PoliticalGraveyard.com
The Political Graveyard: A Database of American History
Dueling Politicians

List of Politicians Who Participated in Duelling
Very incomplete!

See also the narrower category of politicians who died in duels.

in approximate chronological order

  Cuthbert Bullitt (1740-1791) — Born in Fauquier County, Va., 1740. Lawyer; planter; shot and killed John Baylis in a duel on September 24, 1765; later tried for the killing and acquitted; delegate to Virginia state constitutional convention, 1776. Anglican; later Episcopalian. Died in Prince William County, Va., August 27, 1791 (age about 51 years). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Benjamin Bullitt (1692-1766) and Sarah Elizabeth (Harrison) Bullitt (1700-1746); married, August 27, 1761, to Helen Scott; father of Alexander Scott Bullitt (1761-1816); second great-grandfather of William Christian Bullitt (1856-1914), William Marshall Bullitt and Alexander Scott Bullitt (1877-1932); second great-granduncle of Hugh Kennedy Bullitt; third great-grandfather of William Christian Bullitt (1891-1967).
  Political families: Lee-Randolph family of Maryland and Virginia; Marshall-Harrison-Randolph-Cabell family of Virginia; Bullitt-Fry-Henry family (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Button Gwinnett (c.1732-1777) — of Georgia. Born in Down Hatherly, Gloucestershire, England, about 1732. Delegate to Continental Congress from Georgia, 1776; signer, Declaration of Independence, 1776; delegate to Georgia state constitutional convention, 1777; Governor of Georgia, 1777. Mortally wounded in a duel with Lachlan McIntosh, on May 16, 1777, and died three days later, near Savannah, Chatham County, Ga., May 19, 1777 (age about 45 years). Interment at Colonial Park Cemetery, Savannah, Ga.
  Gwinnett County, Ga. is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  Lachlan McIntosh (1725-1806) — of Georgia. Born in Scotland, March 17, 1725. Delegate to Continental Congress from Georgia, 1784. Killed Button Gwinnett in a duel in 1777. Died in Savannah, Chatham County, Ga., February 20, 1806 (age 80 years, 340 days). Interment at Colonial Park Cemetery, Savannah, Ga.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — NNDB dossier
  James Jackson (1757-1806) — of Georgia. Born in Devon, England, September 21, 1757. Delegate to Georgia state constitutional convention, 1777; U.S. Representative from Georgia at-large, 1789-91; U.S. Senator from Georgia, 1793-95, 1801-06; died in office 1806; Governor of Georgia, 1798-1801. Killed George Wells in a duel in 1780; injured in both knees. Died in Washington, D.C., March 19, 1806 (age 48 years, 179 days). Original interment at Rock Creek Cemetery, Washington, D.C.; reinterment in 1832 at Congressional Cemetery, Washington, D.C.
  Relatives: Father of Jabez Young Jackson (1790-?); grandfather of James Jackson.
  Political family: Jackson family of Georgia.
  Jackson County, Ga. is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  George Wells (1744-1780) — of Georgia. Born in Queen Anne's County, Md., March 3, 1744. Physician; served in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; Governor of Georgia, 1780; died in office 1780. Mortally wounded in a duel with James Jackson, and died soon after, in Augusta, Richmond County, Ga., February 15, 1780 (age 35 years, 349 days). Burial location unknown.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Waightstill Avery (1741-1821) — of Burke County, N.C. Born in Groton, New London County, Conn., May 10, 1741. Lawyer; colonel in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; member of North Carolina house of commons, 1776, 1782-83, 1793; North Carolina state attorney general, 1777-79; member of North Carolina state senate, 1796. Fought a pistol duel with Andrew Jackson in 1788; neither man was injured. Died in the judge's chambers at the Burke County Courthouse, Morganton, Burke County, N.C., March 13, 1821 (age 79 years, 307 days). Interment at Swan Ponds Plantation Cemetery, Morganton, N.C.
  Relatives: Son of Jerusha (Morgan) Avery (1704-1763) and Humphrey Avery; married, October 3, 1778, to Leah Probart Franks (1775-1832); father of Elizabeth Avery (who married William Ballard Lenoir); grandfather of Isaac Thomas Lenoir and William Waigstill Avery; granduncle of Lorenzo Burrows; first cousin four times removed of Horace Billings Packer; second cousin once removed of Noyes Barber; second cousin twice removed of Daniel Packer, Asa Packer, Edwin Barber Morgan, Christopher Morgan, Edwin Denison Morgan and Alfred Avery Burnham; second cousin thrice removed of Judson B. Phelps, Morgan Gardner Bulkeley, William Henry Bulkeley, Robert Asa Packer and William Frederick Morgan Rowland; second cousin four times removed of Henry Brewster Stanton, Jonathan R. Herrick, Erskine Mason Phelps and Spencer Gale Frink; second cousin five times removed of D-Cady Herrick, Herman Arod Gager, Walter Richmond Herrick and Burdette Burt Bliss; third cousin twice removed of Nathan Belcher, Samuel Townsend Douglass (1814-1898) and Joshua Perkins; third cousin thrice removed of Charles Phelps Huntington, George Mortimer Beakes, George Douglas Perkins, Chauncey C. Pendleton, Daniel Parrish Witter and Albert Lemando Bingham.
  Political families: Pendleton family of Connecticut; Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York; Porter-Kelsey family of Connecticut (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Avery County, N.C. is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
Andrew Jackson Andrew Jackson (1767-1845) — also known as "Old Hickory"; "The Farmer of Tennessee"; "King Andrew the First" — of Nashville, Davidson County, Tenn. Born, in a log cabin, in The Waxhaws, Lancaster County, S.C., March 15, 1767. Democrat. Lawyer; U.S. Attorney for Tennessee, 1790-97; U.S. Representative from Tennessee at-large, 1796-97; U.S. Senator from Tennessee, 1797-98, 1823-25; justice of Tennessee state supreme court, 1798; general in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812; Governor of Florida Territory, 1821; President of the United States, 1829-37; censured by the U.S. Senate in 1834 over his removal of federal deposits from the Bank of the United States; on January 30, 1835, while attending funeral services at the Capitol Building for Rep. Warren R. Davis of South Carolina, he was shot at with two guns -- which both misfired -- by Richard Lawrence, a house painter (later found not guilty by reason of insanity). Presbyterian. Scotch-Irish ancestry. Member, Freemasons. Killed Charles Dickinson in a pistol duel, May 30, 1806; also dueled with Thomas Hart Benton and Waightstill Avery. Elected in 1910 to the Hall of Fame for Great Americans. Died, of dropsy (congestive heart failure), in Nashville, Davidson County, Tenn., June 8, 1845 (age 78 years, 85 days). Interment at The Hermitage, Nashville, Tenn.; statue erected 1853 at Lafayette Park, Washington, D.C.; statue erected 1856 at Jackson Square, New Orleans, La.
  Relatives: Son of Andrew Jackson (1730-1767) and Elizabeth (Hutchinson) Jackson (1737-1781); married, January 17, 1794, to Rachel (Donelson) Robards (1767-1828; aunt of Andrew Jackson Donelson (1799-1871)).
  Political families: Marshall-Harrison-Randolph-Cabell family of Virginia; Caffery family of Louisiana (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Cross-reference: Francis P. Blair
  Jackson counties in Ala., Ark., Colo., Fla., Ill., Ind., Iowa, Kan., Ky., La., Mich., Miss., Mo., N.C., Ohio, Okla., Ore., Tenn., Tex., W.Va. and Wis., and Hickory County, Mo., are named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: Andrew J. DonelsonAndrew Jackson MillerAndrew J. FaulkAndrew Jackson TitusAndrew Jackson IsacksAndrew Jackson HamiltonAndrew J. HarlanAndrew J. KuykendallAndrew J. ThayerElam A. J. GreeleyAndrew Jackson IngleAndrew J. OgleAndrew Jackson CarrAndrew J. WatermanAndrew J. BentleyAndrew J. RogersWilliam A. J. SparksAndrew Jackson PoppletonAndrew J. HunterAndrew Jackson BryantAndrew J. BealeA. J. ClementsAndrew Jackson BakerAndrew J. FeltA. J. KingAndrew J. SawyerAndrew Jackson GreenfieldAndrew Jackson CaldwellAndrew Jackson GahaganAndrew Jackson BishipAndrew Jackson HoustonAndrew J. CobbAndrew J. MontagueAndrew J. BarchfeldAndrew J. BallietAndrew J. KirkAndrew J. LivingstonA. J. SherwoodAndrew Jackson StewartAndrew J. MayAndrew J. McConnicoAndrew J. SawyerAndrew J. BrewerAndrew BettwyAndrew J. TransueAndrew Jackson GravesAndrew Jackson GilbertAndrew J. GoodwinAndrew J. HinshawAndy YoungAndrew Jackson Kupper
  Coins and currency: His portrait appears on the U.S. $20 bill; from the 1860s until 1927, his portrait appeared on on U.S. notes and certificates of various denominations from $5 to $10,000. In 1861, his portrait appeared on Confederate States $1,000 notes.
  Campaign slogan: "Let the people rule."
