PoliticalGraveyard.com
The Political Graveyard: A Database of American History
The Internet's Most Comprehensive Source of U.S. Political Biography
(or, The Web Site that Tells Where the Dead Politicians are Buried)
Created and maintained by Lawrence Kestenbaum

Namesake Politicians: Ships

in alphabetical order

  George Abernethy (1807-1877) — Born in New York, New York County, N.Y., October 7, 1807. Governor of Oregon Territory, 1845-49; newspaper publisher. Methodist. Scottish ancestry. Died in Portland, Multnomah County, Ore., March 2, 1877 (age 69 years, 146 days). Original interment somewhere in Vancouver, Wash.; reinterment in 1883 at River View Cemetery, Portland, Ore.
  Relatives: Married 1830 to Anne Pope (1881-1884).
  Abernethy Bridge on I-205, crossing the Willamette River between Oregon City & West Linn, Oregon, is named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS George Abernethy (built 1942 at Portland, Oregon; scrapped 1960) was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
John Adams John Adams (1735-1826) — also known as "His Rotundity"; "The Duke of Braintree"; "American Cato"; "Old Sink and Swim"; "The Colossus of Independence"; "Father of the American Navy" — of Quincy, Norfolk County, Mass. Born in Braintree (part now in Quincy), Norfolk County, Mass., October 30, 1735. Lawyer; Delegate to Continental Congress from Massachusetts, 1774-78; signer, Declaration of Independence, 1776; U.S. Minister to Netherlands, 1781-88; Great Britain, 1785-88; Vice President of the United States, 1789-97; President of the United States, 1797-1801; defeated (Federalist), 1800; delegate to Massachusetts state constitutional convention, 1820. Unitarian. English ancestry. Member, American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Elected to the Hall of Fame for Great Americans in 1900. Died in Quincy, Norfolk County, Mass., July 4, 1826 (age 90 years, 247 days). Original interment at Hancock Cemetery, Quincy, Mass.; reinterment in 1828 at United First Parish Church, Quincy, Mass.; memorial monument at Constitution Gardens, Washington, D.C.
  Relatives: Son of John Adams (1691-1761) and Susanna (Boylston) Adams (1699-1797); married, October 25, 1764, to Abigail Quincy Smith (aunt of William Cranch); father of Abigail Amelia Adams (1765-1813; who married William Stephens Smith) and John Quincy Adams (1767-1848) (who married Louisa Catherine Johnson); grandfather of George Washington Adams and Charles Francis Adams (1807-1886); great-grandfather of John Quincy Adams (1833-1894) and Brooks Adams; second great-grandfather of Charles Francis Adams (1866-1954); third great-grandfather of Thomas Boylston Adams; first cousin thrice removed of Edward M. Chapin; first cousin four times removed of Arthur Chapin; first cousin six times removed of Denwood Lynn Chapin; second cousin of Samuel Adams; second cousin once removed of Joseph Allen; second cousin twice removed of John Milton Thayer; second cousin thrice removed of William Vincent Wells; second cousin four times removed of Lyman Kidder Bass, Daniel T. Hayden, Arthur Laban Bates and Almur Stiles Whiting; second cousin five times removed of Charles Grenfill Washburn, Lyman Metcalfe Bass and Emerson Richard Boyles; third cousin once removed of Jeremiah Mason and George Bailey Loring; third cousin twice removed of Asahel Otis, Erastus Fairbanks, Charles Stetson, Henry Brewster Stanton, Charles Adams Jr., Isaiah Stetson, Joshua Perkins, Eli Thayer and Bailey Frye Adams; third cousin thrice removed of Day Otis Kellogg, Dwight Kellogg, Caleb Stetson (1801-1885), Oakes Ames, Oliver Ames Jr., Benjamin W. Waite, Alfred Elisha Ames, George Otis Fairbanks, Austin Wells Holden, Horace Fairbanks, Ebenezer Oliver Grosvenor, Joseph Washburn Yates, Augustus Brown Reed Sprague, Franklin Fairbanks, Erskine Mason Phelps, Arthur Newton Holden, John Alden Thayer, Irving Hall Chase, Isaiah Kidder Stetson and Giles Russell Taggart.
  Political family: Kellogg-Adams-Seymour-Chapin family of Connecticut and New York (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Adams counties in Idaho, Iowa, Miss., Neb., Ohio, Pa., Wash. and Wis. are named for him.
  Mount Adams (second highest peak in the Northeast), in the White Mountains, Coos County, New Hampshire, is named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS John Adams (built 1941-42 at Richmond, California; torpedoed and lost in the Coral Sea, 1942) was named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: John Adams HarperJohn A. CameronJohn A. DixJohn Adams FisherJohn A. TaintorJohn A. GilmerJohn A. PerkinsJohn Adams HymanJohn A. DamonJohn A. LeeJohn A. SandersJohn Adams Hurson
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Books about John Adams: John Ferling, John Adams: A Life — Joseph J. Ellis, The Passionate Sage: The Character and Legacy of John Adams — David McCullough, John Adams — Gore Vidal, Inventing A Nation: Washington, Adams, Jefferson — John Ferling, Adams vs. Jefferson: The Tumultuous Election of 1800 — James Grant, John Adams : Party of One
  Image source: Portrait & Biographical Album of Washtenaw County (1891)
  Samuel Adams (1722-1803) — also known as "The Tribune of the People"; "The Cromwell of New England"; "Determinatus"; "The Psalm Singer"; "Amendment Monger"; "American Cato"; "Samuel the Publican" — of Massachusetts. Born in Boston, Suffolk County, Mass., September 27, 1722. Delegate to Continental Congress from Massachusetts, 1774-81; signer, Declaration of Independence, 1776; delegate to Massachusetts state constitutional convention, 1779, 1788; member of Massachusetts state senate, 1781; candidate for U.S. Representative from Massachusetts, 1788; Lieutenant Governor of Massachusetts, 1789-94; Governor of Massachusetts, 1793-97; received 15 electoral votes, 1796. Congregationalist. Died in Boston, Suffolk County, Mass., October 2, 1803 (age 81 years, 5 days). Interment at Old Granary Burying Ground, Boston, Mass.; memorial monument at Constitution Gardens, Washington, D.C.
  Relatives: Son of Samuel Adams and Mary (Fifield) Adams; married 1749 to Elizabeth Checkley; married 1764 to Elizabeth Wells; uncle of Joseph Allen; granduncle of Charles Allen; great-grandfather of Elizabeth Wells Randall (who married Alfred Cumming) and William Vincent Wells; second cousin of John Adams; second cousin once removed of John Quincy Adams (1767-1848); second cousin twice removed of George Washington Adams, Charles Francis Adams (1807-1886) and John Milton Thayer; second cousin thrice removed of Edward M. Chapin, John Quincy Adams (1833-1894) and Brooks Adams; second cousin four times removed of Lyman Kidder Bass, Daniel T. Hayden, Arthur Chapin, Arthur Laban Bates, Charles Francis Adams (1866-1954) and Almur Stiles Whiting; second cousin five times removed of Charles Grenfill Washburn, Lyman Metcalfe Bass, Emerson Richard Boyles and Thomas Boylston Adams; third cousin of Samuel Huntington; third cousin once removed of Samuel H. Huntington and Caleb Cushing; third cousin twice removed of Willard J. Chapin, Erastus Fairbanks, Nathaniel Huntington, James Huntington, Elisha Mills Huntington, Charles Adams Jr., James Brooks and Bailey Frye Adams; third cousin thrice removed of Alphonso Taft, Benjamin W. Waite, George Otis Fairbanks, Austin Wells Holden, Horace Fairbanks, Ebenezer Oliver Grosvenor (1820-1910), Franklin Fairbanks, Edgar Weeks and Arthur Newton Holden; third cousin four times removed of John Quincy Adams (1848-1911).
  Political family: Kellogg-Adams-Seymour-Chapin family of Connecticut and New York (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Mount Sam Adams, in the White Mountains, Coos County, New Hampshire, is named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS Samuel Adams (built 1941 at Terminal Island, Los Angeles, California; scrapped 1966) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Books about Samuel Adams: Donald Barr Chidsey, The World of Samuel Adams
Jane Addams Jane Addams (1860-1935) — of Chicago, Cook County, Ill. Born in Cedarville, Stephenson County, Ill., September 6, 1860. Progressive. Social worker; sociologist; lecturer; woman suffrage activist; pacifist; delegate to Progressive National Convention from Illinois, 1912; candidate for Presidential Elector for Illinois, 1924; received the Nobel Peace Prize in 1931. Female. Presbyterian or Unitarian. English ancestry. Lesbian. Member, Phi Beta Kappa; American Civil Liberties Union; Women's International League for Peace and Freedom; NAACP. Died, from cancer, in Chicago, Cook County, Ill., May 21, 1935 (age 74 years, 257 days). Interment at Cedarville Cemetery, Cedarville, Ill.
  Relatives: Daughter of Sarah (Weber) Addams (1817-1863) and John Huy Addams; aunt of Anna Marcet Haldeman (1887-1941; who married Emanuel Julius (1889-1951)); grandniece of William Addams.
  The World War II Liberty ship SS Jane Addams (built 1942 at Terminal Island, Los Angeles, California; sold 1947 and converted to a floating wharf) was named for her.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: U.S. postage stamp (1940)
  George Ade (1866-1944) — of Kentland, Newton County, Ind. Born in Kentland, Newton County, Ind., February 9, 1866. Republican. Author; humorist; newspaper columnist; delegate to Republican National Convention from Indiana, 1908. Member, Sigma Chi. Suffered a heart attack, fell into a coma, and died, in Brook, Newton County, Ind., May 16, 1944 (age 78 years, 97 days). Interment at Fairlawn Cemetery, Kentland, Ind.
  Relatives: Son of John Ade and Adaline (Bush) Ade; brother-in-law of Warren Terry McCray (1865-1938).
  The Ross-Ade Stadium (built 1924), at Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana, is partly named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS George Ade (built 1944 at Panama City, Florida; scrapped 1968) was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
John P. Altgeld John Peter Altgeld (1847-1902) — also known as John P. Altgeld — of Andrew County, Mo.; Chicago, Cook County, Ill. Born in Hesse, Germany, December 30, 1847. Served in the Union Army during the Civil War; lawyer; Andrew County State's Attorney, 1875; candidate for U.S. Representative from Illinois, 1884; superior court judge in Illinois, 1886-91; Governor of Illinois, 1893-97; Independent candidate for mayor of Chicago, Ill., 1899. German ancestry. Pardoned the surviving protesters of the Haymarket incident in Chicago, and refused to send troops against the Pullman railway strikers. These actions were not popular at the time, and he never won another election. As he finished a speech at the Joliet Opera House, he suffered a stroke, was carried across the street to the Hotel Monroe, and died the next morning, in Joliet, Will County, Ill., March 12, 1902 (age 54 years, 72 days). Interment at Graceland Cemetery, Chicago, Ill.; statue at Lincoln Park, Chicago, Ill.
  Altgeld Gardens Homes (built 1944-45), a public housing complex in Chicago, Illinois, is named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS John P. Altgeld (built 1943 at Terminal Island, California; sold 1947, scrapped 1969) was named for him.
  See also National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Image source: American Monthly Review of Reviews, April 1902
  John Armstrong Jr. (1758-1843) — also known as "Old Soldier"; "Monsieur Tombo" — of Pennsylvania; Dutchess County, N.Y. Born in Carlisle, Cumberland County, Pa., November 25, 1758. Republican. Major in Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; secretary of the commonwealth of Pennsylvania, 1783-87; Delegate to Continental Congress from Pennsylvania, 1787-88; U.S. Senator from New York, 1800-02, 1803-04; U.S. Minister to France, 1804-10; general in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812; U.S. Secretary of War, 1813-14; blamed for the British capture of Washington, D.C. in August 1814, and forced to resign; member of New York state assembly from Dutchess County, 1825. Catholic. Slaveowner. Died in Red Hook, Dutchess County, N.Y., April 1, 1843 (age 84 years, 127 days). Entombed at Rhinebeck Cemetery, Rhinebeck, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of John Armstrong and Rebecca (Lyon) Armstrong (1719-1797); brother of James Armstrong; married, January 18, 1789, to Alida Livingston (1761-1822; daughter of Robert R. Livingston (1718-1775); sister-in-law of Morgan Lewis; sister of Robert R. Livingston (1746-1813) and Edward Livingston; granddaughter of Robert Livingston); grandfather of John Jacob Astor III; great-grandfather of William Waldorf Astor; second great-grandfather of William Astor Chanler and Lewis Stuyvesant Chanler (1869-1942).
  Political family: Livingston-Schuyler family of New York (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  The World War II Liberty ship SS John Armstrong (built 1942-43 at Houston, Texas; scrapped 1964) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  John Baptista Ashe (1748-1802) — of North Carolina. Born in Rocky Point, Pender County, N.C., 1748. Colonel in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; member of North Carolina state legislature, 1784-86; Delegate to Continental Congress from North Carolina, 1787; member of North Carolina state senate, 1789; U.S. Representative from North Carolina at-large, 1789-93; elected Governor of North Carolina 1802, but died before taking office. Slaveowner. Died in Halifax, Halifax County, N.C., November 27, 1802 (age about 54 years). Interment at Churchyard Cemetery, Halifax, N.C.; cenotaph at Ashe Family Cemetery, Rocky Point, N.C.
  Presumably named for: John the Baptist
  Relatives: Son of Samuel Ashe and Mary (Porter) Ashe (1732-1767); married to Elizabeth Montfort (1755-1812); uncle of John Baptista Ashe, Thomas Samuel Ashe and William Shepperd Ashe; cousin four different ways of George Davis (1820-1896) and Horatio Davis; cousin two different ways of Alfred Moore Waddell; second cousin once removed of William Henry Hill.
  Political families: Polk family; Ashe-Polk family of North Carolina (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  The World War II Liberty ship SS John B. Ashe (built 1942 at Terminal Island, California; sold 1947, scrapped 1962) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Samuel Ashe (1725-1813) — of New Hanover County, N.C. Born in Bath, Beaufort County, N.C., March 24, 1725. Lawyer; delegate to North Carolina state constitutional convention, 1776; justice of North Carolina state supreme court, 1777; Governor of North Carolina, 1795-98; Presidential Elector for North Carolina, 1804. Died in Rocky Point, Pender County, N.C., February 3, 1813 (age 87 years, 316 days). Interment at Ashe Family Cemetery, Rocky Point, N.C.; memorial monument at Pack Square Park, Asheville, N.C.
  Relatives: Son of John Baptista Ashe (1695-1734) and Elizabeth (Swann) Ashe (1699-1729); married to Mary Porter (1732-1767) and Elizabeth Merrick (1735-1815); father of John Baptista Ashe (1748-1802); uncle and cousin by marriage of William Henry Hill; grandfather of John Baptista Ashe (1810-1857), Thomas Samuel Ashe and William Shepperd Ashe; great-granduncle of George Davis (1820-1896) and Horatio Davis; cousin by marriage of Alfred Moore Waddell.
  Political families: Polk family; Ashe-Polk family of North Carolina (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Ashe County, N.C. is named for him.
  The city of Asheville, North Carolina, is named for him.  — The city of Asheboro, North Carolina, is named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS Samuel Ashe (built 1942 at Wilmington, North Carolina; scrapped 1970) was named for him.
  See also National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  James Benjamin Aswell (1869-1931) — also known as James B. Aswell — of Natchitoches, Natchitoches Parish, La. Born in Jackson Parish, La., December 23, 1869. Democrat. School teacher and principal; Louisiana superintendent of public instruction, 1904-08; Chancellor, University of Mississippi, 1907; president, Louisiana State Normal College, 1908-11; U.S. Representative from Louisiana 8th District, 1913-31; died in office 1931. Baptist. Died in Washington, D.C., March 16, 1931 (age 61 years, 83 days). Interment at Rock Creek Cemetery, Washington, D.C.
  Relatives: Son of Benjamin Werner Aswell (1830-1909) and Frances Elizabeth (Lyles) Aswell (1841-1908); married, September 20, 1893, to Mary Lee Wright (1868-1898); married, March 3, 1901, to Ella Foster (1868-1937); father of Corine Aswell (1896-1976; daughter-in-law of James Campbell Cantrill (1870-1923)).
  Political family: Lee-Randolph family (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  The World War II Liberty ship SS James B. Aswell (built 1943-44 at New Orleans, Louisiana; scrapped 1971) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  George Edmund Badger (1795-1866) — also known as George E. Badger — of Raleigh, Wake County, N.C. Born in New Bern, Craven County, N.C., April 17, 1795. Lawyer; member of North Carolina state legislature, 1816; superior court judge in North Carolina, 1820-25; U.S. Secretary of the Navy, 1841; U.S. Senator from North Carolina, 1846-55; delegate to North Carolina secession convention, 1861. Slaveowner. Died in Raleigh, Wake County, N.C., May 11, 1866 (age 71 years, 24 days). Interment at Oakwood Cemetery, Raleigh, N.C.
  Relatives: Son of Thomas Badger and Lydia (Cogdell) Badger; married, December 24, 1818, to Rebecca Turner (1799-1824); married 1826 to Mary Brown Polk (1808-1835); married, April 16, 1836, to Delia (Haywood) Williams (1807-1876); grandfather of Paul Fletcher Faison (1882-1967).
  Political families: Polk family; Manly-Haywood-Polk family of Raleigh, North Carolina (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  The World War II Liberty ship SS George E. Badger (built 1942-43 at Wilmington, North Carolina; scrapped 1972) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  George Luis Baker (1868-1941) — also known as George L. Baker — of Portland, Multnomah County, Ore. Born in The Dalles, Wasco County, Ore., August 23, 1868. Republican. Mayor of Portland, Ore., 1917-33. Member, Freemasons; Knights Templar; Shriners; Odd Fellows; Knights of Pythias; Woodmen; Elks; Rotary. Died in Portland, Multnomah County, Ore., May 16, 1941 (age 72 years, 266 days). Cremated; ashes interred at Wilhelm's Portland Memorial, Portland, Ore.
  Relatives: Son of John Baker and Mary (Edgett) Baker; married, August 7, 1910, to Claire M. Skeel (1876-1945).
  The World War II Liberty ship SS George L. Baker (built 1943 at Portland, Oregon; scrapped 1969) was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Abraham Baldwin (1754-1807) — of Augusta, Richmond County, Ga. Born in North Guilford, Guilford, New Haven County, Conn., November 22, 1754. Served in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; lawyer; member of Georgia state house of representatives, 1785; Delegate to Continental Congress from Georgia, 1785, 1787-89; member, U.S. Constitutional Convention, 1787; U.S. Representative from Georgia at-large, 1789-99; U.S. Senator from Georgia, 1799-1807; died in office 1807. Congregationalist. Member, Society of the Cincinnati. One of the founders, and first president, of Franklin College, which later became the University of Georgia. Died in Washington, D.C., March 4, 1807 (age 52 years, 102 days). Interment at Rock Creek Cemetery, Washington, D.C.; cenotaph at Greenfield Hill Cemetery, Fairfield, Conn.
  Relatives: Son of Michael Baldwin and Lucy (Dudley) Baldwin; half-brother of Henry Baldwin (1780-1844); brother of Ruth Baldwin (who married Joel Barlow).
  Political family: Baldwin family of Connecticut.
  Baldwin counties in Ala. and Ga. are named for him.
  The World War II Liberty ship SS Abraham Baldwin (built 1941 at New Orleans, Louisiana; scuttled 1976 as an artificial reef in the Gulf of Mexico) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Henry Baldwin (1780-1844) — of Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, Pa. Born in New Haven, New Haven County, Conn., January 14, 1780. Lawyer; U.S. Representative from Pennsylvania 14th District, 1817-22; Associate Justice of U.S. Supreme Court, 1830-44; died in office 1844. Episcopalian. Member, Freemasons. Died in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., April 21, 1844 (age 64 years, 98 days). Original interment at Oak Hill Cemetery, Washington, D.C.; reinterment at Greendale Cemetery, Meadville, Pa.
  Relatives: Son of Henry Baldwin and Theodora (Wolcott) Baldwin; half-brother of Abraham Baldwin (1754-1807).
  Political family: Baldwin family of Connecticut.
  The World War II Liberty ship SS Henry Baldwin (built 1942 at Terminal Island, California; scrapped 1970) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — federal judicial profile — Wikipedia article — Ballotpedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial — Biographical Directory of Federal Judges
  George Bancroft (1800-1891) — of Massachusetts. Born in Worcester, Worcester County, Mass., October 3, 1800. Democrat. U.S. Collector of Customs, 1832-34; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Massachusetts, 1844; candidate for Governor of Massachusetts, 1844; U.S. Secretary of the Navy, 1845-46; U.S. Minister to Great Britain, 1846-49; Prussia, 1867-71; Germany, 1871-74. Congregationalist. Elected to the Hall of Fame for Great Americans in 1910. Died in Washington, D.C., January 17, 1891 (age 90 years, 106 days). Interment at Worcester Rural Cemetery, Worcester, Mass.
