeWitt C. HoughDeWitt C. JonesDe Witt C. TowerD. C. CoolmanDeWitt Clinton CregierDeWitt C. HoytDeWitt Clinton SenterDe Witt C. RuggDeWitt C. AllenDeWitt C. PeckDeWitt C. RichmanDewitt C. AldenDeWitt C. CramDe Witt C. BoltonDeWitt C. HuntingtonDeWitt C. JonesDeWitt C. PondDe Witt C. CarrDeWitt C. PierceDe Witt C. BadgerDeWitt C. DominickDeWitt C. BeckerDe Witt C. TitusDe Witt C. WinchellDewitt C. TurnerDewitt C. RuscoeDeWitt C. BrownDeWitt C. FrenchDe Witt C. FlanaganDeWitt C. ColeDeWitt C. TalmageDewitt Clinton ChaseDe Witt C. Poole, Jr.DeWitt C. CunninghamDewitt C. Chastain
  Coins and currency: His portrait appeared on the U.S. $1,000 note in 1898-1905.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about De Witt Clinton: Evan Cornog, The Birth of Empire : DeWitt Clinton and the American Experience, 1769-1828
  Image source: New York Public Library
Jefferson Davis Jefferson Finis Davis (1808-1889) — also known as Jefferson Davis — of Warrenton, Warren County, Miss.; Warren County, Miss. Born in a log cabin, Fairview, Christian County (now Todd County), Ky., June 3, 1808. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army during the Black Hawk War; candidate for Mississippi state house of representatives, 1843; Presidential Elector for Mississippi, 1844; U.S. Representative from Mississippi at-large, 1845-46; served in the U.S. Army during the Mexican War; U.S. Senator from Mississippi, 1847-51, 1857-61; candidate for Governor of Mississippi, 1851; U.S. Secretary of War, 1853-57; President of the Confederacy, 1861-65. Captured by Union forces in May 1865 and imprisoned without trial for about two years. Died of bronchitis and malaria in New Orleans, Orleans Parish, La., December 6, 1889 (age 81 years, 186 days). Original interment at Metairie Cemetery, New Orleans, La.; reinterment in 1893 at Hollywood Cemetery, Richmond, Va.; memorial monument at Memorial Avenue, Richmond, Va.
  Relatives: Son of Samuel Emory Davis and Jane (Cook) Davis; married, June 17, 1835, to Sarah Knox Taylor (1814-1835; daughter of Zachary Taylor); married, February 25, 1845, to Varina Howell (1826-1906; granddaughter of Richard Howell (1754-1802)); uncle of Mary Bradford (who married Richard Brodhead); granduncle of Jefferson Davis Brodhead and Frances Eileen Hutt (who married Thomas Edmund Dewey).
  Political families: Brodhead-Taylor family of Easton, Pennsylvania; Davis-Howell-Morgan-Agnew family of New Orleans and Shreveport, Louisiana (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Cross-reference: Jesse D. Bright — John H. Reagan — Horace Greeley — Solomon Cohen — George W. Jones — Samuel A. Roberts — William T. Sutherlin — Victor Vifquain — Charles O'Conor
  Jeff Davis County, Ga., Jefferson Davis Parish, La., Jefferson Davis County, Miss. and Jeff Davis County, Tex. are named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: J. Davis BrodheadJefferson D. HostetterJefferson D. BlountJeff DavisJefferson D. HelmsJefferson Davis Parris
  Coins and currency: His portrait appeared on Confederate States 50 cent notes in 1861-64.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books by Jefferson Davis: The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government (1881)
  Books about Jefferson Davis: William J. Cooper, Jr., Jefferson Davis, American : A Biography — Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis : Ex-President of the Confederate States of America : A Memoir by His Wife — William C. Davis, An Honorable Defeat: The Last Days of the Confederate Government — James Ronald Kennedy & Walter Donald Kennedy, Was Jefferson Davis Right? — Robert Penn Warren, Jefferson Davis Gets His Citizenship Back — Herman Hattaway & Richard E. Beringer, Jefferson Davis, Confederate President — Felicity Allen, Jefferson Davis: Unconquerable Heart — Clint Johnson, Pursuit: The Chase, Capture, Persecution, and Surprising Release of Confederate President Jefferson Davis
  Image source: Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper, March 9, 1861
Dwight D. Eisenhower Dwight David Eisenhower (1890-1969) — also known as Dwight D. Eisenhower; "Ike" — Born in Denison, Grayson County, Tex., October 14, 1890. Republican. General in the U.S. Army during World War II; president of Columbia University, 1948-53; President of the United States, 1953-61. Presbyterian. German ancestry. Member, American Legion; Council on Foreign Relations; Loyal Legion. Died, after a series of heart attacks, at Walter Reed Army Hospital, Washington, D.C., March 28, 1969 (age 78 years, 165 days). Interment at Eisenhower Center, Abilene, Kan.
  Relatives: Son of Ida Elizabeth (Stover) Eisenhower (1862-1946) and David Jacob Eisenhower (1863-1942); brother of Milton Stover Eisenhower; married, July 1, 1916, to Mary Geneva "Mamie" Doud (1896-1979); father of John Sheldon Doud Eisenhower (1922-?); grandfather of Dwight David Eisenhower II (son-in-law of Richard Milhous Nixon).
  Political family: Eisenhower-Nixon family (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Cross-reference: Sherman Adams — Carter L. Burgess — Woodrow Wilson Mann — Jacqueline C. Odlum — George E. Allen — Meyer Kestnbaum
  The Eisenhower Expressway, from downtown Chicago west to Hillside, in Cook County, Illinois, is named for him.  — The Eisenhower Tunnel (opened 1973), which carries westbound I-70 under the Continental Divide, in the Rocky Mountains, from Clear Creek County to Summit County, Colorado, is named for him.  — The Eisenhower Range of mountains, in Victoria Land, Antarctica, is named for him.  — Mount Eisenhower (formerly Mount Pleasant), in the White Mountains, Coos County, New Hampshire, is named for him.
  Coins and currency: His portrait appeared on the U.S. $1 coin (1971-78).
  Campaign slogan: "I Like Ike."
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile
  Books about Dwight D. Eisenhower: Stephen E. Ambrose, Eisenhower : Soldier and President — Fred I. Greenstein, The Hidden-Hand Presidency : Eisenhower as Leader — Carlo d'Este, Eisenhower : A Soldier's Life — Robert F. Burk, Dwight D. Eisenhower: Hero and Politician — Wiley T. Buchanan, Jr., Red Carpet at the White House : Four years as Chief of Protocol in the Eisenhower Administration — Jim Newton, Eisenhower: The White House Years — William Lee Miller, Two Americans: Truman, Eisenhower, and a Dangerous World
  Image source: U.S. postage stamp (1969)
  Edward Everett (1794-1865) — of Cambridge, Middlesex County, Mass.; Charlestown, Middlesex County (now part of Boston, Suffolk County), Mass. Born in Dorchester, Norfolk County (now part of Boston, Suffolk County), Mass., April 11, 1794. Unitarian minister; college professor; U.S. Representative from Massachusetts 4th District, 1825-35; Governor of Massachusetts, 1836-40; U.S. Minister to Great Britain, 1841-45; president, Harvard College, 1846-49; U.S. Secretary of State, 1852-53; U.S. Senator from Massachusetts, 1853-54; Constitutional Union candidate for Vice President of the United States, 1860; Presidential Elector for Massachusetts, 1864. Unitarian. Delivered a lengthy speech immediately preceding Abraham Lincoln's brief Gettysburg Address, November 19, 1863. Died in Boston, Suffolk County, Mass., January 15, 1865 (age 70 years, 279 days). Interment at Mt. Auburn Cemetery, Cambridge, Mass.
  Relatives: Son of Rev. Oliver Everett and Lucy (Hill) Everett; brother of Alexander Hill Everett; married, May 8, 1822, to Charlotte Gray Brooks (1800-1859; sister-in-law of Charles Francis Adams (1807-1886); niece of Benjamin Gorham; granddaughter of Nathaniel Gorham); father of William Everett; uncle of Charles Hale.
  Political families: Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York; Sewall-Adams-Cony family of Maine; Adams-Baldwin-Otis family of Boston, Massachusetts (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  The city of Everett, Massachusetts, is named for him.  — The borough of Everett, Pennsylvania, is named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: Edward E. BostwickEdward Everett AbramsEdward E. BruenEdward E. RobbinsEdward E. HollandEdward E. ChaseEdward E. McCallE. E. DixonEdward E. LibbyEdward E. EslickEdward E. DenisonE. Everett SwanEdward Everett Brodie
  Coins and currency: His portrait appeared on the U.S. $50 silver certificates in the 1880s.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
Benjamin Franklin Benjamin Franklin (1706-1790) — also known as "Silence Dogood"; "Anthony Afterwit"; "Poor Richard"; "Alice Addertongue"; "Polly Baker"; "Harry Meanwell"; "Timothy Turnstone"; "Martha Careful"; "Benevolus"; "Caelia Shortface" — of Pennsylvania. Born in Boston, Suffolk County, Mass., January 17, 1706. Delegate to Continental Congress from Pennsylvania, 1775; U.S. Postmaster General, 1775-76; signer, Declaration of Independence, 1776; delegate to Pennsylvania state constitutional convention, 1776; U.S. Minister to France, 1778-85; Sweden, 1782-83; President of Pennsylvania, 1785-88; member, U.S. Constitutional Convention, 1787. Deist. Member, Freemasons; American Philosophical Society; American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Famed for his experiments with electricity; invented bifocal glasses and the harmonica. Elected to the Hall of Fame for Great Americans in 1900. Died in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., April 17, 1790 (age 84 years, 90 days). Interment at Christ Church Burial Ground, Philadelphia, Pa.; statue erected 1856 at Old City Hall Grounds, Boston, Mass.; statue at La Arcata Court, Santa Barbara, Calif.
  Relatives: Son of Josiah Franklin (1657-1745) and Abiah Lee (Folger) Franklin (1667-1752); married, September 1, 1730, to Deborah Read; father of Sarah 'Sally' Franklin (1743-1808; who married Richard Bache); uncle of Franklin Davenport; grandfather of Richard Bache, Jr. and Deborah Franklin Bache (1891-1863; who married William John Duane); great-grandfather of Alexander Dallas Bache (1806-1867; physicist), Mary Blechenden Bache (1808-1873; who married Robert John Walker) and Sophia Arabella Bache (1815-1904; who married William Wallace Irwin); second great-grandfather of Robert Walker Irwin; fifth great-grandfather of Daniel Baugh Brewster and Elise du Pont; first cousin four times removed of Charles James Folger, Benjamin Dexter Sprague and Wharton Barker (1846-1921); first cousin six times removed of Thomas Mott Osborne; first cousin seven times removed of Charles Devens Osborne and Lithgow Osborne; second cousin five times removed of George Hammond Parshall.
  Political families: Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York; Bache-Dallas family of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Franklin counties in Ala., Ark., Fla., Ga., Ill., Ind., Iowa, Kan., Ky., La., Maine, Mass., Miss., Mo., Neb., N.Y., N.C., Ohio, Pa., Tenn., Vt., Va. and Wash. are named for him.