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial — Tennessee Encyclopedia
  Books about Andrew Jackson: Robert Vincent Remini, The Life of Andrew Jackson — Robert Vincent Remini, Andrew Jackson : The Course of American Freedom, 1822-1832 — Robert Vincent Remini, Andrew Jackson : The Course of American Democracy, 1833-1845 — Robert Vincent Remini, Andrew Jackson : The Course of American Empire, 1767-1821 — Andrew Burstein, The Passions of Andrew Jackson — David S. Heidler & Jeanne T. Heidler, Old Hickory's War: Andrew Jackson and the Quest for Empire — Donald B. Cole, The Presidency of Andrew Jackson — H. W. Brands, Andrew Jackson : His Life and Times — Jon Meacham, American Lion: Andrew Jackson in the White House — Donald Barr Chidsey, Andrew Jackson, Hero
  Image source: Portrait & Biographical Album of Washtenaw County (1891)
  Joseph Hamilton Daviess (1774-1811) — also known as Joe Daviess — of Danville, Boyle County, Ky.; Lexington, Fayette County, Ky. Born in Bedford County, Va., March 4, 1774. Lawyer; U.S. Attorney for Kentucky, 1800-06; major in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812. Welsh ancestry. Member, Freemasons. Around 1801, he served as a second to John Rowan in his duel with James Chambers; after Chambers was killed, he fled to avoid prosecution as accomplice to murder, and became a fugitive, but when Rowan was arrested, he returned to act as Rowan's legal counsel. Shot and killed in the Battle of Tippecanoe, in what is now Tippecanoe County, Ind., November 7, 1811 (age 37 years, 248 days). Interment at Tippecanoe Battlefield Park, Battle Ground, Ind.
  Relatives: Brother-in-law of John Marshall (1755-1835).
  Political families: Lee-Randolph family of Maryland and Virginia; Marshall-Harrison-Randolph-Cabell family of Virginia; Biddle-Randolph family of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Anderson-Marshall family of Ohio and West Virginia; Pendleton-Lee family (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Daviess counties in Ind., Ky. and Mo., and Jo Daviess County, Ill., are named for him.
  John Rowan (1773-1843) — of Louisville, Jefferson County, Ky. Born near York, York County, Pa., July 12, 1773. Democrat. Lawyer; delegate to Kentucky state constitutional convention, 1799; secretary of state of Kentucky, 1804-08; U.S. Representative from Kentucky 3rd District, 1807-09; member of Kentucky state house of representatives, 1813-17, 1822-24; Judge, Kentucky Court of Appeals, 1819-21; U.S. Senator from Kentucky, 1825-31. Built the mansion "Federal Hill", later made famous by his cousin, the songwriter Stephen Foster, in the song "My Old Kentucky Home." Fought a duel about 1801 with an acquaintance, James Chambers, in which the latter was killed; arrested and tried on murder charges, but acquitted. Died in Louisville, Jefferson County, Ky., July 13, 1843 (age 70 years, 1 days). Interment at Bardstown Cemetery, Bardstown, Ky.
  Relatives: Married to Agnes Anne Lytle; father of John Rowan, Jr. (1807-1855); uncle of Robert Todd Lytle.
  Political family: Rowan-Lytle family of Kentucky.
  Cross-reference: Joseph Hamilton Daviess
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Richard Dobbs Spaight (1758-1802) — of Craven County, N.C. Born in New Bern, Craven County, N.C., March 25, 1758. Democrat. Member of North Carolina state legislature, 1781; Delegate to Continental Congress from North Carolina, 1783-85; member, U.S. Constitutional Convention, 1787; Governor of North Carolina, 1792-95; U.S. Representative from North Carolina, 1798-1801 (10th District 1798-99, at-large 1799-1801); member of North Carolina state senate, 1801. Episcopalian. Mortally wounded in in a duel with John Stanly, his opponent and successor in Congress, and died in New Bern, Craven County, N.C., September 6, 1802 (age 44 years, 165 days). Interment a private or family graveyard, Craven County, N.C.
  Relatives: Father of Richard Dobbs Spaight, Jr. (1796-1850); grandfather of Richard Spaight Donnell.
  Political family: Spaight family of New Bern, North Carolina.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Aaron Burr (1756-1836) — also known as Aaron Edwards — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in Newark, Essex County, N.J., February 6, 1756. Democrat. Colonel in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; lawyer; member of New York state assembly, 1784-85, 1797-99, 1800-01 (New York County 1784-85, 1797-99, Orange County 1800-01); New York state attorney general, 1789-91; appointed 1789; U.S. Senator from New York, 1791-97; Vice President of the United States, 1801-05. Presbyterian. Killed Alexander Hamilton in a duel, July 11, 1804. Tried for treason in 1807 and acquitted. Died, after several strokes, at the Winants or Port Richmond Hotel, Port Richmond, Staten Island, Richmond County, N.Y., September 14, 1836 (age 80 years, 221 days). Interment at Princeton Cemetery, Princeton, N.J.
  Relatives: Son of Aaron Burr (1716-1757) and Esther (Edwards) Burr (1732-1758); brother of Sarah Burr (1754-1797; who married Tapping Reeve); married, July 2, 1782, to Theodosia (Bartow) Prevost (1746-1794; first cousin twice removed of Francis Stebbins Bartow); married 1833 to Eliza (Bowen) Jumel (1775-1865); father of Theodosia Burr (1783-1813; who married Joseph Alston); nephew of Pierpont Edwards; third great-grandson of Thomas Willett; ancestor of Karla Ballard; first cousin of Theodore Dwight and Henry Waggaman Edwards; first cousin four times removed of Anson Foster Keeler (1887-1943); second cousin of John Davenport and James Davenport; second cousin once removed of Theodore Davenport; second cousin twice removed of Charles Robert Sherman; second cousin thrice removed of Charles Taylor Sherman, William Tecumseh Sherman, Lampson Parker Sherman, John Sherman and Evert Harris Kittell; second cousin four times removed of Chauncey Mitchell Depew, Ezekiel Gilbert Stoddard, Stillman Stephen Light and Blanche M. Woodward; second cousin five times removed of Alfred Walstein Bangs, John Clarence Keeler, Louis Ezekiel Stoddard, John Cecil Purcell and Arthur Callen Kittell, Jr.; third cousin of Benjamin Tallmadge; third cousin once removed of Frederick Augustus Tallmadge; third cousin twice removed of Eli Thacher Hoyt, George Smith Catlin, John Appleton, Howkin Bulkley Beardslee, Joseph Pomeroy Root and Edward Williams Hooker; third cousin thrice removed of Greene Carrier Bronson, Abijah Catlin, David Munson Osborne, George Landon Ingraham, Dwight Arthur Silliman and Charles Dunsmore Millard; fourth cousin of Noah Phelps and Hezekiah Case; fourth cousin once removed of Parmenio Adams, Elisha Phelps, Ambrose Tuttle, Jesse Hoyt, Abiel Case, Henry Fisk Janes, Jairus Case, George Washington Wolcott, William Dean Kellogg and Almon Case.
  Political families: Keeler-Floyd-Sherman-Bangs family of New York; Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Cross-reference: Jonathan Dayton — Nathaniel Pendleton — John Smith — John Tayler — Walter D. Corrigan, Sr. — Cowles Mead — Luther Martin — William P. Van Ness — Samuel Swartwout — William Wirt — Theophilus W. Smith
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about Aaron Burr: Milton Lomask, Aaron Burr: The Years from Princeton to Vice President, 1756-1805 — Milton Lomask, Aaron Burr: The Conspiracy and Years of Exile, 1805-1836 — Joseph Wheelan, Jefferson's Vendetta : The Pursuit of Aaron Burr and the Judiciary — Buckner F. Melton Jr., Aaron Burr : Conspiracy to Treason — Thomas Fleming, Duel: Alexander Hamilton, Aaron Burr, and the Future of America — Arnold A. Rogow, A Fatal Friendship: Alexander Hamilton and Aaron Burr — H. W. Brands, The Heartbreak of Aaron Burr — David O. Stewart, American Emperor: Aaron Burr's Challenge to Jefferson's America — Donald Barr Chidsey, The great conspiracy: Aaron Burr and his strange doings in the West
  Fiction about Aaron Burr: Gore Vidal, Burr
Alexander Hamilton Alexander Hamilton (1757-1804) — also known as "Alexander the Coppersmith" — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in Charles Town, Nevis, January 11, 1757. Delegate to Continental Congress from New York, 1782; member of New York state assembly from New York County, 1786-87; member, U.S. Constitutional Convention, 1787; delegate to New York convention to ratify U.S. constitution from New York County, 1788; U.S. Secretary of the Treasury, 1789-95. Episcopalian. Scottish and French ancestry. Member, Freemasons; Society of the Cincinnati. Elected to the Hall of Fame for Great Americans in 1915. Shot and mortally wounded in a duel with Aaron Burr, on July 11, 1804, and died the next day in New York, New York County, N.Y., July 12, 1804 (age 47 years, 183 days). Interment at Trinity Churchyard, Manhattan, N.Y.; statue at Treasury Building Grounds, Washington, D.C.; statue at Commonwealth Avenue Mall, Boston, Mass.
  Relatives: Son of James Hamilton and Rachel (Faucette) Hamilton; married, December 14, 1780, to Elizabeth Schuyler (1757-1854; daughter of Philip John Schuyler; sister of Philip Jeremiah Schuyler); father of Alexander Hamilton, Jr., James Alexander Hamilton (1788-1878) and William Stephen Hamilton; great-grandfather of Robert Ray Hamilton; second great-grandfather of Laurens M. Hamilton; ancestor *** of Robert Hamilton Woodruff.
