PoliticalGraveyard.com
The Political Graveyard: A Database of American History
Shelby County
Tennessee

Cemeteries and Memorial Sites of Politicians in Shelby County

Index to Locations

  • Memphis Calvary Cemetery
  • Memphis Elmwood Cemetery
  • Memphis Forest Hill Cemetery Midtown
  • Memphis Health Sciences Park
  • Memphis National Cemetery
  • Memphis New Park Cemetery
  • Memphis Winchester Park (former Cemetery)


    Calvary Cemetery
    Memphis, Shelby County, Tennessee
    Politicians buried here:
      Joseph Dominic Montedonico (1852-1909) — also known as Joseph D. Montedonico — of Memphis, Shelby County, Tenn. Born in Memphis, Shelby County, Tenn., April 4, 1852. Banker; insurance business; Consular Agent for Italy in Memphis, Tenn., 1875-77, 1892-96; member of Tennessee state senate; elected 1884. Italian ancestry. Died, from heart disease and malaria, in Hotel Pilgrim, Plymouth, Plymouth County, Mass., September 8, 1909 (age 57 years, 157 days). Interment at Calvary Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Louis Montedonico (1813-1872) and Mary Magdalena (Signaigo) Montedonico (1831-1881); married, June 2, 1873, to Annie Louisa Bacigalupo (1857-1922).
      See also Find-A-Grave memorial


    Elmwood Cemetery
    824 S. Dudley St.
    Memphis, Shelby County, Tennessee
    Founded 1852
    Politicians buried here:
      Edward Hull Crump (1874-1954) — also known as Edward H. Crump; Ed Crump; "Boss Crump" — of Memphis, Shelby County, Tenn. Born near Holly Springs, Marshall County, Miss., October 2, 1874. Democrat. Head, E. H. Crump Buggy Manufacturing Co.; president, E. H. Crump & Co. (involved in banking, real estate, and insurance); mayor of Memphis, Tenn., 1910-16, 1940; resigned 1916; proceedings were brought for his ouster as mayor in 1915-16, based on charges that he failed to enforce state liquor laws; when the ouster suit was upheld by the state supreme court, he resigned; Shelby County Treasurer, 1917-23; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Tennessee, 1924, 1928, 1932, 1936, 1940, 1944; U.S. Representative from Tennessee, 1931-35 (10th District 1931-33, 9th District 1933-35); member of Democratic National Committee from Tennessee, 1936-45. Died in Memphis, Shelby County, Tenn., October 16, 1954 (age 80 years, 14 days). Interment at Elmwood Cemetery.
      Relatives: Married to Bessie Byrd McLean.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Books about Edward Hull Crump: William D. Miller, Mr. Crump of Memphis
      A. B. Taylor (1796-1866) — of Memphis, Shelby County, Tenn. Born in 1796. Mayor of Memphis, Tenn., 1852-55. One of the founders of Elmwood Cemetery. Died in 1866 (age about 70 years). Interment at Elmwood Cemetery.
      John William Leftwich (1826-1870) — also known as John W. Leftwich — of Memphis, Shelby County, Tenn. Born in Liberty (now Bedford), Bedford County, Va., September 7, 1826. Democrat. Merchant; U.S. Representative from Tennessee 8th District, 1866-67; mayor of Memphis, Tenn., 1868-69, 1869-70. Died in Lynchburg, Va., March 6, 1870 (age 43 years, 180 days). Interment at Elmwood Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Joel Leftwich (1801-1866) and Mary L. (Thorpe) Leftwich (1809-1857); married, December 17, 1854, to Gertrude Aurelia Wendle (1832-1908); great-grandnephew of Jabez Leftwich; second cousin once removed of Joseph Cabell Breckinridge, Benjamin William Sheridan Cabell and Robert Jefferson Breckinridge; third cousin of John Cabell Breckinridge, Carter Henry Harrison, Peter Augustus Porter (1827-1864), William Lewis Cabell, Robert Jefferson Breckinridge, Jr., William Campbell Preston Breckinridge and George Craighead Cabell; third cousin once removed of Clifton Rodes Breckinridge, Peter Augustus Porter (1853-1925), Benjamin Earl Cabell (1858-1931), Carter Henry Harrison II, Levin Irving Handy, Desha Breckinridge and Henry Skillman Breckinridge; third cousin twice removed of Earle Cabell.