  Mount Franklin, in the White Mountains, Coos County, New Hampshire, is named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: Benjamin F. ButlerBenjamin F. WadeBenjamin Franklin WallaceBenjamin Cromwell FranklinBenjamin Franklin PerryBenjamin Franklin RobinsonBenjamin F. RandolphBenjamin Franklin MasseyBenjamin F. RawlsBenjamin Franklin LeiterBenjamin Franklin ThomasBenjamin F. HallBenjamin F. AngelBenjamin Franklin RossBenjamin F. FlandersBenjamin F. BomarBenjamin F. MudgeBenjamin F. ButlerBenjamin F. LoanBenjamin F. SimpsonBenjamin Franklin TerryBenjamin Franklin JunkinBenjamin F. PartridgeB. F. LangworthyBenjamin F. HardingBenjamin MebaneB. F. WhittemoreBenjamin Franklin BradleyBenjamin Franklin ClaypoolBenjamin F. CoatesB. Franklin MartinBenjamin Franklin HoweyBenjamin F. MartinBenjamin Franklin RiceBenjamin F. RandolphBenjamin F. HopkinsBenjamin F. TracyBenjamin F. GradyBenjamin F. FarnhamBenjamin F. MeyersBenjamin Franklin WhiteBenjamin Franklin PrescottBenjamin F. JonasB. Franklin FisherBenjamin Franklin PottsBenjamin F. FunkBenjamin F. MarshFrank B. ArnoldBenjamin F. HeckertBenjamin F. BradleyBenjamin F. HowellBenjamin F. MahanBen Franklin CaldwellBenjamin Franklin TilleyBenjamin F. HackneyB. F. McMillanBenjamin F. ShivelyB. Frank HiresB. Frank MebaneB. Frank MurphyBenjamin F. StarrBenjamin Franklin Jones, Jr.Benjamin F. WeltyBenjamin F. JonesBenjamin Franklin BoleyBen Franklin LooneyBenjamin F. BledsoeBenjamin Franklin WilliamsBenjamin Franklin KelleyBenjamin Franklin ButlerBenjamin F. JamesFrank B. HeintzlemanBenjamin F. FeinbergB. Franklin BunnBen F. CameronBen F. BlackmonB. Frank WhelchelB. F. Merritt, Jr.Ben F. HornsbyBen Dillingham II
  Coins and currency: His portrait appears on the U.S. $100 bill, and formerly on the U.S. half dollar coin (1948-63).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial — Early American Foreign Service Database
  Books by Benjamin Franklin: The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin — An Account of the Newly Invented Pennsylvanian Fire-Place (1744)
  Books about Benjamin Franklin: H. W. Brands, The First American: The Life and Times of Benjamin Franklin — Edmund S. Morgan, Benjamin Franklin — Stacy Schiff, A Great Improvisation : Franklin, France, and the Birth of America — Gordon S. Wood, The Americanization of Benjamin Franklin — Walter Isaacson, Benjamin Franklin : An American Life — Carl Van Doren, Benjamin Franklin — Philip Dray, Stealing God's Thunder : Benjamin Franklin's Lightning Rod and the Invention of America
  Image source: Library of Congress
Albert Gallatin Albert Gallatin (1761-1849) — also known as Abraham Albert Alphonse de Gallatin — of Fayette County, Pa.; New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in Geneva, Switzerland, January 29, 1761. Democrat. Delegate to Pennsylvania state constitutional convention, 1790; member of Pennsylvania state house of representatives, 1790-92; U.S. Senator from Pennsylvania, 1793-94; U.S. Representative from Pennsylvania 11th District, 1795-1801; U.S. Secretary of the Treasury, 1801-14; U.S. Minister to France, 1815-23; Great Britain, 1826-27. Swiss ancestry. Died in Astoria, Queens, Queens County, N.Y., August 12, 1849 (age 88 years, 195 days). Entombed at Trinity Churchyard, Manhattan, N.Y.; statue at Treasury Building Grounds, Washington, D.C.
  Relatives: Son of Jean Gallatin and Sophia Albertina Rolaz du Rosey Gallatin; married 1789 to Sophie Allègre (1766-1789); married, November 11, 1793, to Hannah Nicholson (1766-1849); second great-grandfather of May Preston Davie; cousin by marriage of Joseph Hopper Nicholson (1770-1817).
  Political families: Key family of Maryland; Davie family of Maryland (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Cross-reference: John L. Dawson
  Gallatin counties in Ill., Ky. and Mont. are named for him.
  The city of Gallatin, Tennessee, is named for him.  — The village of Galatia, Illinois, is named for him.  — The Gallatin River, which flows through Gallatin County, Montana, is named for him.  — Gallatin Hall (dormitory, built 1926), at Harvard University Business School, Boston, Massachusetts, is named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS Albert Gallatin (built 1941, torpedoed and sunk 1944) was named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: Albert Galliton HarrisonAlbert G. JewettAlbert G. HawesAlbert G. WakefieldAlbert Gallatin TalbottAlbert G. DowAlbert Gallatin KelloggAlbert Gallatin MarchandAlbert G. BrownAlbert G. Brodhead, Jr.Albert G. AllisonAlbert G. RiddleAlbert Galiton WatkinsAlbert G. PorterAlbert Gallatin EgbertAlbert Gallatin JenkinsAlbert Gallatin CalvertAlbert G. LawrenceAlbert G. FosterAlbert G. Simms
  Coins and currency: His portrait appeared on the U.S. $500 note in 1862-63.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about Albert Gallatin: John Austin Stevens, Albert Gallatin: An American Statesman — L. B. Kuppenheimer, Albert Gallatin's Vision of Democratic Stability — Nicholas Dungan, Gallatin: America's Swiss Founding Father — Raymond Walters, Albert Gallatin: Jeffersonian Financier and Diplomat
  Image source: New York Public Library
James A. Garfield James Abram Garfield (1831-1881) — also known as James A. Garfield — of Hiram, Portage County, Ohio. Born in a log cabin near Orange, Cuyahoga County, Ohio, November 19, 1831. Republican. Lawyer; college professor; president, Eclectic University (now Hiram College); member of Ohio state senate, 1859-61; general in the Union Army during the Civil War; U.S. Representative from Ohio 19th District, 1863-81; President of the United States, 1881; died in office 1881. Disciples of Christ. English ancestry. Member, Freemasons; Delta Upsilon. Shot by the assassin Charles J. Guiteau, in the Baltimore & Potomac Railroad Station, Washington, D.C., July 2, 1881, and died from the effects of the wound and infection, in Elberon, Monmouth County, N.J., September 19, 1881 (age 49 years, 304 days). Interment at Lake View Cemetery, Cleveland, Ohio; statue erected 1887 at Garfield Circle, Washington, D.C.; statue at Golden Gate Park, San Francisco, Calif.
  Relatives: Son of Abram Garfield (1799-1833) and Elizabeth (Ballou) Garfield (1801-1888); married, November 11, 1858, to Lucretia "Crete" Rudolph (1832-1918); father of James Rudolph Garfield; fourth cousin of Eli Thayer; fourth cousin once removed of John Alden Thayer (1857-1917).
  Political families: Conger-Hungerford family; Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Cross-reference: William S. Maynard
  Garfield counties in Colo., Mont., Neb., Okla., Utah and Wash. are named for him.
  Garfield Mountain, in the Cascade Range, King County, Washington, is named for him.  — The city of Garfield, New Jersey, is named for him.
  Politician named for him: James G. Stewart
  Coins and currency: His portrait appeared on the U.S. $20 gold certificate in 1898-1905.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Books about James A. Garfield: Allan Peskin, Garfield: A Biography — Justus D. Doenecke, The Presidencies of James A. Garfield and Chester A. Arthur
  Image source: James G. Blaine, Twenty Years of Congress, vol. 2 (1886)
Ulysses S. Grant Ulysses Simpson Grant (1822-1885) — also known as Ulysses S. Grant; Hiram Ulysses Grant; "Savior of the Union"; "Lion of Vicksburg"; "The Austerlitz of American Politics"; "Unconditional Surrender Grant"; "The Galena Tanner"; "The Silent Soldier"; "The Silent General" — of Galena, Jo Daviess County, Ill. Born in Point Pleasant, Clermont County, Ohio, April 27, 1822. Republican. General in the Union Army during the Civil War; President of the United States, 1869-77; candidate for Republican nomination for President, 1880. Methodist. Scottish ancestry. Member, Loyal Legion. Elected to the Hall of Fame for Great Americans in 1900. Died of throat cancer, at Mt. McGregor, Saratoga County, N.Y., July 23, 1885 (age 63 years, 87 days). Interment at General Grant Memorial, Manhattan, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Jesse Root Grant (1794-1873) and Hannah (Simpson) Grant (1798-1883); married, August 22, 1848, to Julia Boggs Dent (1826-1902; sister-in-law of Alexander Sharp; sister of George Wrenshall Dent and Lewis Dent); father of Frederick Dent Grant (1850-1912) and Ulysses Simpson Grant, Jr.; grandfather of Nellie Grant (1881-1972; who married William Pigott Cronan); first cousin twice removed of Augustus Seymour Porter (1769-1849) and Peter Buell Porter; second cousin once removed of Augustus Seymour Porter (1798-1872), Peter Buell Porter, Jr. and Peter Augustus Porter (1827-1864); second cousin four times removed of Benjamin Huntington; third cousin of Peter Augustus Porter (1853-1925); third cousin twice removed of John Davenport, Joshua Coit, James Davenport, Henry Huntington, Gurdon Huntington, Samuel Lathrop, Abel Huntington and William Rush Merriam; third cousin thrice removed of Samuel Huntington and Henry Scudder; fourth cousin once removed of Ebenezer Huntington, Theodore Davenport, Benjamin Nicoll Huntington, Jesse Monroe Hatch, Franklin Delano Roosevelt and Warren Delano Robbins.
  Political families: Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York; Grant-Dent family of San Francisco, California (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Cross-reference: Horace Porter — Ayres Phillips Merrill — Robert Martin Douglas — Thomas L. Hamer — James Arkell
  Grant counties in Ark., Kan., La., Minn., Neb., N.M., N.Dak., Okla., Ore., S.Dak., Wash. and W.Va. are named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: Ulysses G. PalmerUlysses S. G. BieberUlysses G. DenmanUlysses G. CrandellUlysses S. G. BlakelyS. U. G. RhodesUlysses G. BordenU. Grant MengelUlysses G. FosterUlysses G. ByersU. S. Grant Leverett
  Coins and currency: His portrait appears on the U.S. $50 bill, and also appeared on $1 and $5 silver certificates in 1887-1927.
  Personal motto: "When in doubt, fight."
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Books about Ulysses S. Grant: Jean Edward Smith, Grant — Frank J. Scaturro, President Grant Reconsidered — William S. McFeely, Grant — Brooks D. Simpson, Ulysses S. Grant: Triumph Over Adversity, 1822-1865 — Brooks D. Simpson, Let Us Have Peace: Ulysses S. Grant and the Politics of War and Reconstruction, 1861-1868 — James S. Brisbin, The campaign lives of Ulysses S. Grant and Schuyler Colfax — Josiah Bunting III, Ulysses S. Grant — Michael Korda, Ulysses S. Grant : The Unlikely Hero — Edward H. Bonekemper, A Victor, Not a Butcher: Ulysses S. Grant's Overlooked Military Genius — Harry J. Maihafer, The General and the Journalists: Ulysses S. Grant, Horace Greeley, and Charles Dana — H. W. Brands, The Man Who Saved the Union: Ulysses Grant in War and Peace — Charles Bracelen Flood, Grant's Final Victory: Ulysses S. Grant's Heroic Last Year — Joan Waugh, U. S. Grant: American Hero, American Myth
  Critical books about Ulysses S. Grant: Nathan Miller, Star-Spangled Men : America's Ten Worst Presidents
  Fiction about Ulysses S. Grant: Newt Gingrich & William R. Forstchen, Grant Comes East — Newt Gingrich & William R. Forstchen, Never Call Retreat : Lee and Grant: The Final Victory
  Image source: Portrait & Biographical Album of Washtenaw County (1891)
Alexander Hamilton Alexander Hamilton (1757-1804) — also known as "Alexander the Coppersmith" — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in Charles Town, Nevis, January 11, 1757. Delegate to Continental Congress from New York, 1782; member of New York state assembly from New York County, 1786-87; member, U.S. Constitutional Convention, 1787; delegate to New York convention to ratify U.S. constitution from New York County, 1788; U.S. Secretary of the Treasury, 1789-95. Episcopalian. Scottish and French ancestry. Member, Freemasons; Society of the Cincinnati. Elected to the Hall of Fame for Great Americans in 1915. Shot and mortally wounded in a duel with Aaron Burr, on July 11, 1804, and died the next day in New York, New York County, N.Y., July 12, 1804 (age 47 years, 183 days). Interment at Trinity Churchyard, Manhattan, N.Y.; statue at Treasury Building Grounds, Washington, D.C.; statue at Commonwealth Avenue Mall, Boston, Mass.
  Relatives: Son of James Hamilton and Rachel (Faucette) Hamilton; married, December 14, 1780, to Elizabeth Schuyler (1757-1854; daughter of Philip John Schuyler; sister of Philip Jeremiah Schuyler); father of Alexander Hamilton, Jr., James Alexander Hamilton (1788-1878) and William Stephen Hamilton; great-grandfather of Robert Ray Hamilton; second great-grandfather of Laurens M. Hamilton; ancestor *** of Robert Hamilton Woodruff.
  Political families: Livingston-Schuyler family of New York; VanRensselaer family of Albany, New York (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Cross-reference: Nathaniel Pendleton — Robert Troup — John Tayler — William P. Van Ness
  Hamilton counties in Fla., Ill., Ind., Kan., Neb., N.Y., Ohio and Tenn. are named for him.
  The city of Hamilton, Ohio, is named for him.  — Hamilton Hall (dormitory, built 1926), at Harvard University Business School, Boston, Massachusetts, is named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: Alexander H. BuellAlexander H. HolleyHamilton FishAlexander H. StephensAlexander H. BullockAlexander H. BaileyAlexander H. RiceAlexander Hamilton JonesAlexander H. WatermanAlexander H. CoffrothAlexander H. DudleyAlexander H. RevellAlexander Hamilton HargisAlexander Hamilton PhillipsAlex Woodle
  Coins and currency: His portrait appears on the U.S. $10 bill; from the 1860s to the 1920s, his portrait also appeared on U.S. notes and certificates of various denominations from $2 to $1,000.