  Relatives: Son of Rev. Aaron Bancroft (1755-1839) and Lucretia (Chandler) Bancroft (1765-1839); brother of Elizabeth 'Eliza' Bancroft (1791-1872; who married John Davis (1787-1854)); married, March 1, 1827, to Sarah H. Dwight (1803-1837); married, August 16, 1838, to Elizabeth (Davis) Bliss (1803-1886); uncle of John Chandler Bancroft Davis (1822-1907) and Horace Davis; granduncle of John Davis (1851-1902); second great-granduncle of Henry Cabot Lodge Jr. and John Davis Lodge; third great-granduncle of George Cabot Lodge.
  Political families: Holden-Davis-Lawrence-Garcelon family of Massachusetts; Saltonstall-Davis-Frelinghuysen-Appleton family of Massachusetts; Davis family of Massachusetts (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  The World War II Liberty ship SS George Bancroft (built 1942 at Terminal Island, California; scrapped 1960) was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  James Barbour (1775-1842) — of Barboursville, Orange County, Va. Born near Gordonsville, Orange County, Va., June 10, 1775. Whig. Lawyer; member of Virginia state house of delegates, 1798-1812; Speaker of the Virginia State House of Delegates, 1809; Governor of Virginia, 1812-14; U.S. Senator from Virginia, 1815-25; U.S. Secretary of War, 1825-28; U.S. Minister to Great Britain, 1828-29; delegate to Whig National Convention from Virginia, 1839 (Convention President; speaker). Presbyterian. Member, Freemasons. Slaveowner. Died in Barboursville, Orange County, Va., June 7, 1842 (age 66 years, 362 days). Interment at Barboursville Vineyards and Winery, Barboursville, Va.
  Relatives: Son of Col. Thomas Barbour and Mary (Thomas) Barbour; brother of Philip Pendleton Barbour (1783-1841); married 1792 to Lucy Johnson; cousin *** of John Strode Barbour.
  Political family: Barbour family of Virginia.
  Barbour County, Ala. is named for him.
  The World War II Liberty ship SS James Barbour (built 1942-43 at Houston, Texas; scrapped 1970) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Henry Barnard (1811-1900) — of Hartford, Hartford County, Conn. Born in Hartford, Hartford County, Conn., January 24, 1811. Lawyer; member of Connecticut state house of representatives from Hartford, 1837-39; secretary to the Connecticut Commissioners of Common Schools, 1838-42; Rhode Island commissioner of public schools, 1845-49; Connecticut Superintendent of Common Schools, 1851-55; chancellor, University of Wisconsin, 1859-60; president, St. John's College in Annapolis, Maryland, 1866; U.S. Commissioner of Education, 1867-70; editor, American Journal of Education. Died in Hartford, Hartford County, Conn., July 5, 1900 (age 89 years, 162 days). Interment at Cedar Hill Cemetery, Hartford, Conn.
  Relatives: Son of Chauncey Barnard (1764-1837) and Elizabeth (Andrews) Barnard (1770-1816); married 1847 to Josephine Desnoyers (1821-1891).
  The World War II Liberty ship SS Henry Barnard (built 1942 at Portland, Oregon; scrapped 1961) was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Phineas Taylor Barnum (1810-1891) — also known as P. T. Barnum; "Prince of Humbugs" — of Fairfield, Fairfield County, Conn.; Bridgeport, Fairfield County, Conn. Born in Bethel, Fairfield County, Conn., July 5, 1810. Republican. Grocer; auctioneer; newspaper publisher; Entrepreneur, impressario, museum owner, founder of the Barnum & Bailey circus, known as "The Greatest Show on Earth"; member of Connecticut state house of representatives, 1865-66, 1877-79; mayor of Bridgeport, Conn., 1875-76. Died, of heart failure, in Bridgeport, Fairfield County, Conn., April 7, 1891 (age 80 years, 276 days). Interment at Mountain Grove Cemetery, Bridgeport, Conn.; statue at Seaside Park, Bridgeport, Conn.; statue at Bethel Public Library Grounds, Bethel, Conn.
  Relatives: Son of Philo Barnum and Irena (Taylor) Barnum (1784-1868); half-brother of Philo Fairchild Barnum; married, November 8, 1829, to Charity Hallet (1808-1873); married, September 16, 1874, to Nancy Fish (1850-1927); second cousin of Andrew Gould Chatfield (1810-1875); second cousin once removed of Charles Robert Sherman; second cousin thrice removed of Benjamin Huntington and Almon Ferdinand Rockwell; third cousin of Charles Taylor Sherman, William Tecumseh Sherman, Lampson Parker Sherman and John Sherman; third cousin once removed of William Henry Barnum; third cousin twice removed of Samuel Huntington, Henry Huntington, Gurdon Huntington and Charles William Barnum; fourth cousin once removed of Ebenezer Huntington, Samuel H. Huntington, Abel Huntington, Benjamin Nicoll Huntington and Rhamanthus Menville Stocker.
  Political families: Otis family of Connecticut; Sherman family of Connecticut; Kellogg-Adams-Seymour-Chapin family of Connecticut and New York (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
   — Barnum Avenue, in Bridgeport, Connecticut, is named for him.  — The town of Barnum (incorporated 1887; annexed 1896 to Denver, Colorado), was named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS P. T. Barnum (built 1943 at Terminal Island, Los Angeles, California; scrapped 1961) was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Books by P. T. Barnum: The Life of P. T. Barnum: Written by Himself
  Francis Stebbins Bartow (1816-1861) — also known as Francis S. Bartow — of Georgia. Born in Savannah, Chatham County, Ga., September 6, 1816. Lawyer; candidate for U.S. Representative from Georgia 1st District, 1856; delegate to Georgia secession convention, 1861; Delegate from Georgia to the Confederate Provisional Congress, 1861; died in office 1861; colonel in the Confederate Army during the Civil War. Slaveowner. Killed by rifle shot, while rallying his men on the Henry House Hill, during the first battle of Manassas, Va., July 21, 1861 (age 44 years, 318 days). Interment at Laurel Grove North Cemetery, Savannah, Ga.
  Relatives: Son of Theodosius Bartow (1775-1856) and Frances Louisa (Stebbins) Bartow (1792-1873); married, April 18, 1844, to Louisa Green Berrien (1827-1913; daughter of John Macpherson Berrien); first cousin twice removed of Theodosia Bartow (1746-1794; who married Aaron Burr (1756-1836)).
  Political families: Kellogg-Adams-Seymour-Chapin family of Connecticut and New York; Sherman family of Connecticut; Tallmadge-Floyd family of New York; Burr-Alston-Wilson-Ballard family of Charleston, South Carolina; Edwards-Davenport-Thompson-Kittell family of Connecticut; Cornell-Schilplin-Washburn-Burr family of New York; Berrien-Burr-Bartow-Biddle family of Pennsylvania; Hamlin-Bemis family of Bangor, Maine (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Bartow County, Ga. is named for him.
  The city of Bartow, Florida, is named for him.  — The town of Bartow, Georgia, is named for him.  — The community of Bartow, West Virginia, is named for him.  — Bartow Elementary School (now Otis J. Brock Elementary School), in Savannah, Georgia, was formerly named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS Francis S. Bartow (built 1944 at Savannah, Georgia; scrapped 1971) was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  John Bascom (1827-1911) — of Madison, Dane County, Wis.; Williamstown, Berkshire County, Mass. Born in Genoa, Cayuga County, N.Y., April 30, 1827. College professor; president, University of Wisconsin, 1874-87; Prohibition candidate for U.S. Representative from Massachusetts, 1890 (12th District), 1896 (1st District), 1902 (1st District); Prohibition candidate for Governor of Massachusetts, 1897. Died in Williamstown, Berkshire County, Mass., October 2, 1911 (age 84 years, 155 days). Interment at Williams College Cemetery, Williamstown, Mass.
  Relatives: Son of Rev. John Bascom (1784-1828) and Laura (Woodbridge) Bascom (1789-1870); married 1853 to Abbie Burt (1828-1854); married, January 8, 1856, to Emma Curtiss (1828-1916).
  Bascom Hall, on the campus of the University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin, is named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS John Bascom (built 1942-43 at Panama City, Florida; bombed and sank in the harbor at Bari, Italy, 1943) was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  James Asheton Bayard Sr. (1767-1815) — also known as "The Chevalier"; "The Goliath of His Party"; "High Priest of the Constitution" — of Wilmington, New Castle County, Del. Born in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., July 28, 1767. Lawyer; U.S. Representative from Delaware at-large, 1797-1803; U.S. Senator from Delaware, 1804-13. Slaveowner. Died in Wilmington, New Castle County, Del., August 6, 1815 (age 48 years, 9 days). Original interment at a private or family graveyard, Cecil County, Md.; reinterment in 1842 at Wilmington and Brandywine Cemetery, Wilmington, Del.
  Relatives: Son of James Asheton Bayard (1738-1770) and Agnes or Ann (Hodge) Bayard; married, February 11, 1795, to Ann Nancy Bassett (1777-1854; daughter of Richard Bassett); father of Richard Henry Bayard (1796-1868) and James Asheton Bayard Jr.; nephew and adoptive son of John Bubenheim Bayard; grandfather of Thomas Francis Bayard Sr.; great-grandfather of Thomas Francis Bayard Jr.; second great-grandfather of Thomas Francis Bayard III and Alexis Irenee du Pont Bayard (1918-1985); second great-grandnephew of Nicholas Bayard (c.1644-1707); third great-grandfather of Richard Henry Bayard (born c.1949); third great-grandnephew of Pieter Stuyvesant; first cousin once removed of Littleton Kirkpatrick; first cousin twice removed of Andrew Kirkpatrick; second cousin twice removed of Stephanus Bayard; third cousin once removed of Nicholas Bayard (1736-1802); fourth cousin once removed of James Adams Ekin.
  Political families: DuPont family of Wilmington, Delaware; Livingston-Schuyler family of New York; Kellogg-Adams-Seymour-Chapin family of Connecticut and New York (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  The World War II Liberty ship SS James A. Bayard (built 1943 at Richmond, California; scrapped 1963) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Hiram Iddings Bearss (1875-1938) — also known as Hiram I. Bearss — of Peru, Miami County, Ind. Born in Peru, Miami County, Ind., April 13, 1875. Republican. Served in the U.S. Marine Corps during Spanish-American War; received the Medal of Honor for his actions in the Philippine Islands, 1901-02; served in the U.S. Marine Corps during World War I; delegate to Republican National Convention from Indiana, 1920, 1936. Died in an automobile accident, in Columbia City, Whitley County, Ind., August 28, 1938 (age 63 years, 137 days). Interment at Mt. Hope Cemetery, Peru, Ind.
  Relatives: Son of Franklin Wallace Bearss (1846-1942) and Desdemonia (Iddings) Bearss (1849-1923); married, May 1, 1904, to Louise A. Madden; nephew of George Russell Bearss and Albert Cole Bearss (born1836); grandson of Daniel Robert Bearss.
  Political family: Bearss family of Peru, Indiana.
  The USS Bearss (built 1943, scapped 1976), a U.S. Navy destroyer, was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  John Crepps Wickliffe Beckham (1869-1940) — also known as J. C. W. Beckham — of Frankfort, Franklin County, Ky.; Louisville, Jefferson County, Ky. Born in Bardstown, Nelson County, Ky., August 5, 1869. Democrat. School principal; lawyer; member of Kentucky state house of representatives, 1894-98; Speaker of the Kentucky State House of Representatives, 1898; Lieutenant Governor of Kentucky, 1900; Governor of Kentucky, 1900-07; defeated, 1927; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Kentucky, 1900, 1904 (member, Platform and Resolutions Committee), 1908, 1912 (member, Platform and Resolutions Committee), 1916, 1920, 1936; U.S. Senator from Kentucky, 1915-21; defeated, 1920, 1936. Presbyterian. Died in Louisville, Jefferson County, Ky., January 9, 1940 (age 70 years, 157 days). Interment at Frankfort Cemetery, Frankfort, Ky.
  Relatives: Son of William Netherton Beckham (1833-1882) and Julia Tevis (Wickliffe) Beckham (1835-1913); married, November 21, 1900, to Jean Raphael Fuqua (1879-1962); nephew of Robert Charles Wickliffe (1819-1895) and John Crepps Wickliffe (1830-1913); grandson of Charles Anderson Wickliffe; first cousin of Robert Charles Wickliffe (1874-1912); second cousin once removed of Robert Wickliffe Woolley.
  Political family: Wickliffe-Holt family of Bardstown, Kentucky.
  Beckham County, Okla. is named for him.
  The World War II Liberty ship SS J. C. W. Beckham (built 1943 at New Orleans, Louisiana; scrapped 1968) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Henry Ward Beecher (1813-1887) — of Indianapolis, Marion County, Ind.; Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y. Born in Litchfield, Litchfield County, Conn., June 24, 1813. Republican. Minister; orator; abolitionist; candidate for delegate to New York state constitutional convention 2nd District, 1867; in 1872, he was accused of an adulterous affair with Mrs. Elizabeth Tilton, the wife of a friend of his; Beecher's church conducted an investigation and declared him innocent; in 1874, Elizabeth Tilton's husband Theodore sued Beecher; a highly-publicized months-long trial took place in 1875; the jury was unable to reach a verdit. Presbyterian; later Congregationalist. Died in Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y., March 8, 1887 (age 73 years, 257 days). Interment at Green-Wood Cemetery, Brooklyn, N.Y.; memorial monument at Cadman Plaza Park, Brooklyn, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Lyman Beecher (1775-1863) and Roxana Ward (Foote) Beecher (1775-1816); brother of Harriet Beecher Stowe (1811-1896; author of Uncle Tom's Cabin); married, August 3, 1837, to Eunice White Bullard (1812-1897); uncle of George Buckingham Beecher; second cousin twice removed of Jonathan Elmer, Ebenezer Elmer and Eli Elmer; second cousin thrice removed of Erastus Wolcott and Oliver Wolcott Sr.; third cousin of Leveret Brainard; third cousin once removed of Amaziah Brainard and Lucius Quintius Cincinnatus Elmer; third cousin twice removed of Oliver Wolcott Jr., Roger Griswold, John Allen, Frederick Wolcott, Walter Keene Linscott, Sidney Smythe Linscott and Frances Payne Bolton; third cousin thrice removed of Aaron Kellogg, Daniel Chapin and Oliver Payne Bolton; fourth cousin of Ambrose Tuttle, Joseph H. Elmer and George Frederick Stone; fourth cousin once removed of Gaylord Griswold, Luther Walter Badger, Daniel Kellogg (1791-1875), Gideon Hotchkiss, Asahel Augustus Hotchkiss, John William Allen, Julius Hotchkiss, Giles Waldo Hotchkiss, Charles Francis Chidsey, Ernest Harvey Woodford and Samuel Russell Chidsey.
  Political families: Kellogg-Adams-Seymour-Chapin family of Connecticut and New York; Eastman family; Walker-Meriwether-Kellogg family of Virginia (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  The World War II Liberty ship SS Henry Ward Beecher (built 1942 at Terminal Island, California; scrapped 1969) was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
Martin Behrman Martin Behrman (1864-1926) — of New Orleans, Orleans Parish, La. Born in New York, New York County, N.Y., October 14, 1864. Democrat. Delegate to Louisiana state constitutional convention, 1898, 1921; Louisiana state auditor, 1904-05; mayor of New Orleans, La., 1904-20, 1925-26; defeated, 1920; died in office 1926; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Louisiana, 1908, 1912, 1916 (member, Credentials Committee), 1924; Louisiana Democratic state chair, 1925. German and Jewish ancestry. Died, of heart disease, in New Orleans, Orleans Parish, La., January 12, 1926 (age 61 years, 90 days). Interment at Metairie Cemetery, New Orleans, La.
  Relatives: Son of Henry Behrman and Frederica Behrman; married 1887 to Julia Collins (1862-1940).
  The World War II Liberty ship SS Martin Behrman (built 1944 at New Orleans, Louisiana; scrapped 1965) was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books by Martin Behrman: Martin Behrman of New Orleans : Memoirs of a City Boss
  Image source: Library of Congress
  John Bell (1796-1869) — also known as "The Great Apostate" — of Franklin, Williamson County, Tenn.; Nashville, Davidson County, Tenn. Born near Nashville, Davidson County, Tenn., February 18, 1796. Lawyer; member of Tennessee state senate, 1817; U.S. Representative from Tennessee 7th District, 1827-41; Speaker of the U.S. House, 1834-35; U.S. Secretary of War, 1841; member of Tennessee state house of representatives, 1847; U.S. Senator from Tennessee, 1847-59; Constitutional Union candidate for President of the United States, 1860. Member, Freemasons. Slaveowner. Died near Cumberland Furnace, Dickson County, Tenn., September 10, 1869 (age 73 years, 204 days). Interment at Mt. Olivet Cemetery, Nashville, Tenn.
  Relatives: Son of Samuel Bell and Margaret (Edmiston) Bell; married to Sally Dickinson and Jane Yeatman; father-in-law of Edwin Augustus Keeble (1807-1868).
  The World War II Liberty ship SS John Bell (built 1943 at Houston, Texas; torpedoed and lost in the Mediterranean Sea, 1943) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Henry Louis Benning (1814-1875) — also known as Henry L. Benning; "Old Rock" — of Columbus, Muscogee County, Ga. Born in Columbia County, Ga., April 2, 1814. Democrat. Lawyer; justice of Georgia state supreme court, 1853-59; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Georgia, 1860; delegate to Georgia secession convention, 1861; general in the Confederate Army during the Civil War. Died in Columbus, Muscogee County, Ga., July 10, 1875 (age 61 years, 99 days). Interment at Linwood Cemetery, Columbus, Ga.
  Relatives: Son of Pleasant Moon Benning (1783-1845) and Malinda Meriwether (White) Benning (1789-1864); married, August 12, 1839, to Mary Howard Jones (1817-1868; daughter of Seaborn Jones (1788-1864)).
  Fort Benning, in Chattahoochee County, Georgia and Russell County, Alabama, is named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS Henry L. Benning (built 1943 at Baltimore, Maryland; scrapped 1967) was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  George Mortimer Bibb (1776-1859) — also known as George M. Bibb — of Yellow Banks (unknown county), Ky. Born in Prince Edward County, Va., October 30, 1776. Lawyer; member of Kentucky state house of representatives, 1806, 1817; U.S. Attorney for Kentucky, 1807-08, 1819-24; Judge, Kentucky Court of Appeals, 1808-10, 1828; U.S. Senator from Kentucky, 1811-14, 1829-35; U.S. Secretary of the Treasury, 1844-45. Slaveowner. Died in Georgetown, Washington, D.C., April 14, 1859 (age 82 years, 166 days). Interment at Frankfort Cemetery, Frankfort, Ky.
  Relatives: Son-in-law of Charles Scott (1739-1813); son of Richard Bibb and Lucy (Booker) Bibb.
  The World War II Liberty ship SS George M. Bibb (built 1943 at Portland, Oregon; scrapped 1962) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  John Bidwell (1819-1900) — of Chico, Butte County, Calif. Born in Chautauqua County, N.Y., August 5, 1819. Major in the U.S. Army during the Mexican War; member of California state senate, 1849-50; delegate to Democratic National Convention from California, 1860; U.S. Representative from California 3rd District, 1865-67; candidate for Governor of California, 1875 (Independent), 1890 (Prohibition); Prohibition candidate for President of the United States, 1892. Member, Freemasons. Died in Chico, Butte County, Calif., April 4, 1900 (age 80 years, 242 days). Interment at Chico Cemetery, Chico, Calif.
  Relatives: Married to Annie Ellicott Kennedy (1839-1918).
  The World War II Liberty ship SS John Bidwell (built 1942 at Terminal Island, California; scrapped 1960) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
Horace Binney Horace Binney (1780-1875) — of Pennsylvania. Born in Northern Liberties (now part of Philadelphia), Philadelphia County, Pa., January 4, 1780. Lawyer; member of Pennsylvania state house of representatives, 1806-07; U.S. Representative from Pennsylvania 2nd District, 1833-35. Member, Society of the Cincinnati. Died in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., August 12, 1875 (age 95 years, 220 days). Interment at St. James the Less Church Cemetery, Philadelphia, Pa.
  Relatives: Son of Barnabas Binney.