      Political families: Marshall-Harrison-Randolph-Cabell family of Virginia; Breckinridge-Preston-Cabell-Henry family of Virginia; Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
      Jacob Thompson (1810-1885) — of Oxford, Lafayette County, Miss. Born in Leasburg, Caswell County, N.C., May 15, 1810. Democrat. U.S. Representative from Mississippi, 1839-51 (at-large 1839-47, 1st District 1847-51); U.S. Secretary of the Interior, 1857-61; served in the Confederate Army during the Civil War. Died in Memphis, Shelby County, Tenn., March 24, 1885 (age 74 years, 313 days). Interment at Elmwood Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      George W. Guess (c.1829-1868) — of Dallas, Dallas County, Tex. Born in North Carolina, about 1829. Lawyer; colonel in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; mayor of Dallas, Tex., 1866-68. Member, Freemasons. Died of sunstroke, aboard a steamboat on the Mississippi River, at a wharf in Memphis, Shelby County, Tenn., July 18, 1868 (age about 39 years). Interment at Elmwood Cemetery.
      Rowlett Paine (b. 1879) — of Memphis, Shelby County, Tenn. Born in Memphis, Shelby County, Tenn., December 22, 1879. Democrat. Wholesale grocer; mayor of Memphis, Tenn., 1920-27. Methodist. Member, Rotary. Interment at Elmwood Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of John James Paine and Elizabeth (Rowlett) Paine; married 1918 to Anna Bell Hughes; nephew by marriage of George Washington Gordon (1836-1911).
      Kenneth Douglas McKellar (1869-1957) — also known as Kenneth D. McKellar — of Memphis, Shelby County, Tenn. Born in Richmond, Dallas County, Ala., January 29, 1869. Democrat. Lawyer; Presidential Elector for Tennessee, 1904; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Tennessee, 1908, 1920, 1936, 1940, 1944 (speaker); U.S. Representative from Tennessee 10th District, 1911-17; U.S. Senator from Tennessee, 1917-53. Presbyterian. Member, Freemasons; Shriners; Odd Fellows; Delta Kappa Epsilon. Died October 25, 1957 (age 88 years, 269 days). Interment at Elmwood Cemetery; statue at Tri-Cities Regional Airport, Near Blountville, Sullivan County, Tenn.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
    Isham G. Harris Isham Green Harris (1818-1897) — also known as Isham G. Harris — of Memphis, Shelby County, Tenn. Born near Tullahoma, Franklin County, Tenn., February 10, 1818. Democrat. Member of Tennessee state senate, 1847; U.S. Representative from Tennessee 9th District, 1849-53; Governor of Tennessee, 1857-62; served in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; U.S. Senator from Tennessee, 1877-97; died in office 1897. Died in Washington, D.C., July 8, 1897 (age 79 years, 148 days). Interment at Elmwood Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Books about Isham G. Harris: Sam Davis Elliott, Isham G. Harris of Tennessee: Confederate Governor and United States Senator
      Image source: American Monthly Review of Reviews, August 1897
      James Chamberlain Jones (1809-1859) — also known as James C. Jones; "Lean Jimmy" — of Memphis, Shelby County, Tenn. Born in Davidson County, Tenn., April 20, 1809. Member of Tennessee state house of representatives, 1839; Governor of Tennessee, 1841-45; U.S. Senator from Tennessee, 1851-57. Died October 29, 1859 (age 50 years, 192 days). Interment at Elmwood Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Andrew Jackson Donelson (1799-1871) — also known as Andrew J. Donelson — of Nashville, Davidson County, Tenn.; Memphis, Shelby County, Tenn. Born in Nashville, Davidson County, Tenn., August 25, 1799. Whig. Lawyer; U.S. Charge d'Affaires to Texas Republic, 1844-45; U.S. Minister to Prussia, 1846-49; candidate for Vice President of the United States, 1856. Died, of a heart attack, in Memphis, Shelby County, Tenn., June 26, 1871 (age 71 years, 305 days). Interment at Elmwood Cemetery.
      Presumably named for: Andrew Jackson
      Relatives: Son of Samuel Donelson (1770-1802) and Mary Polly (Smith) Donelson (1781-1857); married, September 16, 1824, to Emily Tennessee Donelson (1807-1836; his first cousin); married 1841 to Elizabeth (Martin) Randolph (1816-1871; widow of Meriwether Lewis Randolph); nephew of Rachel Donelson (1767-1828; who married Andrew Jackson); grandson of Daniel Smith; first cousin once removed of Donelson Caffery; first cousin twice removed of Charles Duval Caffery, John Murphy Caffery and Edward Caffery; first cousin thrice removed of Jefferson Caffery (1886-1974) and Patrick Thomson Caffery.