  Personal motto: "Do it better yet."
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about Alexander Hamilton: Richard Brookhiser, Alexander Hamilton, American — Forrest McDonald, Alexander Hamilton: A Biography — Gertrude Atherton, Conqueror : Dramatized Biography of Alexander Hamilton — Ron Chernow, Alexander Hamilton — Thomas Fleming, Duel: Alexander Hamilton, Aaron Burr, and the Future of America — Arnold A. Rogow, A Fatal Friendship: Alexander Hamilton and Aaron Burr — Willard Sterne Randall, Alexander Hamilton: A Life — John Harper, American Machiavelli : Alexander Hamilton and the Origins of U.S. Foreign Policy — Stephen F. Knott, Alexander Hamilton and the Persistence of Myth — Charles Cerami, Young Patriots: The Remarkable Story of Two Men. Their Impossible Plan and The Revolution That Created The Constitution — Donald Barr Chidsey, Mr. Hamilton and Mr. Jefferson
  Critical books about Alexander Hamilton: Thomas DiLorenzo, Hamilton's Curse : How Jefferson's Arch Enemy Betrayed the American Revolution -- and What It means for Americans Today
  Image source: U.S. postage stamp (1957)
Winfield S. Hancock Winfield Scott Hancock (1824-1886) — also known as Winfield S. Hancock — of St. Louis, Mo.; Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, Calif.; New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in Montgomery County, Pa., February 14, 1824. Democrat. General in the Union Army during the Civil War; candidate for Democratic nomination for President, 1868, 1876; candidate for President of the United States, 1880. Member, Freemasons; Loyal Legion. Died in Governor's Island, New York County, N.Y., February 9, 1886 (age 61 years, 360 days). Interment at Montgomery Cemetery, Norristown, Pa.; statue erected 1896 at Hancock Circle, Washington, D.C.
  Presumably named for: Winfield Scott
  Relatives: Son of Benjamin Franklin Hancock (1800-1867) and Elizabeth (Hoxworth) Hancock (1801-1879); married, February 1, 1850, to Almira Dubois Russell (1832-1893); uncle of Laura Elizabeth Hancock (1850-1943; who married William Rush Merriam (1849-1931)).
  Political families: Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York; Grant-Dent family of San Francisco, California (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Mount Hancock, in Yellowstone National Park, Teton County, Wyoming, is named for him.
  Coins and currency: His portrait appeared on the U.S. $2 silver certificate in the 1880s and early 1890s.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Books about Winfield Scott Hancock: David M. Jordan, Winfield Scott Hancock : A Soldier's Life
  Image source: Cornell University Library
Thomas A. Hendricks Thomas Andrews Hendricks (1819-1885) — also known as Thomas A. Hendricks — of Shelbyville, Shelby County, Ind.; Indianapolis, Marion County, Ind. Born near Zanesville, Muskingum County, Ohio, September 7, 1819. Democrat. Lawyer; member of Indiana state house of representatives, 1848-49; delegate to Indiana state constitutional convention, 1850-51; U.S. Representative from Indiana, 1851-55 (5th District 1851-53, 6th District 1853-55); defeated, 1854; U.S. Senator from Indiana, 1863-69; candidate for Democratic nomination for President, 1868, 1876, 1884; Governor of Indiana, 1873-77; defeated, 1860, 1868; Vice President of the United States, 1885; defeated, 1876; died in office 1885; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Indiana, 1884. Presbyterian; later Episcopalian. Scottish and Dutch ancestry. Member, Odd Fellows. Died, apparently from a heart attack, in Indianapolis, Marion County, Ind., November 25, 1885 (age 66 years, 79 days). Interment at Crown Hill Cemetery, Indianapolis, Ind.
  Relatives: Son of John Hendricks and Jane Ann (Thomson) Hendricks (1793-1874); married, September 25, 1845, to Eliza C. Morgan (1823-1903); nephew of Thomas Hendricks and William Hendricks; first cousin of Abraham Hendricks, William Hendricks, Jr., Abram Washington Hendricks and William Chalmers Hendricks (1825-1892); first cousin once removed of Scott Springer Hendricks.
  Political family: Hendricks family (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Coins and currency: His portrait appeared on the U.S. $10 silver certificate in 1887-1914.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: Life and Work of James G. Blaine (1893)
  Robert Mercer Taliaferro Hunter (1809-1887) — also known as Robert M. T. Hunter — of Lloyds, Essex County, Va. Born near Loretto, Essex County, Va., April 21, 1809. Democrat. Lawyer; member of Virginia state house of delegates, 1834-35; member of Virginia state senate, 1835-37; U.S. Representative from Virginia, 1837-43, 1845-47 (8th District 1837-39, 12th District 1839-41, 9th District 1841-43, 8th District 1845-47); Speaker of the U.S. House, 1839-41; U.S. Senator from Virginia, 1847-61; candidate for Democratic nomination for President, 1860; Delegate from Virginia to the Confederate Provisional Congress, 1861-62; Confederate Secretary of State, 1861-62; Senator from Virginia in the Confederate Congress, 1862-65; delegate to Virginia state constitutional convention, 1867-68; Virginia state treasurer, 1874-80. When the Civil War began, he left Washington but did not resign his seat in the Senate; he was one of ten Southern senators expelled in absentia on July 11, 1861. Arrested in 1865 and imprisoned without trial by federal forces in Fort Pulaski, Tennessee, until 1866. Died in Lloyds, Essex County, Va., July 18, 1887 (age 78 years, 88 days). Interment a private or family graveyard, Essex County, Va.
  Relatives: Uncle of Muscoe Russell Hunter Garnett (1821-1864).
  Political family: Garnett family of Virginia.
  Coins and currency: His portrait appeared on Confederate States $10 notes in 1861-64.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
Andrew Jackson Andrew Jackson (1767-1845) — also known as "Old Hickory"; "The Farmer of Tennessee"; "King Andrew the First" — of Nashville, Davidson County, Tenn. Born, in a log cabin, in The Waxhaws, Lancaster County, S.C., March 15, 1767. Democrat. Lawyer; U.S. Attorney for Tennessee, 1790-97; U.S. Representative from Tennessee at-large, 1796-97; U.S. Senator from Tennessee, 1797-98, 1823-25; justice of Tennessee state supreme court, 1798; general in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812; Governor of Florida Territory, 1821; President of the United States, 1829-37; censured by the U.S. Senate in 1834 over his removal of federal deposits from the Bank of the United States; on January 30, 1835, while attending funeral services at the Capitol Building for Rep. Warren R. Davis of South Carolina, he was shot at with two guns -- which both misfired -- by Richard Lawrence, a house painter (later found not guilty by reason of insanity). Presbyterian. Scotch-Irish ancestry. Member, Freemasons. Killed Charles Dickinson in a pistol duel, May 30, 1806; also dueled with Thomas Hart Benton and Waightstill Avery. Elected in 1910 to the Hall of Fame for Great Americans. Died, of dropsy (congestive heart failure), in Nashville, Davidson County, Tenn., June 8, 1845 (age 78 years, 85 days). Interment at The Hermitage, Nashville, Tenn.; statue erected 1853 at Lafayette Park, Washington, D.C.; statue erected 1856 at Jackson Square, New Orleans, La.
  Relatives: Son of Andrew Jackson (1730-1767) and Elizabeth (Hutchinson) Jackson (1737-1781); married, January 17, 1794, to Rachel (Donelson) Robards (1767-1828; aunt of Andrew Jackson Donelson (1799-1871)).
  Political families: Marshall-Harrison-Randolph-Cabell family of Virginia; Caffery family of Louisiana (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Cross-reference: Francis P. Blair
  Jackson counties in Ala., Ark., Colo., Fla., Ill., Ind., Iowa, Kan., Ky., La., Mich., Miss., Mo., N.C., Ohio, Okla., Ore., Tenn., Tex., W.Va. and Wis., and Hickory County, Mo., are named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: Andrew J. DonelsonAndrew Jackson MillerAndrew J. FaulkAndrew Jackson TitusAndrew Jackson IsacksAndrew Jackson HamiltonAndrew J. HarlanAndrew J. KuykendallAndrew J. ThayerElam A. J. GreeleyAndrew Jackson IngleAndrew J. OgleAndrew Jackson CarrAndrew J. WatermanAndrew J. BentleyAndrew J. RogersWilliam A. J. SparksAndrew Jackson PoppletonAndrew J. HunterAndrew Jackson BryantAndrew J. BealeA. J. ClementsAndrew Jackson BakerAndrew J. FeltA. J. KingAndrew J. SawyerAndrew Jackson GreenfieldAndrew Jackson CaldwellAndrew Jackson GahaganAndrew Jackson BishipAndrew Jackson HoustonAndrew J. CobbAndrew J. MontagueAndrew J. BarchfeldAndrew J. BallietAndrew J. KirkAndrew J. LivingstonA. J. SherwoodAndrew Jackson StewartAndrew J. MayAndrew J. McConnicoAndrew J. SawyerAndrew J. BrewerAndrew BettwyAndrew J. TransueAndrew Jackson GravesAndrew Jackson GilbertAndrew J. GoodwinAndrew J. HinshawAndy YoungAndrew Jackson Kupper
  Coins and currency: His portrait appears on the U.S. $20 bill; from the 1860s until 1927, his portrait appeared on on U.S. notes and certificates of various denominations from $5 to $10,000. In 1861, his portrait appeared on Confederate States $1,000 notes.
  Campaign slogan: "Let the people rule."
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial — Tennessee Encyclopedia
  Books about Andrew Jackson: Robert Vincent Remini, The Life of Andrew Jackson — Robert Vincent Remini, Andrew Jackson : The Course of American Freedom, 1822-1832 — Robert Vincent Remini, Andrew Jackson : The Course of American Democracy, 1833-1845 — Robert Vincent Remini, Andrew Jackson : The Course of American Empire, 1767-1821 — Andrew Burstein, The Passions of Andrew Jackson — David S. Heidler & Jeanne T. Heidler, Old Hickory's War: Andrew Jackson and the Quest for Empire — Donald B. Cole, The Presidency of Andrew Jackson — H. W. Brands, Andrew Jackson : His Life and Times — Jon Meacham, American Lion: Andrew Jackson in the White House — Donald Barr Chidsey, Andrew Jackson, Hero
  Image source: Portrait & Biographical Album of Washtenaw County (1891)
Thomas Jefferson Thomas Jefferson (1743-1826) — also known as "Apostle of Liberty"; "Sage of Monticello"; "Friend of the People"; "Father of the University of Virginia" — of Albemarle County, Va. Born in Albemarle County, Va., April 13, 1743. Lawyer; Delegate to Continental Congress from Virginia, 1775-76, 1783-84; signer, Declaration of Independence, 1776; Governor of Virginia, 1779-81; member of Virginia state legislature, 1782; U.S. Minister to France, 1785-89; U.S. Secretary of State, 1790-93; Vice President of the United States, 1797-1801; President of the United States, 1801-09; defeated (Democratic-Republican), 1796. Deist. English ancestry. Member, American Philosophical Society; American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He was elected to the Hall of Fame for Great Americans in 1900. Died near Charlottesville, Albemarle County, Va., July 4, 1826 (age 83 years, 82 days). Interment at Monticello Graveyard, Near Charlottesville, Albemarle County, Va.; cenotaph at University of Missouri Quadrangle, Columbia, Mo.; memorial monument at West Potomac Park, Washington, D.C.
  Relatives: Son of Peter Jefferson (1707-1757) and Jane (Randolph) Jefferson (1720-1776); married, January 1, 1772, to Martha Wayles Skelton (1748-1782); father of Martha Jefferson (1772-1836; who married Thomas Mann Randolph, Jr.) and Maria Jefferson (1778-1804; who married John Wayles Eppes); uncle of Dabney Carr; grandfather of Francis Wayles Eppes, Virginia Jefferson Randolph (who married Nicholas Philip Trist), Benjamin Franklin Randolph, Meriwether Lewis Randolph and George Wythe Randolph; grandnephew of Richard Randolph; granduncle of Dabney Smith Carr (1802-1854); great-grandfather of Thomas Jefferson Coolidge and Frederick Madison Roberts; second great-grandfather of John Gardner Coolidge; first cousin once removed of Richard Bland and Peyton Randolph (1721-1775); first cousin twice removed of John Jordan Crittenden, Thomas Turpin Crittenden, Robert Crittenden and Carter Henry Harrison; first cousin thrice removed of Alexander Parker Crittenden, Thomas Leonidas Crittenden, Thomas Theodore Crittenden and Carter Henry Harrison II; first cousin four times removed of Thomas Theodore Crittenden, Jr.; second cousin of Theodorick Bland, Edmund Jenings Randolph, Beverley Randolph and John Randolph of Roanoke; second cousin once removed of John Marshall, Henry Lee, Charles Lee, James Markham Marshall, Alexander Keith Marshall, Edmund Jennings Lee, Peyton Randolph (1779-1828), Henry St. George Tucker and William Segar Archer; second cousin twice removed of Thomas Marshall, James Keith Marshall, Nathaniel Beverly Tucker and Edmund Randolph; second cousin thrice removed of Fitzhugh Lee and John Augustine Marshall; second cousin four times removed of William Marshall Bullitt, Alexander Scott Bullitt and Francis Beverley Biddle; second cousin five times removed of William Welby Beverley; third cousin thrice removed of William Henry Robertson.