  The World War II Liberty ship SS Horace Binney (built 1942 at Baltimore, Maryland; wrecked and scrapped 1958) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: Twentieth-Century Bench and Bar of Pennsylvania (1903)
  James Gillespie Birney (1792-1857) — also known as James G. Birney — of Danville, Boyle County, Ky.; Huntsville, Madison County, Ala.; Cincinnati, Hamilton County, Ohio; New York, New York County, N.Y.; Lower Saginaw, Saginaw County (now Bay City, Bay County), Mich. Born in Danville, Boyle County, Ky., February 4, 1792. Lawyer; studied law in the office of Alexander J. Dallas in Philadelphia; member of Kentucky state house of representatives, 1816-18; member of Alabama state house of representatives, 1819-20; solicitor general of Alabama, 1823-26; candidate for Presidential Elector for Alabama, 1828; mayor of Huntsville, Ala., 1829; abolitionist; Liberty candidate for President of the United States, 1840, 1844; candidate for Governor of Michigan, 1843, 1845. Presbyterian. Member, Freemasons; American Anti-Slavery Society. While traveling in 1845, the horse he was riding bucked; he fell and was injured; his condition worsened over time, leading to tremors and paralysis, and he died as a result, in Perth Amboy, Middlesex County, N.J., November 25, 1857 (age 65 years, 294 days). Interment at Williamsburgh Cemetery, Groveland, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of James Gillespie Birney and Mary Reed Birney; married, February 16, 1816, to Agatha McDowell; married 1840 to Elizabeth Potts Fitzhugh (sister of Henry Fitzhugh); father of James M. Birney (1817-1888); uncle of Humphrey Marshall; grandfather of Arthur Alexis Birney.
  Political family: Birney family of Danville, Kentucky (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  The World War II Liberty ship SS James G. Birney (built 1943 at Terminal Island, California; scrapped 1967) was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
Jeremiah Sullivan Black Jeremiah Sullivan Black (1810-1883) — also known as Jeremiah S. Black — of Somerset, Somerset County, Pa.; Washington, D.C.; York, York County, Pa. Born in Stonycreek Township, Somerset County, Pa., January 10, 1810. Democrat. Lawyer; district judge in Pennsylvania, 1842-51; chief justice of Pennsylvania state supreme court, 1851-54; U.S. Attorney General, 1857-60; U.S. Secretary of State, 1860-61; delegate to Pennsylvania state constitutional convention, 1873. Disciples of Christ. Scotch-Irish and German ancestry. Died in York, York County, Pa., August 19, 1883 (age 73 years, 221 days). Interment at Prospect Hill Cemetery, York, Pa.
  Relatives: Son of Mary (Sullivan) Black (1780-1852) and Henry Black; married, March 23, 1836, to Mary Forward (1819-1897; daughter of Chauncey Forward); father of Chauncey Forward Black (1839-1904).
  Political family: Kellogg-Adams-Seymour-Chapin family of Connecticut and New York (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  The World War II Liberty ship SS Jeremiah S. Black (built 1942 at Terminal Island, California; scrapped 1963) was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: Twentieth-Century Bench and Bar of Pennsylvania (1903)
Joseph C. S. Blackburn Joseph Clay Stiles Blackburn (1838-1918) — also known as Joseph C. S. Blackburn — of Versailles, Woodford County, Ky. Born near Spring Station, Woodford County, Ky., October 1, 1838. Democrat. Lawyer; served in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; member of Kentucky state house of representatives, 1871-75; U.S. Representative from Kentucky 7th District, 1875-85; U.S. Senator from Kentucky, 1885-97, 1901-07; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Kentucky, 1896, 1900, 1904 (member, Credentials Committee). Died in Washington, D.C., September 12, 1918 (age 79 years, 346 days). Interment at Frankfort Cemetery, Frankfort, Ky.
  Relatives: Son of Edward Mitchell Blackburn (1787-1867) and Lavinia St. Clair (Bell) Blackburn (1794-1863); brother of Luke Pryor Blackburn; married, February 10, 1858, to Therese Graham (1839-1899); married, December 11, 1901, to Mary E. Blackburn; father of Corinne Blackburn (1869-1958; who married William Holt Gale); granduncle of Smith Alford Blackburn; great-granduncle of Charles Milton Blackburn; first cousin twice removed of Gabriel Slaughter; third cousin of Charles Rice Slaughter (1819-1862); third cousin once removed of Robert Pryor Henry, John Flournoy Henry and Gustavus Adolphus Henry.
  Political families: Blackburn-Slaughter-Buckner-Madison family of Kentucky; Pendleton-Lee family of Maryland (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Mount Blackburn, the highest peak of the Wrangell Mountains, in the Copper River Census Area, Alaska, is named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS Joe C. S. Blackburn (built 1943 at Brunswick, Georgia; sold for scrap 1967) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: The Parties and The Men (1896)
James G. Blaine James Gillespie Blaine (1830-1893) — also known as James G. Blaine; "The Plumed Knight"; "Belshazzar Blaine"; "Magnetic Man" — of Augusta, Kennebec County, Maine. Born in West Brownsville, Washington County, Pa., January 31, 1830. Republican. Delegate to Republican National Convention from Maine, 1856 (Honorary Secretary); member of Maine state house of representatives, 1859-62; Speaker of the Maine State House of Representatives, 1861-62; U.S. Representative from Maine 3rd District, 1863-76; Speaker of the U.S. House, 1869-75; candidate for Republican nomination for President, 1876, 1880; U.S. Senator from Maine, 1876-81; U.S. Secretary of State, 1881, 1889-92; candidate for President of the United States, 1884. Congregationalist. Scotch-Irish ancestry. Died in Washington, D.C., January 27, 1893 (age 62 years, 362 days). Original interment at Oak Hill Cemetery, Washington, D.C.; reinterment in 1920 at Blaine Memorial Park, Augusta, Maine.
  Relatives: Son of Ephraim Lyon Blaine (1796-1850) and Maria Louise (Gillespie) Blaine (1801-1871); married, June 30, 1850, to Harriet Stanwood (1827-1903); father of Harriet Blaine (1871-1958; who married Truxtun Beale); nephew of Ellen Blaine (who married John Hoge Ewing (1796-1887)); grandfather of James Gillespie Blaine III.
  Political family: Dewey-Blaine-Coit-Huntington family of Connecticut (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Cross-reference: Robert G. Ingersoll
  Blaine counties in Idaho, Mont., Neb. and Okla. are named for him.
  Mount Blaine, in Park County, Colorado, is named for him.  — The city of Blaine, Washington, is named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS James G. Blaine (built 1942 at South Portland, Maine; scrapped 1969) was named for him.
  Politician named for him: J. B. McLaughlin
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about James G. Blaine: Mark Wahlgren Summers, Rum, Romanism, & Rebellion : The Making of a President, 1884 — Edward P. Crapol, James G. Blaine : Architect of Empire — Richard B. Cheney & Lynne V. Cheney, Kings Of The Hill : How Nine Powerful Men Changed The Course of American History
  Image source: William C. Roberts, Leading Orators (1884)
  John Blair Jr. (1732-1800) — of York County, Va. Born in Williamsburg, Va., 1732. Lawyer; member of Virginia House of Burgesses, 1766-71; delegate to Virginia state constitutional convention, 1776; member of Virginia Governor's Council, 1776-78; state court judge in Virginia, 1777-78; Judge, Virginia Court of Appeals, 1779-89; member, U.S. Constitutional Convention, 1787; delegate to Virginia convention to ratify U.S. constitution from York County, 1788; justice of Virginia state supreme court, 1789; Associate Justice of U.S. Supreme Court, 1789-95; resigned 1795. Presbyterian or Episcopalian. Member, Freemasons. Slaveowner. Died in Williamsburg, Va., August 31, 1800 (age about 68 years). Interment at Bruton Parish Church Cemetery, Williamsburg, Va.
  Relatives: Son of John Blair and Mary (Monro) Blair; married to Jean Balfour.
  The World War II Liberty ship SS John Blair (built 1942 at Richmond, California; scrapped 1966) was named for him.
  See also federal judicial profile — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial — Biographical Directory of Federal Judges
  Henry Goode Blasdel (1825-1900) — also known as Henry G. Blasdel — of Virginia City, Storey County, Nev.; Oakland, Alameda County, Calif. Born near Lawrenceburg, Dearborn County, Ind., January 29, 1825. Republican. Farmer; merchant; riverboat captain; miller; mining business; Governor of Nevada, 1864-71. Died in Oakland, Alameda County, Calif., July 22, 1900 (age 75 years, 174 days). Interment at Mountain View Cemetery, Oakland, Calif.
  Relatives: Son of Jacob Blasdel (1782-1841) and Elizabeth (Weaver) Blasdel (1791-1878); married 1845 to Sarah Jane Cox (1827-1904).
  The Blasdel state office building, in Carson City, Nevada, is named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS H. G. Blasdel (built 1943 at Richmond, California; scrapped 1947) was named for him.
  See also National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Samuel M. Blatchford (1820-1893) — of Auburn, Cayuga County, N.Y.; New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in New York, New York County, N.Y., March 9, 1820. Lawyer; U.S. District Judge for the Southern District of New York, 1867-78; Judge of U.S. Court of Appeals for the 2nd Circuit, 1878-82; Associate Justice of U.S. Supreme Court, 1882-93; died in office 1893. Episcopalian. Member, Freemasons. Died in Newport, Newport County, R.I., July 7, 1893 (age 73 years, 120 days). Interment at Green-Wood Cemetery, Brooklyn, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Julia (Mumford) Blatchford and Richard Milford Blatchford (1798-1875); married, December 17, 1844, to Caroline Appleton (1817-1881).
  The World War II Liberty ship SS Samuel Blatchford (built 1942 at Baltimore, Maryland, scrapped 1969) was named for him.
  See also federal judicial profile — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Henry Hooper Blood (1872-1942) — also known as Henry H. Blood — of Utah. Born in Kaysville, Davis County, Utah, October 1, 1872. Democrat. Davis County Treasurer, 1898-1901; school teacher; bank director; member, Utah Public Utilities Commission, 1917-21; member, Utah State Road Commission, 1922-32; Governor of Utah, 1933-41. Mormon. Died, from a cerebral hemorrhage, in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Utah, June 19, 1942 (age 69 years, 261 days). Interment at Kaysville City Cemetery, Kaysville, Utah.
  Relatives: Son of William Blood (1839-1917) and Jane Wilkie (Hooper) Blood (1845-1898); married, June 4, 1896, to Minnie Ann Barnes (1872-1947; daughter of John Richard Barnes; half-sister of John George Moroni Barnes (1860-1932)).
  Political family: Barnes family of Kaysville, Utah.
  The World War II Liberty ship SS Henry H. Blood (built 1943 at Richmond, California; scrapped 1961) was named for him.
  See also National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  George Sewall Boutwell (1818-1905) — also known as George S. Boutwell — of Groton, Middlesex County, Mass. Born in Brookline, Norfolk County, Mass., January 28, 1818. Member of Massachusetts state house of representatives, 1842-50; Governor of Massachusetts, 1851-53; delegate to Massachusetts state constitutional convention, 1853; delegate to Republican National Convention from Massachusetts, 1860, 1864 (alternate); first U.S. Commissioner of Internal Revenue, 1862; U.S. Representative from Massachusetts, 1863-69 (7th District 1863-69, 9th District 1869); U.S. Secretary of the Treasury, 1869-73; U.S. Senator from Massachusetts, 1873-77. Died, from pneumonia, in Groton, Middlesex County, Mass., February 27, 1905 (age 87 years, 30 days). Interment at Groton Cemetery, Groton, Mass.
  Cross-reference: Daniel Needham
  Boutwell School (built 1915; now Boutwell Early Childhood Center), in Groton, Massachusetts, is named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS George S. Boutwell (built 1942 at Richmond, California; scrapped 1964) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  James Bowdoin (1726-1790) — of Massachusetts. Born in Boston, Suffolk County, Mass., August 7, 1726. Delegate to Massachusetts state constitutional convention, 1779-80; Governor of Massachusetts, 1785-87; delegate to Massachusetts convention to ratify U.S. constitution, 1788. French ancestry. Member, American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Died, of consumption (tuberculosis), in Boston, Suffolk County, Mass., November 6, 1790 (age 64 years, 91 days). Interment at Old Granary Burying Ground, Boston, Mass.
  Relatives: Son of James Bowdoin (1676-1747) and Hannah (Portage) Bowdoin (1686-1726); married to Elizabeth Erving (1731-1809); father of James Bowdoin III; great-grandfather of Robert Charles Winthrop; fifth great-grandfather of William Amory Gardner Minot and John Forbes Kerry; second cousin thrice removed of George Griswold Sill (1829-1907).
  Political family: Kellogg-Adams-Seymour-Chapin family of Connecticut and New York (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Bowdoin College, in Brunswick, Maine, is named for him.  — The towns of Bowdoin & Bowdoinham, Maine, are named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS James Bowdoin (built 1943 at South Portland, Maine; scrapped 1972) was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  John Green Brady (1848-1918) — also known as John G. Brady — of Alaska. Born in New York, New York County, N.Y., May 25, 1848. Republican. Missionary; co-founder of the school that later became Sheldon Jackson College, in Sitka, Alaska; merchant; Governor of Alaska District, 1897-1906; forced to resign as governor in 1906, after an inquiry about his involvement with the Reynolds-Alaska Development Company. Presbyterian. Ill with diabetes, he suffered a stroke and died in Sitka, Alaska, December 17, 1918 (age 70 years, 206 days). Interment at Sitka National Cemetery, Sitka, Alaska.
  Relatives: Adoptive son of John Green (1807-1887); married 1887 to Elizabeth Patton (1863-1951).
  The World War II Liberty ship SS John G. Brady (built 1943 at Portland, Oregon; scrapped 1960) was named for him.
  Epitaph: "A Life Ruled By Faith In God And Man."
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  John Branch Jr. (1782-1863) — of Enfield, Halifax County, N.C. Born in Halifax, Halifax County, N.C., November 4, 1782. Democrat. Lawyer; member of North Carolina state senate, 1811, 1813-17, 1834; Governor of North Carolina, 1817-20; federal judge, 1822; U.S. Senator from North Carolina, 1823-29; U.S. Secretary of the Navy, 1829-31; U.S. Representative from North Carolina 5th District, 1831-33; delegate to North Carolina state constitutional convention, 1835; Governor of Florida Territory, 1844-45. Episcopalian. Slaveowner. Died of pneumonia, in Enfield, Halifax County, N.C., January 4, 1863 (age 80 years, 61 days). Interment at Elmwood Cemetery, Enfield, N.C.
  Relatives: Son of Col. John Branch and Mary (Bradford) Branch; married to Elizabeth Fort and Eliza Jordan; uncle of Lawrence O'Bryan Branch; granduncle of William Augustus Blount Branch (1847-1910).
  Political family: Branch family of Enfield, North Carolina.
  Branch County, Mich. is named for him.
  The World War II Liberty ship SS John Branch (built 1943 at Wilmington, North Carolina; sold 1947, scrapped 1962) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  John Cabell Breckinridge (1821-1875) — also known as John C. Breckinridge — of Lexington, Fayette County, Ky. Born near Lexington, Fayette County, Ky., January 16, 1821. Democrat. Lawyer; major in the U.S. Army during the Mexican War; member of Kentucky state house of representatives, 1849-51; U.S. Representative from Kentucky 8th District, 1851-55; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Kentucky, 1856; Vice President of the United States, 1857-61; Southern Democratic candidate for President of the United States, 1860; U.S. Senator from Kentucky, 1861; general in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; Confederate Secretary of War, 1865. Presbyterian. Member, Freemasons. Expelled from the U.S. Senate on December 4, 1861 for his participation in the Confederate military. Fled to Cuba at the end of the war, and lived in England and Canada until 1869. Slaveowner. Died, from lung disease and liver cirrhosis, in Lexington, Fayette County, Ky., May 17, 1875 (age 54 years, 121 days). Interment at Lexington Cemetery, Lexington, Ky.
  Relatives: Son of Mary Clay (Smith) Breckinridge (1787-1864) and Joseph Cabell Breckinridge; married 1840 to Elizabeth Lucas (1825-1889); married, December 12, 1843, to Mary Cyrene Burch; father of Clifton Rodes Breckinridge; nephew of Robert Jefferson Breckinridge; grandson of John Breckinridge; great-grandson of John Witherspoon; great-grandnephew of William Preston and William Cabell; first cousin of Peter Augustus Porter (1827-1864), Robert Jefferson Breckinridge Jr. and William Campbell Preston Breckinridge; first cousin once removed of James Douglas Breckinridge, Benjamin William Sheridan Cabell (1793-1862), Peter Augustus Porter (1853-1925), Levin Irving Handy, Desha Breckinridge and Henry Skillman Breckinridge; first cousin twice removed of William Cabell Jr., Francis Smith Preston, William Henry Cabell and James Patton Preston; second cousin of Carter Henry Harrison, William Lewis Cabell and George Craighead Cabell; second cousin once removed of William Campbell Preston, James McDowell, John Buchanan Floyd, John Smith Preston, George Rogers Clark Floyd, Edward Carrington Cabell, Benjamin Earl Cabell and Carter Henry Harrison II; second cousin twice removed of Earle Cabell; third cousin of John William Leftwich.
  Political families: Harrison-Randolph-Marshall-Cabell family of Virginia; Breckinridge-Preston-Cabell family of Virginia; Kellogg-Adams-Seymour-Chapin family of Connecticut and New York; Walker-Bolling family of Huntsville, Alabama (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  The city of Breckenridge, Missouri, is named for him.  — The city of Breckenridge, Colorado, is named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS John C. Breckinridge (built 1943 at Savannah, Georgia; scrapped 1960) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial — BillionGraves burial record — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Books about John C. Breckinridge: William C. Davis, An Honorable Defeat: The Last Days of the Confederate Government — Frank Hopkins Heck, Proud Kentuckian, John C. Breckinridge, 1821-1875 — William C. Davis, Breckinridge : Statesman, Soldier, Symbol
  Andrew Broaddus (1900-1972) — of Louisville, Jefferson County, Ky. Born in Louisville, Jefferson County, Ky., May 15, 1900. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Navy during World War I; laundry business; mayor of Louisville, Ky., 1953-57. Died, from a heart attack, in Louisville, Jefferson County, Ky., September 7, 1972 (age 72 years, 115 days). Interment at Cave Hill Cemetery, Louisville, Ky.
  Relatives: Son of Russell Broaddus (1873-1946) and Julia Ducan (Ely) Broaddus (1876-1961); married, September 24, 1924, to Elizabeth Robertson (1900-1993); third cousin twice removed of Elbridge Jackson Broaddus; fourth cousin once removed of Joseph Broaddus and Bower Slack Broaddus (1888-1949).
  Political family: Broaddus family of Madison County, Kentucky.
  The Mayor Andrew Broaddus, a floating life-saving station in Louisville, Kentucky, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Heywood Campbell Broun (1888-1939) — also known as Heywood Broun — of New York; Stamford, Fairfield County, Conn. Born in Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y., December 7, 1888. Socialist. Sportswriter; columnist for New York newspapers;; candidate for U.S. Representative from New York 17th District, 1930; founder of the American Newspaper Guild in 1933 and its first president; expelled from Socialist Party in 1933. Catholic. Member, American Civil Liberties Union. Died, of pneumonia, in the Harkness Pavilion of the Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center, Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., December 18, 1939 (age 51 years, 11 days). Interment at Gate of Heaven Cemetery, Hawthorne, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Heywood Cox Broun and Henriette (Brose) Broun; married 1917 to Ruth Hale (1886-1934); married 1935 to Constance (Madison) Dooley (actress).
  The World War II Liberty ship SS Heywood Broun (built 1943 at Baltimore, Maryland; scrapped 1969) was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books by Heywood Broun: Collected Edition of Heywood Broun (1941) — Christians only : a study in prejudice
  Books about Heywood Broun: Richard O'Connor, Heywood Broun : A Biography
  Albert Gallatin Brown (1813-1880) — also known as Albert G. Brown — of Terry, Hinds County, Miss. Born in Chester District (now Chester County), S.C., May 31, 1813. Democrat. Lawyer; member of Mississippi state house of representatives, 1835-39; U.S. Representative from Mississippi, 1839-41, 1847-53 (at-large 1839-41, 4th District 1847-53); circuit judge in Mississippi, 1842-43; Governor of Mississippi, 1844-48; U.S. Senator from Mississippi, 1854-61; served in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; Senator from Mississippi in the Confederate Congress, 1862-65. Member, Freemasons. Slaveowner. Died near Terry, Hinds County, Miss., June 12, 1880 (age 67 years, 12 days). Interment at Greenwood Cemetery, Jackson, Miss.
  Presumably named for: Albert Gallatin
  Relatives: Son of Joseph Brown (1778-1844) and Elizabeth (Rice) Brown (1787-1855); married 1835 to Elizabeth Taliaferro (1817-1836); married, January 12, 1841, to Roberta Eugenia Young (1817-1886).
  Brown County, Kan. is named for him.
  The World War II Liberty ship SS Albert G. Brown (built 1943 at New Orleans, Louisiana; scrapped 1960) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Henry Billings Brown (1836-1913) — also known as Henry B. Brown — of Detroit, Wayne County, Mich.; Washington, D.C. Born in South Lee, Lee, Berkshire County, Mass., March 2, 1836. Lawyer; circuit judge in Michigan 3rd Circuit, 1868; U.S. District Judge for the Eastern District of Michigan, 1875-90; Associate Justice of U.S. Supreme Court, 1890-1906; resigned 1906. Congregationalist. Died in Bronxville, Westchester County, N.Y., September 4, 1913 (age 77 years, 186 days). Interment at Elmwood Cemetery, Detroit, Mich.