      Political family: Caffery family of Louisiana (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      See also U.S. State Dept career summary — Tennessee Encyclopedia
      Books about Andrew Jackson Donelson: Mark R. Cheathem, Old Hickory's Nephew: The Political and Private Struggles of Andrew Jackson Donelson
      Stephen Adams (1807-1857) — of Aberdeen, Monroe County, Miss. Born in Pendleton District (now Anderson County), S.C., October 17, 1807. Democrat. Lawyer; member of Tennessee state senate, 1833-34; circuit judge in Mississippi, 1837-45, 1848; U.S. Representative from Mississippi at-large, 1845-47; member of Mississippi state house of representatives, 1850; delegate to Mississippi state constitutional convention, 1851; U.S. Senator from Mississippi, 1852-57. Died in Memphis, Shelby County, Tenn., May 11, 1857 (age 49 years, 206 days). Interment at Elmwood Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
      Spencer Jarnagin (1792-1853) — of Knoxville, Knox County, Tenn.; Athens, McMinn County, Tenn.; Memphis, Shelby County, Tenn. Born in Grainger County, Tenn., 1792. Whig. Lawyer; member of Tennessee state house of representatives, 1833-35; Presidential Elector for Tennessee, 1840; U.S. Senator from Tennessee, 1843-47. Became ill with cholera, subjected to "heroic treatment" by his doctor, and died, in Memphis, Shelby County, Tenn., June 25, 1853 (age about 60 years). Interment at Elmwood Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Chesley Jarnagin (1774-1826) and Martha (Barton) Jarnagin (1774-1843).
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
      Thomas Battle Turley (1845-1910) — also known as Thomas B. Turley — of Memphis, Shelby County, Tenn. Born in Tennessee, 1845. Democrat. U.S. Senator from Tennessee, 1897-1901. Died in 1910 (age about 65 years). Interment at Elmwood Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Robert Bruce Macon (1859-1925) — also known as Robert B. Macon — of Helena (now part of Helena-West Helena), Phillips County, Ark. Born near Trenton, Phillips County, Ark., July 6, 1859. Democrat. Lawyer; member of Arkansas state house of representatives, 1883-87; prosecuting attorney, 1st Circuit, 1898-1902; U.S. Representative from Arkansas 1st District, 1903-13. Died in Marvell, Phillips County, Ark., October 9, 1925 (age 66 years, 95 days). Interment at Elmwood Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      William Graham Swan (1821-1869) — also known as William G. Swan — of Knoxville, Knox County, Tenn. Born in 1821. Lawyer; circuit judge in Tennessee, 1840; Tennessee state attorney general, 1851; mayor of Knoxville, Tenn., 1855-56; served in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; Representative from Tennessee in the Confederate Congress, 1862-65. Died April 18, 1869 (age about 47 years). Interment at Elmwood Cemetery.
      David Maney Currin (1817-1864) — of Tennessee. Born in Murfreesboro, Rutherford County, Tenn., November 11, 1817. Member of Tennessee state legislature, 1851; Delegate from Tennessee to the Confederate Provisional Congress, 1861-62; Representative from Tennessee in the Confederate Congress, 1862-64; died in office 1864. Died in Richmond, Va., March 25, 1864 (age 46 years, 135 days). Interment at Elmwood Cemetery.
      Hiram Casey Young (1828-1899) — also known as H. Casey Young — of Memphis, Shelby County, Tenn. Born in Alabama, 1828. Democrat. U.S. Representative from Tennessee 10th District, 1875-81, 1883-85. Died in 1899 (age about 71 years). Interment at Elmwood Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Joseph Brown Heiskell (1823-1913) — of Tennessee. Born in Knoxville, Knox County, Tenn., November 5, 1823. Member of Tennessee state senate, 1858; Representative from Tennessee in the Confederate Congress, 1862-64; delegate to Tennessee state constitutional convention, 1870; Tennessee state attorney general, 1870-78. Died in Memphis, Shelby County, Tenn., March 7, 1913 (age 89 years, 122 days). Interment at Elmwood Cemetery.
      James Trezvant (c.1782-1841) — of Virginia. Born in Virginia, about 1782. Member of Virginia state legislature, 1820; U.S. Representative from Virginia 2nd District, 1825-31. Died September 2, 1841 (age about 59 years). Interment at Elmwood Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      James Phelan (1856-1891) — of Memphis, Shelby County, Tenn. Born in Aberdeen, Monroe County, Miss., December 7, 1856. Democrat. U.S. Representative from Tennessee 10th District, 1887-91; died in office 1891. Died in Bahamas, January 30, 1891 (age 34 years, 54 days). Interment at Elmwood Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      William Henry Carroll (1810-1868) — also known as William H. Carroll — of Memphis, Shelby County, Tenn. Born in Nashville, Davidson County, Tenn., 1810. Democrat. Postmaster at Memphis, Tenn., 1853-60; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Tennessee, 1860; general in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; Gen. Braxton Bragg had him arrested for drunkenness, and he resigned from the army. Died in Montreal, Quebec, May 3, 1868 (age about 57 years). Interment at Elmwood Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of William Carroll and Cecilia (Bradford) Carroll (1792-1848); brother of Mary Catherine Carroll (1816-1842; who married Caleb Cushing Norvell); father of William Henry Carroll (1842-1915).