  Political families: Livingston-Schuyler family of New York; VanRensselaer family of Albany, New York (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Cross-reference: Nathaniel Pendleton — Robert Troup — John Tayler — William P. Van Ness
  Hamilton counties in Fla., Ill., Ind., Kan., Neb., N.Y., Ohio and Tenn. are named for him.
  The city of Hamilton, Ohio, is named for him.  — Hamilton Hall (dormitory, built 1926), at Harvard University Business School, Boston, Massachusetts, is named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: Alexander H. BuellAlexander H. HolleyHamilton FishAlexander H. StephensAlexander H. BullockAlexander H. BaileyAlexander H. RiceAlexander Hamilton JonesAlexander H. WatermanAlexander H. CoffrothAlexander H. DudleyAlexander H. RevellAlexander Hamilton HargisAlexander Hamilton PhillipsAlex Woodle
  Coins and currency: His portrait appears on the U.S. $10 bill; from the 1860s to the 1920s, his portrait also appeared on U.S. notes and certificates of various denominations from $2 to $1,000.
  Personal motto: "Do it better yet."
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about Alexander Hamilton: Richard Brookhiser, Alexander Hamilton, American — Forrest McDonald, Alexander Hamilton: A Biography — Gertrude Atherton, Conqueror : Dramatized Biography of Alexander Hamilton — Ron Chernow, Alexander Hamilton — Thomas Fleming, Duel: Alexander Hamilton, Aaron Burr, and the Future of America — Arnold A. Rogow, A Fatal Friendship: Alexander Hamilton and Aaron Burr — Willard Sterne Randall, Alexander Hamilton: A Life — John Harper, American Machiavelli : Alexander Hamilton and the Origins of U.S. Foreign Policy — Stephen F. Knott, Alexander Hamilton and the Persistence of Myth — Charles Cerami, Young Patriots: The Remarkable Story of Two Men. Their Impossible Plan and The Revolution That Created The Constitution — Donald Barr Chidsey, Mr. Hamilton and Mr. Jefferson
  Critical books about Alexander Hamilton: Thomas DiLorenzo, Hamilton's Curse : How Jefferson's Arch Enemy Betrayed the American Revolution -- and What It means for Americans Today
  Image source: U.S. postage stamp (1957)
  William Peter Van Ness (1778-1826) — also known as William P. Van Ness — Born in Claverack, Columbia County, N.Y., February 13, 1778. Lawyer; U.S. District Judge for New York, 1812-14; U.S. District Judge for the Southern District of New York, 1814-26; died in office 1826. Dutch ancestry. Served as second to Aaron Burr, during his duel with Alexander Hamilton, 1804. Died in New York, New York County, N.Y., September 6, 1826 (age 48 years, 205 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Brother of John Peter Van Ness and Cornelius Peter Van Ness (1782-1852).
  Political family: VanNess family of New York City, New York.
  See also federal judicial profile
  William Charles Cole Claiborne (1775-1817) — also known as William C. C. Claiborne — of New Orleans, Orleans Parish, La. Born in Sussex County, Va., 1775. Lawyer; delegate to Tennessee state constitutional convention, 1796; state court judge in Tennessee, 1796; U.S. Representative from Tennessee at-large, 1797-1801; Governor of Mississippi Territory, 1801-04; Governor of Orleans Territory, 1804-12; Governor of Louisiana, 1812-16; U.S. Senator from Louisiana, 1817; died in office 1817. Episcopalian. Member, Freemasons. Fought a duel with Daniel Clark on June 8, 1807; he was wounded in the thigh. Died of a liver ailment, in New Orleans, Orleans Parish, La., November 23, 1817 (age about 42 years). Originally entombed at St. Louis Cemetery No. 1, New Orleans, La.; re-entombed in 1872 at Metairie Cemetery, New Orleans, La.
  Relatives: Son of William Charles Cole Claiborne (1748-1809) and Mary (Leigh) Claiborne (1750-1782); brother of Ferdinand Leigh Claiborne and Nathaniel Herbert Claiborne; married to Clarissa Duralde (1776-1809), Suzette Bosque and Elizabeth Lewis; uncle of John Francis Hamtramck Claiborne; second great-granduncle of Herbert Claiborne Pell, Jr. (1884-1961) and Corinne Claiborne Boggs; third great-granduncle of Claiborne de Borda Pell, Barbara Boggs Sigmund and Thomas Hale Boggs, Jr.; first cousin once removed of Thomas Claiborne (1749-1812); second cousin of John Claiborne and Thomas Claiborne (1780-1856); third cousin thrice removed of Andrew Fuller Fox.
  Political family: Claiborne-Dallas family of Virginia and Louisiana (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Claiborne counties in La., Miss. and Tenn. are named for him.
  Epitaph: "Cara patria, carior libertas; ubi est libertas, ibi mea patria." [Dear my country, dearer liberty; where liberty is, there is my country.]
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
Thomas Hart Benton Thomas Hart Benton (1782-1858) — also known as "Old Bullion" — of Franklin, Williamson County, Tenn.; St. Louis, Mo. Born near Hillsborough, Orange County, N.C., March 14, 1782. Lawyer; newspaper editor; member of Tennessee state senate, 1809; U.S. Senator from Missouri, 1821-51; U.S. Representative from Missouri 1st District, 1853-55; Benton Democrat candidate for Governor of Missouri, 1856. Fought a duel with Andrew Jackson, who later became a political ally. In April, 1850, he caused a scandal with his attempt to assault Sen. Henry Stuart Foote, of Mississippi, during debate on the Senate floor; he was restrained by other senators. Foote had a cocked pistol in his hand and undoubtedly would have shot him. Died in Washington, D.C., April 10, 1858 (age 76 years, 27 days). Interment at Bellefontaine Cemetery, St. Louis, Mo.
  Relatives: Son of Jesse Benton and Ann (Gooch) Benton; married 1821 to Elizabeth McDowell (1794-1854; sister of James McDowell); father of Jessie Benton (who married John Charles Frémont); uncle of Thomas Hart Benton, Jr. (1816-1879); granduncle of Maecenas Eason Benton.
  Political family: Benton family (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Benton counties in Ark., Ind., Iowa, Minn., Ore. and Wash. are named for him.
  Coins and currency: His portrait appeared on the U.S. $100 gold certificate in the 1880s to 1920s.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Image source: The South in the Building of the Nation (1909)
  John Ward Gurley (c.1787-1808) — of Louisiana. Born in Lebanon, New London County, Conn., about 1787. Orleans territory attorney general, 1803. Killed in a duel with Philip L. Jones, in New Orleans, Orleans Parish, La., March 3, 1808 (age about 21 years). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Brother of Henry Hosford Gurley (1788-1833).
Henry Clay Henry Clay (1777-1852) — also known as "The Sage of Ashland"; "The Great Compromiser" — of Lexington, Fayette County, Ky. Born in Hanover County, Va., April 12, 1777. Member of Kentucky state house of representatives, 1803; U.S. Senator from Kentucky, 1806-07, 1810-11, 1831-42, 1849-52; died in office 1852; U.S. Representative from Kentucky, 1811-14, 1815-21, 1823-25 (5th District 1811-13, at-large 1813-14, 2nd District 1815-21, 3rd District 1823-25); Speaker of the U.S. House, 1811-14, 1815-20, 1823-25; candidate for President of the United States, 1824, 1832 (National Republican), 1844 (Whig); U.S. Secretary of State, 1825-29; candidate for Whig nomination for President, 1839. Member, Freemasons. In 1809, he fought a duel with Humphrey Marshall, in which both men were wounded. Elected to the Hall of Fame for Great Americans in 1900. Died in Washington, D.C., June 29, 1852 (age 75 years, 78 days). Interment at Lexington Cemetery, Lexington, Ky.; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery, Washington, D.C.
  Relatives: Son of John Clay and Elizabeth (Hudson) Clay (1750-1829); brother of Porter Clay; married, April 11, 1799, to Lucretia (Hart) Erwin (1781-1864); father of Thomas Hart Clay, Henry Clay, Jr. and James Brown Clay; grandfather of Henry Clay; granduncle of Ellen Hart Ross (who married James Reily (1811-1863)); first cousin once removed of Matthew Clay (1754-1815) and Green Clay; second cousin of Matthew Clay (1795?-1827), Brutus Junius Clay (1808-1878) and Cassius Marcellus Clay; second cousin once removed of Brutus Junius Clay (1847-1932); second cousin thrice removed of Oliver Carroll Clay; second cousin four times removed of Archer Woodford; third cousin of Clement Comer Clay; third cousin once removed of Clement Claiborne Clay, Jr..
  Political family: Clay family of Kentucky (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Clay counties in Ala., Fla., Ga., Ill., Ind., Kan., Minn., Miss., Mo., Neb., N.C., S.Dak., Tenn., Tex. and W.Va. are named for him.