  Relatives: Son of Billings Brown and Mary (Tyler) Brown; married, July 13, 1864, to Caroline Pitts (died 1901); married, June 25, 1904, to Josephine E. Tyler.
  The World War II Liberty ship SS Henry B. Brown (built 1942-43 at Baltimore, Maryland; scrapped 1965) was named for him.
  Epitaph: "Integer Vitae Sclerisque Purus." [Upright of life and free from Wickedness.]
  See also federal judicial profile — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  John William Brown (c.1867-1941) — also known as John W. Brown — of Worcester, Worcester County, Mass.; Woolwich, Sagadahoc County, Maine. Born in Canada, about 1867. Socialist. Naturalized U.S. citizen; carpenter; labor organizer; candidate for U.S. Representative from Massachusetts 3rd District, 1904; candidate for Governor of Massachusetts, 1907; candidate for U.S. Representative from Maine 3rd District, 1910; newspaper columnist. Member, United Mine Workers. While working on his hunting rifle, it accidentally discharged, and he died soon after, in Woolwich, Sagadahoc County, Maine, June 19, 1941 (age about 74 years). Burial location unknown.
  The World War II Liberty ship SS John W. Brown (built 1942 at Baltimore, Maryland; now a museum ship) is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article
James Buchanan James Buchanan (1791-1868) — also known as "The Sage of Wheatland"; "Buck"; "Old Buck" — of Lancaster, Lancaster County, Pa. Born in a log cabin near Mercersburg, Franklin County, Pa., April 23, 1791. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812; lawyer; member of Pennsylvania state house of representatives, 1814; U.S. Representative from Pennsylvania, 1821-31 (3rd District 1821-23, 4th District 1823-31); U.S. Minister to Russia, 1832-33; Great Britain, 1853-56; U.S. Senator from Pennsylvania, 1834-45; resigned 1845; candidate for Democratic nomination for President, 1844, 1848, 1852; U.S. Secretary of State, 1845-49; President of the United States, 1857-61. Presbyterian. Member, Freemasons. Died near Lancaster, Lancaster County, Pa., June 1, 1868 (age 77 years, 39 days). Interment at Woodward Hill Cemetery, Lancaster, Pa.; memorial monument at Meridian Hill Park, Washington, D.C.
  Relatives: Son of James Buchanan (c.1761-1821) and Elizabeth (Speer) Buchanan (1767-1833).
  Cross-reference: David Fullerton Robison — John A. Quitman — John Gallagher Montgomery
  Buchanan counties in Iowa, Mo. and Va. are named for him.
  The city of Buchanan, Michigan, is named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS James Buchanan (built 1942 at Terminal Island, California; scrapped 1969) was named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: James B. DukeJames B. CullisonJames Buchanan SigginsJ. B. MarcumJames B. Searcy
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Books about James Buchanan: Philip S. Klein, President James Buchanan: A Biography — Jean H. Baker, James Buchanan — R. G. Horton, The Life And Public Services Of James Buchanan: Late Minister To England And Formerly Minister To Russia, Senator And Representative In Congress, And Sec. Of State
  Critical books about James Buchanan: Nathan Miller, Star-Spangled Men : America's Ten Worst Presidents
  Image source: Portrait & Biographical Album of Washtenaw County (1891)
  Aedanus Burke (1743-1802) — also known as "Cassius" — of Charleston, Charleston District (now Charleston County), S.C. Born in County Galway, Ireland, June 16, 1743. Circuit judge in South Carolina, 1778; member of South Carolina state house of representatives, 1778-79, 1787-88; served in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; delegate to South Carolina convention to ratify U.S. constitution, 1788; U.S. Representative from South Carolina at-large, 1789-91. Slaveowner. Died in Charleston, Charleston County, S.C., March 30, 1802 (age 58 years, 287 days). Interment at Burnt Church Burial Ground, Jacksonboro, S.C.
  The World War II Liberty ship SS Aedanus Burke (built 1943 at New Orleans, Louisiana; scrapped 1964) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  John Burke (1859-1937) — of Devils Lake, Ramsey County, N.Dak.; Fargo, Cass County, N.Dak.; Bismarck, Burleigh County, N.Dak. Born in Sigourney, Keokuk County, Iowa, February 25, 1859. Democrat. Lawyer; member of North Dakota state house of representatives, 1891; member of North Dakota state senate, 1893-97; Governor of North Dakota, 1907-13; candidate for Democratic nomination for Vice President, 1912; Treasurer of the United States, 1913-21; candidate for U.S. Senator from North Dakota, 1916; delegate to Democratic National Convention from North Dakota, 1924; justice of North Dakota state supreme court, 1925-37; chief justice of North Dakota state supreme court, 1935-36. Catholic. Irish ancestry. Died May 14, 1937 (age 78 years, 78 days). Interment at St. Mary's Cemetery, Bismarck, N.Dak.; statue at State Capitol Grounds, Bismarck, N.Dak.
  Relatives: Son of John Burke and Mary (Ryan) Burke; married, August 22, 1891, to Mary E. Kane.
  Cross-reference: Usher L. Burdick
  Burke County, N.Dak. is named for him.
  The World War II Liberty ship SS John Burke (built 1942 at Portland, Oregon; bombed by kamikazi and sank in the Sulu Sea, 1944) was named for him.
  See also National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Albert Sidney Burleson (1863-1937) — also known as Albert S. Burleson — of Austin, Travis County, Tex. Born in San Marcos, Hays County, Tex., June 7, 1863. Democrat. Lawyer; U.S. Representative from Texas, 1899-1913 (9th District 1899-1903, 10th District 1903-13); alternate delegate to Democratic National Convention from Texas, 1912 (speaker); U.S. Postmaster General, 1913-21. Died, from a heart attack, in Austin, Travis County, Tex., November 24, 1937 (age 74 years, 170 days). Interment at Oakwood Cemetery, Austin, Tex.
  Relatives: Son of Edward Burleson Jr. (1826-1877) and Emma Lucy (Kyle) Burleson (1832-1877); married 1889 to Adele Lubbock Steiner (1863-1948; author, playwright, poet); grandson of Edward Burleson.
  Political family: Burleson family of Austin, Texas.
  The World War II Liberty ship SS Albert S. Burleson (built 1943 at Houston, Texas; scrapped 1971) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Otway Burns (c.1775-1850) — of Swansboro, Onslow County, N.C.; Beaufort, Carteret County, N.C. Born near Swansboro, Onslow County, N.C., about 1775. Ship captain; privateer during the War of 1812; shipbuilder; planter; member of North Carolina house of commons, 1821-22, 1824-27, 1832; member of North Carolina state senate, 1828-30, 1834; lighthouse keeper at the Brant Island Shoal Light, 1835-50. Died in Portsmouth, Carteret County, N.C., August 25, 1850 (age about 75 years). Interment at Old Burying Ground, Beaufort, N.C.; statue at Town Square, Burnsville, N.C.
  Relatives: Married, July 6, 1809, to Joanna Grant; grandfather of Walter Francis Burns (born c.1872).
  The town of Burnsville, North Carolina, is named for him.  — The community of Otway, North Carolina, is named for him.  — Two U.S. Navy destroyers were named for him, in 1918 and in 1942.
  See also Wikipedia article
  Fiction about Otway Burns: Ruth P. Barbour, The Cruise of the Snap Dragon
  Pierce Butler (1744-1822) — of South Carolina. Born in County Carlow, Ireland, July 11, 1744. Democrat. Member of South Carolina state house of representatives, 1778-89; Adjutant General of South Carolina, 1779; Delegate to Continental Congress from South Carolina, 1787; member, U.S. Constitutional Convention, 1787; U.S. Senator from South Carolina, 1789-96, 1802-04. Episcopalian. Slaveowner. Died in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., February 15, 1822 (age 77 years, 219 days). Interment at Christ Church Burial Ground, Philadelphia, Pa.; cenotaph at St. Michael's Church Cemetery, Charleston, S.C.
  Relatives: Son of Sir Richard Butler (1699-1771) and Henrietta (Percy) Butler (1701-1794); married, January 10, 1771, to Mary Middleton (1748-1790; niece of Henry Middleton (1717-1784); first cousin of Arthur Middleton).
  Political families: Middleton-Huger-Rutledge-Drayton family of Charleston, South Carolina; Pinckney-Middleton family of Charleston, South Carolina; Shippen-Middleton family of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  The World War II Liberty ship SS Pierce Butler (built 1942 at Baltimore, Maryland; torpedoed and lost 1942 in the Indian Ocean) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
John C. Calhoun John Caldwell Calhoun (1782-1850) — also known as John C. Calhoun — of Pickens District (now Pickens County), S.C. Born in Abbeville District (part now in McCormick County), S.C., March 18, 1782. Member of South Carolina state house of representatives, 1808; U.S. Representative from South Carolina 6th District, 1811-17; U.S. Secretary of War, 1817-25; Vice President of the United States, 1825-32; resigned 1832; U.S. Senator from South Carolina, 1832-43, 1845-50; died in office 1850; U.S. Secretary of State, 1844-45. Scotch-Irish ancestry. Slaveowner. Died in Washington, D.C., March 31, 1850 (age 68 years, 13 days). Interment at St. Philip's Churchyard, Charleston, S.C.; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery, Washington, D.C.; memorial monument at Marion Park, Charleston, S.C.
  Relatives: Son of James Patrick Calhoun (1727-1795) and Martha (Caldwell) Calhoun (1750-1802); married, December 27, 1809, to Floride Bonneau (1792-1866) and Floride Calhoun (daughter of John Ewing Colhoun (c.1749-1802)); father of Anna Maria Calhoun (1817-1875; who married Thomas Green Clemson (1807-1888)); uncle of John Alfred Calhoun and Martha Catherine Calhoun (1809-1869; who married Armistead Burt); great-granduncle of John Temple Graves; first cousin of John Ewing Colhoun (c.1749-1802) and Joseph Calhoun; first cousin once removed of Andrew Pickens; first cousin twice removed of Francis Wilkinson Pickens; second cousin once removed of Sarah Ann Calhoun (1811-1892; who married Alexander Henry Brown); second cousin twice removed of William Francis Calhoun.
  Political family: Calhoun-Pickens family of South Carolina (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Calhoun counties in Ala., Ark., Fla., Ga., Ill., Iowa, Mich., Miss., S.C., Tex. and W.Va. are named for him.
  The John C. Calhoun State Office Building (opened 1926), in Columbia, South Carolina, is named for him.  — Lake Calhoun (now known by its Dakota name, Bde Maka Ska), in Minneapolis, Minnesota, was named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS John C. Calhoun (built 1941-42 at Wilmington, North Carolina; destroyed in cargo explosion at Finchhafen, Papua New Guinea, 1944) was named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: John C. JohnsonJohn Calhoun NichollsJohn Calhoun CookJohn C. SheppardJohn C. BellJohn C. C. MayoJohn C. Phillips
  Coins and currency: His portrait appeared on Confederate States $1,000 notes (1861) and $100 notes (1862).
  Campaign slogan: "Liberty dearer than union."
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about John C. Calhoun: Margaret L. Coit, John C. Calhoun : American Portrait — Clyde N. Wilson, John C. Calhoun — Merrill D. Peterson, The Great Triumvirate: Webster, Clay, and Calhoun — Warren Brown, John C. Calhoun (for young readers)
  Image source: James Smith Noel Collection, Louisiana State University in Shreveport
  George Washington Campbell (1769-1848) — also known as George W. Campbell — of Nashville, Davidson County, Tenn. Born in Scotland, February 9, 1769. Democrat. U.S. Representative from Tennessee at-large, 1803-09; state court judge in Tennessee, 1809; U.S. Senator from Tennessee, 1811-14, 1815-18; U.S. Secretary of the Treasury, 1814; U.S. Minister to Russia, 1818-20. Scottish ancestry. Died in Nashville, Davidson County, Tenn., February 17, 1848 (age 79 years, 8 days). Interment at Nashville City Cemetery, Nashville, Tenn.
  Campbell County, Tenn. is named for him.
  The World War II Liberty ship SS George W. Campbell (built 1942-43 at Portland, Oregon; scrapped 1967) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  John Archibald Campbell (1811-1889) — also known as John A. Campbell — of Montgomery, Montgomery County, Ala.; Baltimore, Md. Born in Washington, Wilkes County, Ga., June 24, 1811. Lawyer; member of Alabama state house of representatives, 1837; Associate Justice of U.S. Supreme Court, 1853-61; Confederate States Assistant Secretary of War, 1861-65; at the end of the Civil War, he was suspected of involvement in the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln; arrested in May 1865; held in detention for five months, but never charged; released in October 1865. Episcopalian. Died in Baltimore, Md., March 12, 1889 (age 77 years, 261 days). Interment at Green Mount Cemetery, Baltimore, Md.
  Relatives: Married to Anna E. Goldthwaite; grandfather of Duncan Lawrence Groner (1873-1957).
  The John A. Campbell U.S. Courthouse, in Mobile, Alabama, is named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS John A. Campbell (built 1943 at Brunswick, Georgia; scrapped 1968) was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
John G. Carlisle John Griffin Carlisle (1835-1910) — also known as John G. Carlisle — of Covington, Kenton County, Ky. Born in Campbell County (part now in Kenton County), Ky., September 5, 1835. Democrat. Lawyer; law partner of Charles D. Foote; member of Kentucky state house of representatives, 1859-61; member of Kentucky state senate, 1866-71; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Kentucky, 1868; Lieutenant Governor of Kentucky, 1871-75; U.S. Representative from Kentucky 6th District, 1877-90; resigned 1890; Speaker of the U.S. House, 1883-89; candidate for Democratic nomination for President, 1884; U.S. Senator from Kentucky, 1890-93; U.S. Secretary of the Treasury, 1893-97. Died, reportedly from intestinal trouble and heart disease, in the Hotel Wolcott, Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., July 31, 1910 (age 74 years, 329 days). Interment at Linden Grove Cemetery, Covington, Ky.
  Relatives: Son-in-law of John A. Goodson; son of Lilborn Hardin Carlisle (1811-1852) and Mary A. (Reynolds) Carlisle (1813-1881); brother of Napoleon H. Carlisle (born1840); married, January 15, 1857, to Mary Jane Goodson (1834-1905).
  Political family: Carlisle-Goodson family of Covington, Kentucky.
  Carlisle County, Ky. is named for him.
  The World War II Liberty ship SS John G. Carlisle (built 1942-43 at Richmond, California; scrapped 1965) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about John G. Carlisle: James A. Barnes, John Carlisle : Financial Statesman
  Image source: The Parties and The Men (1896)
  John Catron (1786-1865) — of Tennessee. Born in Virginia, January 7, 1786. Served in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812; lawyer; justice of Tennessee state supreme court, 1824-34; Associate Justice of U.S. Supreme Court, 1837-65; died in office 1865. Presbyterian. Member, Freemasons. Died May 30, 1865 (age 79 years, 143 days). Interment at Mt. Olivet Cemetery, Nashville, Tenn.
  The World War II Liberty ship SS John Catron (built 1942-43 at Brunswick, Georgia; scrapped 1972) was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Anton Josef Cermak (1873-1933) — also known as Anton J. Cermak; "Pushcart Tony" — of Chicago, Cook County, Ill. Born in Kladno, Bohemia (now Czechia), May 9, 1873. Democrat. Member of Illinois state house of representatives, 1910; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Illinois, 1924, 1928, 1932; candidate for U.S. Senator from Illinois, 1928; mayor of Chicago, Ill., 1931-33; died in office 1933. Bohemian ancestry. On February 15, 1933, while he was standing on the running board of an open car from which president-elect Franklin D. Roosevelt had just given a speech, was shot and badly wounded by Italian-American bricklayer Guiseppe Zangara, who had aimed for Roosevelt; over the next month, the wound became infected, and he died, in Jackson Memorial Hospital, Miami, Dade County (now Miami-Dade County), Fla., March 6, 1933 (age 59 years, 301 days). Entombed at Bohemian National Cemetery, Chicago, Ill.
  Relatives: Married 1894 to Marie Horejs (1875-1928); father of Ludmila 'Lillian' Cermak (1885-1971; who married Richey V. Graham) and Helena Irene Cermak (1906-1973; daughter-in-law of Otto Kerner; who married Otto Kerner Jr. (1908-1976)).
  Political family: Kerner-Cermak family of Chicago, Illinois.
  Cermak Road (formerly 22nd Street), from Chicago to Oak Brook, Illinois, is named for him.  — Antonin Cermak Elementary School, in Prague, Czechia, is named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS A. J. Cermak (built 1943 at Baltimore, Maryland; scrapped 1964) was named for him.
  Epitaph: "I Am Glad It Was Me, Instead of You."
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
George E. Chamberlain George Earle Chamberlain (1854-1928) — also known as George E. Chamberlain — of Albany, Linn County, Ore.; Portland, Multnomah County, Ore. Born near Natchez, Adams County, Miss., January 1, 1854. Democrat. Lawyer; member of Oregon state house of representatives, 1880-84; Oregon state attorney general, 1891-95; appointed 1891; Governor of Oregon, 1903-09; resigned 1909; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Oregon, 1904, 1924 (alternate); U.S. Senator from Oregon, 1909-21; defeated, 1920; candidate for Democratic nomination for Vice President, 1912; member, U.S. Shipping Board, 1921-23. Member, Phi Kappa Psi. Died in Washington, D.C., July 9, 1928 (age 74 years, 190 days). Interment at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Va.
  Relatives: Son of Charles Thomson Chamberlain (1815-1871) and Pamela A. (Archer) Chamberlain (1821-1910); married, May 21, 1879, to Sarah Newman Welch (1856-1925); married 1926 to Carolyn Bertha Skiff (1876-1936); grandson of Stevenson Archer (1786-1848).
  Political family: Archer family of Churchville, Maryland.
  The World War II Liberty ship SS George Chamberlain (built 1942 at Portland, Oregon; scrapped 1971) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: American Monthly Review of Reviews, July 1902
John Chandler John Chandler (1762-1841) — of Monmouth, Kennebec County, Maine. Born in Epping, Rockingham County, N.H., February 1, 1762. Democrat. Served in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; member of Massachusetts state senate, 1803-05; U.S. Representative from Massachusetts 17th District, 1805-09; Kennebec County Sheriff, 1808; served in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812; member of Massachusetts state house of representatives, 1819; delegate to Maine state constitutional convention, 1819-20; U.S. Senator from Maine, 1820-29; U.S. Collector of Customs, 1829-37. Died in Augusta, Kennebec County, Maine, September 25, 1841 (age 79 years, 236 days). Interment at Mt. Vernon Cemetery, Augusta, Maine.
  Relatives: Brother of Thomas Chandler; married 1783 to Mary Whittier (1764-1846); uncle of Zachariah Chandler (1813-1879).
  Political families: Chandler-Hale family of Portland, Maine; Woodbury-Holden family of Massachusetts and New Hampshire; Kellogg-Adams-Seymour-Chapin family of Connecticut and New York; Starkweather-Pendleton family of Preston, Connecticut (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  The World War II Liberty ship SS John Chandler (built 1943 at South Portland, Maine; sold 1947, scrapped 1971) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: Maine State Archives/Maine Historical Society
Salmon P. Chase Salmon Portland Chase (1808-1873) — also known as Salmon P. Chase; "Old Mr. Greenbacks" — of Cincinnati, Hamilton County, Ohio. Born in Cornish, Sullivan County, N.H., January 13, 1808. Republican. Liberty candidate for U.S. Representative from Ohio 1st District, 1846; U.S. Senator from Ohio, 1849-55, 1861; Governor of Ohio, 1856-60; candidate for Republican nomination for President, 1856, 1860; U.S. Secretary of the Treasury, 1861-64; Chief Justice of U.S. Supreme Court, 1864-73; died in office 1873. Episcopalian. Died in New York, New York County, N.Y., May 7, 1873 (age 65 years, 114 days). Original interment at Oak Hill Cemetery, Washington, D.C.; reinterment at Spring Grove Cemetery, Cincinnati, Ohio.
  Relatives: Son of Ithamar Chase (1762-1817) and Janette Chase (1777-1832); married to Eliza Ann Smith (1821-1845); father of Katherine Jane 'Kate' Chase (1840-1899; who married William Sprague (1830-1915)); nephew of Dudley Chase; cousin *** of Dudley Chase Denison.
  Political families: Sprague family; Chase family of Vermont (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Chase County, Kan. is named for him.
  Chase Hall (dormitory, built 1926), at Harvard University Business School, Boston, Massachusetts, is named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS Salmon P. Chase (built 1942 at Portland, Oregon; scrapped 1960) was named for him.