      Political family: Conway-Norvell-Johnson family.
      See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
      James Ronald Chalmers (1831-1898) — also known as James R. Chalmers — of Vicksburg, Warren County, Miss. Born near Lynchburg, Halifax County, Va., January 12, 1831. Democrat. Lawyer; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Mississippi, 1852; delegate to Mississippi secession convention, 1861; general in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; member of Mississippi state senate, 1876-77; U.S. Representative from Mississippi, 1877-82, 1884-85 (6th District 1877-82, 2nd District 1884-85). Died, from complications of the grippe, in Memphis, Shelby County, Tenn., April 9, 1898 (age 67 years, 87 days). Interment at Elmwood Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Joseph Williams Chalmers; brother of H. H. Chalmers; nephew of John Gordon Chalmers (1803-1847).
      Political family: Chalmers family of Mississippi.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      George Washington Gordon (1836-1911) — also known as George W. Gordon — of Memphis, Shelby County, Tenn. Born in Pulaski, Giles County, Tenn., October 5, 1836. Democrat. Civil engineer; general in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; lawyer; Tennessee Railroad Commissioner, 1883-85; Special U.S. Indian Agent in Arizona and Nevada, 1885-89; superintendent of schools; U.S. Representative from Tennessee 10th District, 1907-11; died in office 1911. Member, United Confederate Veterans. Died, from asthma and uremia, in Memphis, Shelby County, Tenn., August 9, 1911 (age 74 years, 308 days). Interment at Elmwood Cemetery.
      Presumably named for: George Washington
      Relatives: Married 1876 to Ora Susan Paine; uncle by marriage of Rowlett Paine (1879-?).
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Joseph Hunter Bryan (1782-1839) — of North Carolina. Born in Martin County, N.C., April 9, 1782. Member of North Carolina house of commons, 1804-05, 1807-09; U.S. Representative from North Carolina 2nd District, 1815-19. Died in La Grange, Fayette County, Tenn., December 28, 1839 (age 57 years, 263 days). Interment at Elmwood Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Joseph Bryan (1742-1807) and Mary (Hunter) Bryan (1744-1810); brother of Henry Hunter Bryan (1786-1835); married to Sarah Burlingham; third cousin of Needham Bryan, Hardy Bryan and Bryan Whitfield; third cousin once removed of Lovard Bryan, Nathan Bryan Whitfield (1799-1868) and James Bryan Whitfield (1809-1841); third cousin twice removed of Nathan Bryan Whitfield (1835-1914); third cousin thrice removed of James Bryan Whitfield (1860-1948).
      Political family: Bryan-Whitfield family of North Carolina.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Asa Hodges (1822-1900) — of Little Rock, Pulaski County, Ark. Born near Moulton, Lawrence County, Ala., January 22, 1822. Republican. Delegate to Arkansas state constitutional convention, 1867; member of Arkansas state house of representatives, 1868; member of Arkansas state senate, 1870; U.S. Representative from Arkansas 1st District, 1873-75; delegate to Republican National Convention from Arkansas, 1876. Died June 6, 1900 (age 78 years, 135 days). Interment at Elmwood Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Henry Cousins Chambers (1823-1871) — of Mississippi. Born in Limestone County, Ala., July 26, 1823. Member of Mississippi state legislature, 1859; Representative from Mississippi in the Confederate Congress, 1862-65. Killed William Augustus Lake, his opponent for the Confederate Congress, in a duel on October 15, 1861, at Hopefield, Ark. Died in Bolivar County, Miss., May 1, 1871 (age 47 years, 279 days). Interment at Elmwood Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Henry H. Chambers (1790-1826).
      William Claiborne Dunlap (1798-1872) — of Knoxville, Knox County, Tenn.; Bolivar, Hardeman County, Tenn. Born in Knoxville, Knox County, Tenn., February 25, 1798. Democrat. Lawyer; U.S. Representative from Tennessee 13th District, 1833-37; circuit judge in Tennessee, 1840-49; member of Tennessee state senate, 1851-57; member of Tennessee state house of representatives, 1857-59. Died near Memphis, Shelby County, Tenn., November 16, 1872 (age 74 years, 265 days). Interment at Elmwood Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      William Tecumsah Avery (1819-1880) — of Tennessee. Born in Hardeman County, Tenn., November 11, 1819. Democrat. Member of Tennessee state house of representatives, 1843; U.S. Representative from Tennessee 10th District, 1857-61; colonel in the Confederate Army during the Civil War. Accidentally drowned in Ten Mile Bayou, Crittenden County, Ark., May 22, 1880 (age 60 years, 193 days). Interment at Elmwood Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Frank Hoyt Gailor (1892-1954) — of Memphis, Shelby County, Tenn. Born in Sewanee, Franklin County, Tenn., May 9, 1892. Rhodes scholar; lawyer; member of Tennessee state house of representatives, 1921; member of Tennessee state senate, 1923; Shelby County Attorney, 1936-41; circuit judge in Tennessee, 1941-42; justice of Tennessee state supreme court, 1942-48. Member, Alpha Tau Omega; American Legion. Died in 1954 (age about 62 years). Interment at Elmwood Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Ellen Douglas (Cunningham) Gailor (1854-1931) and Thomas Frank Gailor; brother of Ellen Douglas Gailor (1897-1954; daughter-in-law of Grover Cleveland (1837-1908); who married Richard Folsom Cleveland); married, August 9, 1922, to Mary Louise Pennel (1902-1962).