  Mount Clay (also called Mount Reagan), in the White Mountains, Coos County, New Hampshire, is named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: Henry Clay LongneckerHenry Clay DeanH. Clay DickinsonHenry C. BrockmeyerH. Clay CockerillHenry Clay EwingHenry Clay CaldwellHenry Clay HallHenry Clay GoodingHenry Clay NaillHenry C. MyersHenry C. ColeH. Clay HarrisHenry C. MinerHenry C. WarmothHenry Clay ClevelandH. Clay EvansHenry C. PayneHenry C. BatesH. Clay FosterHenry C. McCormickHenry C. IdeHenry Clay WilliamsHenry C. SimmsHenry Clay FergusonHenry C. GloverH. Clay ParkHenry C. HansbroughHenry C. SnodgrassH. Clay MaydwellHenry C. GleasonHenry C. LoudenslagerH. Clay Van VoorhisHenry C. ClippingerH. Clay CrawfordH. Clay BascomH. Clay MichieH. Clay ChisolmH. Clay HowardHenry C. HallHenry Clay McDowellH. Clay JonesH. Clay DayHenry Clay HinesH. Clay HeatherHenry Clay MeachamHenry Clay CallowayH. Clay SuterH. Clay WarthHenry Clay ElwoodH. Clay KennedyH. Clay DavisH. Clay NeedhamHenry Clay EthertonH. Clay MaceH. Clay ArmstrongH. Clay BaldwinH. Clay HaynesH. Clay BurkholderMrs. H. Clay KauffmanH. Clay BentleyHenry C. GreenbergH. Clay Gardenhire, Jr.Henry Clay CoxH. Clay Myers, Jr.H. Clay Johnson
  Coins and currency: His portrait appeared on some U.S. currency issued in the 19th and early 20th centuries.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Books about Henry Clay: Robert Vincent Remini, Henry Clay: Statesman for the Union — Maurice G. Baxter, Henry Clay the Lawyer — Richard B. Cheney & Lynne V. Cheney, Kings Of The Hill : How Nine Powerful Men Changed The Course of American History — Merrill D. Peterson, The Great Triumvirate: Webster, Clay, and Calhoun — Scott Farris, Almost President: The Men Who Lost the Race but Changed the Nation — David S. Heidler & Jeanne T. Heidler, Henry Clay: The Essential American — Fergus M. Bordewich, America's Great Debate: Henry Clay, Stephen A. Douglas, and the Compromise That Preserved the Union
  Image source: James Smith Noel Collection, Louisiana State University in Shreveport
  Humphrey Marshall (1760-1841) — of Kentucky. Born in Orlean, Fauquier County, Va., 1760. Served in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; lawyer; delegate to Virginia convention to ratify U.S. constitution from Fayette County, 1788; member of Kentucky state house of representatives, 1793-94, 1807-09; U.S. Senator from Kentucky, 1795-1801. In 1809, he opposed Henry Clay's proposal to require all Kentucky legislators to wear domestic homespun instead of British broadcloth; this clash resulted in a duel in which both men were wounded. Author of the first history of Kentucky, published in 1812. Died near Lexington, Fayette County, Ky., July 3, 1841 (age about 81 years). Interment in private or family graveyard.
  Relatives: Father of Thomas Alexander Marshall; grandfather of Humphrey Marshall (1812-1872); first cousin and brother-in-law of John Marshall, James Markham Marshall and Alexander Keith Marshall (1770-1825); first cousin once removed and uncle by marriage of Edward Colston, Thomas Francis Marshall, Alexander Keith Marshall (1808-1884), Charles Alexander Marshall and Edward Colston Marshall.
  Political families: Marshall-Harrison-Randolph-Cabell family of Virginia; Birney family of Danville, Kentucky (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Gabriel Moore (c.1785-1845) — of Huntsville, Madison County, Ala. Born in Stokes County, N.C., about 1785. Lawyer; member of Alabama territorial House of Representatives, 1817; delegate to Alabama state constitutional convention, 1819; member of Alabama state senate, 1819-20; U.S. Representative from Alabama, 1821-29 (at-large 1821-23, 1st District 1823-29); Governor of Alabama, 1829-31; U.S. Senator from Alabama, 1831-37. Fought a duel with his brother-in-law. Died in Harrison County, Tex., June 9, 1845 (age about 60 years). Interment a private or family graveyard, Harrison County, Tex.
  Relatives: Brother of Samuel B. Moore (1789-1846).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  Peter Buell Porter (1773-1844) — also known as Peter B. Porter — of Canandaigua, Ontario County, N.Y.; Niagara Falls, Niagara County, N.Y. Born in Salisbury, Litchfield County, Conn., August 4, 1773. Democrat. Member of New York state assembly, 1801-02, 1828 (Ontario and Steuben counties 1801-02, Erie County 1828); U.S. Representative from New York, 1809-13, 1815-16 (15th District 1809-13, 21st District 1815-16); general in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812; fought a duel with Gen. Alexander Smyth; secretary of state of New York, 1815-16; candidate for Governor of New York, 1817; U.S. Secretary of War, 1828-29. Died in Niagara Falls, Niagara County, N.Y., March 20, 1844 (age 70 years, 229 days). Interment at Oakwood Cemetery, Niagara Falls, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Joshua Porter (1730-1825) and Abigail (Buell) Porter (1734-1797); brother of Augustus Seymour Porter (1769-1849); married, October 16, 1818, to Letitia Preston Breckinridge (1786-1831; daughter of John Breckinridge; sister of Joseph Cabell Breckinridge and Robert Jefferson Breckinridge; widow of Alfred William Grayson); father of Peter Augustus Porter (1827-1864); uncle of Augustus Seymour Porter (1798-1872) and Peter Buell Porter, Jr.; grandfather of Peter Augustus Porter (1853-1925); first cousin twice removed of Ulysses Simpson Grant; first cousin thrice removed of Frederick Dent Grant and Ulysses Simpson Grant, Jr.; second cousin twice removed of Benjamin Huntington; second cousin thrice removed of Asa H. Otis and Alvred Bayard Nettleton; second cousin four times removed of Daniel Frederick Webster, Lovel Davis Parmelee and Theron Ephron Catlin; third cousin of John Davenport, Joshua Coit, James Davenport, Henry Huntington, Gurdon Huntington, Samuel Lathrop and Abel Huntington; third cousin once removed of Samuel Huntington, Henry Scudder, Ebenezer Huntington, Gaylord Griswold, Benjamin Trumbull, Parmenio Adams, Elisha Phelps, Lancelot Phelps, Theodore Davenport, Abijah Blodget and Benjamin Nicoll Huntington; third cousin twice removed of Jabez Williams Huntington, Abiel Case, Samuel George Andrews, Harrison Blodget, John Hall Brockway, Jairus Case, Lorenzo Burrows, Norman A. Phelps, Anson Levi Holcomb, George Smith Catlin, Waitman Thomas Willey, Lyman Trumbull, William Dean Kellogg, John Smith Phelps, William Gleason, Jr., Almon Case, James Phelps, Robert Coit, Jr., Samuel Lathrop Bronson, Abial Lathrop, Roger Wolcott and Allen Jacob Holcomb; third cousin thrice removed of Charles Creighton Stratton, Edmund Holcomb, Ira Chandler Backus, Calvin Tilden Hulburd, Albert Asahel Bliss, Philemon Bliss, Charles Jenkins Hayden, John Leake Newbold Stratton, Bushrod Ebenezer Hoppin, Judson B. Phelps, Edwin Carpenter Pinney, Timothy E. Griswold, Erskine Mason Phelps, William Walter Phelps, William Patrick Willey, Charles A. Hungerford, Walter Harrison Blodget, William Barret Ridgely, George Harrison Hall, Clayton Hyde Lathrop, Phineas Orange Small, Clement Phineas Kellogg, William Brainard Coit, Lafayette Blanchard Gleason (1863-1937), Arthur Eugene Parmelee, Austin Eugene Lathrop and Hiram Bingham; fourth cousin of Samuel H. Huntington; fourth cousin once removed of William Woodbridge, Isaac Backus, Eli Thacher Hoyt, Nathaniel Huntington, Caleb Scudder, James Huntington, Charles Phelps Huntington, John Arnold Rockwell, Elisha Mills Huntington, Henry Titus Backus, Bailey Frye Adams and Henry Joel Scudder.
  Political family: Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  John George Jackson (1777-1825) — also known as John G. Jackson — of Clarksburg, Harrison County, Va. (now W.Va.). Born in Buckhannon, Upshur County, Va. (now W.Va.), September 22, 1777. Democrat. Member of Virginia state house of delegates, 1798-1801, 1811-12; U.S. Representative from Virginia, 1803-10, 1813-17 (at-large 1803-07, 1st District 1807-10, 1813-17); U.S. District Judge for the Western District of Virginia, 1819-25; died in office 1825. In November, 1807, leaving the courthouse in Clarksburg, has was attacked and suffered a skull fracture. While in Congress, fought a duel with Joseph Pearson of North Carolina, and on the second fire was wounded in the hip. Died in Clarksburg, Harrison County, Va (now W.Va.), March 28, 1825 (age 47 years, 187 days). Interment at Old Jackson Cemetery, Clarksburg, W.Va.
  Relatives: Son of George Jackson; brother of Edward Brake Jackson; married 1800 to Mary Payne (1781-1808; sister-in-law of James Madison and Richard Cutts); married, July 19, 1810, to Mary Sophia Meigs (1793-1863; daughter of Return Jonathan Meigs, Jr.); father of John Jay Jackson (1800-1877) and Mary Jackson (who married John James Allen); grandfather of John Jay Jackson, Jr., James Monroe Jackson, Jacob Beeson Jackson and William Thomas Bland.
  Political family: Jackson-Lee family of Virginia (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — federal judicial profile
  Joseph Pearson (1776-1834) — of North Carolina. Born in Rowan County, N.C., 1776. Lawyer; member of North Carolina house of commons, 1804-05; U.S. Representative from North Carolina, 1809-15 (at-large 1809-11, 10th District 1811-13, at-large 1813-15). While in Congress, fought a duel with John George Jackson of Virginia, and on the second fire wounded his opponent on the hip. Died in Salisbury, Rowan County, N.C., October 27, 1834 (age about 58 years). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Richmond Pearson (1751-1819) and Sarah (Haden) Pearson; married to Ellen Brent and Catherine Worthington; great-grandfather of Peter Augustus Jay (1877-1933).