  Politician named for him: Chase S. Osborn
  Coins and currency: His portrait appeared on various U.S. currency, including $1 and $10 notes in the 1860s, and the $10,000 bill from 1918 to 1946.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Books about Salmon P. Chase: Frederick J. Blue, Salmon P. Chase : A Life in Politics — John Niven, Salmon P. Chase : A Biography — Albert B. Hart, Salmon P. Chase — Doris Kearns Goodwin, Team of Rivals : The Political Genius of Abraham Lincoln
  Image source: Life and Work of James G. Blaine (1893)
  George Campbell Childress (1804-1841) — also known as George C. Childress — of Texas. Born in Nashville, Davidson County, Tenn., January 8, 1804. Lawyer; delegate to Texas Republic Republic constitutional convention from District of Milam, 1836; signer, Texas Declaration of Independence, 1836. Killed himself with a Bowie knife, in Galveston, Galveston County, Tex., October 6, 1841 (age 37 years, 271 days). Interment at Trinity Episcopal Cemetery, Galveston, Tex.; statue at Washington-on-the-Brazos State Park, Washington, Tex.
  Childress County, Tex. is named for him.
  The World War II Liberty ship SS George C. Childress (built 1943 at Houston, Texas; sold and renamed SS K. Hadjipateras; sunk during a storm in the Bay of Bengal, 1967) was originally named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Abraham Clark (1726-1794) — of Elizabethtown, Essex County (now Elizabeth, Union County), N.J. Born near Elizabethtown, Essex County (now Elizabeth Union County), N.J., February 15, 1726. Delegate to Continental Congress from New Jersey, 1776-78, 1779-83, 1787-89; signer, Declaration of Independence, 1776; member of New Jersey state house of assembly from Essex County, 1776, 1783-85; U.S. Representative from New Jersey at-large, 1791-94; died in office 1794. Presbyterian. Slaveowner. Died in Rahway, Union County, N.J., September 15, 1794 (age 68 years, 212 days). Interment at Rahway Cemetery, Rahway, N.J.; memorial monument at Constitution Gardens, Washington, D.C.
  Relatives: Married to Sarah Hatfield (1728-1804).
  The World War II Liberty ship SS Abraham Clark (built 1941 at Terminal Island, Los Angeles, California; wrecked and scrapped 1959) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Alexander Stephens Clay (1853-1910) — also known as Alexander S. Clay — of Marietta, Cobb County, Ga. Born near Powder Springs, Cobb County, Ga., September 25, 1853. Democrat. Lawyer; member of Georgia state house of representatives, 1884-87, 1889-90; member of Georgia state senate, 1892-94; U.S. Senator from Georgia, 1897-1910; died in office 1910. Methodist. Member, Freemasons; Odd Fellows. Died in Atlanta, Fulton County, Ga., November 13, 1910 (age 57 years, 49 days). Interment at Marietta City Cemetery, Marietta, Ga.
  Presumably named for: Alexander H. Stephens
  Relatives: Son of William J. Clay (1829-1911) and Edna Ann Elizabeth (Peak) Clay (1829-1914); married, November 25, 1880, to Sara Frances White (1861-1940).
  The World War II Liberty ship SS Alexander S. Clay (built 1944 at Brunswick, Georgia; scrapped 1970) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
Henry Clay Henry Clay (1777-1852) — also known as "The Sage of Ashland"; "The Great Compromiser" — of Lexington, Fayette County, Ky. Born in Hanover County, Va., April 12, 1777. Member of Kentucky state house of representatives, 1803; U.S. Senator from Kentucky, 1806-07, 1810-11, 1831-42, 1849-52; died in office 1852; U.S. Representative from Kentucky, 1811-14, 1815-21, 1823-25 (5th District 1811-13, at-large 1813-14, 2nd District 1815-21, 3rd District 1823-25); Speaker of the U.S. House, 1811-14, 1815-20, 1823-25; candidate for President of the United States, 1824, 1832 (National Republican), 1844 (Whig); U.S. Secretary of State, 1825-29; candidate for Whig nomination for President, 1839. Member, Freemasons. In 1809, he fought a duel with Humphrey Marshall, in which both men were wounded. Elected to the Hall of Fame for Great Americans in 1900. Slaveowner. Died in Washington, D.C., June 29, 1852 (age 75 years, 78 days). Interment at Lexington Cemetery, Lexington, Ky.; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery, Washington, D.C.
  Relatives: Son of John Clay and Elizabeth (Hudson) Clay (1750-1829); brother of Porter Clay; married, April 11, 1799, to Lucretia (Hart) Erwin (1781-1864); father of Thomas Hart Clay, Henry Clay Jr. and James Brown Clay; grandfather of Henry Clay; granduncle of Ellen Hart Ross (who married James Reily (1811-1863)); first cousin once removed of Matthew Clay (1754-1815) and Green Clay; second cousin of Matthew Clay (c.1795-1827), Brutus Junius Clay (1808-1878) and Cassius Marcellus Clay; second cousin once removed of Brutus Junius Clay (1847-1932); second cousin thrice removed of Oliver Carroll Clay; second cousin four times removed of Archer Woodford; third cousin of Clement Comer Clay; third cousin once removed of Clement Claiborne Clay Jr..
  Political family: Clay family of Kentucky (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Clay counties in Ala., Fla., Ga., Ill., Ind., Kan., Minn., Miss., Mo., Neb., N.C., S.Dak., Tenn., Tex. and W.Va. are named for him.
  Mount Clay (also called Mount Reagan), in the White Mountains, Coos County, New Hampshire, is named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS Henry Clay (built 1941-42 at Mobile, Alabama; scrapped 1967) was named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: Henry Clay LongneckerHenry Clay DeanH. Clay DickinsonHenry C. BrockmeyerH. Clay CockerillHenry Clay EwingHenry Clay CaldwellHenry Clay HallHenry Clay GoodingHenry Clay NaillHenry C. MyersHenry C. ColeH. Clay HarrisHenry C. MinerHenry C. WarmothHenry Clay ClevelandH. Clay EvansHenry C. PayneHenry C. BatesH. Clay FosterHenry C. McCormickHenry C. IdeHenry Clay WilliamsHenry C. SimmsHenry Clay FergusonHenry C. GloverH. Clay ParkHenry C. HansbroughHenry C. SnodgrassH. Clay MaydwellHenry C. GleasonHenry C. LoudenslagerH. Clay Van VoorhisHenry C. ClippingerH. Clay CrawfordH. Clay BascomH. Clay MichieH. Clay ChisolmH. Clay HowardHenry C. HallHenry Clay McDowellH. Clay JonesH. Clay DayHenry Clay HinesH. Clay HeatherHenry Clay MeachamHenry Clay CallowayH. Clay SuterH. Clay WarthHenry Clay ElwoodH. Clay KennedyH. Clay DavisH. Clay NeedhamHenry Clay EthertonH. Clay MaceH. Clay ArmstrongH. Clay BaldwinH. Clay HaynesH. Clay BurkholderMrs. H. Clay KauffmanH. Clay BentleyHenry C. GreenbergH. Clay Gardenhire, Jr.Henry Clay CoxH. Clay Myers, Jr.H. Clay Johnson
  Coins and currency: His portrait appeared on some U.S. currency issued in the 19th and early 20th centuries.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about Henry Clay: Robert Vincent Remini, Henry Clay: Statesman for the Union — Maurice G. Baxter, Henry Clay the Lawyer — Richard B. Cheney & Lynne V. Cheney, Kings Of The Hill : How Nine Powerful Men Changed The Course of American History — Merrill D. Peterson, The Great Triumvirate: Webster, Clay, and Calhoun — Scott Farris, Almost President: The Men Who Lost the Race but Changed the Nation — David S. Heidler & Jeanne T. Heidler, Henry Clay: The Essential American — Fergus M. Bordewich, America's Great Debate: Henry Clay, Stephen A. Douglas, and the Compromise That Preserved the Union
  Image source: James Smith Noel Collection, Louisiana State University in Shreveport
  John Middleton Clayton (1796-1856) — also known as John M. Clayton — of Dover, Kent County, Del.; New Castle, New Castle County, Del. Born in Dagsboro, Sussex County, Del., July 24, 1796. Lawyer; member of Delaware state house of representatives from Kent County, 1824; secretary of state of Delaware, 1826-28; U.S. Senator from Delaware, 1829-36, 1845-49, 1853-56; resigned 1836, 1849; died in office 1856; justice of Delaware state supreme court, 1837-39; U.S. Secretary of State, 1849-50. Slaveowner. Died in Dover, Kent County, Del., November 9, 1856 (age 60 years, 108 days). Interment at Old Presbyterian Cemetery, Dover, Del.
  Relatives: Son of James George Clayton (1761-1820) and Sarah (Middleton) Clayton (1774-1829); married, September 13, 1822, to Sally Ann Fisher (1799-1825); nephew of Joshua Clayton; great-granduncle of Clayton Douglass Buck (1890-1965); first cousin of Thomas Clayton.
  Political families: DuPont family of Wilmington, Delaware; Livingston-Schuyler family of New York (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Clayton County, Iowa is named for him.
  The World War II Liberty ship SS John M. Clayton (built 1942 at Terminal Island, California; bombed 1945; repaired; renamed USS Harcourt; scrapped 1962) was originally named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
James M. Clements James Merritt Clements (1849-1921) — also known as James M. Clements — of Helena, Lewis and Clark County, Mont.; Nome, Nome census area, Alaska. Born in Ohio, October 1, 1849. Lawyer; Lewis and Clark County Probate Judge, 1887-88; People's candidate for justice of Montana state supreme court, 1896; district judge in Montana, 1901-16; U.S. Attorney for the 2nd District of Alaska Territory, 1919-21; resigned 1921. Died in Helena, Lewis and Clark County, Mont., September 1, 1921 (age 71 years, 335 days). Interment at Forestvale Cemetery, Helena, Mont.
  Relatives: Son of John R. Clements and Belinda (Ramage) Clements; married to Alta D. Cook (1854-1941).
  The World War II Liberty ship SS James M. Clements (built 1943 at Portland, Oregon; scrapped 1960) was named for him.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: The Butte (Mont.) Miner, September 2, 1921
  George Clymer (1739-1813) — of Pennsylvania. Born in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., March 16, 1739. Delegate to Continental Congress from Pennsylvania, 1776; signer, Declaration of Independence, 1776; delegate to Pennsylvania state constitutional convention, 1776; member of Pennsylvania state house of representatives, 1785; member, U.S. Constitutional Convention, 1787; U.S. Representative from Pennsylvania at-large, 1789-91. Episcopalian. Died in Morrisville, Bucks County, Pa., January 23, 1813 (age 73 years, 313 days). Interment at Friends Graveyard, Trenton, N.J.; memorial monument at Constitution Gardens, Washington, D.C.
  Relatives: Son of Christopher Clymer (1711-1746) and Deborah (Fitzwater) Clymer (1712-1740); married, March 18, 1765, to Elizabeth Meredith (1740-1815; sister of Samuel Meredith); great-grandfather of Edward Overton Jr. (1836-1903); second great-grandfather of James Rieman Macfarlane.
  Political families: Shippen-Middleton family of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Harrison-Randolph-Marshall-Cabell family of Virginia (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  The World War II Liberty ship SS George Clymer (built 1941-42 at Portland, Oregon; torpedoed and wrecked in the South Atlantic Ocean, 1942) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Howell Cobb (1815-1868) — of Athens, Clarke County, Ga. Born in Jefferson County, Ga., September 7, 1815. Democrat. U.S. Representative from Georgia, 1843-51, 1855-57 (at-large 1843-45, 6th District 1845-51, 1855-57); Speaker of the U.S. House, 1849-51; Governor of Georgia, 1851-53; U.S. Secretary of the Treasury, 1857-60; Delegate from Georgia to the Confederate Provisional Congress, 1861-62; general in the Confederate Army during the Civil War. Slaveowner. Died in New York, New York County, N.Y., October 9, 1868 (age 53 years, 32 days). Interment at Oconee Hill Cemetery, Athens, Ga.
  Relatives: Son of John Addison Cobb (1788-1855) and Sarah Robinson (Rootes) Cobb (1792-1865); brother of Thomas Reade Rootes Cobb; married 1835 to Mary Ann Lamar (1818-1889); nephew of Howell Cobb; grandfather of Andrew Cobb Erwin; great-grandson of Howell Lewis; great-grandnephew of John Smith; first cousin of Henry Rootes Jackson; second cousin twice removed of Meriwether Lewis; second cousin thrice removed of George Washington; third cousin of Thomas Leonidas Crittenden; third cousin once removed of Thomas Chilton, William Parish Chilton, David Shelby Walker and Joshua Chilton; third cousin twice removed of Bushrod Washington; third cousin thrice removed of Dracos Alexander Dimitry Jr. (1922-1973); fourth cousin of James David Walker, Commodore Perry Chilton, David Shelby Walker Jr. and Shadrach Chilton; fourth cousin once removed of John Thornton Augustine Washington, Horace George Chilton and Arthur Bounds Chilton.
  Political families: Pendleton-Lee family of Maryland; Jackson-Lee family (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  The World War II Liberty ship SS Howell Cobb (built 1943 at Richmond, California; scuttled as a breakwater in Cook Inlet, 1966) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books by Howell Cobb: A Scriptural Examination of the Institution of Slavery in the United States, With its Objects and Purposes (1856)
  Isaac Coles (1747-1813) — of Halifax County, Va.; Pittsylvania County, Va. Born in Richmond, Va., March 2, 1747. Colonel in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; planter; member of Virginia state house of delegates from Halifax County, 1780-81, 1783-88; delegate to Virginia convention to ratify U.S. constitution from Halifax County, 1788; U.S. Representative from Virginia, 1789-91, 1793-97 (at-large 1789-91, 6th District 1793-97). Slaveowner. Died near Chatham, Pittsylvania County, Va., June 3, 1813 (age 66 years, 93 days). Interment a private or family graveyard, Pittsylvania County, Va.
  Relatives: Son of John Coles (1706-1747) and Mary Ann (Winston) Coles (1721-1758); married 1771 to Elizabeth Lightfoot; father of Walter Coles; cousin *** of Patrick Henry (1736-1799).
  Political families: Breckinridge-Preston-Cabell family of Virginia; Harrison-Randolph-Marshall-Cabell family of Virginia (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  The World War II Liberty ship SS Isaac Coles (built 1942 at Terminal Island, California; scrapped 1967) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
James Fenimore Cooper James Fenimore Cooper (1789-1851) — also known as Jane Morgan — of Cooperstown, Otsego County, N.Y. Born in Burlington, Burlington County, N.J., September 15, 1789. Novelist; U.S. Consul in Lyon, 1826-28. Died September 14, 1851 (age 61 years, 364 days). Interment at Christ Churchyard, Cooperstown, N.Y.; statue at Cooper Garden, Cooperstown, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of William Cooper (1754-1809); married to Susan Augusta De Lancey.
  The World War II Liberty ship SS James Fenimore Cooper (built 1942 at Portland, Oregon; wrecked and scrapped 1967) was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Fiction by James Fenimore Cooper: Last of the Mohicans — The Pioneers — The Prairie — The Deerslayer — The Pathfinder
  Books about James Fenimore Cooper: Donald A. Ringe, James Fenimore Cooper — Warren Motley, The American Abraham : James Fenimore Cooper and the Frontier Patriarch — Donald G. Darnell, James Fenimore Cooper: Novelist of Manners
  Image source: U.S. postage stamp (1940)
  Henry Winslow Corbett (1827-1903) — also known as Henry W. Corbett — of Oregon. Born in Westborough, Worcester County, Mass., February 18, 1827. Republican. U.S. Senator from Oregon, 1867-73; delegate to Republican National Convention from Oregon, 1868; member of Republican National Committee from Oregon, 1868-72. Died in Portland, Multnomah County, Ore., May 31, 1903 (age 76 years, 102 days). Interment at River View Cemetery, Portland, Ore.
  Relatives: Brother of Emily Phelps Corbett (who married Henry Failing (1834-1898)).
  Political family: Failing-Corbett family of Portland, Oregon.
  The community of Corbett, Oregon, is named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS Henry W. Corbett (built 1943 at Portland, Oregon; scrapped 1978) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  George Henry Corliss (1817-1888) — also known as George H. Corliss — of North Providence, Providence County, R.I. Born in Easton, Washington County, N.Y., June 2, 1817. Republican. Mechanical engineer; inventor; developed the Corliss steam engine; member of Rhode Island state house of representatives, 1868-70; Presidential Elector for Rhode Island, 1876. Congregationalist. Died in Providence, Providence County, R.I., February 21, 1888 (age 70 years, 264 days). Interment at Swan Point Cemetery, Providence, R.I.
  Relatives: Son of Dr. Hiram Corliss (1793-1877) and Susan (Sheldon) Corliss (1794-1843); married 1839 to Phebe F. Frost (1814-1859); married 1866 to Emily Shaw (1835-1910).
  Corliss Street, in Providence, Rhode Island, is named for him.  — Corliss High School (opened 1974), in Chicago, Illinois, is named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS G. H. Corliss (built 1942 at Richmond, California; scrapped 1972) was named for him.
  Epitaph: "Serving God in his life and with his wealth. Serving men with a kindness that was both careful and generous. By the gift of God, he increased magnificently as an inventor the world's resources in the use of steam machinery."
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
George B. Cortelyou George Bruce Cortelyou (1862-1940) — also known as George B. Cortelyou — of Huntington Bay, Suffolk County, Long Island, N.Y. Born in New York, New York County, N.Y., July 26, 1862. Republican. School principal; confidential stenographer to President Grover Cleveland, 1895-96; Executive Clerk of the White House, 1896-98; secretary to President William McKinley, 1900-01; secretary to President Theodore Roosevelt, 1901-03; financier; U.S. Secretary of Commerce and Labor, 1903-04; Chairman of Republican National Committee, 1904-07; U.S. Postmaster General, 1905-07; U.S. Secretary of the Treasury, 1907-09; president, Consolidated Gas Company, New York, 1909-35; director, New York Life Insurance Company; first president, Edison Electric Institute, 1933. Member, Union League. Died, following two heart attacks, in Huntington Bay, Suffolk County, Long Island, N.Y., October 23, 1940 (age 78 years, 89 days). Interment at Memorial Cemetery of St. John's Church, Laurel Hollow, Long Island, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Peter Crolius Cortelyou, Jr. (1839-1873) and Rose (Seary) Cortelyou (1840-1925); married, September 15, 1888, to Lily Morris Hinds (1867-1947); second cousin thrice removed of Lawrence Hillier Cortelyou (1802-1882); second cousin four times removed of Aaron Cortelyou.
  Political family: Cortelyou family of Staten Island, New York.
  The World War II Liberty ship SS George B. Cortelyou (built 1942 at Richmond, California; scrapped 1972) was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: American Monthly Review of Reviews, October 1901
  Jesse Samuel Cottrell (1878-1944) — also known as Jesse S. Cottrell — of Tennessee; Tucson, Pima County, Ariz.; Arlington, Arlington County, Va. Born in Knoxville, Knox County, Tenn., October 23, 1878. Republican. Newspaper reporter; member of Tennessee state house of representatives, 1907-09; secretary to U.S. Sen. Newell Sanders, 1910-11; served in the U.S. Army during World War I; U.S. Minister to Bolivia, 1921-28. Baptist. Member, Elks. Died March 24, 1944 (age 65 years, 153 days). Interment at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Va.
  Relatives: Son of Samuel Houston Cottrell and Telitha Anne (Simpson) Cottrell; married, January 14, 1918, to Lucile A. Wilcox (divorced 1929); married, October 15, 1938, to Mary Elizabeth James.
  The World War II Liberty ship SS Jesse Cottrell (built 1944 at Baltimore, Maryland; scrapped 1966) was named for him.
  See also U.S. State Dept career summary — Find-A-Grave memorial
  George Walker Crawford (1798-1872) — of Georgia. Born in Columbia County, Ga., December 22, 1798. Georgia state attorney general, 1827; member of Georgia state house of representatives, 1837; U.S. Representative from Georgia at-large, 1843; Governor of Georgia, 1843-47; U.S. Secretary of War, 1849-50; delegate to Georgia secession convention, 1861. Slaveowner. Died near Augusta, Richmond County, Ga., July 27, 1872 (age 73 years, 218 days). Interment at Summerville Cemetery, Augusta, Ga.
  Relatives: Son of Peter Crawford (1765-1830) and Mary Ann Crawford (1769-1852); married to Mary Ann Mackintosh (1801-1878).
  The World War II Liberty ship SS George W. Crawford (built 1943-44 at Brunswick, Georgia; scrapped 1971) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  John Jordan Crittenden (1787-1863) — also known as John J. Crittenden — of Illinois; Russellville, Logan County, Ky.; Frankfort, Franklin County, Ky. Born near Versailles, Woodford County, Ky., September 10, 1787. Lawyer; Illinois territory attorney general, 1809-10; member of Kentucky state house of representatives, 1811-17, 1825-29; served in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812; U.S. Senator from Kentucky, 1817-19, 1835-41, 1842-48, 1855-61; Presidential Elector for Kentucky, 1824; U.S. Attorney for Kentucky, 1827-29; secretary of state of Kentucky, 1834-35; U.S. Attorney General, 1841, 1850-53; Governor of Kentucky, 1848-50; U.S. Representative from Kentucky 8th District, 1861-63. Two of his sons were generals on opposite sides in the Civil War; a grandson of his was killed in Gen. Custer's expedition against the Sioux in 1876. Slaveowner. Died in Frankfort, Franklin County, Ky., July 26, 1863 (age 75 years, 319 days). Interment at Frankfort Cemetery, Frankfort, Ky.