      Political families: Kidder family of Connecticut; Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      See also Find-A-Grave memorial
      Jeremiah Watkins Clapp (1814-1898) — of Mississippi. Born in Abingdon, Washington County, Va., September 24, 1814. Delegate to Mississippi secession convention, 1861; Representative from Mississippi in the Confederate Congress, 1862-64. Presbyterian. Died in Memphis, Shelby County, Tenn., September 5, 1898 (age 83 years, 346 days). Interment at Elmwood Cemetery.
      William Jay Smith (1823-1913) — also known as William J. Smith — of Memphis, Shelby County, Tenn. Born in Birmingham, England, September 24, 1823. Republican. Served in the U.S. Army during the Mexican War; served in the Union Army during the Civil War; delegate to Tennessee state constitutional convention, 1865; member of Tennessee state house of representatives, 1865-67; member of Tennessee state senate, 1867-69, 1885-87; delegate to Republican National Convention from Tennessee, 1868, 1876; U.S. Representative from Tennessee 8th District, 1869-71; defeated, 1870; U.S. Surveyor of Customs, 1875-81. Died in Memphis, Shelby County, Tenn., November 29, 1913 (age 90 years, 66 days). Interment at Elmwood Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      James Patton Anderson (1822-1872) — of Hernando, DeSoto County, Miss.; Olympia, Thurston County, Wash.; near Monticello, Jefferson County, Fla.; Memphis, Shelby County, Tenn. Born near Winchester, Franklin County, Tenn., February 16, 1822. Democrat. Lawyer; colonel in the U.S. Army during the Mexican War; member of Mississippi state legislature, 1850; Delegate to U.S. Congress from Washington Territory, 1855-57; delegate to Florida secession convention, 1861; Delegate from Florida to the Confederate Provisional Congress, 1861; general in the Confederate Army during the Civil War. Died in Memphis, Shelby County, Tenn., September 20, 1872 (age 50 years, 217 days). Interment at Elmwood Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Henry Thomas Ellett (1812-1887) — also known as Henry T. Ellett — of Port Gibson, Claiborne County, Miss. Born in Salem, Salem County, N.J., March 8, 1812. Democrat. U.S. Representative from Mississippi at-large, 1847; member of Mississippi state legislature, 1850. Died suddenly while delivering an address of welcome to President Grover Cleveland in Memphis, Shelby County, Tenn., October 15, 1887 (age 75 years, 221 days). Interment at Elmwood Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      John W. Farley (1878-1942) — of Memphis, Shelby County, Tenn. Born March 4, 1878. Republican. Lawyer; candidate for U.S. Representative from Tennessee, 1916; delegate to Republican National Convention from Tennessee, 1916 (alternate), 1924. Member, Kappa Alpha Order; Freemasons. Led drive to establish the West Tennessee Normal School (now University of Memphis) in 1912. Died, of pneumonia and severe arthritis, November, 1942 (age 64 years, 0 days). Interment at Elmwood Cemetery.
      Alexander M. Arzeno (d. 1878) — of Newport, Monroe County, Mich. Member of Michigan state house of representatives from Monroe County, 1847; delegate to Michigan state constitutional convention, 1850; member of Michigan state senate 8th District, 1853-54. Died, of yellow fever, in Memphis, Shelby County, Tenn., November 19, 1878. Interment at Elmwood Cemetery.
      Merrill Parrish Hudson (d. 1967) — also known as Merrill P. Hudson; Mrs. Asaph R. Hudson — of Memphis, Shelby County, Tenn. Democrat. Alternate delegate to Democratic National Convention from Tennessee, 1936, 1940. Female. Died May 4, 1967. Interment at Elmwood Cemetery.