  Political families: Lee-Randolph family of Maryland and Virginia; Marshall-Harrison-Randolph-Cabell family of Virginia (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Cross-reference: Jefferson M. Levy — Joshua Fry
  Jefferson counties in Ala., Ark., Colo., Fla., Ga., Idaho, Ill., Ind., Iowa, Kan., Ky., La., Miss., Mo., Mont., Neb., N.Y., Ohio, Okla., Ore., Pa., Tenn., Tex., Wash., W.Va. and Wis. are named for him.
  Mount Jefferson (third highest peak in the Northeast), in Coos County, New Hampshire, is named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: Thomas Jefferson KennardThomas Jefferson CampbellThomas J. GazleyThomas Jefferson WordThomas J. DrakeThomas Jefferson HeardThomas Jefferson GreenThomas J. RuskThomas Jefferson WithersThomas J. ParsonsThomas J. DryerThomas J. FosterThomas J. HenleyThomas J. BarrThomas Jefferson JenningsThomas J. HendersonThomas J. Van AlstyneThomas Jefferson CasonThomas Jefferson BufordT. Jefferson CoolidgeThomas J. MegibbenThomas J. BunnThomas J. HardinThomas J. McLain, Jr.Thomas J. BrownThomas Jefferson SpeerThomas J. BoyntonThomas J. HudsonThomas J. BradyThomas J. SelbyThomas Jefferson DeavittThomas Jefferson MajorsThomas Jefferson WoodT. J. JarrattThomas Jefferson NunnThomas J. StraitThomas J. HumesT. J. AppleyardThomas J. ClunieThomas J. SteeleThomas J. BoyntonThomas J. O'DonnellThomas J. HalseyThomas J. GrahamT. J. MartinThomas Jefferson LillyThomas J. RandolphTom J. TerralT. Jeff BusbyThomas Jefferson MurphyThomas J. HamiltonTom ManganThomas J. RyanTom J. MurrayTom SteedThomas Jefferson Edmonds, Jr.Thomas J. AndersonThomas Jefferson RobertsThomas J. Barlow III
  Coins and currency: His portrait has appeared on the U.S. nickel (five cent coin) since 1938, and on the $2 bill since the 1860s.
  Personal motto: "Rebellion to tyrants is obedience to God."
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about Thomas Jefferson: Joseph J. Ellis, American Sphinx: The Character of Thomas Jefferson — Willard Sterne Randall, Thomas Jefferson : A Life — R. B. Bernstein, Thomas Jefferson — Joyce Appleby, Thomas Jefferson — Gore Vidal, Inventing A Nation: Washington, Adams, Jefferson — John Ferling, Adams vs. Jefferson: The Tumultuous Election of 1800 — Susan Dunn, Jefferson's Second Revolution : The Election Crisis of 1800 — Andrew Burstein, Jefferson's Secret: Death and Desire at Monticello — Christopher Hitchens, Thomas Jefferson : Author of America — David Barton, The Jefferson Lies: Exposing the myths you've always believed about Thomas Jefferson — David Barton, The Jefferson Lies: Exposing the Myths You've Always Believed About Thomas Jefferson — Donald Barr Chidsey, Mr. Hamilton and Mr. Jefferson
  Critical books about Thomas Jefferson: Joseph Wheelan, Jefferson's Vendetta : The Pursuit of Aaron Burr and the Judiciary
  Image source: Portrait & Biographical Album of Washtenaw County (1891)
  John Fitzgerald Kennedy (1917-1963) — also known as John F. Kennedy; "J.F.K."; "Lancer" — of Boston, Suffolk County, Mass. Born in Brookline, Norfolk County, Mass., May 29, 1917. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Navy during World War II; U.S. Representative from Massachusetts 11th District, 1947-53; U.S. Senator from Massachusetts, 1953-60; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Massachusetts, 1956; candidate for Democratic nomination for Vice President, 1956; received a 1957 Pulitzer Prize for his book Profiles in Courage; President of the United States, 1961-63; died in office 1963. Catholic. Irish ancestry. Member, Knights of Columbus; American Legion; Elks. Kennedy was posthumously awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1963. Shot by a sniper, Lee Harvey Oswald, while riding in a motorcade, and died in Parkland Hospital, Dallas, Dallas County, Tex., November 22, 1963 (age 46 years, 177 days). Oswald was shot and killed two days later by Jack Ruby. Interment at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Va.; memorial monument at John F. Kennedy Memorial Plaza, Dallas, Tex.
  Relatives: Son of Joseph Patrick Kennedy, Sr. and Rose (Fitzgerald) Kennedy (1890-1995); step-brother-in-law of Nina Gore Auchincloss (who married Newton Ivan Steers, Jr.); brother of Joseph Patrick Kennedy, Jr., Eunice Mary Kennedy (1921-2009; who married Robert Sargent Shriver, Jr.), Patricia Kennedy Lawford (who married Peter Lawford), Robert Francis Kennedy, Jean Kennedy Smith and Edward Moore Kennedy (who married Virginia Joan Bennett); married, September 12, 1953, to Jacqueline Lee 'Jackie' Bouvier (1929-1994; step-daughter of Hugh Dudley Auchincloss; step-sister of Eugene Luther Gore Vidal, Jr. and Hugh Dudley Auchincloss III); father of John Fitzgerald Kennedy, Jr.; uncle of Maria Owings Shriver (who married Arnold Alois Schwarzenegger), Kathleen Kennedy Townsend, Joseph Patrick Kennedy II, Mark Kennedy Shriver (1964-) and Patrick Joseph Kennedy (1967-); grandson of Patrick Joseph Kennedy (1858-1929) and John Francis Fitzgerald.
  Political family: Kennedy family.
  Cross-reference: John B. Connally — Henry B. Gonzalez — Henry M. Wade — Walter Rogers — Gerry E. Studds — James B. McCahey, Jr. — Mark Dalton — Waggoner Carr — Theodore C. Sorensen — Pierre Salinger — John Bartlow Martin — Abraham Davenport
  The John F. Kennedy Memorial Bridge (opened 1963), which carries southbound I-65 over the Ohio River from Jeffersonville, Indiana, to Louisville, Kentucky, is named for him.
  Coins and currency: His portrait appears on the U.S. half dollar coin.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile
  Books by John F. Kennedy: Profiles in Courage
  Books about John F. Kennedy: Christopher Loviny & Vincent Touze, JFK : Remembering Jack — Robert Dallek, An Unfinished Life : John F. Kennedy, 1917-1963 — Michael O'Brien, John F. Kennedy : A Biography — Sean J. Savage, JFK, LBJ, and the Democratic Party — Thurston Clarke, Ask Not : The Inauguration of John F. Kennedy and the Speech That Changed America — Thomas Reeves, A Question of Character : A Life of John F. Kennedy — Chris Matthews, Jack Kennedy: Elusive Hero — Shelley Sommer, John F. Kennedy : His Life and Legacy (for young readers)
  Critical books about John F. Kennedy: Seymour Hersh, The Dark Side of Camelot — Lance Morrow, The Best Year of Their Lives: Kennedy, Johnson, and Nixon in 1948: Learning the Secrets of Power — Victor Lasky, JFK: the Man and the Myth
  John Jay Knox, Jr. (1828-1892) — Born in Knoxboro, Oneida County, N.Y., March 19, 1828. Banker; U.S. Comptroller of the Currency, 1872-84. Died in New York, New York County, N.Y., February 9, 1892 (age 63 years, 327 days). Interment at Oak Hill Cemetery, Washington, D.C.
  Presumably named for: John Jay
  Relatives: Son of John J. Knox (1791-1876) and Sarah Ann (Curtis) Knox (1794-1875); married to Caroline Elizabeth Todd (1847-1922).
  Coins and currency: His portrait appeared on the U.S. $100 National Bank Notes in 1902.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial — Comptrollers of the Currency
  Meriwether Lewis (1774-1809) — of Missouri. Born near Ivy, Albemarle County, Va., August 18, 1774. Governor of Louisiana (Missouri) Territory, 1807-09; died in office 1809. English and Welsh ancestry. Member, Freemasons. Commanded expedition with William Clark to Oregon, 1803-04. Died from gunshot wounds under mysterious circumstances (murder or suicide?) at Grinder's Stand, an inn on the Natchez Trace near Hohenwald, Lewis County, Tenn., October 11, 1809 (age 35 years, 54 days). Interment at Meriwether Lewis Park, Near Hohenwald, Lewis County, Tenn.
  Relatives: Son of William Lewis (1733-1779) and Lucy (Meriwether) Lewis (1852-1837); first cousin once removed of John Walker, David Meriwether (1755-1822), James Meriwether (1755-1817), Francis Walker and George Rockingham Gilmer; first cousin five times removed of Arthur Sidney Demarest; second cousin of James Meriwether (1788-1852), David Meriwether (1800-1893) and James Archibald Meriwether; second cousin once removed of George Washington, Thomas Walker Gilmer and Reuben Handy Meriwether; second cousin thrice removed of Hubbard T. Smith; second cousin four times removed of Archer Woodford; third cousin of Theodorick Bland, Robert Brooke, Bushrod Washington, George Madison and Richard Aylett Buckner; third cousin once removed of John Randolph of Roanoke, Henry St. George Tucker, John Thornton Augustine Washington, Zachary Taylor and Aylette Buckner; third cousin twice removed of John Strother Pendleton, Albert Gallatin Pendleton, Aylett Hawes Buckner and Nathaniel Beverly Tucker; third cousin thrice removed of James Francis Buckner, Key Pittman and Vail Montgomery Pittman.
  Political families: Demarest-Meriwether family of New Jersey; Marshall-Harrison-Randolph-Cabell family of Virginia; Meriwether-Kellogg-Tyler family of Virginia and Connecticut (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Cross-reference: George F. Shannon
  Lewis counties in Idaho, Ky., Mo., Tenn. and Wash. are named for him; Lewis and Clark County, Mont. is named partly for him.
  Other politicians named for him: Meriwether Lewis RandolphMeriwether Lewis Walker
  Coins and currency: His portrait appeared (along with Clark's) on the $10 U.S. Note from 1898 to 1927.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Books about Meriwether Lewis: Thomas C. Danisi, Uncovering the Truth About Meriwether Lewis — Donald Barr Chidsey, Lewis and Clark: The Great Adventure
Abraham Lincoln Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865) — also known as "Honest Abe"; "Old Abe"; "The Rail-Splitter"; "The Illinois Baboon" — of New Salem, Menard County, Ill.; Springfield, Sangamon County, Ill. Born in a log cabin, Hardin County (part now in Larue County), Ky., February 12, 1809. Republican. Served in the U.S. Army during the Black Hawk War; postmaster; lawyer; member of Illinois state house of representatives, 1834-41; U.S. Representative from Illinois 7th District, 1847-49; candidate for Republican nomination for Vice President, 1856; candidate for U.S. Senator from Illinois, 1858; President of the United States, 1861-65; died in office 1865; His election as president in 1860 precipitated the Civil War; determined to preserve the Union, he led the North to victory on the battlefield, freed the slaves in the conquered states, and in doing this, redefined American nationhood. He was. English ancestry. Elected in 1900 to the Hall of Fame for Great Americans. Shot by the assassin John Wilkes Booth, during a play at Ford's Theater, in Washington, D.C., April 14, 1865; died at Peterson's Boarding House, across the street, the following day, April 15, 1865 (age 56 years, 62 days). Interment at Oak Ridge Cemetery, Springfield, Ill.; memorial monument at National Mall, Washington, D.C.; statue erected 1868 at Judiciary Park, Washington, D.C.
  Relatives: Son of Thomas Lincoln (1778-1851) and Nancy (Hanks) Lincoln (1784-1818); married, November 4, 1842, to Mary Ann Todd (1818-1882; sister-in-law of Ninian Wirt Edwards (1809-1889); half-sister-in-law of N. H. R. Dawson; aunt of Martha Dee Todd; grandniece of David Rittenhouse Porter); father of Robert Todd Lincoln; second cousin four times removed of Richard Henry Lee, Francis Lightfoot Lee and Arthur Lee; third cousin twice removed of Levi Lincoln; third cousin thrice removed of Thomas Sim Lee, Henry Lee, Charles Lee, Edmund Jennings Lee and Zachary Taylor; fourth cousin once removed of Levi Lincoln, Jr. and Enoch Lincoln.