  Relatives: Son of John Crittenden and Judith Turpin (Harris) Crittenden (1760-1800); brother of Thomas Turpin Crittenden and Robert Crittenden; married 1811 to Sarah O. Lee (1787-1824); married 1826 to Maria Knox Innes (1796-1851); married 1853 to Elizabeth Moss (1804-1873); father of Thomas Leonidas Crittenden; uncle of Alexander Parker Crittenden and Thomas Theodore Crittenden; granduncle of Thomas Theodore Crittenden Jr. (1863-1938); first cousin twice removed of Thomas Jefferson; second cousin once removed of Martha Jefferson Randolph and Dabney Carr; third cousin of Francis Wayles Eppes, Dabney Smith Carr, Benjamin Franklin Randolph, Meriwether Lewis Randolph and George Wythe Randolph; third cousin once removed of Thomas Jefferson Coolidge and Frederick Madison Roberts; third cousin twice removed of John Gardner Coolidge and Edith Wilson.
  Political families: Harrison-Randolph-Marshall-Cabell family of Virginia; Lee-Randolph family (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Crittenden County, Ky. is named for him.
  The World War II Liberty ship SS John J. Crittenden (built 1942-43 at Jacksonville, Florida; scrapped 1968) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
Albert B. Cummins Albert Baird Cummins (1850-1926) — also known as Albert B. Cummins — of Des Moines, Polk County, Iowa. Born, in a log house, near Carmichaels, Greene County, Pa., February 15, 1850. Republican. Lawyer; member of Iowa state house of representatives, 1888; member of Republican National Committee from Iowa, 1896-1900; delegate to Republican National Convention from Iowa, 1896, 1904, 1924; Governor of Iowa, 1902-08; U.S. Senator from Iowa, 1908-26; died in office 1926; candidate for Republican nomination for President, 1912, 1916. Congregationalist. Died of a heart attack, in Des Moines, Polk County, Iowa, July 30, 1926 (age 76 years, 165 days). Interment at Woodland Cemetery, Des Moines, Iowa.
  Relatives: Son of Thomas Layton Cummins and Sarah (Baird) Cummins; married, June 24, 1874, to Ida Lucette Gallery.
  The World War II Liberty ship SS Albert B. Cummins (built 1943 at Portland, Oregon; scrapped 1961) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: American Monthly Review of Reviews, September 1901
  George Law Curry (1820-1878) — also known as George L. Curry — of Oregon. Born in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., July 2, 1820. Democrat. Newspaper publisher; jeweler; member of Oregon territorial legislature, 1848-49, 1851-52; secretary of Oregon Territory, 1853-55; Governor of Oregon Territory, 1853, 1854, 1854-59; candidate for U.S. Senator from Oregon, 1860. Died in Portland, Multnomah County, Ore., July 28, 1878 (age 58 years, 26 days). Interment at Lone Fir Cemetery, Portland, Ore.
  Curry County, Ore. is named for him.
  The World War II Liberty ship SS George L. Curry (built 1943 at Portland, Oregon; scrapped 1968) was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
Jabez L. M. Curry Jabez Lamar Monroe Curry (1825-1903) — also known as Jabez L. M. Curry — of Talladega, Talladega County, Ala.; Washington, D.C. Born near Double Branches, Lincoln County, Ga., June 5, 1825. Lawyer; served in the U.S. Army during the Mexican War; member of Alabama state house of representatives, 1847-48, 1853-57; U.S. Representative from Alabama 7th District, 1857-61; Delegate from Alabama to the Confederate Provisional Congress, 1861-62; Representative from Alabama in the Confederate Congress 4th District, 1862-64; defeated, 1863; colonel in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; president, Howard College, Alabama, 1866-68; college professor; U.S. Minister to Spain, 1885-88. Baptist. Slaveowner. Died near Asheville, Buncombe County, N.C., February 12, 1903 (age 77 years, 252 days). Interment at Hollywood Cemetery, Richmond, Va.
  Relatives: Son of William Curry and Susan (Winn) Curry.
  The Curry School of Education at the University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia, was named for him from 1905 to 2020.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS J. L. M. Curry (built 1941-42 at Mobile, Alabama; sank in the North Sea, 1943) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: American Monthly Review of Reviews, February 1902
  Manasseh Cutler (1742-1823) — of Massachusetts. Born in Killingly, Windham County, Conn., May 13, 1742. Ordained minister; physician; member of Massachusetts state legislature, 1780; U.S. Representative from Massachusetts at-large, 1801-05. Congregationalist. Died in Hamilton, Essex County, Mass., July 28, 1823 (age 81 years, 76 days). Interment at Hamilton Cemetery, Hamilton, Mass.
  Relatives: Son of Hezekiah Cutler and Susanna (Clark) Cutler; father of Ephraim Cutler; great-grandfather of Rufus R. Dawes; second great-grandfather of Charles Gates Dawes (1865-1951), Rufus Cutler Dawes, Beman Gates Dawes and Henry May Dawes.
  Political families: Dawes-Upson family of Connecticut; Kellogg-Adams-Seymour-Chapin family of Connecticut and New York (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  The World War II Liberty ship SS Manasseh Cutler (built 1943 at Portland, Oregon; torpedoed and lost 1943 in the Gulf of Aden) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Samuel Sam Dale (1772-1841) — also known as Sam Dale — of Alabama; Mississippi. Born in Rockbridge County, Va., 1772. Served in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812; member of Alabama state house of representatives, 1819; member of Mississippi state house of representatives, 1836. Scotch-Irish ancestry. Died near Daleville, Lauderdale County, Miss., May 24, 1841 (age about 68 years). Original interment at a private or family graveyard, Lauderdale County, Miss.; reinterment at Oakwood Cemetery, Montgomery, Ala.
  Dale County, Ala. is named for him.
  The community of Daleville, Mississippi, is named for him.  — Sam Dale State Park, on Highway 39, near Daleville, Mississippi, is named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS Sam Dale (built 1944 at New Orleans, Louisiana; scrapped 1973) was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Alexander James Dallas (1759-1817) — also known as Alexander J. Dallas — of Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa. Born in Kingston, Jamaica, June 21, 1759. Lawyer; newspaper editor; secretary of the commonwealth of Pennsylvania, 1791-1801; resigned 1801; U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania, 1801-14; U.S. Secretary of the Treasury, 1814-16. Scottish ancestry. Died in Trenton, Mercer County, N.J., January 16, 1817 (age 57 years, 209 days). Interment at St. Peter's Episcopal Churchyard, Philadelphia, Pa.
  Relatives: Son of Dr. Robert Charles Dallas and Sarah Elizabeth (Cormack) Dallas; married to Arabella Maria Smith (1761-1837); father of Sophia Burrell Dallas (1784-1860; who married Richard Bache Jr.) and George Mifflin Dallas (1792-1864) (who married Sophia Chew Nicklin); grandfather of Mary Blechenden Bache (1808-1873; who married Robert John Walker), Sophia Arabella Bache (1815-1904; who married William Wallace Irwin) and George Mifflin Dallas (1839-1917); great-grandfather of Robert Walker Irwin; third great-grandfather of Claiborne de Borda Pell; fourth great-grandfather of Daniel Baugh Brewster.
  Political families: Bache-Dallas family of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Claiborne-Dallas family of Virginia and Louisiana (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Cross-reference: James G. Birney
  Dallas County, Ala. is named for him.
  The World War II Liberty ship SS Alexander J. Dallas (built 1942 at Portland, Oregon; scrapped 1966) was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  George Davis (1820-1896) — of Wilmington, New Hanover County, N.C. Born in Porter's Neck, Pender County, N.C., March 1, 1820. Lawyer; Delegate from North Carolina to the Confederate Provisional Congress, 1861-62; Senator from North Carolina in the Confederate Congress, 1862-64; Confederate Attorney General, 1864-65. Episcopalian. At the end of the Civil War, with other Confederate officials, attempted to flee overseas, but turned himself in at Key West, Fla.; spent several months in prison at Fort Hamilton; pardoned in 1866. Died in Wilmington, New Hanover County, N.C., February 23, 1896 (age 75 years, 359 days). Interment at Oakdale Cemetery, Wilmington, N.C.; statue erected 1911 at Third and Market Streets, Wilmington, N.C.
  Relatives: Son of Thomas Frederick Davis (1778-1846) and Sarah Isabella (Eagles) Davis (1784-1829); half-brother and fourth cousin of Horatio Davis; married, November 17, 1842, to Mary Adelaide Polk (1817-1863; first cousin once removed of Frank Lyon Polk (1871-1943); second cousin once removed of James Knox Polk and William Hawkins Polk; third cousin of Marshall Tate Polk); married, May 9, 1866, to Monimia Fairfax (1837-1889); great-grandnephew of Samuel Ashe; cousin four different ways of John Baptista Ashe (1748-1802), John Baptista Ashe (1810-1857), Thomas Samuel Ashe and William Shepperd Ashe; cousin three different ways of Alfred Moore Waddell; second cousin twice removed of William Henry Hill.
  Political families: Ashe-Polk family of North Carolina; Polk family; Manly-Haywood-Polk family of Raleigh, North Carolina (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  The World War II Liberty ship SS George Davis (built 1942 at Wilmington, North Carolina; scrapped 1960) was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
Jefferson Davis Jefferson Finis Davis (1808-1889) — also known as Jefferson Davis — of Warrenton, Warren County, Miss.; Warren County, Miss. Born in a log cabin, Fairview, Christian County (now Todd County), Ky., June 3, 1808. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army during the Black Hawk War; candidate for Mississippi state house of representatives, 1843; Presidential Elector for Mississippi, 1844; U.S. Representative from Mississippi at-large, 1845-46; served in the U.S. Army during the Mexican War; U.S. Senator from Mississippi, 1847-51, 1857-61; candidate for Governor of Mississippi, 1851; U.S. Secretary of War, 1853-57; President of the Confederacy, 1861-65. Captured by Union forces in May 1865 and imprisoned without trial for about two years. Slaveowner. Died of bronchitis and malaria in New Orleans, Orleans Parish, La., December 6, 1889 (age 81 years, 186 days). Original interment at Metairie Cemetery, New Orleans, La.; reinterment in 1893 at Hollywood Cemetery, Richmond, Va.; memorial monument at Memorial Avenue, Richmond, Va.
  Relatives: Son of Samuel Emory Davis and Jane (Cook) Davis; married, June 17, 1835, to Sarah Knox Taylor (1814-1835; daughter of Zachary Taylor and Margaret Taylor); married, February 25, 1845, to Varina Howell (1826-1906; granddaughter of Richard Howell (1754-1802)); uncle of Mary Bradford (who married Richard Brodhead); granduncle of Jefferson Davis Brodhead and Frances Eileen Hutt (who married Thomas Edmund Dewey).
  Political families: Taylor-Brodhead family of Easton, Pennsylvania; Davis-Howell-Morgan-Agnew family of New Orleans and Shreveport, Louisiana (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Cross-reference: Jesse D. Bright — John H. Reagan — Horace Greeley — Solomon Cohen — George W. Jones — Samuel A. Roberts — William T. Sutherlin — Victor Vifquain — Charles O'Conor
  Jeff Davis County, Ga., Jefferson Davis Parish, La., Jefferson Davis County, Miss. and Jeff Davis County, Tex. are named for him.
  The World War II Liberty ship SS Jefferson Davis (built 1942 at Mobile, Alabama; scrapped 1961) was named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: J. Davis BrodheadJefferson D. HostetterJefferson D. BlountJefferson Davis CarwileJeff DavisJefferson D. HelmsJefferson Davis WigginsJefferson Davis Parris
  Coins and currency: His portrait appeared on Confederate States 50 cent notes in 1861-64.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books by Jefferson Davis: The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government (1881)
  Books about Jefferson Davis: William J. Cooper, Jr., Jefferson Davis, American : A Biography — Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis : Ex-President of the Confederate States of America : A Memoir by His Wife — William C. Davis, An Honorable Defeat: The Last Days of the Confederate Government — James Ronald Kennedy & Walter Donald Kennedy, Was Jefferson Davis Right? — Robert Penn Warren, Jefferson Davis Gets His Citizenship Back — Herman Hattaway & Richard E. Beringer, Jefferson Davis, Confederate President — Felicity Allen, Jefferson Davis: Unconquerable Heart — Clint Johnson, Pursuit: The Chase, Capture, Persecution, and Surprising Release of Confederate President Jefferson Davis
  Image source: Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper, March 9, 1861
  John Wesley Davis (1799-1859) — also known as John W. Davis — of Carlisle, Sullivan County, Ind. Born in New Holland, Lancaster County, Pa., April 16, 1799. Democrat. Candidate for Indiana state senate, 1828; state court judge in Indiana, 1829-31; member of Indiana state house of representatives, 1831-33, 1841-43, 1851-52, 1857; Speaker of the Indiana State House of Representatives, 1832-33, 1841-42, 1851-52; U.S. Representative from Indiana, 1835-37, 1839-41, 1843-47 (2nd District 1835-37, 1839-41, 6th District 1843-47); Speaker of the U.S. House, 1845-47; U.S. Diplomatic Commissioner to China, 1848-50; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Indiana, 1852; Governor of Oregon Territory, 1853-54. Died in Carlisle, Sullivan County, Ind., August 22, 1859 (age 60 years, 128 days). Interment at City Cemetery, Carlisle, Ind.
  Presumably named for: John Wesley
  The World War II Liberty ship SS John W. Davis (built 1943 at Portland, Oregon; scrapped 1961) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary
  Henry Dearborn (1751-1829) — of Massachusetts. Born in North Hampton, Rockingham County, N.H., February 23, 1751. Democrat. U.S. Representative from Massachusetts, 1793-97 (4th District 1793-95, 1st District 1795-97); U.S. Secretary of War, 1801-09; U.S. Minister to Portugal, 1822-24. Member, Freemasons. Died in Roxbury, Norfolk County (now part of Boston, Suffolk County), Mass., June 6, 1829 (age 78 years, 103 days). Original interment in unknown location; subsequent interment in 1834 at Mt. Auburn Cemetery, Cambridge, Mass.; reinterment in 1848 at Forest Hills Cemetery, Jamaica Plain, Boston, Mass.
  Relatives: Father of Henry Alexander Scammell Dearborn (1783-1851).
  Dearborn County, Ind. is named for him.
  The city of Dearborn, Michigan, is named for him.  — The Dearborn River, in Lewis & Clark and Cascade counties, Montana, is named for him.  — Mount Dearborn, a former military arsenal on an island in the Catawba River, Chester County, South Carolina, is named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS Henry Dearborn (built 1942 at Portland, Oregon; scrapped 1959) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary
  John Deere (1804-1886) — of Moline, Rock Island County, Ill. Born in Rutland, Rutland County, Vt., February 7, 1804. Blacksmith; inventor of the first successful steel plow; founder of John Deere & Company, manufacturers of farm implements; president, National Bank of Moline; mayor of Moline, Ill., 1873-75. Died in Moline, Rock Island County, Ill., May 17, 1886 (age 82 years, 99 days). Interment at Riverside Cemetery, Moline, Ill.; statue at John Deere Historic Site, Grand Detour, Ill.
  Relatives: Son of William Rinold Deere and Sarah (Yates) Deere (1780-1826); married, January 28, 1827, to Demarias Lamb (1805-1865; aunt of Charles Otis Nason (1828-1903)); married 1867 to Lucenia Lamb (1809-1888; aunt of Charles Otis Nason (1828-1903)).
  Political families: Kellogg-Adams-Seymour-Chapin family of Connecticut and New York; Weeks-Bigelow-Andrew-Prescott family of Massachusetts and New York; Greene-Lippitt family of Providence, Rhode Island (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  The World War II Liberty ship SS John Deere (built 1942 at Portland, Oregon; scrapped 1961) was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  James William Denver (1817-1892) — also known as James W. Denver — Born near Winchester, Frederick County, Va., October 23, 1817. Served in the U.S. Army during the Mexican War; member of California state senate, 1852-53; killed newspaper editor Edward Gilbert in a duel on August 2, 1852; secretary of state of California, 1853-55; U.S. Representative from California at-large, 1855-57; secretary of Kansas Territory, 1857-58; Governor of Kansas Territory, 1857-58, 1858, 1858; general in the Union Army during the Civil War; candidate for U.S. Representative from Ohio, 1866. Died in Washington, D.C., August 9, 1892 (age 74 years, 291 days). Interment at Sugar Grove Cemetery, Wilmington, Ohio.
  Relatives: Father of Matthew Rombach Denver (1870-1954).
  Denver County, Colo. is named for him.
  The city and county of Denver, Colorado, are named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS James W. Denver (built 1943 at Baltimore, Maryland; torpedoed and lost 1943 in the Atlantic Ocean) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
George H. Dern George Henry Dern (1872-1936) — also known as George H. Dern — of Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Utah. Born in Dodge County, Neb., September 8, 1872. Democrat. General Manager of the Mercur Gold Mining and Milling Company; joint inventor, with Theodore P. Holt, of the Holt-Dern ore roaster; member of Utah state senate, 1915-23; Governor of Utah, 1925-33; U.S. Secretary of War, 1933-36; died in office 1936; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Utah, 1936. Congregationalist. Member, Freemasons. Died, in a hospital, of influenza and kidney failure, August 27, 1936 (age 63 years, 354 days). Interment at Mt. Olivet Cemetery, Salt Lake City, Utah.
  Relatives: Son of John Dern and Elizabeth (Dern) Dern; married, June 7, 1899, to Charlotte Brown.
  The World War II Liberty ship SS George H. Dern (built 1942 at Richmond, California; scrapped 1969) was named for him.
  See also National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Image source: Library of Congress
  James De Wolf (1764-1837) — of Bristol, Bristol County, R.I. Born in Bristol, Bristol County, R.I., March 18, 1764. Democrat. Slave trader; built an early cotton mill; manufacturer; member of Rhode Island state house of representatives, 1800; Speaker of the Rhode Island State House of Representatives, 1819-21; U.S. Senator from Rhode Island, 1821-27. Slaveowner. Died in New York, New York County, N.Y., December 21, 1837 (age 73 years, 278 days). Original interment at De Wolf Family Cemetery, Bristol, R.I.; reinterment at Juniper Hill Cemetery, Bristol, R.I.
  Relatives: Son of Mark A. De Wolf and Abigail (Porter) De Wolf; married to Nancy Bradford (1770-1838; daughter of William Bradford); grandfather of James DeWolf Perry (1815-1876); great-granduncle of LeBaron Bradford Colt.
  Political families: Butler-Perry-Belmont-Slidell family of Edgefield, South Carolina; Bradford-DeWolf-Butler-Perry family of Bristol, Rhode Island (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  The World War II Liberty ship SS James De Wolf (built 1942-43 at Providence, Rhode Island; scrapped 1961) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Michael Henry de Young (1849-1925) — also known as M. H. de Young — of San Francisco, Calif. Born in St. Louis, Mo., September 30, 1849. Republican. Newspaper publisher; in 1879, his brother Charles de Young (1846-1880), then editor of the San Francisco Chronicle, shot and wounded San Francisco mayor Isaac S. Kalloch; a few months later, Charles was shot to death in his office by the mayor's son; on November 19, 1884, he was shot and seriously wounded by Adolph B. Spreckels, who had been angered by an article in the Chronicle; Spreckels, who pleaded temporary insanity, was tried and found not guilty; delegate to Republican National Convention from California, 1888, 1892, 1908, 1920. Catholic. Jewish ancestry. Died in San Francisco, Calif., February 15, 1925 (age 75 years, 138 days). Entombed at Holy Cross Catholic Cemetery, Colma, Calif.
  The World War II Liberty ship SS M. H. De Young (built 1943 at Richmond, California; scrapped 1950) was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  John Dickinson (1732-1808) — also known as "Penman of the Revolution" — of Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa.; Wilmington, New Castle County, Del. Born near Trappe, Talbot County, Md., November 13, 1732. Planter; lawyer; Delegate to Continental Congress from Pennsylvania, 1774-76; Delegate to Continental Congress from Delaware, 1779; member of Delaware state legislative council from New Castle County, 1781; President of Delaware, 1781-83; President of Pennsylvania, 1782-85; member, U.S. Constitutional Convention, 1787; member of Delaware state senate from New Castle County, 1793. Quaker; later Episcopalian. English ancestry. Member, Freemasons. Died in Wilmington, New Castle County, Del., February 14, 1808 (age 75 years, 93 days). Interment at Friends Burial Ground, Wilmington, Del.
  Relatives: Son of Samuel Dickinson and Mary (Cadwalader) Dickinson; brother of Philemon Dickinson (1739-1809); married, July 19, 1770, to Mary 'Polly' Norris.