  Political family: Livingston-Schuyler family of New York (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  James Nelson Barker (1784-1858) — of Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa. Born in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., June 17, 1784. Playwright; major in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812; severely wounded in a duel, 1814; mayor of Philadelphia, Pa., 1819-20; U.S. Collector of Customs, 1829-38. Died in Washington, D.C., March 9, 1858 (age 73 years, 265 days). Interment at Laurel Hill Cemetery, Philadelphia, Pa.
  Relatives: Son of John Barker (1746?-1818).
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Armistead Thomson Mason (1787-1819) — also known as Armistead T. Mason — of Virginia. Born in Louisa County, Va., August 4, 1787. Democrat. Colonel in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812; U.S. Senator from Virginia, 1816-17. As a result of a bitter election campaign, was killed in a duel with Col. John Mason McCarty, at Bladensburg, Prince George's County, Md., February 6, 1819 (age 31 years, 186 days). Interment at Episcopal Churchyard, Leesburg, Va.
  Relatives: Son of Mary Elizabeth 'Polly' (Armistead) Mason (1760-1825) and Stevens Thomson Mason (1760-1803); brother of Catherine Armistead Mason (born 1795; who married William Taylor Barry), John Thomson Mason (1787-1850) and Mary Thomson Mason (1791-1813; who married Benjamin Howard); married, May 1, 1817, to Charlotte Eliza Taylor (died 1846); nephew of John Thomson Mason (1765-1824); uncle of Stevens Thomson Mason (1811-1843); grandson of Thomson Mason; grandnephew of George Mason; first cousin of John Thomson Mason, Jr.; second cousin of Thomson Francis Mason and James Murray Mason.
  Political family: Mason family of Virginia (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — NNDB dossier
  Clement Comer Clay (1789-1866) — also known as Clement C. Clay — of Huntsville, Madison County, Ala. Born in Halifax County, Va., December 17, 1789. Democrat. Lawyer; served in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812; member Alabama territorial council, 1817-18; state court judge in Alabama, 1819-23; member of Alabama state house of representatives, 1827-28; U.S. Representative from Alabama 1st District, 1829-35; Governor of Alabama, 1835-37; U.S. Senator from Alabama, 1837-41; associate justice of Alabama state supreme court, 1843. Fought a duel in 1823 with Dr. Waddy Tate. Died in Huntsville, Madison County, Ala., September 7, 1866 (age 76 years, 264 days). Interment at Maple Hill Cemetery, Huntsville, Ala.
  Relatives: Father of Clement Claiborne Clay, Jr. (1816-1882); second cousin once removed of Matthew Clay (1754-1815) and Green Clay; third cousin of Henry Clay (1777-1852), Porter Clay, Matthew Clay (1795?-1827), Brutus Junius Clay (1808-1878) and Cassius Marcellus Clay; third cousin once removed of Thomas Hart Clay, James Brown Clay and Brutus Junius Clay (1847-1932); third cousin twice removed of Henry Clay (1849-1884).
  Political families: Clay family of Kentucky; Ligon-Clay-Clopton family of Montgomery and Tuskegee, Alabama (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  The Clement C. Clay Bridge (built 1931; second span built 1965; first span replaced 2006), which carries U.S. 231 over the Tennessee River, between Madison and Morgan counties, Alabama, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  Andrew Scott (1789-1851) — of Ste. Genevieve, Ste. Genevieve County, Mo. Born in Hanover County, Va., August 6, 1789. Lawyer; justice of Arkansas territorial supreme court, 1819-25; member of Arkansas territorial House of Representatives, 1831. Scottish ancestry. Killed Joseph Selden, another Arkansas Territory judge, in a duel on an island in the Mississippi River near Helena, Ark., May 26, 1824. Died in Norristown, Pope County, Ark., March 13, 1851 (age 61 years, 219 days). Original interment at Dover Cemetery, Pope County, Ark.; reinterment at Oakland Cemetery, Russellville, Ark.
  Relatives: Brother-in-law of George Wallace Jones; brother of John Scott; father-in-law of Joseph Russel Jones (1823-1909); father of John Rice Homer Scott.
  Political family: Jones family of Ste. Genevieve, Missouri.
  Alexander Dimitry (1805-1883) — also known as Tobias Guarneriius — of New Orleans, Orleans Parish, La. Born in New Orleans, Orleans Parish, La., February 7, 1805. Newspaper editor; college professor; linguist; as a young man, took part in several duels; Louisiana superintendent of public instruction, 1848-51; U.S. Minister to Costa Rica, 1859-61; Nicaragua, 1859-61. Greek and Alabama Indian ancestry. Died in New Orleans, Orleans Parish, La., January 30, 1883 (age 77 years, 357 days). Interment at St. Louis Cemetery No. 1, New Orleans, La.
  Relatives: Son of Andrea Drussakis Dimitry (1775-1852) and Marie Celeste (Dragon) Dimitry (1777-1856); married to Mary Powell Mills (1816-1894; daughter of Robert Mills (1781-1855; architect of the Washington Monument in Washington, D.C.)); second great-grandfather and great-granduncle of Dracos Alexander Dimitry, Jr. (1922-1973).
  Political family: Chilton family of Missouri.
  See also U.S. State Dept career summary
  Henry Wharton Conway (1793-1827) — also known as Henry W. Conway — of Little Rock, Pulaski County, Ark. Born near Greeneville, Greene County, Tenn., March 18, 1793. Served in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812; postmaster at Little Rock, Ark., 1821-23; Delegate to U.S. Congress from Arkansas Territory, 1823-27; died in office 1827. Mortally wounded in a duel with Robert Crittenden on October 29, 1827, and died at Arkansas Post, Arkansas County, Ark., November 9, 1827 (age 34 years, 236 days). Interment at Scull Cemetery, Arkansas Post, Ark.
  Relatives: Son of Thomas C. Conway (1771-1835) and Nancy Ann Elizabeth (Rector) Conway (1771-1845); brother of James Sevier Conway, William Conway and Elias Nelson Conway; first cousin of Ambrose Hundley Sevier and Henry Massey Rector (1816-1899); second cousin twice removed of George Taylor Conway and Walter B. Conway; second cousin thrice removed of Charles Mitchell Conway; third cousin of James Lawson Kemper.
  Political family: Conway-Norvell-Johnson family.
  Conway County, Ark. is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Robert Brank Vance (1793-1827) — of Nashville, Nash County, N.C. Born near Asheville, Buncombe County, N.C., 1793. Democrat. U.S. Representative from North Carolina 12th District, 1823-25. Mortally wounded in a duel with Samuel P. Carson, who had defeated him for Congress; died the next day at a hotel in Henderson County, N.C., 1827 (age about 34 years). Interment a private or family graveyard, Buncombe County, N.C.
  Relatives: Uncle of Robert Brank Vance (1828-1899) and Zebulon Baird Vance.
  Political family: Vance family of Asheville, North Carolina.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Robert Crittenden (1797-1834) — of Arkansas. Born near Versailles, Woodford County, Ky., January 1, 1797. Secretary of Arkansas Territory, 1819-29. Mortally wounded Henry Wharton Conway in a duel on October 29, 1827. Died in Vicksburg, Warren County, Miss., December 18, 1834 (age 37 years, 351 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of John Crittenden and Judith Turpin (Harris) Crittenden (1760-1800); brother of John Jordan Crittenden and Thomas Turpin Crittenden; uncle of Alexander Parker Crittenden (1816-1870), Thomas Leonidas Crittenden and Thomas Theodore Crittenden; granduncle of Thomas Theodore Crittenden, Jr.; first cousin twice removed of Thomas Jefferson; second cousin once removed of Dabney Carr; third cousin of Francis Wayles Eppes, Dabney Smith Carr, Benjamin Franklin Randolph, Meriwether Lewis Randolph and George Wythe Randolph; third cousin once removed of Thomas Jefferson Coolidge and Frederick Madison Roberts; third cousin twice removed of John Gardner Coolidge.
  Political families: Marshall-Harrison-Randolph-Cabell family of Virginia; Lee-Randolph family of Maryland and Virginia (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Crittenden County, Ark. is named for him.
  Henry Stuart Foote (1804-1880) — also known as "Hangman Foote" — Born in Fauquier County, Va., February 28, 1804. U.S. Senator from Mississippi, 1847-52; Governor of Mississippi, 1852-54; Representative from Tennessee in the Confederate Congress, 1862-65. Fought four duels; fled Alabama in 1830 to escape prosecution for dueling. Exchanged blows with Thomas Hart Benton on the floor of the U.S. Senate. Expelled from the Confederate Congress in early 1865 for going North on an unauthorized peace mission. Died in Nashville, Davidson County, Tenn., May 20, 1880 (age 76 years, 82 days). Interment at Mt. Olivet Cemetery, Nashville, Tenn.