  Political families: Lincoln-Lee family; Edwards-Cook family of Illinois and Nebraska (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Cross-reference: Clement Claiborne Clay, Jr. — Isham N. Haynie — William M. Stone — John Pitcher — Stephen Miller — John T. Stuart — William H. Seward — Henry L. Burnett — Judah P. Benjamin — Robert Toombs — Richard Taylor Jacob — George W. Jones — James Adams — John G. Nicolay — Edward Everett — Stephen T. Logan — Francis P. Blair — John Hay — Henry Reed Rathbone — James A. Ekin — Frederick W. Seward — John H. Surratt — John H. Surratt, Jr. — James Shields
  Lincoln counties in Ark., Colo., Idaho, Kan., La., Minn., Miss., Mont., Neb., Nev., N.M., Okla., Ore., Wash., W.Va., Wis. and Wyo. are named for him.
  The city of Lincoln, Nebraska, is named for him.  — Lincoln Memorial University, in Harrogate, Tennessee, is named for him.  — Lincoln University, in Jefferson City, Missouri, is named for him.  — Lincoln University, near Oxford, Pennsylvania, is named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: Abraham L. KeisterAbraham L. TuckerAbraham L. BrickAbraham L. KelloggAbraham Lincoln BernsteinA. Lincoln ReileyA. L. HelmickAbraham L. SuttonA. Lincoln AckerAbraham L. OsgoodAbraham L. WitmerAbraham L. PhillipsAbraham L. PaytonA. L. AuthA. Lincoln MooreA. Lincoln NiditchAbraham L. RubensteinAbraham L. Davis, Jr.Abraham L. FreedmanA. L. MarovitzLincoln GordonAbraham L. BannerAbraham Lincoln Tosti
  Coins and currency: His portrait has appeared on the U.S. penny (one cent coin) since 1909, and on the $5 bill since 1913. From the 1860s until 1927, his portrait also appeared on U.S. notes and certificates of various denominations from $1 to $500.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about Abraham Lincoln: David Herbert Donald, Lincoln — George Anastaplo, Abraham Lincoln : A Constitutional Biography — G. S. Boritt, ed., The Lincoln Enigma : The Changing Faces of an American Icon — Albert J. Beveridge, Abraham Lincoln 1809-1858 — Geoffrey Perret, Lincoln's War : The Untold Story of America's Greatest President as Commander in Chief — David Herbert Donald, We Are Lincoln Men : Abraham Lincoln and His Friends — Edward Steers, Jr., Blood on the Moon: The Assassination of Abraham Lincoln — Mario Cuomo, Why Lincoln Matters : Today More Than Ever — Michael W. Kauffman, American Brutus : John Wilkes Booth and the Lincoln Conspiracies — Doris Kearns Goodwin, Team of Rivals : The Political Genius of Abraham Lincoln — Joshua Wolf Shenk, Lincoln's Melancholy : How Depression Challenged a President and Fueled His Greatness — John Channing Briggs, Lincoln's Speeches Reconsidered — Ronald C. White, Jr., The Eloquent President : A Portrait of Lincoln Through His Words — Harold Holzer, Lincoln at Cooper Union : The Speech That Made Abraham Linco ln President — Michael Lind, What Lincoln Believed : The Values and Convictions of America's Greatest President — Doris Kearns Goodwin, Team of Rivals : The Political Genius of Abraham Lincoln — Michael Burlingame, ed., Abraham Lincoln: The Observations of John G. Nicolay and John Hay — Thomas J. Craughwell, Stealing Lincoln's Body — Roy Morris, Jr., The Long Pursuit: Abraham Lincoln's Thirty-Year Struggle with Stephen Douglas for the Heart and Soul of America — John Stauffer, Giants: The Parallel Lives of Frederick Douglass and Abraham Lincoln — Karen Judson, Abraham Lincoln (for young readers) — Maira Kalman, Looking at Lincoln (for young readers)
  Critical books about Abraham Lincoln: Thomas J. DiLorenzo, The Real Lincoln : A New Look at Abraham Lincoln, His Agenda, and an Unnecessary War
  Fiction about Abraham Lincoln: Gore Vidal, Lincoln: A Novel
  Image source: Portrait & Biographical Album of Washtenaw County (1891)
James Madison James Madison (1751-1836) — also known as "Father of the Constitution and the Bill of Rights" — of Virginia. Born in Port Conway, King George County, Va., March 16, 1751. Democrat. Served in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; member of Virginia state legislature, 1776; Delegate to Continental Congress from Virginia, 1780-83, 1787-88; member, U.S. Constitutional Convention, 1787; U.S. Representative from Virginia, 1789-97 (at-large 1789-91, 5th District 1791-93, 15th District 1793-97); U.S. Secretary of State, 1801-09; President of the United States, 1809-17. Episcopalian. English ancestry. He was elected in 1905 to the Hall of Fame for Great Americans. Died in Montpelier, Orange County, Va., June 28, 1836 (age 85 years, 104 days). Interment at Montpelier Plantation, Montpelier Station, Va.
  Relatives: Son of James Madison (1723-1801) and Eleanor Rose (Conway) Madison (1731-1829); brother of William Taylor Madison; married, September 15, 1794, to Dolly (Payne) Todd (sister-in-law of Richard Cutts and John George Jackson); first cousin once removed of George Madison; first cousin twice removed of Edmund Pendleton; second cousin of Zachary Taylor; second cousin once removed of Nathaniel Pendleton and Coleby Chew; second cousin twice removed of John Strother Pendleton, Albert Gallatin Pendleton and Samuel Bullitt Churchill; second cousin thrice removed of George Cassety Pendleton, Hubbard T. Smith, Charles M. Pendleton, Elliot Woolfolk Major, Edgar Bailey Woolfolk and Daniel Micajah Pendleton; second cousin four times removed of Charles Sumner Pendleton and Sidney Fletcher Taliaferro; third cousin of Clement F. Dorsey, Philip Clayton Pendleton, Edmund Henry Pendleton and Nathanael Greene Pendleton; third cousin once removed of Gabriel Slaughter, Andrew Dorsey, Philip Coleman Pendleton, George Hunt Pendleton and Joseph Henry Pendleton; third cousin twice removed of Robert Pryor Henry, John Flournoy Henry, Gustavus Adolphus Henry, Alexander Warfield Dorsey, William Barret Pendleton, Francis Key Pendleton, Charles Rittenhouse Pendleton and John Overton Pendleton; third cousin thrice removed of Charles Rice Slaughter (1819-1862) and Eli Huston Brown, Jr.; fourth cousin once removed of Charles Willing Byrd.
  Political families: Blackburn-Slaughter-Buckner-Madison family of Kentucky; Pendleton-Lee family (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Madison counties in Ala., Ark., Fla., Ga., Idaho, Ill., Ind., Iowa, Ky., La., Miss., Mo., Mont., Neb., N.Y., N.C., Ohio, Tenn., Tex. and Va. are named for him.
  The city of Madison, Wisconsin, is named for him.  — Mount Madison, in the White Mountains, Coos County, New Hampshire, is named for him.  — Fort Madison (1808-13), and the subsequent city of Fort Madison, Iowa, were named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: James Madison BroomJames Madison Hite BealeJames Madison PorterJames M. BuchananJames Madison GreggJ. Madison WellsJames M. TarletonJames Madison HughesJames M. MarvinJames Madison GaylordJames M. LeachJames TurnerJames M. HarveyJames M. SeymourJames Madison BarkerJames Madison MullenJames Madison McKinneyJames M. MortonJames Madison Barrett, Sr.James M. Gudger, Jr.James Madison Morton, Jr.James Madison WoodardJames M. Waddell, Jr.
  Coins and currency: His portrait appeared on the U.S. $5,000 bill in 1915-46.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Books about James Madison: Ralph Louis Ketcham, James Madison : A Biography — Garry Wills, James Madison — Robert Allen Rutland, The Presidency of James Madison — Charles Cerami, Young Patriots: The Remarkable Story of Two Men. Their Impossible Plan and The Revolution That Created The Constitution — Samuel Kernell, ed., James Madison: The Theory and Practice of Republican Government — Kevin R. C. Gutzman, James Madison and the Making of America
  Image source: Portrait & Biographical Album of Washtenaw County (1891)
  Daniel Manning (1831-1887) — of Albany, Albany County, N.Y. Born in Albany, Albany County, N.Y., May 16, 1831. Democrat. Newspaper editor; delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1876, 1880; New York Democratic state chair, 1882-84; U.S. Secretary of the Treasury, 1885-87. Died, from Bright's disease, in Albany, Albany County, N.Y., December 24, 1887 (age 56 years, 222 days). Interment at Albany Rural Cemetery, Menands, N.Y.
  Relatives: Married 1853 to Mary Little (1831-1882); married, November 19, 1884, to Mary Margaretta Fryer (1844-1928); father of James Hilton Manning (1854-1925).
  Coins and currency: His portrait appeared on the U.S. $20 silver certificate from the 1890s until 1919.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
William L. Marcy William Learned Marcy (1786-1857) — also known as William L. Marcy — of Albany, Albany County, N.Y. Born in Southbridge, Worcester County, Mass., December 12, 1786. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812; lawyer; New York state comptroller, 1823-29; Justice of New York Supreme Court, 1829; U.S. Senator from New York, 1831-33; Governor of New York, 1833-39; defeated, 1838; U.S. Secretary of War, 1845-49; candidate for Democratic nomination for President, 1852; U.S. Secretary of State, 1853-57. Died in Ballston Spa, Saratoga County, N.Y., July 4, 1857 (age 70 years, 204 days). Interment at Albany Rural Cemetery, Menands, N.Y.
  Mount Marcy (the highest point in New York State), in the Adirondack Mountains, Essex County, New York, is named for him.
  Coins and currency: His portrait appeared on some U.S. currency issued in the 19th and early 20th century.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Books about William Learned Marcy: Robert L Scribner, The diplomacy of William L. Marcy, Secretary of State, 1853-1857 — Ivor Debenham Spencer, The victor and the spoils: a life of William L. Marcy
  Image source: New York Red Book 1896
John Marshall John Marshall (1755-1835) — of Virginia. Born in Germantown, Fauquier County, Va., September 24, 1755. Served in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; lawyer; member of Virginia state house of delegates, 1782-96; U.S. Attorney for Virginia, 1789; U.S. Representative from Virginia at-large, 1799-1800; U.S. Secretary of State, 1800-01; Chief Justice of U.S. Supreme Court, 1801-35; died in office 1835; received 4 electoral votes for Vice-President, 1816. Episcopalian. Scottish ancestry. Member, Freemasons; Phi Beta Kappa. Elected to the Hall of Fame for Great Americans in 1900. Died in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., July 6, 1835 (age 79 years, 285 days). Interment at Shockoe Hill Cemetery, Richmond, Va.
  Relatives: Son of Thomas Marshall (1730-1802) and Mary Randolph (Keith) Marshall (1737-1809); brother-in-law of William McClung, George Keith Taylor and Joseph Hamilton Daviess; brother of James Markham Marshall and Alexander Keith Marshall (1770-1825); married, January 3, 1783, to Mary Willis Ambler (1766-1831; daughter of Jacquelin Ambler); father of Thomas Marshall (1784-1835), Mary Marshall (who married Jacquelin Burwell Harvie) and James Keith Marshall; uncle and first cousin once removed of Thomas Alexander Marshall; uncle of Edward Colston, Thomas Francis Marshall, Alexander Keith Marshall (1808-1884), Alexander Keith McClung, Charles Alexander Marshall and Edward Colston Marshall; granduncle by marriage of Humphrey Marshall (1812-1872); granduncle of John Augustine Marshall; great-grandfather of Lewis Minor Coleman; great-grandnephew of Richard Randolph; great-granduncle of Hudson Snowden Marshall (1870-1931), William Marshall Bullitt and Alexander Scott Bullitt; first cousin and brother-in-law of Humphrey Marshall (1760-1841); first cousin once removed of William Marshall Anderson and Charles Anderson; first cousin twice removed of Richard Bland and Peyton Randolph (1721-1775); second cousin of Thomas Mann Randolph, Jr.; second cousin once removed of Theodorick Bland, Thomas Jefferson, Edmund Jenings Randolph, Beverley Randolph, John Randolph of Roanoke, Benjamin Franklin Randolph, Meriwether Lewis Randolph and George Wythe Randolph; second cousin twice removed of Thomas Jefferson Coolidge; second cousin thrice removed of John Gardner Coolidge; third cousin of Henry Lee, Charles Lee, Edmund Jennings Lee, Dabney Carr, Peyton Randolph (1779-1828) and Henry St. George Tucker; third cousin once removed of Francis Wayles Eppes, Dabney Smith Carr, Edmund Randolph, Nathaniel Beverly Tucker and Carter Henry Harrison; third cousin twice removed of Fitzhugh Lee, Carter Henry Harrison II and Frederick Madison Roberts; third cousin thrice removed of Francis Beverley Biddle; fourth cousin of John Wayles Eppes.