  The World War II Liberty ship SS John Dickinson (built 1941-42 at Portland, Oregon; scrapped 1973) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  John Adams Dix (1798-1879) — also known as John A. Dix — of Cooperstown, Otsego County, N.Y.; Albany, Albany County, N.Y.; New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in Boscawen, Merrimack County, N.H., July 24, 1798. Democrat. Secretary of state of New York, 1833-39; member of New York state assembly from Albany County, 1842; U.S. Senator from New York, 1845-49; postmaster at New York City, N.Y., 1860-61; U.S. Secretary of the Treasury, 1861; general in the Union Army during the Civil War; U.S. Minister to France, 1866-69; Governor of New York, 1873-75; defeated, 1848, 1874; candidate for mayor of New York City, N.Y., 1876. Died in New York, New York County, N.Y., April 21, 1879 (age 80 years, 271 days). Interment at Trinity Cemetery, Manhattan, N.Y.
  Presumably named for: John Adams
  Relatives: Son-in-law of John Jordan Morgan; son of Col. Timothy Dix, Jr. (1770-1813) and Abigail (Wilkins) Dix; married to Catharine Waine Morgan (1802-1884); first cousin thrice removed of Roger Sherman; second cousin once removed of Nathan Read; third cousin once removed of Roger Sherman Baldwin, Sherman Day, Ebenezer Rockwood Hoar, William Maxwell Evarts, George Frisbie Hoar, John Hill Walbridge and Henry E. Walbridge; third cousin twice removed of Aaron Kellogg and Charles Kirk Tilden; fourth cousin of Simeon Eben Baldwin, Rockwood Hoar, Sherman Hoar, Maxwell Evarts and Arthur Outram Sherman; fourth cousin once removed of Abel Merrill, Samuel Laning, Orsamus Cook Merrill, Amariah Kibbe Jr., John Lanning, Timothy Merrill (1781-1836), Daniel Putnam Tyler, Chauncey Mitchell Depew, John Frederick Addis and Roger Sherman Hoar.
  Political families: Kellogg-Adams-Seymour-Chapin family of Connecticut and New York; Hoar-Sherman family of Massachusetts; Murphy-Merrill family of Harbor Beach, Michigan (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Fort Dix (established 1917 as Camp Dix; later Fort Dix; now Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst), a U.S. Army post in Burlington County, New Jersey, is named for him.  — Dix Mountain, in the Ardirondack Mountains, Essex County, New York, is named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS John A. Dix (built 1942-43 at South Portland, Maine; sold 1947, scrapped 1968) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  John Francis Dockweiler (1895-1943) — also known as John F. Dockweiler — of Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, Calif. Born in Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, Calif., September 19, 1895. Democrat. U.S. Representative from California 16th District, 1933-39; candidate in primary for Governor of California, 1938; Los Angeles County District Attorney, 1940-43. Catholic. Member, American Bar Association. Died in Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, Calif., January 31, 1943 (age 47 years, 134 days). Interment at Calvary Cemetery, Los Angeles, Calif.
  Relatives: Son of Isidore Bernard Dockweiler and Gertrude (Reeve) Dockweiler; brother of Henry Isidore Dockweiler (1893-1970).
  Political family: Dockweiler family of Los Angeles, California.
  The World War II Liberty ship SS John Dockweiler (built 1943-44 at Terminal Island, California; scrapped 1970) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Philip Doddridge (1773-1832) — of Virginia. Born in Bedford County, Va., May 17, 1773. Member of Virginia state legislature, 1810; U.S. Representative from Virginia 18th District, 1829-32; died in office 1832. Slaveowner. Died in Washington, D.C., November 19, 1832 (age 59 years, 186 days). Interment at Congressional Cemetery, Washington, D.C.
  Relatives: Son of John Doddridge (1745-1791) and Mary (Wells) Doddridge (1748-1776); married to Juliana Parr Musser.
  Doddridge County, W.Va. is named for him.
  The World War II Liberty ship SS Philip Doddridge (built 1943 at Wilmington, North Carolina; scrapped 1969) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Grenville Mellen Dodge (1831-1916) — also known as Grenville M. Dodge — of Iowa. Born in Danvers, Essex County, Mass., April 12, 1831. Republican. General in the Union Army during the Civil War; U.S. Representative from Iowa 5th District, 1867-69; delegate to Republican National Convention from Iowa, 1868 (member, Resolutions Committee); member of Republican National Committee from Iowa, 1872-74. Member, Loyal Legion. Chief engineer of the Union Pacific Railroad. Died in Council Bluffs, Pottawattamie County, Iowa, January 3, 1916 (age 84 years, 266 days). Entombed at Walnut Hill Cemetery, Council Bluffs, Iowa.
  The World War II Liberty ship SS Grenville M. Dodge (built 1943 at Richmond, California; scrapped 1974) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Henry Dodge (1782-1867) — of Ste. Genevieve County, Mo.; Michigan; Dodgeville, Iowa County, Wis. Born near Vincennes, Knox County, Ind., October 12, 1782. Democrat. General in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812; delegate to Missouri state constitutional convention from Ste. Genevieve County, 1820; member Michigan territorial council 7th District, 1832-33; Governor of Wisconsin Territory, 1836-41, 1845-48; Delegate to U.S. Congress from Wisconsin Territory, 1841-45; U.S. Senator from Wisconsin, 1848-57. Slaveowner. Died in Burlington, Des Moines County, Iowa, June 19, 1867 (age 84 years, 250 days). Interment at Aspen Grove Cemetery, Burlington, Iowa.
  Relatives: Son of Nancy Ann (Hunter) Dodge and Israel Dodge (1760-1806); half-brother of Lewis Fields Linn; married 1800 to Christiana McDonald; father-in-law of James Clarke (1812-1850); father of Augustus Caesar Dodge; third cousin once removed of Augustus Sabin Chase (1828-1896); third cousin twice removed of Irving Hall Chase; third cousin thrice removed of Augustus Sabin Chase (1897-1970); fourth cousin once removed of David Lane Dodge.
  Political family: Polk family (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Dodge counties in Minn. and Wis., and Henry County, Iowa, are named for him.
  Fort Dodge (military installation, 1850-53), and the city of Fort Dodge, Iowa, were named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS Henry Dodge (built 1943 at Richmond, California; sold and renamed SS Alheli; sank during a storm in the North Atlantic Ocean, 1968) was originally named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  John Addie Donald (1857-1922) — also known as John A. Donald — of Staten Island, Richmond County, N.Y.; Rye, Westchester County, N.Y. Born in Kirkintilloch, East Dunbartonshire, Scotland, July 24, 1857. Democrat. Naturalized U.S. citizen; steamship business; member, U.S. Shipping Board, 1917-21. Episcopalian. Scottish ancestry. Died, from pneumonia, in Rye, Westchester County, N.Y., January 13, 1922 (age 64 years, 173 days). Interment at Moravian Cemetery, New Dorp, Staten Island, N.Y.
  Relatives: Married, November 4, 1891, to Lillian 'Lillie' Dunshee.
  The World War II Liberty ship SS John A. Donald (built 1943 at Baltimore, Maryland; scrapped 1964) was named for him.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Alexander William Doniphan (1808-1887) — of Liberty, Clay County, Mo.; Richmond, Ray County, Mo. Born in Maysville, Mason County, Ky., July 9, 1808. Lawyer; member of Missouri state house of representatives, 1836, 1840, 1854; in 1838, he refused to obey an order to execute Joseph Smith and other Mormon leaders, calling it "cold-blooded murder"; colonel in the U.S. Army during the Mexican War; led Doniphan's Expedition into Mexico, 1846-47; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Missouri, 1876. Died in Richmond, Ray County, Mo., August 8, 1887 (age 79 years, 30 days). Interment at Fairview Cemetery, Liberty, Mo.; statue at County Courthouse Grounds, Richmond, Mo.
  Relatives: Son-in-law of John Thorton (1786-1847); married, December 21, 1837, to Elizabeth Jane Thornton (1820-1873).
  Political family: Trigg family of Virginia.
  Doniphan County, Kan. is named for him.
  The city of Doniphan, Missouri, is named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS Alexander W. Doniphan (built 1944 at New Orleans, Louisiana; scrapped 1964) was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about Alexander William Doniphan: Roger D. Launius, Alexander William Doniphan: Portrait of a Missouri Moderate
  Ignatius Loyola Donnelly (1831-1901) — also known as Ignatius L. Donnelly — of Nininger, Dakota County, Minn.; Hastings, Dakota County, Minn. Born in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., November 3, 1831. Lawyer; Lieutenant Governor of Minnesota, 1860-63; U.S. Representative from Minnesota 2nd District, 1863-69; defeated, 1868, 1870; member of Minnesota state senate, 1874-78, 1891-94 (20th District 1874-78, 24th District 1891-94); member of Minnesota state house of representatives, 1887-88, 1897-98 (District 25 1887-88, District 24 1897-98); People's candidate for Governor of Minnesota, 1892; People's candidate for Vice President of the United States, 1900. Died in Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minn., January 1, 1901 (age 69 years, 59 days). Interment at Calvary Cemetery, St. Paul, Minn.
  Relatives: Married, September 10, 1855, to Katharine McCaffrey (died 1894); married, February 22, 1898, to Marian Hanson.
  The World War II Liberty ship SS Ignatius L. Donnelly (built 1943 at Portland, Oregon; scrapped 1962) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Minnesota Legislator record
  James Duane Doty (1799-1865) — also known as James D. Doty — of Neenah, Winnebago County, Wis.; Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Utah. Born in Salem, Washington County, N.Y., November 5, 1799. Democrat. Lawyer; federal judge, 1828-32; member Michigan territorial council 7th District, 1834-35; Delegate to U.S. Congress from Wisconsin Territory, 1839-41; Governor of Wisconsin Territory, 1841-44; delegate to Wisconsin state constitutional convention, 1846; U.S. Representative from Wisconsin 3rd District, 1849-53; Governor of Utah Territory, 1863-65; died in office 1865. Presbyterian. Died in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Utah, June 13, 1865 (age 65 years, 220 days). Interment at Fort Douglas Cemetery, Salt Lake City, Utah.
  Relatives: Son of Chillus Doty and Sarah (Martin) Doty; married to Sarah Collins; father of Charles Doty (1824-1918); first cousin of Morgan Lewis Martin; third cousin twice removed of Samuel Allyne Otis; fourth cousin once removed of Harrison Gray Otis.
  Political family: Otis family of Connecticut (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Doty Elementary School, in Green Bay, Wisconsin, is named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS James D. Doty (built 1943 at Portland, Oregon; scrapped 1961) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  John Drayton (1766-1822) — of Charleston, Charleston County, S.C. Born in Charleston, Charleston County, S.C., June 22, 1766. Lawyer; author; botanist; member of South Carolina state house of representatives, 1792-96, 1798, 1802-04; Lieutenant Governor of South Carolina, 1798-1800; Governor of South Carolina, 1800-02, 1808-10; intendant of Charleston, South Carolina, 1803-04; member of South Carolina state senate from St. Philip & St. Michael, 1805-08; U.S. District Judge for South Carolina, 1812-22. Died in Charleston, Charleston County, S.C., November 27, 1822 (age 56 years, 158 days). Interment at Cathedral Church of St. Luke and St. Paul, Charleston, S.C.
  Relatives: Son of William Henry Drayton and Dorothy (Golightly) Drayton (1747-1780); married 1794 to Hester Rose Tidyman (1773-1816); first cousin once removed of John Drayton; second cousin of William Drayton (1776-1846).
  Political family: Middleton-Huger-Rutledge-Drayton family of Charleston, South Carolina (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  The World War II Liberty ship SS John Drayton (built 1942 at Wilmington, North Carolina; torpedoed and lost in the Indian Ocean, 1943) was named for him.
  See also National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Josiah Hayden Drummond (1827-1902) — of Portland, Cumberland County, Maine. Born in Winslow, Kennebec County, Maine, August 30, 1827. Republican. Lawyer; member of Maine state house of representatives, 1857-58, 1869; Speaker of the Maine State House of Representatives, 1858; member of Maine state senate, 1859-60; Maine state attorney general, 1860-63; delegate to Republican National Convention from Maine, 1864, 1884. Member, Freemasons; Scottish Rite Masons. Died in Portland, Cumberland County, Maine, October 25, 1902 (age 75 years, 56 days). Interment at Evergreen Cemetery, Portland, Maine.
  Relatives: Son of Clark Drummond and Cynthia (Blackwell) Drummond; married to Elzada Rollins Bean (1829-1907).
  The World War II Liberty ship SS J. H. Drummond (built 1944 at Panama City, Florida; wrecked and scrapped 1966) was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  James Buchanan Duke (1856-1925) — also known as James B. Duke; "Buck"; "Tobacco King" — of Somerville, Somerset County, N.J. Born near Durham, Durham County, N.C., December 23, 1856. Republican. Organizer and president, American Tobacco Company, which monopolized the tobacco industry until it was broken up in 1911; organizer of electric power companies; delegate to Republican National Convention from New Jersey, 1904. Left a large trust fund which supported Duke University. Died, of bronchial pneumonia, in Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., October 10, 1925 (age 68 years, 291 days). Entombed at Duke University Chapel, Durham, N.C.
  Presumably named for: James Buchanan
  Relatives: Son of Washington Duke (1820-1905); married 1904 to Lillian Fletcher McCredy (divorced 1906); married, July 23, 1907, to Nanaline Lee 'Nannie' (Holt) Inman (1870-1962); father of Doris Duke (1912-1993; who married James Henry Roberts Cromwell (1896-1990)); uncle of Mary Lillian Duke (1887-1960; who married Anthony Joseph Drexel Biddle Jr.).
  Political families: Biddle-Randolph family of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Barkley-MacArthur family; Dodge-Duke-Cromwell family of Detroit, Michigan (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  The World War II Liberty ship SS James B. Duke (built 1944 at Brunswick, Georgia; scrapped 1972) was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Henry Durant (1802-1875) — of Byfield, Newbury, Essex County, Mass.; Oakland, Alameda County, Calif. Born in Acton, Middlesex County, Mass., June 18, 1802. Pastor; founder, College of California; first president, University of California, 1870-72; mayor of Oakland, Calif., 1873-75; died in office 1875. Congregationalist. Died in Oakland, Alameda County, Calif., January 22, 1875 (age 72 years, 218 days). Interment at Mountain View Cemetery, Oakland, Calif.
  Relatives: Married 1833 to Mary E. Buffett.
  The Hotel Durant (built 1928; renamed 2017 as Graduate Berkeley), in Berkeley, California, was named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS Henry Durant (built 1943 at Sausalito, California; scrapped 1963) was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article
  Gabriel Duvall (1752-1844) — of Maryland. Born in Prince George's County, Md., December 6, 1752. Democrat. Member of Maryland state legislature, 1787; U.S. Representative from Maryland 2nd District, 1794-96; state court judge in Maryland, 1796-1802; Presidential Elector for Maryland, 1796, 1800; Associate Justice of U.S. Supreme Court, 1811-35. Episcopalian. Slaveowner. Died in Prince George's County, Md., March 6, 1844 (age 91 years, 91 days). Interment at Duvall Memorial Garden, Marietta House, Glenn Dale, Md.
  Relatives: Married to Mary Bryce (1761-1790) and Jane Gibbon (1757-1834).
  The World War II Liberty ship SS Gabriel Duvall (built 1942 at Terminal Island, Los Angeles, California; scrapped 1962) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Ballotpedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
George Eastman George Eastman (1854-1932) — of Rochester, Monroe County, N.Y. Born in Waterville, Oneida County, N.Y., July 12, 1854. Republican. Inventor; founder, Eastman Kodak Company; philanthropist; Presidential Elector for New York, 1900, 1916; alternate delegate to Republican National Convention from New York, 1928. English ancestry. Died from a self-inflicted gunshot, in Rochester, Monroe County, N.Y., March 14, 1932 (age 77 years, 246 days). His suicide note was just six words: "My work is done. Why wait?". Interment at Kodak Park, Rochester, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of George Washington Eastman (1815-1862) and Maria (Kilbourn) Eastman (1821-1907); first cousin of Harvey Gridley Eastman (1832-1878); third cousin of Frederick Walker Pitkin; third cousin twice removed of James Kilbourne and Daniel Kellogg (1791-1875); fourth cousin once removed of Silas Condict, Byron H. Kilbourn, Harrison Blodget, George Bradley Kellogg, Daniel Kellogg (1835-1918), Clarence Horatio Pitkin, Carroll Peabody Pitkin, Caleb Seymour Pitkin and Eldred C. Pitkin.
  Political families: Kellogg-Adams-Seymour-Chapin family of Connecticut and New York; Eastman family (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  The World War II Liberty ship SS George Eastman (built 1943 at Richmond, California; scrapped 1977) was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about George Eastman: Carl W. Ackerman, George Eastman: Founder of Kodak and the Photography Business — Elizabeth Brayer, George Eastman: A Biography — Lynda Pflueger, George Eastman: Bringing Photography to the People (for young readers)
  Image source: Time Magazine, March 31, 1924
  John Henry Eaton (1790-1856) — also known as John H. Eaton — of Nashville, Davidson County, Tenn. Born near Scotland Neck, Halifax County, N.C., June 18, 1790. Democrat. Lawyer; served in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812; member of Tennessee state house of representatives, 1815-16; U.S. Senator from Tennessee, 1818-21, 1821-29; U.S. Secretary of War, 1829-31; Governor of Florida Territory, 1834-36; U.S. Minister to Spain, 1836-40. Member, Freemasons. Resigned from Cabinet in 1831 during the scandal (called the "Petticoat Affair") over past infedelities of his second wife, Peggy Eaton. Slaveowner. Died in Washington, D.C., November 17, 1856 (age 66 years, 152 days). Interment at Oak Hill Cemetery, Washington, D.C.
  Eaton County, Mich. is named for him.
  The World War II Liberty ship SS John H. Eaton (built 1942-43 at Houston, Texas; sold 1947, scrapped 1968) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary
  William Eaton (1764-1811) — of Windsor, Windsor County, Vt.; Brimfield, Hampden County, Mass. Born in Woodstock, Windham County, Conn., February 23, 1764. Served in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; Clerk, Vermont House of Representatives, 1791-92; U.S. Consul General in Tunis, 1797-1803; led multinational military force in North Africa, 1804-05, in an effort to overthrow the Barbary pirates; member of Massachusetts state house of representatives, 1807-08. Died in Brimfield, Hampden County, Mass., June 1, 1811 (age 47 years, 98 days). Interment at Brimfield Cemetery, Brimfield, Mass.
  The town of Eaton, New York, is named for him.  — The USS Eaton, a World War II destroyer, was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Morris Michael Edelstein (1888-1941) — also known as M. Michael Edelstein — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born in Meseritz (Międzyrzec), Poland, February 5, 1888. Democrat. Lawyer; U.S. Representative from New York 14th District, 1940-41; died in office 1941. Jewish. Completed delivery of a speech on the floor of the U.S. House of Representatives, and then died nearby in the House cloakroom, in the U.S. Capitol Building, Washington, D.C., June 4, 1941 (age 53 years, 119 days). Interment at Mt. Zion Cemetery, Maspeth, Queens, N.Y.
  The World War II Liberty ship SS M. Michael Edelstein (built 1944 at Panama City, Florida; scrapped 1969) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Henry Leavitt Ellsworth (1791-1858) — also known as Henry L. Ellsworth; "Father of the U.S. Department of Agriculture" — of Hartford, Hartford County, Conn. Born in Windsor, Hartford County, Conn., November 10, 1791. Democrat. Lawyer; member of Connecticut state house of representatives from Hartford, 1830; mayor of Hartford, Conn., 1835; resigned 1835; commissioner of the U.S. Patent Office, 1835-45. Died in Fair Haven, New Haven, New Haven County, Conn., December 28, 1858 (age 67 years, 48 days). Interment at Grove Street Cemetery, New Haven, Conn.