    Politicians formerly buried here:
      Landon Carter Haynes (1816-1875) — also known as Landon C. Haynes — of Tennessee. Born in Elizabethton, Carter County, Tenn., December 2, 1816. Member of Tennessee state senate, 1847; member of Tennessee state house of representatives, 1849-51; Speaker of the Tennessee State House of Representatives, 1849-51; Senator from Tennessee in the Confederate Congress, 1862-65. Died in Memphis, Shelby County, Tenn., February 17, 1875 (age 58 years, 77 days). Original interment at Elmwood Cemetery; reinterment in 1902 at Jackson Cemetery, Jackson, Tenn.
      Relatives: Uncle of Nathaniel Edwin Harris (1846-1929).
      Political family: Taylor family of Tennessee.
      Nathan Bedford Forrest (1821-1877) — also known as "Wizard of the Saddle" — of Memphis, Shelby County, Tenn. Born near Chapel Hill, Bedford County (now Marshall County), Tenn., July 13, 1821. Democrat. Cotton planter; slave trader; general in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; in April 1864, after the Battle of Fort Pillow, Tennessee, Confederate troops under his command massacred African-American Union soldiers, not accepting them as prisoners, since the Confederacy refused to recognize ex-slaves as legitimate combatants; this event, seen as a war crime, sparked outrage across the North, and a congressional inquiry; in 1867, he became involved in the Ku Klux Klan and was elected Grand Wizard; the organization used violent tactics to intimidate Black voters and suppress their votes; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Tennessee, 1868; in 1869, he had a change of heart, and issued a letter ordering that the Klan be dissolved and its costumes destroyed; he went on to denounce the group and its crimes; in 1875, he gave a "friendly speech" to a meeting of an African-American organization in Memphis, calling for peace, harmony, and economic advancement of former slaves; for this speech, he was vehemently denounced in the Southern press. English ancestry. Member, Ku Klux Klan. After his death, he became a folk hero among white Southerners, particularly during the imposition of Jim Crow segregation laws in the early 20th century, and later, in reaction to the Civil Rights movement in the 1950s and 1960s. Died, from complications of diabetes, in Memphis, Shelby County, Tenn., October 29, 1877 (age 56 years, 108 days). Original interment at Elmwood Cemetery; reinterment in 1904 at Health Sciences Park; memorial monument at Myrtle Hill Cemetery, Rome, Ga.; memorial monument at Live Oak Cemetery, Selma, Ala.
      Relatives: Son of William B. Forrest (1801-1837) and Miriam (Beck) Forrest (1802-1867); married 1845 to Mary Ann Montgomery (1826-1893).
      Forrest County, Miss. is named for him.
      The city of Forrest City, Arkansas, is named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS Nathan B. Forrest (built 1943, scrapped 1973) was named for him.
      See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial


    Forest Hill Cemetery Midtown
    1661 Elvis Presley Boulevard
    Memphis, Shelby County, Tennessee
    See also Findagrave page for this location.
    Politicians buried here:
    Luke E. Wright Luke Edward Wright (1846-1922) — also known as Luke E. Wright — of Memphis, Shelby County, Tenn. Born in Memphis, Shelby County, Tenn., August 29, 1846. Served in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; lawyer; Tennessee state attorney general, 1870-78; Governor-General of the Philippine Islands, 1904-05; U.S. Ambassador to Japan, 1906-07; U.S. Secretary of War, 1908-09. Died in Memphis, Shelby County, Tenn., November 17, 1922 (age 76 years, 80 days). Interment at Forest Hill Cemetery Midtown.
      Relatives: Son of Archibald W. Wright (1816?-?); married 1868 to Katherine Middleton 'Kate' Semmes (1844-1937).
      See also Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — Find-A-Grave memorial
      Image source: American Monthly Review of Reviews, December 1902
      Walter Chandler (1887-1967) — also known as Clift Chandler — of Memphis, Shelby County, Tenn. Born in Jackson, Madison County, Tenn., October 5, 1887. Democrat. Member of Tennessee state house of representatives, 1917; served in the U.S. Army during World War I; member of Tennessee state senate, 1921-23; U.S. Representative from Tennessee 9th District, 1935-40; resigned 1940; mayor of Memphis, Tenn., 1940-46, 1955; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Tennessee, 1940, 1944 (member, Credentials Committee). Episcopalian. Member, American Bar Association; Phi Kappa Phi; Sigma Alpha Epsilon; Freemasons. Died in Memphis, Shelby County, Tenn., October 1, 1967 (age 79 years, 361 days). Interment at Forest Hill Cemetery Midtown.
      Relatives: Son of William Henry Chandler and Knoxie (Clift) Chandler; married, October 10, 1925, to Dorothy Wyeth.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
    Malcolm R. Patterson Malcolm Rice Patterson (1861-1935) — also known as Malcolm R. Patterson — of Memphis, Shelby County, Tenn. Born in Somerville, Morgan County, Ala., June 7, 1861. Democrat. Lawyer; Shelby County District Attorney, 1894-1900; U.S. Representative from Tennessee 10th District, 1901-06; resigned 1906; Governor of Tennessee, 1907-11. Died in Sarasota, Sarasota County, Fla., March 8, 1935 (age 73 years, 274 days). Interment at Forest Hill Cemetery Midtown.