  Political family: Marshall-Harrison-Randolph-Cabell family of Virginia (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Marshall counties in Ala., Ill., Ind., Iowa, Ky., Miss., Tenn. and W.Va. are named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: John Marshall StoneJohn Marshall MartinJohn Marshall HarlanJ. Marshall HagansJohn M. ClaiborneJohn M. HamiltonJohn Marshall RaymondJohn M. RoseJohn M. SlatonJohn M. WolvertonJohn M. RobsionJohn Marshall HutchesonJohn M. ButlerJohn Marshall HarlanJohn M. Robsion, Jr.John Marshall BrileyJohn Marshall Lindley
  Coins and currency: His portrait appeared on the $20 U.S. Treasury note in the 1880s, and on the $500 bill in the early 20th century.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — federal judicial profile — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about John Marshall: Jean Edward Smith, John Marshall : Definer of a Nation — Charles F. Hobson, The Great Chief Justice : John Marshall and the Rule of Law — Albert J. Beveridge, The Life of John Marshall: The Building of the Nation 1815-1835 — Albert J. Beveridge, The Life of John Marshall: Conflict and Construction 1800-1815 — Albert J. Beveridge, The Life of John Marshall: Politician, Diplomatist, Statesman 1789-1801 — Albert J. Beveridge, The Life of John Marshall: Frontiersman, Soldier, Lawmaker — David Scott Robarge, A Chief Justice's Progress: John Marshall from Revolutionary Virginia to the Supreme Court — R. Kent Newmyer, John Marshall and the Heroic Age of the Supreme Court
  Image source: New York Public Library
William McKinley William McKinley, Jr. (1843-1901) — also known as "Idol of Ohio" — of Canton, Stark County, Ohio. Born in Niles, Trumbull County, Ohio, January 29, 1843. Republican. Major in the Union Army during the Civil War; lawyer; U.S. Representative from Ohio, 1877-84, 1885-91 (17th District 1877-79, 16th District 1879-81, 17th District 1881-83, 18th District 1883-84, 20th District 1885-87, 18th District 1887-91); delegate to Republican National Convention from Ohio, 1884, 1888; Governor of Ohio, 1892-96; President of the United States, 1897-1901; died in office 1901. Methodist. Scotch-Irish ancestry. Member, Loyal Legion; Freemasons; Grand Army of the Republic; Knights of Pythias; Sigma Alpha Epsilon. Shot by the assassin Leon Czolgosz, at a reception in the Temple of Music, at the Pan American Exposition in Buffalo, N.Y., September 6, 1901, and died eight days later, in Buffalo, Erie County, N.Y., September 14, 1901 (age 58 years, 228 days). Original interment at West Lawn Cemetery, Canton, Ohio; reinterment in 1907 at McKinley Monument, Canton, Ohio; statue at Lucas County Courthouse Grounds, Toledo, Ohio.
  Relatives: Son of William McKinley (1807-1892) and Nancy Campbell (Allison) McKinley (1809-1897); married, January 25, 1871, to Ida Saxton (1847-1907); first cousin of William McKinley Osborne; fourth cousin once removed of Henry Prather Fletcher (1873-1959).
  Political family: McKinley-Osborne-Fletcher-Allison family of Ohio.
  Cross-reference: Albert Halstead — Loran L. Lewis — George B. Cortelyou — John Goodnow
  McKinley County, N.M. is named for him.
  Mount McKinley (the highest peak in North America, now known by its traditional name, Denali), in Denali Borough, Alaska, was named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: William McKinley ThomasWilliam McKinley ThomasWilliam M. BellWilliam M. Branch
  Coins and currency: His portrait appeared on the U.S. $500 bill in 1928-46.
  Campaign slogan (1896): "The Full Dinner Pail."
  Campaign slogan (1896): "The Advance Agent of Prosperity."
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about William McKinley: Lewis L. Gould, The Presidency of William McKinley — Kevin Phillips, William McKinley — H. Wayne Morgan, William McKinley and His America
  Image source: American Monthly Review of Reviews, October 1901
  Christopher Gustavus Memminger (1803-1888) — also known as Christopher G. Memminger — of Charleston, Charleston District (now Charleston County), S.C. Born in Wurttemberg, Germany, January 9, 1803. Lawyer; member of South Carolina state house of representatives, 1836-52, 1854-60; delegate to South Carolina secession convention from St. Philips' & St. Michael's, 1860-62; chairman of the committee that drew up the Constitution of the Confederate States of America; Delegate from South Carolina to the Confederate Provisional Congress, 1861-62; Confederate Secretary of the Treasury, 1861-64; pardoned by President Andrew Johnson, 1867; member of South Carolina state legislature, 1876-79. Episcopalian. Died in Flat Rock, Henderson County, N.C., March 7, 1888 (age 85 years, 58 days). Interment at St. John in the Wilderness Cemetery, Flat Rock, N.C.
  Relatives: Adoptive son of Thomas Bennett; married, October 25, 1832, to Mary Wilkinson (1813-1875); grandfather of Lucien Memminger; great-grandfather of Robert B. Memminger (1904-1981).
  Political family: Memminger family of Charleston, South Carolina.
  Coins and currency: His portrait appeared on Confederate States $5 notes in 1861-64 and $10 notes in 1861.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
James Monroe James Monroe (1758-1831) — of Spotsylvania County, Va. Born in Westmoreland County, Va., April 28, 1758. Colonel in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; lawyer; member of Virginia state house of delegates, 1782, 1786, 1810-11; Delegate to Continental Congress from Virginia, 1783-86; delegate to Virginia convention to ratify U.S. constitution from Spotsylvania County, 1788; U.S. Senator from Virginia, 1790-94; U.S. Minister to France, 1794-96; Great Britain, 1803-07; Governor of Virginia, 1799-1802, 1811; U.S. Secretary of State, 1811-17; U.S. Secretary of War, 1814-15; President of the United States, 1817-25; delegate to Virginia state constitutional convention, 1829. Episcopalian. English ancestry. Member, Freemasons. Elected to the Hall of Fame for Great Americans in 1930. Died, probably of tuberculosis, in New York, New York County, N.Y., July 4, 1831 (age 73 years, 67 days). Originally entombed at New York Marble Cemetery, Manhattan, N.Y.; subsequently entombed at New York City Marble Cemetery, Manhattan, N.Y.; reinterment in 1858 at Hollywood Cemetery, Richmond, Va.
  Relatives: Son of Andrew Spence Monroe (1727-1774) and Elizabeth (Jones) Monroe (1727-1758); married, February 16, 1786, to Eliza Kortright (1768-1830); nephew of Joseph Jones; uncle of James Monroe; second great-granduncle of Theodore Douglas Robinson (1883-1934) and Corinne Robinson Alsop; distant cousin *** of Thomas Bell Monroe.
  Political families: Roosevelt family of New York City, New York; Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York; Monroe family of Virginia and Washington (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Monroe counties in Ala., Ark., Fla., Ga., Ill., Ind., Iowa, Ky., Mich., Miss., Mo., N.Y., Ohio, Pa., Tenn., W.Va. and Wis. are named for him.
  The city of Monrovia, Liberia, is named for him.  — Mount Monroe, in the White Mountains, Coos County, New Hampshire, is named for him.  — Fort Monroe (military installation 1819-2011), at Old Point Comfort, Hampton, Virginia, is named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: James MonroeJames MonroeJames M. PendletonJames M. JacksonJames Monroe LettsJames M. RitchieJames M. RosseJames M. ComlyJames Monroe BufordJames M. SeibertJames M. LownJames M. MillerJames Monroe JonesJames Monroe HaleJames Monroe SpearsJ. M. AlfordJames M. Lown, Jr.James M. Miley
  Coins and currency: His portrait appeared on the U.S. $100 silver certificate in the 1880s and 1890s.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier
  Books about James Monroe: Harry Ammon, James Monroe: The Quest for National Identity
  Image source: Portrait & Biographical Album of Washtenaw County (1891)
  Robert Morris (1734-1806) — of Pennsylvania. Born in Liverpool, England, January 31, 1734. Delegate to Continental Congress from Pennsylvania, 1776; signer, Declaration of Independence, 1776; member of Pennsylvania state house of representatives, 1785; member, U.S. Constitutional Convention, 1787; U.S. Senator from Pennsylvania, 1789-95. Episcopalian. English ancestry. Financier of the American Revolution, but went broke in the process. Imprisoned for debt from February 1798 to August 1801. Died in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., May 8, 1806 (age 72 years, 97 days). Entombed at Christ Church Burial Ground, Philadelphia, Pa.; statue at Independence National Historical Park, Philadelphia, Pa.
  Relatives: Son of Robert Morris (1711-1750) and Elizabeth (Murphet) Morris (1712-1778); married, March 2, 1769, to Mary White (1749-1827); father of Thomas Morris and Henrietta 'Hetty' Morris (1774-1816; who married James Markham Marshall (1764-1848)); great-grandfather of John Augustine Marshall.
  Political families: Lee-Randolph family of Maryland and Virginia; Marshall-Harrison-Randolph-Cabell family of Virginia; Biddle-Randolph family of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Morris Hall (dormitory, built 1926), at Harvard University Business School, Boston, Massachusetts, is named for him.
  Coins and currency: His portrait appeared on the U.S. $10 silver certificate in the 1870s and 1880s.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about Robert Morris: Charles Rappleye, Robert Morris: Financier of the American Revolution
  George Wythe Randolph (1818-1867) — also known as George W. Randolph — of Virginia. Born near Charlottesville, Albemarle County, Va., March 10, 1818. Lawyer; delegate to Virginia secession convention, 1861; general in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; Confederate Secretary of War, 1862; after the collapse of the Confederacy, fled to Europe to avoid capture; pardoned in 1866. Episcopalian. Died of pulmonary pneumonia, near Charlottesville, Albemarle County, Va., April 3, 1867 (age 49 years, 24 days). Interment at Monticello Graveyard, Near Charlottesville, Albemarle County, Va.
  Relatives: Son of Thomas Mann Randolph, Jr. and Martha (Jefferson) Randolph; brother of Benjamin Franklin Randolph, Meriwether Lewis Randolph and Virginia Jefferson Randolph (who married Nicholas Philip Trist); uncle of Thomas Jefferson Coolidge; grandson of Thomas Jefferson; granduncle of John Gardner Coolidge; great-grandson of Archibald Cary; second great-grandson of Richard Randolph; first cousin of Francis Wayles Eppes; first cousin once removed of Dabney Carr, John Wayles Eppes and Frederick Madison Roberts; first cousin twice removed of John Randolph of Roanoke; first cousin thrice removed of Richard Bland and Peyton Randolph (1721-1775); second cousin of Dabney Smith Carr; second cousin once removed of John Marshall, James Markham Marshall and Alexander Keith Marshall; second cousin twice removed of Theodorick Bland, Edmund Jenings Randolph and Beverley Randolph; third cousin of Thomas Marshall, John Jordan Crittenden, Thomas Turpin Crittenden, Robert Crittenden, James Keith Marshall and Carter Henry Harrison; third cousin once removed of Henry Lee, Charles Lee, Edmund Jennings Lee, Peyton Randolph (1779-1828), Henry St. George Tucker, Alexander Parker Crittenden, Thomas Leonidas Crittenden, Thomas Theodore Crittenden, John Augustine Marshall and Carter Henry Harrison II; third cousin twice removed of Thomas Theodore Crittenden, Jr., William Marshall Bullitt and Alexander Scott Bullitt; fourth cousin of Benjamin William Sheridan Cabell (1793-1862), Edmund Randolph and Nathaniel Beverly Tucker; fourth cousin once removed of Thomas Jones Hardeman, Bailey Hardeman, William Lewis Cabell, Fitzhugh Lee, George Craighead Cabell and William Henry Robertson.
  Political families: Marshall-Harrison-Randolph-Cabell family of Virginia; Breckinridge-Preston-Cabell-Henry family of Virginia; Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York; Walker-Bolling family of Huntsville, Alabama (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Coins and currency: His portrait appeared on Confederate States $100 notes in 1862-64.
Franklin D. Roosevelt Franklin Delano Roosevelt (1882-1945) — also known as Franklin D. Roosevelt; "F.D.R." — of Hyde Park, Dutchess County, N.Y. Born in Hyde Park, Dutchess County, N.Y., January 30, 1882. Democrat. Lawyer; member of New York state senate 26th District, 1911-13; resigned 1913; U.S. Assistant Secretary of the Navy, 1913-20; candidate for Vice President of the United States, 1920; delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1920, 1924, 1928; speaker, 1944; contracted polio in the early 1920s; as a result, his legs were paralyzed for the rest of his life; Governor of New York, 1929-33; President of the United States, 1933-45; died in office 1945; on February 15, 1933, in Miami, Fla., he and Chicago mayor Anton J. Cermak were shot at by Guiseppe Zangara; Cermak was hit and mortally wounded. Episcopalian. Member, Freemasons; Alpha Delta Phi; Phi Beta Kappa; Elks; Grange; Knights of Pythias. Led the nation through the Depression and World War II. Died of a cerebral hemorrhage, in Warm Springs, Meriwether County, Ga., April 12, 1945 (age 63 years, 72 days). Interment at Roosevelt Home, Hyde Park, N.Y.; memorial monument at Federal Triangle, Washington, D.C.; memorial monument at West Potomac Park, Washington, D.C.