  Relatives: Son of Richard Helm Foote (1772-1817) and Helen Gibbon (Stuart) Foote (1776-1815); married, March 22, 1827, to Elizabeth Winters (1810-1855); married, June 15, 1859, to Rachel Douglas Boyd (1831-1882).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Charles Magill Conrad (1804-1878) — of Louisiana. Born in Winchester, Va., December 24, 1804. Lawyer; fought a duel and killed his opponent; member of Louisiana state house of representatives, 1840-42; U.S. Senator from Louisiana, 1842-43; delegate to Louisiana state constitutional convention, 1844; U.S. Representative from Louisiana 2nd District, 1849-50; U.S. Secretary of War, 1850-53; Delegate from Louisiana to the Confederate Provisional Congress, 1861-62; Representative from Louisiana in the Confederate Congress, 1862-65. Suffered a stroke while testifying in court, and died a few days later, in New Orleans, Orleans Parish, La., February 11, 1878 (age 73 years, 49 days). Originally entombed at Girod Street Cemetery (which no longer exists), New Orleans, La.; re-entombed in 1957 at Hope Mausoleum, New Orleans, La.
  Relatives: Grandnephew by marriage of George Washington (1732-1799).
  Political families: Roosevelt family of New York City, New York; Lee-Randolph family of Maryland and Virginia; Meriwether-Kellogg-Tyler family of Virginia and Connecticut; Washington family; Clay family of Kentucky; DeBruyn-Washington family of Savannah, Georgia; Marshall-Harrison-Randolph-Cabell family of Virginia (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  Volney Erskine Howard (1809-1889) — also known as Volney E. Howard — of Brandon, Rankin County, Miss.; San Antonio, Bexar County, Tex.; Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, Calif. Born in Norridgewock, Somerset County, Maine, October 22, 1809. Democrat. Lawyer; member of Mississippi state house of representatives, 1836; candidate for U.S. Representative from Mississippi, 1840; delegate to Texas state constitutional convention, 1845; Texas state attorney general, 1846; U.S. Representative from Texas 2nd District, 1849-53; delegate to California state constitutional convention, 1878-79; superior court judge in California, 1879. Injured in duel with Hiram G. Runnels. Died in Santa Monica, Los Angeles County, Calif., May 14, 1889 (age 79 years, 204 days). Original interment at Fort Hill Cemetery (which no longer exists), Los Angeles, Calif.; reinterment to unknown location.
  Howard County, Tex. is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Spencer Darwin Pettis (1802-1831) — also known as Spencer D. Pettis — of Fayette, Howard County, Mo. Born in Culpeper County, Va., 1802. Democrat. Secretary of state of Missouri, 1826-28; U.S. Representative from Missouri at-large, 1829-31; died in office 1831. The fierce campaign of 1830 led to a quarrel and ultimately a duel with Maj. Thomas Biddle, in which both fell mortally wounded; died the next day, in St. Louis, Mo., August 28, 1831 (age about 29 years). Interment at Old City Cemetery, St. Louis, Mo.
  Pettis County, Mo. is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Hiram George Runnels (1796-1857) — also known as Hiram G. Runnels — Born in Hancock County, Ga., December 17, 1796. Mississippi state auditor, 1822-30; member of Mississippi state legislature, 1830, 1841; Governor of Mississippi, 1833-35; delegate to Texas state constitutional convention, 1845. Fought a duel with Volney E. Howard. Died in Houston, Harris County, Tex., December 17, 1857 (age 61 years, 0 days). Interment at Glenwood Cemetery, Houston, Tex.
  Relatives: Uncle of Hardin Richard Runnels and Hester Eleanor Runnels (1825-1880; who married William Robinson Baker (1820-1890)).
  Political family: Runnels-Terry family of Houston, Texas.
  Runnels County, Tex. is named for him.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Thomas Lavan Baltzell (1804-1866) — also known as Thomas Baltzell — of Jackson County, Fla.; Tallahassee, Leon County, Fla. Born in Frankfort, Franklin County, Ky., July 11, 1804. Lawyer; member Florida territorial council, 1832; delegate to Florida state constitutional convention from Jackson County, 1838-39; member of Florida territorial senate, 1844-46; justice of Florida state supreme court, 1846-50, 1854-60; member of Florida state house of representatives, 1862-63; delegate to Florida state constitutional convention from Leon County, 1865. About 1832, he wounded James D. Westcott in a duel. Died in Tallahassee, Leon County, Fla., January 14, 1866 (age 61 years, 187 days). Interment a private or family graveyard, Leon County, Fla.
  Relatives: Married to Harriet Seymour King (1816-1872); father of George Lavan Baltzell (1848-1914).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Alexander Keith McClung (1809-1855) — also known as Alexander K. McClung; "The Black Knight of the South" — of Mississippi. Born in Virginia, 1809. Lawyer; colonel in the U.S. Army during the Mexican War; U.S. Charge d'Affaires to Bolivia, 1849-51. Killed his opponents in a number of duels. Died from a self-inflicted gunshot, with a dueling pistol, in a hotel room at Jackson, Hinds County, Miss., March 23, 1855 (age about 45 years). Interment at Friendship Cemetery, Columbus, Miss.
  Relatives: Son of William McClung (1758-1811); nephew of John Marshall.
  Political family: Marshall-Harrison-Randolph-Cabell family of Virginia (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also U.S. State Dept career summary — Find-A-Grave memorial
  James Diament Westcott, Jr. (1802-1880) — also known as James D. Westcott, Jr. — of Tallahassee, Leon County, Fla. Born in Alexandria, Va., May 10, 1802. Democrat. Lawyer; secretary of Florida Territory, 1830-34; member of Florida territorial House of Representatives, 1832; delegate to Florida state constitutional convention from Leon County, 1838-39; U.S. Senator from Florida, 1845-49. About 1832, he was wounded in a duel with Thomas Baltzell. Died in Montreal, Quebec, January 19, 1880 (age 77 years, 254 days). Interment at City Cemetery, Tallahassee, Fla.
  Relatives: Father of James D. Westcott (1828?-?).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Albert Sidney Johnston (1803-1862) — of Texas. Born in Washington, Mason County, Ky., February 2, 1803. Served in the U.S. Army during the Black Hawk War; served in the Texas Army during the Texas War of Independence; wounded in a duel with Texas Gen. Felix Huston, Februay 7, 1837; Texas Republic Secretary of War, 1838-40; general in the Confederate Army during the Civil War. Shot and killed while leading his forces at the Battle of Shiloh, Hardin County, Tenn., April 6, 1862 (age 59 years, 63 days). He was the highest-ranking officer on either side killed during the war. Original interment at St. Louis Cemetery No. 1, New Orleans, La.; reinterment in 1867 at Texas State Cemetery, Austin, Tex.; statue at South Mall, University of Texas, Austin, Tex.
  Relatives: Son of Dr. John Johnston and Abigail (Harris) Johnston; half-brother of Josiah Stoddard Johnston; married 1829 to Henrietta Preston (sister of William Preston); married 1843 to Eliza Griffin; grandfather of Henrietta Preston Johnston (who married Henry St. George Tucker (1853-1932)).
  Political families: Marshall-Harrison-Randolph-Cabell family of Virginia; Johnston-Preston family of Kentucky and Virginia (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Politician named for him: Albert S. J. Lehr
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Jonathan Cilley (1802-1838) — of Thomaston, Knox County, Maine. Born in Nottingham, Rockingham County, N.H., July 2, 1802. Lawyer; member of Maine state house of representatives, 1831-36; Speaker of the Maine State House of Representatives, 1835-36; U.S. Representative from Maine 3rd District, 1837-38; died in office 1838. Killed in a duel by Representative William J. Graves of Kentucky, on the Marlboro Pike, in Prince George's County, Md., February 24, 1838 (age 35 years, 237 days). Interment at Elm Grove Cemetery, Thomaston, Maine; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery, Washington, D.C.
  Relatives: Brother of Joseph Cilley; nephew of Bradbury Cilley (1760-1831).
  Political family: Cilley family of Nottingham, New Hampshire.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — NNDB dossier
  William Jordan Graves (1805-1848) — also known as William J. Graves — of New Castle, Henry County, Ky. Born in New Castle, Henry County, Ky., 1805. Whig. Lawyer; member of Kentucky state house of representatives, 1834, 1843; U.S. Representative from Kentucky 8th District, 1835-41. Killed Rep. Jonathan Cilley of Maine, in a duel, February 24, 1838. Died in Louisville, Jefferson County, Ky., September 27, 1848 (age about 43 years). Interment a private or family graveyard, Henry County, Ky.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Augustus A. Alston (1805-1839) — of Georgia. Born in Hancock County, Ga., 1805. Member of Georgia state house of representatives, 1828-29. Killed in a duel with Gen. Leigh Read, in Tallahassee, Leon County, Fla., 1839 (age about 34 years). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Brother of Henrietta Alston (who married Augustus Holmes Kenan (1805-1870)) and Philoclea Alston (who married David Shelby Walker); nephew of Willis Alston; uncle of Robert Augustus Alston and Lewis Holmes Kenan.
  Political family: Walker-Alston family of North Carolina.
  Preston Smith Brooks (1819-1857) — also known as Preston S. Brooks — of Ninety Six, Edgefield District (now Greenwood County), S.C. Born in Edgefield, Edgefield District (now Edgefield County), S.C., August 5, 1819. Lawyer; member of South Carolina state house of representatives, 1844; U.S. Representative from South Carolina 4th District, 1853-56, 1856-57; died in office 1857. Suffered a hip wound in a duel with Louis T. Wigfall, 1839, and could walk only with a cane for the rest of his life. In May, 1856, furious over an anti-slavery speech, he went to the Senate and beat Senator Charles Sumner with a cane, causing severe injuries; an attempt to expel him from Congress failed for lack of the necessary two-thirds vote, but he resigned; re-elected to his own vacancy. Died in Washington, D.C., January 27, 1857 (age 37 years, 175 days). Interment at Willow Brook Cemetery, Edgefield, S.C.; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery, Washington, D.C.