      Relatives: Son of Josephine (Rice) Patterson and Josiah Patterson (1837-1904).
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
      Image source: American Monthly Review of Reviews, August 1908
      Clifford Davis (1897-1970) — of Memphis, Shelby County, Tenn. Born in Hazlehurst, Copiah County, Miss., November 18, 1897. Democrat. Lawyer; city judge in Tennessee, 1923-27; U.S. Representative from Tennessee, 1940-65 (9th District 1940-43, 10th District 1943-53, 9th District 1953-65). Baptist. Member, Freemasons; Shriners; Sigma Alpha Epsilon; Moose; Elks; Order of Ahepa. Died in Washington, D.C., June 8, 1970 (age 72 years, 202 days). Interment at Forest Hill Cemetery Midtown.
      Relatives: Son of Odom A. Davis and Jessie Davis; married to Carolyn Leigh.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
      John Ethridge McCall (1859-1920) — also known as John E. McCall — of Lexington, Henderson County, Tenn. Born in Clarksburg, Carroll County, Tenn., August 14, 1859. Republican. Member of Tennessee state legislature, 1890; U.S. Representative from Tennessee 8th District, 1895-97; delegate to Republican National Convention from Tennessee, 1900; U.S. District Judge for the Western District of Tennessee, 1905-20; died in office 1920. Died in Huntingdon, Carroll County, Tenn., August 8, 1920 (age 60 years, 360 days). Interment at Forest Hill Cemetery Midtown.
      Relatives: Son of Mildren (Connally) McCall (1802-1879) and Henry M. McCall (1817-1880); married to Mary Adaline Timberlake (1864-1952).
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — federal judicial profile — Find-A-Grave memorial
      Harry Bennett Anderson (1879-1935) — of Memphis, Shelby County, Tenn. Born in Van Buren County, Mich., November 5, 1879. Lawyer; member of Tennessee Republican State Executive Committee, 1904-10; Progressive candidate for Presidential Elector for Tennessee, 1912; colonel in the U.S. Army during World War I; U.S. District Judge for the Western District of Tennessee, 1926-35; died in office 1935. Member, Elks; Freemasons; Odd Fellows; American Legion. Died, from a heart ailment and pneumonia, in Crook Sanitarium, Jackson, Madison County, Tenn., April 9, 1935 (age 55 years, 155 days). Interment at Forest Hill Cemetery Midtown.
      Relatives: Son of Seneca Benjamin Anderson and Achsah Adelaide (Bennett) Anderson; married, October 8, 1908, to Patty Crook.
      See also federal judicial profile — Find-A-Grave memorial
      Josiah Patterson (1837-1904) — of Memphis, Shelby County, Tenn. Born in Morgan County, Ala., April 14, 1837. Democrat. Member of Tennessee state legislature, 1870; U.S. Representative from Tennessee 10th District, 1891-97. Died in Memphis, Shelby County, Tenn., February 10, 1904 (age 66 years, 302 days). Interment at Forest Hill Cemetery Midtown.
      Relatives: Married to Josephine Rice (1840-1921); father of Malcolm Rice Patterson (1861-1935).
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
      William Robert Moore (1830-1909) — of Memphis, Shelby County, Tenn. Born near Huntsville, Madison County, Ala., March 28, 1830. Republican. Dry goods merchant; U.S. Representative from Tennessee 10th District, 1881-83; member of Tennessee state house of representatives, 1889-91. Through a bequest, he founded William R. Moore College of Technology (now Moore Tech). Died in Memphis, Shelby County, Tenn., June 12, 1909 (age 79 years, 76 days). Interment at Forest Hill Cemetery Midtown.
      Relatives: Son of Robert Cleveland Moore and Mary F. (Lingow) Moore; married, February 14, 1878, to Charlotte Heywood Blood (1852-1918).
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
      Hugh Chalmers (1876-1928) — Born March 6, 1876. Member of Arkansas state house of representatives, 1921-24; member of Arkansas state senate 32nd District, 1927-28. Died August 26, 1928 (age 52 years, 173 days). Interment at Forest Hill Cemetery Midtown.
      Relatives: Married to Ardine Hayes (1878-1960).