  Relatives: Son of James Roosevelt (1828-1900) and Sara (Delano) Roosevelt (1854-1941); married, March 17, 1905, to Eleanor Roosevelt (niece of Theodore Roosevelt (1858-1919); first cousin of Corinne Douglas Robinson); father of James Roosevelt (1907-1991), Elliott Roosevelt and Franklin Delano Roosevelt, Jr.; half-uncle of Helen Roosevelt Robinson; second great-grandson of Edward Hutchinson Robbins; first cousin of Warren Delano Robbins (1885-1935) and Katharine Price Collier St. George; first cousin once removed of Helen Lloyd Aspinwall (1863-1929; who married Francis Emanuel Shober); first cousin four times removed of Ebenezer Huntington; first cousin six times removed of Benjamin Huntington; second cousin of Caroline Astor Drayton (who married William Phillips); second cousin thrice removed of Nicholas Roosevelt, Jr. and Jabez Williams Huntington; second cousin five times removed of Samuel Huntington, George Washington, Joshua Coit, Henry Huntington, Gurdon Huntington and Samuel Gager; third cousin twice removed of Philip DePeyster and James I. Roosevelt; third cousin thrice removed of Sulifand Sutherland Ross; fourth cousin once removed of Ulysses Simpson Grant, Robert Barnwell Roosevelt, Roger Wolcott and Theodore Roosevelt (1858-1919).
  Political families: Roosevelt family of New York City, New York; Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Cross-reference: Ross T. McIntire — Milton Lipson — W. W. Howes — Bruce Barton — Hamilton Fish, Jr. — Joseph W. Martin, Jr. — Samuel I. Rosenman — Rexford G. Tugwell — Raymond Moley — Adolf A. Berle — George E. Allen — Lorence E. Asman — Grenville T. Emmet — Eliot Janeway — Jonathan Daniels — Ralph Bellamy
  The Franklin Delano Roosevelt Bridge (opened 1962), over Lubec Narrows, between Lubec, Maine and Campobello Island, New Brunswick, Canada, is named for him.  — The borough of Roosevelt, New Jersey (originally Jersey Homesteads; renamed 1945), is named for him.
  Politician named for him: Frank Garrison
  Coins and currency: His portrait appears on the U.S. dime (ten cent coin).
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about Franklin D. Roosevelt: James MacGregor Burns & Susan Dunn, The Three Roosevelts: Patrician Leaders Who Transformed America — Doris Kearns Goodwin, No Ordinary Time : Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt: The Home Front in World War II — Joseph Alsop & Roland Gelatt, FDR : 1882-1945 — Bernard Bellush, Franklin Roosevelt as Governor of New York — Robert H. Jackson, That Man : An Insider's Portrait of Franklin D. Roosevelt — Jonas Klein, Beloved Island : Franklin & Eleanor and the Legacy of Campobello — Conrad Black, Franklin Delano Roosevelt : Champion of Freedom — Charles Peters, Five Days in Philadelphia: The Amazing "We Want Willkie!" Convention of 1940 and How It Freed FDR to Save the Western World — Steven Neal, Happy Days Are Here Again : The 1932 Democratic Convention, the Emergence of FDR--and How America Was Changed Forever — H. W. Brands, Traitor to His Class: The Privileged Life and Radical Presidency of Franklin Delano Roosevelt — Hazel Rowley, Franklin and Eleanor: An Extraordinary Marriage — Alan Brinkley, Franklin Delano Roosevelt — Stanley Weintraub, Young Mr. Roosevelt: FDR's Introduction to War, Politics, and Life — Karen Bornemann Spies, Franklin D. Roosevelt (for young readers)
  Critical books about Franklin D. Roosevelt: Jim Powell, FDR's Folly: How Roosevelt and His New Deal Prolonged the Great Depression — John T. Flynn, The Roosevelt Myth — Burton W. Folsom, New Deal or Raw Deal?: How FDR's Economic Legacy Has Damaged America
  Fiction about Franklin D. Roosevelt: Philip Roth, The Plot Against America: A Novel
  Image source: New York Red Book 1936
William H. Seward William Henry Seward (1801-1872) — also known as William H. Seward — of Auburn, Cayuga County, N.Y. Born in Florida, Orange County, N.Y., May 16, 1801. Lawyer; co-founded (with Thurlow Weed), the Albany Evening Journal newspaper in 1830; member of New York state senate 7th District, 1831-34; Governor of New York, 1839-43; defeated (Whig), 1834; U.S. Senator from New York, 1849-61; candidate for Republican nomination for President, 1856, 1860; U.S. Secretary of State, 1861-69; as Secretary of State in 1867, he made a treaty with Russia for the purchase of Alaska; critics dubbed the territory "Seward's Folly". Survived an assassination attempt on April 14, 1865 (the same night Abraham Lincoln was shot), when Lewis Payne, an associate of John Wilkes Booth, broke into his bedroom and stabbed him repeatedly. Payne was arrested, tried with the other conspirators, and hanged. Died in Auburn, Cayuga County, N.Y., October 16, 1872 (age 71 years, 153 days). Interment at Fort Hill Cemetery, Auburn, N.Y.; statue at Madison Square Park, Manhattan, N.Y.; statue at Volunteer Park, Seattle, Wash.
  Relatives: Son of Samuel Swayze Seward and Mary (Jennings) Seward (1769-1845); married to Frances Adeline Miller (1805-1865); father of Frederick William Seward and William Henry Seward, Jr.; uncle of Caroline Cornelia Canfield (1834-1922; who married John Lawrence Schoolcraft) and George Frederick Seward (1840-1910); granduncle of Frederick Whittlesey Seward, Jr..
  Political family: Seward family of New York (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Cross-reference: George W. Jones — Samuel J. Barrows — Frederick W. Seward — Elias P. Pellet
  Seward counties in Kan. and Neb. are named for him.
  Seward Mountain, in the Adirondack Mountains, Franklin County, New York, is named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: W. Seward WhittleseyW. H. Seward ThomsonWilliam S. Shanahan
  Coins and currency: His portrait appeared on the $50 U.S. Treasury note in the 1890s.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about William H. Seward: Doris Kearns Goodwin, Team of Rivals : The Political Genius of Abraham Lincoln — Walter Stahr, Seward: Lincoln's Indispensable Man — Walter Stahr, Seward: Lincoln's Indispensable Man — Michael Burgan, William Henry Seward : Senator and Statesman (for young readers)
  Image source: New York Public Library
  Edwin McMasters Stanton (1814-1869) — also known as Edwin M. Stanton; "The Great Energy" — Born in Steubenville, Jefferson County, Ohio, December 19, 1814. U.S. Attorney General, 1860-61; U.S. Secretary of War, 1862-68. Quaker. Died in Washington, D.C., December 24, 1869 (age 55 years, 5 days). Interment at Oak Hill Cemetery, Washington, D.C.
  Relatives: Grandfather of Cora Van Voorhis Stanton (who married Ernest Lee Jahncke (1877-1960)).
  Political family: Jahncke-Stanton family of New Orleans, Louisiana.
  Cross-reference: Daniel E. Sickles
  Coins and currency: His portrait appeared on the $1 U.S. Treasury note in the 1880s and 1890s.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about Edwin M. Stanton: Amy Allison, Edwin Stanton, Union War Secretary — Doris Kearns Goodwin, Team of Rivals : The Political Genius of Abraham Lincoln
Alexander H. Stephens Alexander Hamilton Stephens (1812-1883) — also known as Alexander H. Stephens — of Crawfordville, Taliaferro County, Ga. Born near Crawfordville, Taliaferro County, Ga., February 11, 1812. Democrat. Member of Georgia state house of representatives, 1836; member of Georgia state senate, 1842; U.S. Representative from Georgia, 1843-59, 1873-82 (at-large 1843-45, 7th District 1845-53, 8th District 1853-59, 1873-82); Presidential Elector for Georgia, 1860; delegate to Georgia secession convention, 1861; Delegate from Georgia to the Confederate Provisional Congress, 1861-62; Vice President of the Confederacy, 1861-65; Governor of Georgia, 1882-83; died in office 1883. Died in Atlanta, Fulton County, Ga., March 4, 1883 (age 71 years, 21 days). Originally entombed at Oakland Cemetery, Atlanta, Ga.; later interred at Liberty Hall Cemetery, Crawfordville, Ga.
  Presumably named for: Alexander Hamilton
  Relatives: Half-brother of Linton Stephens (1823-1872); great-granduncle of Robert Grier Stephens, Jr..
  Political family: Stephens family of Crawfordville and Atlanta, Georgia.
  The World War II Liberty ship SS Alexander H. Stephens (built 1942, scrapped 1973) was named for him.
  Politician named for him: Alexander S. Clay
  Coins and currency: His portrait appeared on Confederate States $20 notes in 1861-64.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — NNDB dossier
  Books about Alexander H. Stephens: Thomas E. Schott, Alexander H. Stephens of Georgia : A Biography — William C. Davis, The Union That Shaped the Confederacy: Robert Toombs and Alexander H. Stephens
  Image source: James G. Blaine, Twenty Years of Congress, vol. 2 (1886)
  John Elliott Ward (1814-1902) — also known as John E. Ward — of Savannah, Chatham County, Ga. Born in 1814. Mayor of Savannah, Ga., 1853-54; Speaker of the Georgia State House of Representatives, 1853-54; U.S. Minister to China, 1858-60. Died in 1902 (age about 88 years). Interment at Midway Church Cemetery, Midway, Ga.
  Coins and currency: His portrait appeared on Confederate States $10 notes in 1861.
  See also U.S. State Dept career summary
George Washington George Washington (1732-1799) — also known as "Father of His Country"; "The American Fabius" — of Virginia. Born in Westmoreland County, Va., February 22, 1732. Delegate to Continental Congress from Virginia, 1774-75; general in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; member, U.S. Constitutional Convention, 1787; President of the United States, 1789-97. Episcopalian. English ancestry. Member, Freemasons; Society of the Cincinnati; American Academy of Arts and Sciences. As the leader of the Revolution, he could have been King; instead, he served as the first President and voluntarily stepped down after two terms. Elected to the Hall of Fame for Great Americans in 1900. Died, probably from acute bacterial epiglottitis, at Mt. Vernon, Fairfax County, Va., December 14, 1799 (age 67 years, 295 days). Entombed at Mt. Vernon, Mt. Vernon, Va.; memorial monument at National Mall, Washington, D.C.; statue erected 1860 at Washington Circle, Washington, D.C.; statue erected 1869 at Boston Public Garden, Boston, Mass.
  Relatives: Son of Augustine Washington (1694-1743) and Mary (Ball) Washington (c.1709-1789); married, January 6, 1759, to Martha (Dandridge) Custis (1731-1802; aunt of Burwell Bassett); uncle of Bushrod Washington; granduncle by marriage of Charles Magill Conrad; granduncle of John Thornton Augustine Washington and George Corbin Washington; first cousin six times removed of Archer Woodford; second cousin once removed of Meriwether Lewis (1774-1809); second cousin twice removed of Sulifand Sutherland Ross; second cousin five times removed of Thomas Henry Ball, Jr., William de Bruyn Kops, Horace Lee Washington, Edwin McPherson Holden, Claude C. Ball, Arthur Wesley Holden and Franklin Delano Roosevelt; third cousin thrice removed of Samuel Bullitt Churchill and Thomas Leonidas Crittenden.
  Political families: Pendleton-Lee family; Demarest-Meriwether family of New Jersey; Marshall-Harrison-Randolph-Cabell family of Virginia; Meriwether-Kellogg-Tyler family of Virginia and Connecticut; Washington family; Clay family of Kentucky (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Cross-reference: Henry Lee — Joshua Fry — Alexander Dimitry — Tobias Lear — David Mathews — Rufus Putnam
  Washington counties in Ala., Ark., Colo., Fla., Ga., Idaho, Ill., Ind., Iowa, Kan., Ky., La., Maine, Md., Minn., Miss., Mo., Neb., N.Y., N.C., Ohio, Okla., Ore., Pa., R.I., Tenn., Tex., Utah, Vt., Va. and Wis. are named for him.