  Relatives: Son of Whitefield Brooks and Mary P. (Carroll) Brooks; married 1841 to Caroline Means (1820-1843); married 1843 to Martha Means; cousin *** of Milledge Luke Bonham (1813-1890).
  Political family: Bonham family of Edgefield, South Carolina.
  Cross-reference: L. M. Keitt
  Brooks County, Ga. is named for him.
  The city of Brooksville, Florida, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  August Belmont (1816-1890) — also known as August Schönberg — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in Alzei, Germany, December 2, 1816. Democrat. U.S. Charge d'Affaires to Netherlands, 1853-54; U.S. Minister to Netherlands, 1854-57; Chairman of Democratic National Committee, 1860-68; delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1860, 1864, 1876; speaker, 1868. Jewish. Fought a duel with Edward Hayward, in Elkton, Md., 1840; both men were injured. Died in New York, New York County, N.Y., November 24, 1890 (age 73 years, 357 days). Interment at Island Cemetery, Newport, R.I.
  Relatives: Son of Simon Belmont; married 1849 to Caroline Slidell Perry (daughter of Matthew C. Perry (1794-1858; Commodore, U.S. Navy); aunt by marriage of Joseph Clark Grew; first cousin of Matthew Calbraith Butler); father of Perry Belmont, August Belmont (1853-1924) and Oliver Hazard Perry Belmont.
  Political family: Belmont-Perry family of New York City, New York (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  The town of Belmont, New Hampshire, is named for him.  — The former town of Belmont, Missouri (now largely abandoned due to flooding), was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary
  Louis Trezevant Wigfall (1816-1874) — also known as Louis T. Wigfall — of Texas. Born near Edgefield, Edgefield County, S.C., April 21, 1816. Democrat. Killed Thomas Bird in a duel around 1840; wounded Rep. Preston S. Brooks in another duel; member of Texas state house of representatives, 1849; member of Texas state senate, 1857; U.S. Senator from Texas, 1859-61; when the Civil War began, he left Washington but did not resign his seat in the Senate; one of ten Southern senators expelled in absentia on July 11, 1861; general in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; Delegate from Texas to the Confederate Provisional Congress, 1861-62; Senator from Texas in the Confederate Congress, 1862-65. Died in Galveston, Galveston County, Tex., February 18, 1874 (age 57 years, 303 days). Interment at Trinity Episcopal Cemetery, Galveston, Tex.
  Relatives: Son of Levi Durand Wigfall (1777-1817) and Eliza (Thomson) Wigfall; married, August 22, 1844, to Charlotte Cross (1820-1893); second cousin twice removed of Francis Irenee du Pont (1873-1942).
  Political families: DuPont family of Wilmington, Delaware; Livingston-Schuyler family of New York (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
  James Shields (1806-1879) — of Springfield, Sangamon County, Ill.; Belleville, St. Clair County, Ill.; Rice County, Minn.; San Francisco, Calif.; Carrollton, Carroll County, Mo. Born in Altmore, County Tyrone, Ireland (now Northern Ireland), May 10, 1806. Democrat. Lawyer; member of Illinois state house of representatives, 1836; member of Illinois Democratic State Committee, 1839-41; Illinois state auditor of public accounts, 1841-43; in 1842, when the Springfield paper published letters from "Aunt Becca" ridiculing him, Shields demanded to know who wrote them; Abraham Lincoln (then a Springfield lawyer) acknowledged responsibility, and Shields challenged him to a duel, which was averted only through the intervention of friends; justice of Illinois state supreme court, 1843-45; general in the U.S. Army during the Mexican War; U.S. Senator from Illinois, 1849, 1849-55; U.S. Senator from Minnesota, 1858-59; general in the Union Army during the Civil War; candidate for U.S. Representative from Missouri, 1868; member of Missouri state house of representatives, 1874, 1879; U.S. Senator from Missouri, 1879. Catholic. Irish ancestry. Died in Ottumwa, Wapello County, Iowa, June 1, 1879 (age 73 years, 22 days). Interment at St. Mary's Cemetery, Carrollton, Mo.; statue at Courthouse Grounds, Carrollton, Mo.; statue at State Capitol Grounds, St. Paul, Minn.
  Relatives: Nephew of James Shields (1762-1831).
  The community of Shieldsville, Minnesota (which he founded), is named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS James Shields (built 1943, scrapped 1971) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  George Augustus Waggaman (1782-1843) — also known as George A. Waggaman — of New Orleans, Orleans Parish, La. Born in Caroline County, Md., 1782. Circuit judge in Louisiana, 1818; secretary of state of Louisiana, 1830-32; U.S. Senator from Louisiana, 1831-35. Mortally wounded in a duel, and died in New Orleans, Orleans Parish, La., March 22, 1843 (age about 60 years). Original interment at Girod Street Cemetery (which no longer exists), New Orleans, La.; reinterment to unknown location.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  James William Denver (1817-1892) — also known as James W. Denver — Born near Winchester, Frederick County, Va., October 23, 1817. Served in the U.S. Army during the Mexican War; member of California state senate, 1852-53; secretary of state of California, 1853-55; U.S. Representative from California at-large, 1855-57; secretary of Kansas Territory, 1857-58; Governor of Kansas Territory, 1857-58, 1858, 1858; general in the Union Army during the Civil War; candidate for U.S. Representative from Ohio, 1866. Killed newspaper editor Edward Gilbert in a duel on August 2, 1852. Died in Washington, D.C., August 9, 1892 (age 74 years, 291 days). Interment at Sugar Grove Cemetery, Wilmington, Ohio.
  Relatives: Father of Matthew Rombach Denver (1870-1954).
  Denver County, Colo. is named for him.
  The city and county of Denver, Colorado, are named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS James W. Denver (built 1943, torpedoed and lost 1943) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Edward Gilbert (c.1819-1852) — of San Francisco, Calif. Born in Cherry Valley, Otsego County, N.Y., about 1819. Democrat. Printer; newspaper editor; delegate to California state constitutional convention from San Francisco District, 1849; U.S. Representative from California at-large, 1850-51. Killed in a duel with Col. James W. Denver, near Sacramento, Sacramento County, Calif., August 2, 1852 (age about 33 years). Original interment at Laurel Hill Cemetery (which no longer exists), San Francisco, Calif.; reinterment to unknown location.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  John McDougal (1818-1866) — of California. Born in 1818. Lieutenant Governor of California, 1849-51; Governor of California, 1851-52. Engaged in a duel with A. C. Russell, editor of the San Francisco Picayune, on January 12, 1852; Russell was slightly wounded. Died March 30, 1866 (age about 47 years). Burial location unknown.
  Felix Kirk Zollicoffer (1812-1862) — also known as Felix K. Zollicoffer — of Nashville, Davidson County, Tenn. Born in Bigbyville, Maury County, Tenn., May 19, 1812. Member of Tennessee state senate, 1849; fought a pistol duel with rival editor John L. Martin, in Nashville, Tenn., 1852; U.S. Representative from Tennessee 8th District, 1853-59; general in the Confederate Army during the Civil War. Shot and killed in a Civil War battle near Mill Springs, Wayne County, Ky., January 19, 1862 (age 49 years, 245 days). Interment at Nashville City Cemetery, Nashville, Tenn.; cenotaph at Zollicoffer Park Cemetery, Near Nancy, Pulaski County, Ky.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Samuel Williams Inge (1817-1868) — of Livingston, Sumter County, Ala. Born in Warren County, N.C., February 22, 1817. Democrat. Lawyer; member of Alabama state house of representatives, 1844-45; U.S. Representative from Alabama 4th District, 1847-51; in 1853, he participated in a duel with Rep. Edward Stanly, but neither was seriously injured; U.S. Attorney for the Northern District of California, 1853-56. Died in San Francisco, Calif., June 10, 1868 (age 51 years, 109 days). Original interment at Calvary Cemetery (which no longer exists), San Francisco, Calif.; reinterment in 1942 at Holy Cross Catholic Cemetery, Colma, Calif.
  Relatives: Nephew of William Marshall Inge (1802-1846).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Edward Stanly (1810-1872) — of Washington, Beaufort County, N.C.; San Francisco, Calif. Born in New Bern, Craven County, N.C., January 10, 1810. Republican. Lawyer; U.S. Representative from North Carolina, 1837-43, 1849-53 (3rd District 1837-43, 8th District 1849-53); member of North Carolina house of commons, 1844-46, 1848-49; Speaker of the North Carolina State House of Representatives, 1844-46; North Carolina state attorney general, 1846-48; in 1853, he participated in a duel with Rep. Samuel W. Inge, but neither was seriously injured; candidate for Governor of California, 1857; general in the Union Army during the Civil War. Died in San Francisco, Calif., July 12, 1872 (age 62 years, 184 days). Interment at Mountain View Cemetery, Oakland, Calif.