      See also Find-A-Grave memorial
      Walter Preston Armstrong (1884-1949) — also known as Walter P. Armstrong — of Memphis, Shelby County, Tenn. Born in Pittsboro, Calhoun County, Miss., October 26, 1884. Democrat. Lawyer; alternate delegate to Democratic National Convention from Tennessee, 1928, 1940. Methodist. Member, American Bar Association; Sigma Chi; Phi Delta Phi. Died July 27, 1949 (age 64 years, 274 days). Interment at Forest Hill Cemetery Midtown.
      Relatives: Son of George Wells Armstrong and May (Cruthirds) Armstrong; married, November 12, 1912, to Irma Waddell.


    Health Sciences Park
    Memphis, Shelby County, Tennessee
    Politicians buried here:
      Nathan Bedford Forrest (1821-1877) — also known as "Wizard of the Saddle" — of Memphis, Shelby County, Tenn. Born near Chapel Hill, Bedford County (now Marshall County), Tenn., July 13, 1821. Democrat. Cotton planter; slave trader; general in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; in April 1864, after the Battle of Fort Pillow, Tennessee, Confederate troops under his command massacred African-American Union soldiers, not accepting them as prisoners, since the Confederacy refused to recognize ex-slaves as legitimate combatants; this event, seen as a war crime, sparked outrage across the North, and a congressional inquiry; in 1867, he became involved in the Ku Klux Klan and was elected Grand Wizard; the organization used violent tactics to intimidate Black voters and suppress their votes; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Tennessee, 1868; in 1869, he had a change of heart, and issued a letter ordering that the Klan be dissolved and its costumes destroyed; he went on to denounce the group and its crimes; in 1875, he gave a "friendly speech" to a meeting of an African-American organization in Memphis, calling for peace, harmony, and economic advancement of former slaves; for this speech, he was vehemently denounced in the Southern press. English ancestry. Member, Ku Klux Klan. After his death, he became a folk hero among white Southerners, particularly during the imposition of Jim Crow segregation laws in the early 20th century, and later, in reaction to the Civil Rights movement in the 1950s and 1960s. Died, from complications of diabetes, in Memphis, Shelby County, Tenn., October 29, 1877 (age 56 years, 108 days). Original interment at Elmwood Cemetery; reinterment in 1904 at Health Sciences Park; memorial monument at Myrtle Hill Cemetery, Rome, Ga.; memorial monument at Live Oak Cemetery, Selma, Ala.
      Relatives: Son of William B. Forrest (1801-1837) and Miriam (Beck) Forrest (1802-1867); married 1845 to Mary Ann Montgomery (1826-1893).
      Forrest County, Miss. is named for him.
      The city of Forrest City, Arkansas, is named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS Nathan B. Forrest (built 1943, scrapped 1973) was named for him.
      See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial


    National Cemetery
    Memphis, Shelby County, Tennessee
    Politicians buried here:
      George William Grider (1912-1991) — also known as George W. Grider; "Gindy" — of Memphis, Shelby County, Tenn.; Niagara Falls, Niagara County, N.Y.; Memphis, Shelby County, Tenn. Born in Memphis, Shelby County, Tenn., October 1, 1912. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Navy during World War II; lawyer; county judge in Tennessee, 1959-64; U.S. Representative from Tennessee 9th District, 1965-67. Methodist. Member, American Legion. Died in Memphis, Shelby County, Tenn., March 20, 1991 (age 78 years, 170 days). Interment at National Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article


    New Park Cemetery
    Memphis, Shelby County, Tennessee
    Politicians buried here:
      Thomas Oscar Fuller, Sr. (1867-1942) — also known as Thomas O. Fuller, Sr. — of Wilmington, New Hanover County, N.C.; Memphis, Shelby County, Tenn. Born in Franklinton, Franklin County, N.C., October 25, 1867. Minister; member of North Carolina state senate; elected 1898; historian. African ancestry. Member, NAACP. Died in Memphis, Shelby County, Tenn., June 21, 1942 (age 74 years, 239 days). Interment at New Park Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of J. Henderson Fuller and Mary Eliza Fuller.
      T.O. Fuller State Park, in Memphis, Tennessee, is named for him.
      See also Find-A-Grave memorial


    Winchester Park (former Cemetery)
    Memphis, Shelby County, Tennessee
    Politicians buried here:
      Marcus Brutus Winchester (1796-1856) — also known as Marcus B. Winchester — of Memphis, Shelby County, Tenn. Born March 28, 1796. Served in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812; postmaster at Memphis, Tenn., 1823-49; mayor of Memphis, Tenn., 1827-29; member of Tennessee state house of representatives, 1851. Died November 2, 1856 (age 60 years, 219 days). Interment at Winchester Park (former Cemetery).
      Relatives: Son of James Lonchester and Susan (Black) Winchester; married 1823 to Amarante 'Mary' Loiselle (died 1840); married 1842 to Lucy Lenore (Ferguson) McLean.


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