  The city of Washington, D.C., is named for him.  — The state of Washington is named for him.  — Mount Washington (highest peak in the Northeast), in the White Mountains, Coos County, New Hampshire, is named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: George Washington Lent MarrGeorge Washington HeardGeorge Washington BarnettGeorge Washington DavisGeorge W. OwenGeorge W. TolandGeorge W. LayGeorge W. PattersonGeorge W. B. TownsGeorge Washington AdamsGeorge Washington HockleyGeorge W. SmythG. W. IngersollGeorge W. HopkinsGeorge Washington MontgomeryGeorge W. KittredgeGeorge W. JonesGeorge W. HarrisonGeorge Washington EwingGeorge Washington SeabrookGeorge W. MorrisonGeorge Washington WoodwardGeorge Washington WrightGeorge Washington TriplettGeorge Washington GlasscockGeorge W. SchuylerGeorge Washington HolmanGeorge W. GreeneGeorge W. WolcottGeorge W. PaschalGeorge Washington DunlapGeorge Washington WarrenGeorge Washington HillGeorge Washington LoganGeorge W. GetchellGeorge Washington WrightGeorge W. JulianGeorge Washington DyalGeorge W. LaddGeorge W. PeckGeorge Washington NesmithGeorge W. MorganGeorge Washington BrooksGeorge Washington CowlesGeorge W. GeddesGeorge Washington WhitmoreGeorge Washington BridgesGeorge W. CateGeorge W. HoukGeorge W. WebberGeorge W. BemisGeorge Washington FairbrotherGeorge Washington GlickGeorge W. JonesGeorge W. BakerGeorge W. ShellGeorge W. AndersonGeorge W. CrouseGeorge W. HulickGeorge W. AllenGeorge W. F. HarperGeorge Washington ClarkGeorge Washington McCraryGeorge W. GordonGeorge W. KingsburyGeorge W. CovingtonGeorge Washington FleegerGeorge W. SteeleGeorge W. WilsonGeorge Washington MartinGeorge W. E. DorseyGeorge W. PlunkittGeorge W. FurbushGeorge W. SuttonGeorge W. CurtinGeorge W. RayGeorge W. RooseveltGeorge W. SmithGeorge W. KippGeorge W. CampbellGeorge W. TaylorGeorge W. StoneGeorge W. BartchGeorge W. ShonkGeorge W. CookGeorge W. MurrayGeorge W. FarisGeorge W. FithianGeorge W. PrinceGeorge W. BucknerGeorge W. CromerGeorge W. DonagheyGeorge W. AldridgeGeorge Washington WagonerGeorge Washington GoethalsGeorge W. ArmstrongGeorge W. LovejoyGeorge W. OakesGeorge W. HaysGeorge W. EdmondsGeorge W. LindsayGeorge Washington JonesT. G. W. TarverGeorge W. DardenGeorge W. MeadGeorge W. GibbonsGeorge W. ListGeorge W. CalkinGeorge W. RauchGeorge W. MichellGeorge Washington JacksonGeorge W. BlanchardGeorge Washington HerzGeorge W. BristowGeorge Washington HardyGeorge W. BallardGeorge W. McKownGeorge Thomas WashingtonGeorge W. CollinsGeorge A. Washington
  Coins and currency: His portrait appears on the U.S. quarter (25 cent coin), and on the $1 bill. His portrait also appeared on various other denominations of U.S. currency, and on the Confederate States $50 note during the Civil War.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Books about George Washington: Richard Brookhiser, Founding Father: Rediscovering George Washington — James Thomas Flexner, Washington: The Indispensable Man — Willard Sterne Randall, George Washington : A Life — Richard Norton Smith, Patriarch : George Washington and the New American Nation — Henry Wiencek, An Imperfect God : George Washington, His Slaves, and the Creation of America — James MacGregor Burns, George Washington — Joseph J. Ellis, His Excellency, George Washington — Gore Vidal, Inventing A Nation: Washington, Adams, Jefferson — David Barton, The Bulletproof George Washington: An Account of God's Providential Care — Wendie C. Old, George Washington (for young readers)
  Image source: Portrait & Biographical Album of Washtenaw County (1891)
Daniel Webster Daniel Webster (1782-1852) — also known as "Black Dan"; "Defender of the Constitution"; "Great Expounder of the Constitution" — of Boston, Suffolk County, Mass.; Marshfield, Plymouth County, Mass. Born in Salisbury (part now in Franklin), Merrimack County, N.H., January 18, 1782. Whig. Lawyer; U.S. Representative from New Hampshire at-large, 1813-17; delegate to New Hampshire state constitutional convention, 1820; Presidential Elector for New Hampshire, 1820; U.S. Representative from Massachusetts 1st District, 1823-27; resigned 1827; U.S. Senator from Massachusetts, 1827-41, 1845-50; candidate for President of the United States, 1836; U.S. Secretary of State, 1841-43, 1850-52; died in office 1852. Presbyterian. English ancestry. Elected to the Hall of Fame for Great Americans in 1900. Died in Marshfield, Plymouth County, Mass., October 24, 1852 (age 70 years, 280 days). Interment at Winslow Cemetery, Marshfield, Mass.; statue erected 1900 at Scott Circle, Washington, D.C.; statue at State House Grounds, Boston, Mass.
  Relatives: Son of Ebenezer Webster (1739-1806) and Abigail (Eastman) Webster (1759-1836); married, May 29, 1808, to Grace Fletcher (1781-1828); second cousin once removed of Hiram Augustus Huse; second cousin twice removed of Edwin George Eastman; third cousin twice removed of Alonzo Mark Leffingwell; third cousin thrice removed of John Leffingwell Randolph; fourth cousin once removed of Jedediah Sabin, Charles Rowell and Amos Tuck (1810-1879).
  Political families: Saltonstall-Weeks family of Massachusetts; Vanderbilt-Tuck-Pickering-Webster family; Eastman-Webster-Rowell family; Vanderbilt-Colby-Burden-French family of New York City, New York (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Webster counties in Ga., Iowa, Ky., La., Miss., Mo., Neb. and W.Va. are named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: Daniel Webster WilderDaniel W. MillsDaniel W. JonesDaniel Webster ComstockDaniel Webster WaughDaniel Webster HeagyDaniel W. WhitmoreDaniel W. HamiltonDaniel W. AllamanWebster TurnerDan W. TurnerDaniel W. HoanDaniel W. Ambrose, Jr.
  Coins and currency: His portrait appeared on the $10 U.S. note from the 1860s until the early 20th century.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Books about Daniel Webster: Robert Vincent Remini, Daniel Webster : The Man and His Time — Maurice G. Baxter, One and Inseparable : Daniel Webster and the Union — Robert A. Allen, Daniel Webster, Defender of the Union — Richard N. Current, Daniel Webster and the Rise of National Conservatism — Merrill D. Peterson, The Great Triumvirate: Webster, Clay, and Calhoun
  Image source: Life and Work of James G. Blaine (1893)
Woodrow Wilson Woodrow Wilson (1856-1924) — also known as Thomas Woodrow Wilson; "Schoolmaster in Politics" — of New Jersey. Born in Staunton, Va., December 28, 1856. Democrat. University professor; president of Princeton University, 1902-10; Governor of New Jersey, 1911-13; President of the United States, 1913-21. Presbyterian. Member, Phi Kappa Psi; Phi Alpha Delta. Recipient of Nobel Peace Prize in 1919; elected to the Hall of Fame for Great Americans in 1950. Died in Washington, D.C., February 3, 1924 (age 67 years, 37 days). Interment at Washington National Cathedral, Washington, D.C.
  Relatives: Son of Rev. Joseph Ruggles Wilson (1822-1903) and Janet 'Jessie' (Woodrow) Wilson (1826-1888); married, June 24, 1885, to Ellen Louise Axson (1860-1914); married, December 18, 1915, to Edith (Bolling) Galt (1872-1961); father of Eleanor Randolph Wilson (1889-1967; who married William Gibbs McAdoo (1863-1941)).
  Political family: Wilson-Floyd-McAdoo family.
  Cross-reference: William C. Bullitt — Bainbridge Colby — Joseph E. Davies — Joseph P. Tumulty — Thomas H. Birch — Byron R. Newton
  Mount Woodrow Wilson, in Fremont County and Sublette County, Wyoming, is named for him.  — The Woodrow Wilson Plaza, in the Federal Triangle, Washington, D.C., is named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: Woodrow W. BeanWoodrow W. JonesWoodrow W. ScottTom Woodrow PayneW. W. DumasWoodrow Wilson MannWoodrow W. BairdWoodrow W. MathnaWoodrow W. HulmeWoodrow W. KlineWoodrow W. McDonaldWoodrow W. HollanWoodrow W. CarterWoodrow W. FergusonW. Wilson GoodeWoodrow Wilson StoreyWoodrow W. Bean III
  Coins and currency: His portrait appeared on the U.S. $100,000 gold certificate, which was issued in 1934-45 for cash transactions between banks.
  Campaign slogan (1916): "He kept us out of war."
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about Woodrow Wilson: Louis Auchincloss, Woodrow Wilson — Herbert Hoover, The Ordeal of Woodrow Wilson — James Chace, 1912 : Wilson, Roosevelt, Taft and Debs : The Election that Changed the Country — John Milton Cooper, Reconsidering Woodrow Wilson: Progressivism, Internationalism, War, and Peace — A. Scott Berg, Wilson — Anne Schraff, Woodrow Wilson (for young readers)
  Critical books about Woodrow Wilson: Jim Powell, Wilson's War : How Woodrow Wilson's Great Blunder Led to Hitler, Lenin, Stalin, and World War II
  Image source: American Monthly Review of Reviews, July 1902
  William Windom (1827-1891) — of Winona, Winona County, Minn. Born in Belmont County, Ohio, May 10, 1827. Republican. U.S. Representative from Minnesota, 1859-69 (at-large 1859-63, 1st District 1863-69); member of Republican National Committee from Minnesota, 1866-68; U.S. Senator from Minnesota, 1870-71, 1871-81, 1881-83; candidate for Republican nomination for President, 1880; U.S. Secretary of the Treasury, 1881, 1889-91; died in office 1891. Quaker. Fell dead, from heart disease, at the annual banquet of the New York Board of Trade and Transportation, just after finishing a speech, in New York, New York County, N.Y., January 29, 1891 (age 63 years, 264 days). Interment at Rock Creek Cemetery, Washington, D.C.
  The city of Windom, Minnesota, is named for him.
  Coins and currency: His portrait appeared on the U.S. $2 silver certificate in the 1890s.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
Silas Wright, Jr. Silas Wright, Jr. (1795-1847) — of Canton, St. Lawrence County, N.Y. Born in Amherst, Hampshire County, Mass., May 24, 1795. Democrat. Lawyer; St. Lawrence County Surrogate, 1821-24; member of New York state senate 4th District, 1824-27; U.S. Representative from New York 20th District, 1827-29, 1829-30; New York state comptroller, 1829-34; U.S. Senator from New York, 1833-44; resigned 1844; candidate for Democratic nomination for Vice President, 1844; Governor of New York, 1845-47; defeated, 1846. Died in Canton, St. Lawrence County, N.Y., August 27, 1847 (age 52 years, 95 days). Interment at Silas Wright Cemetery, Canton, N.Y.; memorial monument at Weybridge Town Center, Weybridge, Vt.
  Relatives: Son of Silas Wright (1760-1843) and Eleanor (Goodale) Wright (1762-1846); second cousin thrice removed of Henry Merrill Wolcott; second cousin four times removed of Charles Ellsworth Goodell; third cousin once removed of Elijah Hunt Mills; fourth cousin of Morris Woodruff, Martin Keeler, Marshall Chapin and William Dean Kellogg; fourth cousin once removed of Theodore Dwight, Orsamus Cook Merrill, Timothy Merrill (1781-1836), Greene Carrier Bronson, Charles Phelps Huntington, George Catlin Woodruff, Stephen Hiram Keeler, Lewis Bartholomew Woodruff, Edmund Gillett Chapin, William Chapman Williston, Zenas Ferry Moody, Charles Edward Phelps, Arthur Chapin and John Wingate Weeks.
  Political families: Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York; Woodruff-Hornblower-Seymour-Wadsworth family of Connecticut; Hoar-Sherman family of Massachusetts; Murphy-Merrill family of Harbor Beach, Michigan (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Wright counties in Minn. and Mo. are named for him; Wright County, Iowa may have been named for him.
  Wright Peak, in the Ardirondack Mountains, Essex County, New York, is named for him.
  Coins and currency: His portrait appeared on the U.S. $50 gold certificate from the 1880s until 1913.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Image source: New York Red Book 1896
"Enjoy the hospitable entertainment of a political graveyard."
Henry L. Clinton, Apollo Hall, New York City, February 3, 1872
The Political Graveyard

The Political Graveyard is a web site about U.S. political history and cemeteries. Founded in 1996, it is the Internet's most comprehensive free source for American political biography, listing 312,576 politicians, living and dead.
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