  Relatives: Son of John Stanly (1774-1834).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  William McKendree Gwin (1805-1885) — also known as W. M. Gwin — of Mississippi; San Francisco, Calif. Born near Gallatin, Sumner County, Tenn., October 9, 1805. Democrat. Physician; U.S. Representative from Mississippi at-large, 1841-43; went to California for the 1849 Gold Rush; delegate to California state constitutional convention, 1849; U.S. Senator from California, 1850-55, 1857-61. Engaged in a duel with J. W. McCorkle, June 1, 1853; there were no injuries; twice arrested for alleged disloyalty during the Civil War. Died in New York, New York County, N.Y., September 3, 1885 (age 79 years, 329 days). Entombed at Mountain View Cemetery, Oakland, Calif.
  Relatives: Son of Rev. James Gwin (1769-1841).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Joseph Walker McCorkle (1819-1884) — also known as Joseph W. McCorkle; J. W. McCorkle — of Dayton, Montgomery County, Ohio; Sutter County, Calif.; Virginia City, Storey County, Nev.; Washington, D.C. Born in Piqua, Miami County, Ohio, June 24, 1819. Democrat. Lawyer; postmaster at Dayton, Ohio, 1845-49; went to California for the 1849 Gold Rush; member of California state assembly 14th District, 1851-52; U.S. Representative from California 2nd District, 1851-53. Engaged in a duel with U.S. Senator W. M. Gwin, June 1, 1853; there were no injuries. Died in Branchville, Prince George's County, Md., March 18, 1884 (age 64 years, 268 days). Interment at Forest Hill Cemetery, Piqua, Ohio.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Solomon Weathersbee Downs (1801-1854) — also known as Solomon W. Downs — of Louisiana. Born in Montgomery County, Tenn., 1801. Democrat. Lawyer; U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of Louisiana, 1845-46; U.S. Senator from Louisiana, 1847-53; U.S. Collector of Customs, 1853. Mortally wounded in a duel, and subsequently died, at Crab Orchard Springs, Lincoln County, Ky., August 14, 1854 (age about 53 years). Original interment at a private or family graveyard, Ouachita Parish, La.; reinterment at Riverview Cemetery, Monroe, La.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  David Colbreth Broderick (1820-1859) — also known as David C. Broderick — of New York; San Francisco, Calif. Born in Washington, D.C., February 4, 1820. Democrat. Candidate for U.S. Representative from New York, 1846; went to California for the 1849 Gold Rush; member of California state senate, 1850-52; Lieutenant Governor of California, 1851-52; U.S. Senator from California, 1857-59; died in office 1859. Irish ancestry. Mortally wounded in a duel on September 13, 1859 with David S. Terry, chief justice of the California Supreme Court, and died in San Francisco, Calif., September 16, 1859 (age 39 years, 224 days). Original interment at Laurel Hill Cemetery (which no longer exists), San Francisco, Calif.; reinterment in 1942 at Cypress Lawn Memorial Park, Colma, Calif.
  Relatives: Son of Thomas Broderick and Honora (Colbert) Broderick; cousin *** of Andrew Kennedy and Case Broderick (1839-1920).
  Political family: Broderick-Kennedy family of Indianapolis and Muncie, Indiana.
  The former town of Broderick, now part of West Sacramento, California, was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  David Smith Terry (1823-1889) — also known as David S. Terry — of Galveston, Galveston County, Tex.; San Francisco, Calif.; Stockton, San Joaquin County, Calif. Born in Christian County (part now in Todd County), Ky., March 8, 1823. Lawyer; went to California for the 1849 Gold Rush; advocated the extension of slavery to California; justice of California state supreme court, 1855-59; chief justice of California state supreme court, 1857-59; killed U.S. Senator David C. Broderick in a duel near San Francisco in 1859; tried for murder, but acquitted; served in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; delegate to California state constitutional convention, 1878-79; candidate for Presidential Elector for California, 1880; his wife Sarah Althea Hill claimed to be the widow and heir of wealthy U.S. Senator William Sharon; in September, 1888, when her claim was finally rejected by U.S. Supreme Court Justice Stephen J. Field (acting as a Court of Appeals judge for California), she and Terry caused an altercation in the courtroom and were jailed six months for contempt of court. Five months after his release from jail, he encountered Justice Field and slapped him in the face; he was then shot through the heart and killed by U.S. Deputy Marshal David Neagle, the justice's bodyguard, in the train station dining room at Lathrop, San Joaquin County, Calif., August 14, 1889 (age 66 years, 159 days). Neagle was arrested by local authorities, but later released on the demand of the U.S. government. Interment at Stockton Rural Cemetery, Stockton, Calif.
  Relatives: Son of Joseph Royal Terry (1792-1877) and Sarah David (Smith) Terry (1793-1837); brother of Benjamin Franklin Terry (1821-1861); married, November 26, 1852, to Cornelia Runnels (1829-1884; niece of Hardin Richard Runnels); married, January 7, 1886, to Sarah Althea Hill (1857-1937).
  Political family: Runnels-Terry family of Houston, Texas.
  Cross-reference: Peter Singleton Wilkes
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  William Augustus Lake (1808-1861) — Born near Cambridge, Dorchester County, Md., January 6, 1808. Member of Maryland state house of delegates, 1831; member of Mississippi state senate, 1848; U.S. Representative from Mississippi 4th District, 1855-57; member of Mississippi state house of representatives, 1859. Killed in a duel by Henry Cousins Chambers, his opponent for Confederate Congress, at Hopefield, Crittenden County, Ark., October 15, 1861 (age 53 years, 282 days). Interment at Cedar Hill Cemetery, Vicksburg, Miss.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Henry Cousins Chambers (1823-1871) — of Mississippi. Born in Limestone County, Ala., July 26, 1823. Member of Mississippi state legislature, 1859; Representative from Mississippi in the Confederate Congress, 1862-65. Killed William Augustus Lake, his opponent for the Confederate Congress, in a duel on October 15, 1861, at Hopefield, Ark. Died in Bolivar County, Miss., May 1, 1871 (age 47 years, 279 days). Interment at Elmwood Cemetery, Memphis, Tenn.
  Relatives: Son of Henry H. Chambers (1790-1826).
  William Evelyn Cameron (1842-1927) — also known as William E. Cameron — of Petersburg, Va. Born in Petersburg, Va., November 29, 1842. Democrat. Served in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; lawyer; newspaper editor; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Virginia, 1872; mayor of Petersburg, Va., 1876-82; Governor of Virginia, 1882-86; delegate to Virginia state constitutional convention from Petersburg city, 1901-02. In 1869, he was injured in a duel with Robert William Hughes. Died in Louisa County, Va., January 26, 1927 (age 84 years, 58 days). Interment at Blandford Cemetery, Petersburg, Va.
  Relatives: Son of Walker Anderson Cameron and Elizabeth Page (Walker) Cameron; married, October 1, 1868, to Louisa Clarinda Egerton (1846-1908).
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Robert William Hughes (1821-1901) — of Virginia. Born in Powhatan County, Va., January 16, 1821. Republican. Lawyer; newspaper editor; served in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; U.S. Attorney for the Western District of Virginia, 1871-73; candidate for Governor of Virginia, 1873; U.S. District Judge for the Eastern District of Virginia, 1874-98; retired 1898. In a duel in 1869, he shot and wounded William E. Cameron. Died near Abingdon, Washington County, Va., December 10, 1901 (age 80 years, 328 days). Interment at Sinking Spring Cemetery, Abingdon, Va.
  Relatives: Married 1850 to Eliza M. Johnston (adoptive daughter of John Buchanan Floyd (1806-1863); niece of Joseph Eggleston Johnston); father of Robert Morton Hughes.
  Political families: Breckinridge-Preston-Cabell-Henry family of Virginia; Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York; Johnston family of Abingdon, Virginia (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also federal judicial profile — Wikipedia article
  Albert Jennings Fountain (1838-1896) — also known as Albert J. Fountain; Albert Jennings — of El Paso, El Paso County, Tex.; Mesilla, Dona Ana County, N.M. Born in Staten Island, Richmond County, N.Y., October 23, 1838. Republican. Served in the Union Army during the Civil War; U.S. Collector of Customs at El Paso; Assessor and Collector of Internal Revenue for the Western District of Texas; member of Texas state senate, 1869-70; fought a duel with Frank Williams, and killed him; lawyer. Presumed murdered near White Sands, Dona Ana County, N.M., February 1, 1896 (age 57 years, 101 days). His body was never found.
  Relatives: Son of Solomon Jennings and Catherine (de la Fontaine) Jennings; married 1862 to Mariana Perez.
  See also Wikipedia article
  André Louis Bagger (1846-1895) — also known as André L. Bagger — of Washington, D.C. Born in Copenhagen, Denmark, 1846. Fought on the German side in the Franco-Prussian War, 1870; patent attorney; during a controversy with D.C. Governor Alexander R. Shepherd, challenged him to a duel, but nothing came of it; Vice-Consul for Denmark in Washington, D.C., 1886-95; Vice-Consul for Sweden & Norway in Washington, D.C., 1887-95. Danish ancestry. Member, Freemasons. Died, reportedly from apoplexy, in his room at the DeWitt House hotel, Ocean Grove, Monmouth County, N.J., May 23, 1895 (age about 48 years). Interment at Congressional Cemetery, Washington, D.C.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
"Enjoy the hospitable entertainment of a political graveyard."
Henry L. Clinton, Apollo Hall, New York City, February 3, 1872
The Political Graveyard

The Political Graveyard is a web site about U.S. political history and cemeteries. Founded in 1996, it is the Internet's most comprehensive free source for American political biography, listing 312,576 politicians, living and dead.
  The listings are incomplete; development of the database is a continually ongoing project.  
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