  Relatives: Son of Oliver Ellsworth and Abigail (Wolcott) Ellsworth (1756-1818); married, June 22, 1813, to Nancy Allen Goodrich (1793-1847; daughter of Elizur Goodrich); married to Marietta Mariana Bartlett and Catherine Smith; great-grandnephew of Roger Wolcott (1679-1767); fourth great-grandson of Thomas Welles; fourth great-grandnephew of Robert Treat; first cousin twice removed of Erastus Wolcott and Oliver Wolcott Sr.; second cousin once removed of Oliver Wolcott Jr., Roger Griswold and Frederick Wolcott; second cousin twice removed of William Pitkin; third cousin of Samuel Clesson Allen and Abijah Blodget; third cousin once removed of Matthew Griswold (1714-1799), Daniel Pitkin, Harrison Blodget, John William Allen, Elisha Hunt Allen, James Samuel Wadsworth, Gouverneur Morris, Henry Titus Backus, George Washington Wolcott, Christopher Parsons Wolcott, Matthew Griswold (1833-1919) and Roger Wolcott (1847-1900); third cousin twice removed of Albert Asahel Bliss (born1812), Philemon Bliss, William Fessenden Allen, Charles Frederick Wadsworth, James Wolcott Wadsworth, Edward Oliver Wolcott, Walter Harrison Blodget, Alfred Wolcott and Frederick Hobbes Allen; third cousin thrice removed of Judson H. Warner, Luther Thomas Ellsworth, Henry Augustus Wolcott, James Wolcott Wadsworth Jr. and Selden Chapin; fourth cousin of James Hillhouse, Timothy Pitkin, Gaylord Griswold, Elisha Phelps and Gideon Hard; fourth cousin once removed of Ebenezer Huntington, Hezekiah Case, Gershom Birdsey, Benjamin Hard, Oliver Owen Forward, Walter Forward, Phineas Lyman Tracy, Abiel Case, Chauncey Forward, Albert Haller Tracy, Israel Coe, Eli Coe Birdsey, Edmund Holcomb, Jairus Case, Norman A. Phelps, Anson Levi Holcomb, George Smith Catlin, John Smith Phelps, William Gleason Jr., John Robert Graham Pitkin, Caleb Seymour Pitkin and Allen Jacob Holcomb; twin brother of William Wolcott Ellsworth.
  Political families: Kellogg-Adams-Seymour-Chapin family of Connecticut and New York; Wolcott-Wadsworth family of Connecticut (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  The World War II Liberty ship SS Henry L. Ellsworth (built 1943 at New Orleans, Louisiana; scrapped 1968) was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
John Evans John Evans (1814-1897) — of Chicago, Cook County, Ill. Born in Waynesville, Warren County, Ohio, March 9, 1814. Republican. Physician; Governor of Colorado Territory, 1862-65; delegate to Republican National Convention from Colorado Territory, 1868 (member, Credentials Committee; member, Committee on Permanent Organization; speaker). Methodist. One of the founders of Northwestern University, and of the University of Denver. Died in Denver, Colo., July 3, 1897 (age 83 years, 116 days). Interment at Riverside Cemetery, Denver, Colo.
  Relatives: Son of David Evans and Rachel (Burnett) Evans; married 1838 to Hannah P. Canby (1813-1850); married 1853 to Margaret Patten Gray (1830-1906); father of Josephine Evans (1844-1868; who married Samuel Hitt Elbert (1833-1899)).
  The city of Evanston, Illinois, is named for him.  — The city of Evans, Colorado, is named for him.  — Mount Evans, in Clear Creek County, Colorado, is named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS John Evans (built 1943 at Richmond, California; scrapped 1961) was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: American Monthly Review of Reviews, August 1897
  Henry Failing (1834-1898) — of Portland, Multnomah County, Ore. Born in New York, New York County, N.Y., January 17, 1834. Republican. Mayor of Portland, Ore., 1864-65, 1873-75. Died November 8, 1898 (age 64 years, 295 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Josiah Failing and Henrietta (Ellison) Failing; married, October 21, 1858, to Emily Phelps Corbett (sister of Henry Winslow Corbett (1827-1903)).
  Political family: Failing-Corbett family of Portland, Oregon.
  The World War II Liberty ship SS Henry Failing (built 1943 at Portland, Oregon; scrapped 1961) was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article
  John Fairfield (1797-1847) — of Saco, York County, Maine. Born in Saco, York County, Maine, January 30, 1797. Democrat. Lawyer; U.S. Representative from Maine, 1835-38 (3rd District 1835-37, 4th District 1837-38); resigned 1838; Governor of Maine, 1839-41, 1842-43; defeated, 1840; U.S. Senator from Maine, 1843-47; died in office 1847. Died in Washington, D.C., December 24, 1847 (age 50 years, 328 days). Interment at Laurel Hill Cemetery, Saco, Maine; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery, Washington, D.C.
  Fort Fairfield (old military installation), and the town of Fort Fairfield, Maine, were named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS John Fairfield (built 1943 at South Portland, Maine; scrapped 1968) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Jacob Sloat Fassett (1853-1924) — also known as J. Sloat Fassett — of Elmira, Chemung County, N.Y. Born in Elmira, Chemung County, N.Y., November 13, 1853. Republican. Lawyer; newspaper editor; Chemung County District Attorney, 1879-80; delegate to Republican National Convention from New York, 1880, 1892, 1904, 1908, 1916; member of New York state senate 27th District, 1884-91; Secretary of Republican National Committee, 1888-92; U.S. Collector of Customs, 1891; candidate for Governor of New York, 1891; U.S. Representative from New York 33rd District, 1905-11; defeated, 1910; banker; lumber business. Died in Vancouver, British Columbia, April 21, 1924 (age 70 years, 160 days). Interment at Woodlawn Cemetery, Elmira, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Newton Pomeroy Fassett (1822-1894) and Martha Ellen (Sloat) Fassett (1829-1907); married, February 13, 1879, to Jennie L. Crocker (1860-1939; daughter of Edwin Bryant Crocker; niece of Charles Crocker); fourth cousin once removed of Zenas Ferry Moody (1832-1917) and Alfred Clark Chapin.
  Political families: Kellogg-Adams-Seymour-Chapin family of Connecticut and New York; Crocker-Whitehouse family of Sacramento, California (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  The village of Fassett, Quebec, Canada, is named for him.  — Fassett Elementary School, in Elmira, New York, is named for him.  — Fassett Commons, a building at Elmira College, Elmira, New York, is named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS Jacob Sloat Fassett (built 1944 at Savannah, Georgia; scrapped 1965) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  John Buchanan Floyd (1806-1863) — also known as John B. Floyd — of Virginia. Born in Smithfield, Isle of Wight County, Va., June 1, 1806. Lawyer; member of Virginia state house of delegates, 1847-48; Governor of Virginia, 1849-52; U.S. Secretary of War, 1857-60; general in the Confederate Army during the Civil War. Died near Abingdon, Washington County, Va., August 26, 1863 (age 57 years, 86 days). Interment at Sinking Spring Cemetery, Abingdon, Va.
  Relatives: Son of Letitia (Preston) Floyd (1776-1852) and John Floyd; brother of George Rogers Clark Floyd; married to Sarah 'Sally' Preston (1802-1879); adoptive father of Eliza M. Johnston (who married Robert William Hughes); nephew of Francis Smith Preston, James Patton Preston and James Douglas Breckinridge; grandson of William Preston; first cousin of William Campbell Preston (1794-1860), James McDowell and John Smith Preston; first cousin once removed of John Breckinridge, Robert Jefferson Breckinridge Jr. and William Campbell Preston Breckinridge; first cousin twice removed of Levin Irving Handy, Desha Breckinridge and Henry Skillman Breckinridge; second cousin of Joseph Cabell Breckinridge and Robert Jefferson Breckinridge; second cousin once removed of John Cabell Breckinridge, Peter Augustus Porter (1827-1864) and Joseph Weldon Bailey Jr.; second cousin twice removed of Clifton Rodes Breckinridge and Peter Augustus Porter (1853-1925).
  Political families: Breckinridge-Preston-Cabell family of Virginia; Kellogg-Adams-Seymour-Chapin family of Connecticut and New York (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  The World War II Liberty ship SS John B. Floyd (built 1942 at Richmond, California; scrapped 1965) was named for him.
  See also National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Henry Stuart Foote (1804-1880) — also known as Henry S. Foote; "Hangman Foote" — of Tuscumbia, Colbert County, Ala.; Jackson, Hinds County, Miss.; San Francisco, Calif.; Nashville, Davidson County, Tenn. Born in Fauquier County, Va., February 28, 1804. Lawyer; co-founder of LaGrange College, which later became the University of North Alabama; fought four duels; fled Alabama in 1830 to escape prosecution for dueling; U.S. Senator from Mississippi, 1847-52; exchanged blows with Thomas Hart Benton on the floor of the U.S. Senate; Governor of Mississippi, 1852-54; Representative from Tennessee in the Confederate Congress, 1862-65; expelled from the Confederate Congress in early 1865 for going North on an unauthorized peace mission; delegate to Republican National Convention from Tennessee, 1876. Slaveowner. Died in Nashville, Davidson County, Tenn., May 19, 1880 (age 76 years, 81 days). Interment at Mt. Olivet Cemetery, Nashville, Tenn.
  Relatives: Son of Richard Helm Foote (1772-1817) and Helen Gibbon (Stuart) Foote (1776-1815); married, March 22, 1827, to Elizabeth Winters (1810-1855); married, June 15, 1859, to Rachel Douglas Boyd (1831-1882).
  The World War II Liberty ship SS Henry S. Foote (built 1943 at New Orleans, Louisiana; scrapped 1960) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Nathan Bedford Forrest (1821-1877) — also known as "Wizard of the Saddle" — of Memphis, Shelby County, Tenn. Born near Chapel Hill, Bedford County (now Marshall County), Tenn., July 13, 1821. Democrat. Cotton planter; slave trader; general in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; in April 1864, after the Battle of Fort Pillow, Tennessee, Confederate troops under his command massacred African-American Union soldiers, not accepting them as prisoners, since the Confederacy refused to recognize ex-slaves as legitimate combatants; this event, seen as a war crime, sparked outrage across the North, and a congressional inquiry; in 1867, he became involved in the Ku Klux Klan and was elected Grand Wizard; the organization used violent tactics to intimidate Black voters and suppress their votes; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Tennessee, 1868; in 1869, he had a change of heart, and issued a letter ordering that the Klan be dissolved and its costumes destroyed; he went on to denounce the group and its crimes; in 1875, he gave a "friendly speech" to a meeting of an African-American organization in Memphis, calling for peace, harmony, and economic advancement of former slaves; for this speech, he was vehemently denounced in the Southern press. English ancestry. Member, Ku Klux Klan. After his death, he became a folk hero among white Southerners, particularly during the imposition of Jim Crow segregation laws in the early 20th century, and later, in reaction to the Civil Rights movement in the 1950s and 1960s. Slaveowner. Died, from complications of diabetes, in Memphis, Shelby County, Tenn., October 29, 1877 (age 56 years, 108 days). Original interment at Elmwood Cemetery, Memphis, Tenn.; reinterment in 1904 at Health Sciences Park, Memphis, Tenn.; memorial monument at Myrtle Hill Cemetery, Rome, Ga.; memorial monument at Live Oak Cemetery, Selma, Ala.
  Relatives: Son of William B. Forrest (1801-1837) and Miriam (Beck) Forrest (1802-1867); married 1845 to Mary Ann Montgomery (1826-1893).
  Forrest County, Miss. is named for him.
  The city of Forrest City, Arkansas, is named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS Nathan B. Forrest (built 1943 at Panama City, Florida; scrapped 1973) was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Abiel Foster (1735-1806) — of New Hampshire. Born in Andover, Essex County, Mass., August 8, 1735. Pastor; Delegate to Continental Congress from New Hampshire, 1783-85; common pleas court judge in New Hampshire, 1784-88; U.S. Representative from New Hampshire at-large, 1789-91, 1795-1803; member of New Hampshire state senate, 1791-94. Died in Canterbury, Merrimack County, N.H., February 6, 1806 (age 70 years, 182 days). Interment at Center Cemetery, Canterbury, N.H.
  Relatives: Son of Asa Foster (1710-1787) and Elizabeth (Abbott) Foster (1712-1758); married 1761 to Hanna Badger (died 1768); married 1769 to Mary Wise Rogers (1745-1813).
  The World War II Liberty ship SS Abiel Foster (built 1941 at Terminal Island, Los Angeles, California; scrapped 1961) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
John W. Foster John Watson Foster (1836-1917) — also known as John W. Foster — of Evansville, Vanderburgh County, Ind.; Washington, D.C. Born in Pike County, Ind., March 2, 1836. Republican. Lawyer; colonel in the Union Army during the Civil War; newspaper editor; alternate delegate to Republican National Convention from Indiana, 1868; postmaster at Evansville, Ind., 1869-73; Indiana Republican state chair, 1872; U.S. Minister to Mexico, 1873-80; Russia, 1880-81; Spain, 1883-85; U.S. Secretary of State, 1892-93. Presbyterian. Member, Loyal Legion. Died in Washington, D.C., November 15, 1917 (age 81 years, 258 days). Interment at Oak Hill Cemetery, Evansville, Ind.
  Relatives: Son of Matthew Watson Foster (1800-1863) and Eleanor (Johnson) Foster (1811-1849); married 1859 to Mary Parke McFerson (1840-1922; President General of the D.A.R., 1895-96); father of Eleanor Foster (1866-1934; who married Robert Lansing); grandfather of John Foster Dulles (1888-1959) and Allen Welsh Dulles.
  Political families: Kellogg-Adams-Seymour-Chapin family of Connecticut and New York; Foster-Dulles family of Watertown and New York City, New York; Wanamaker-Welsh-Dulles-Brown family of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  The World War II Liberty ship SS John W. Foster (built 1943 at Richmond, California; scrapped 1971) was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: Life and Work of James G. Blaine (1893)
John C. Fremont John Charles Frémont (1813-1890) — also known as "The Pathfinder"; "The Champion of Freedom" — of San Francisco, Calif. Born in Savannah, Chatham County, Ga., January 21, 1813. Republican. Explorer; Military Governor of California, 1847; arrested for mutiny, 1847; court-martialed; found guilty of mutiny, disobedience, and conduct prejudicial to order; penalty remitted by Pres. James K. Polk; U.S. Senator from California, 1850-51; candidate for President of the United States, 1856; general in the Union Army during the Civil War; Governor of Arizona Territory, 1878-81; speaker, Republican National Convention, 1888. Episcopalian. French ancestry. Died, of peritonitis, in a hotel room at New York, New York County, N.Y., July 13, 1890 (age 77 years, 173 days). Original interment at Trinity Cemetery, Manhattan, N.Y.; reinterment in 1891 at Rockland Cemetery, Nyack, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Jean Charles Frémont and Ann Whiting (Pryor) Frémont; married, October 19, 1841, to Jessie Benton (daughter of Thomas Hart Benton (1782-1858)).
  Political families: Benton family; Breckinridge-Preston-Cabell family of Virginia (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Cross-reference: Selah Hill
  Fremont County, Colo., Fremont County, Idaho, Fremont County, Iowa and Fremont County, Wyo. are named for him.
  Fremont Peak, in Monterey County and San Benito County, California, is named for him.  — Fremont Peak, in Coconino County, Arizona, is named for him.  — The city of Fremont, California, is named for him.  — The city of Fremont, Ohio, is named for him.  — The city of Fremont, Nebraska, is named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS John C. Fremont (built 1941 at Terminal Island, California; mined and wrecked in Manila Bay, Philippines, 1945) was named for him.
  Politician named for him: John F. Hill
  Campaign slogan (1856): "Free Soil, Free Men, Fremont."
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books by John C. Fremont: Memoirs of My Life and Times
  Books about John C. Fremont: Tom Chaffin, Pathfinder: John Charles Fremont and the Course of American Empire — David Roberts, A Newer World : Kit Carson, John C. Fremont and the Claiming of the American West — Andrew Rolle, John Charles Fremont: Character As Destiny
  Image source: Life and Work of James G. Blaine (1893)
  John Pollard Gaines (1795-1857) — Born in Augusta County, Va., September 22, 1795. Served in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812; member of Kentucky state legislature, 1830; served in the U.S. Army during the Mexican War; U.S. Representative from Kentucky 10th District, 1847-49; Governor of Oregon Territory, 1850-53. Slaveowner. Died in Salem, Marion County, Ore., December 9, 1857 (age 62 years, 78 days). Interment at Pioneer Cemetery, Salem, Ore.
  The World War II Liberty ship SS John P. Gaines (built 1943 at Portland, Oregon; broke in two and sank in the North Pacific Ocean, 1943) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  George Gale (1756-1815) — of Maryland. Born in Somerset County, Md., June 3, 1756. Member of Maryland state house of delegates, 1784; member of Maryland state senate, 1784-90; state court judge in Maryland, 1785-86; U.S. Representative from Maryland at-large, 1789-91. Episcopalian. Slaveowner. Died in Cecil County, Md., January 2, 1815 (age 58 years, 213 days). Interment at St. Mark's Episcopal Church Cemetery, Aiken, Md.
  Relatives: Father of Levin Gale (1784-1834).
  The World War II Liberty ship SS George Gale (built 1942 at New Orleans, Louisiana; scrapped 1970) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
Albert Gallatin Albert Gallatin (1761-1849) — also known as Abraham Albert Alphonse de Gallatin — of Fayette County, Pa.; New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in Geneva, Switzerland, January 29, 1761. Democrat. Delegate to Pennsylvania state constitutional convention, 1790; member of Pennsylvania state house of representatives, 1790-92; U.S. Senator from Pennsylvania, 1793-94; U.S. Representative from Pennsylvania 11th District, 1795-1801; U.S. Secretary of the Treasury, 1801-14; U.S. Minister to France, 1815-23; Great Britain, 1826-27. Swiss ancestry. Died in Astoria, Queens, Queens County, N.Y., August 12, 1849 (age 88 years, 195 days). Entombed at Trinity Churchyard, Manhattan, N.Y.; statue at Treasury Building Grounds, Washington, D.C.
  Relatives: Son of Jean Gallatin and Sophia Albertina Rolaz du Rosey Gallatin; married 1789 to Sophie Allègre (1766-1789); married, November 11, 1793, to Hannah Nicholson (1766-1849); second great-grandfather of May Preston Davie; cousin by marriage of Joseph Hopper Nicholson (1770-1817).
  Political families: Pendleton-Lee family of Maryland; Davie family of Maryland (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Cross-reference: John L. Dawson
  Gallatin counties in Ill., Ky. and Mont. are named for him.
  The city of Gallatin, Tennessee, is named for him.  — The village of Galatia, Illinois, is named for him.  — The Gallatin River, which flows through Gallatin County, Montana, is named for him.  — Gallatin Hall (dormitory, built 1926), at Harvard University Business School, Boston, Massachusetts, is named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS Albert Gallatin (built 1941 at Terminal Island, Los Angeles, California; torpedoed and sunk 1944 in the Arabian Sea) was named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: Albert Galliton HarrisonAlbert G. JewettAlbert G. HawesAlbert G. WakefieldAlbert Gallatin TalbottAlbert G. DowAlbert G. DoleAlbert Gallatin KelloggAlbert Gallatin MarchandAlbert G. BrownAlbert G. Brodhead, Jr.Albert G. AllisonAlbert G. RiddleAlbert Galiton WatkinsAlbert G. PorterAlbert Gallatin EgbertAlbert Gallatin JenkinsAlbert Gallatin CalvertAlbert G. LawrenceAlbert G. FosterAlbert G. Simms
  Coins and currency: His portrait appeared on the U.S. $500 note in 1862-63.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about Albert Gallatin: John Austin Stevens, Albert Gallatin: An American Statesman — L. B. Kuppenheimer, Albert Gallatin's Vision of Democratic Stability — Nicholas Dungan, Gallatin: America's Swiss Founding Father — Raymond Walters, Albert Gallatin: Jeffersonian Financier and Diplomat
  Image source: New York Public Library
  Jacob Harold Gallinger (1837-1918) — also known as Jacob H. Gallinger — of Concord, Merrimack County, N.H. Born in Cornwall, Ontario, March 28, 1837. Republican. Physician; member of New Hampshire state house of representatives, 1872-73, 1891; delegate to New Hampshire state constitutional convention, 1876; member of New Hampshire state senate, 1878-80 (4th District 1878-79, 10th District 1879-80); New Hampshire Republican state chair, 1882-90, 1898-1907; U.S. Representative from New Hampshire 2nd District, 1885-89; delegate to Republican National Convention from New Hampshire, 1888, 1900, 1904, 1908; U.S. Senator from New Hampshire, 1891-1918; died in office 1918; member of Republican National Committee from New Hampshire, 1902-04. Died in Franklin, Merrimack County, N.H., August 17, 1918 (age 81 years, 142 days). Interment at Blossom Hill Cemetery, Concord, N.H.
  Relatives: Son of Jacob Gallinger and Catherine (Cook) Gallinger; married 1860 to Mary Anna Bailey.
  The World War II Liberty ship SS Jacob H. Gallinger (built 1943 at South Portland, Maine; wrecked 1967, scrapped 1969) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Internet Movie Database profile
  Harry Augustus Garfield (1863-1942) — also known as Harry A. Garfield; Hal Garfield — of Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, Ohio; Princeton, Mercer County, N.J.; Williamstown, Berkshire County, Mass. Born in Hiram, Portage County, Ohio, October 11, 1863. Republican. Lawyer; university professor; alternate delegate to Republican National Convention from New Jersey, 1904; president of Williams College, 1908-34; U.S. Fuel Administrator, 1917-19. Member, American Political Science Association; Loyal Legion. Died in Williamstown, Berkshire County, Mass., December 12, 1942 (age 79 years, 62 days). Interment at Williams College Cemetery, Williamstown, Mass.
  Relatives: Son of James Abram Garfield and Lucretia Garfield; brother of James Rudolph Garfield; married 1888 to Belle Hartford Mason (1864-1944); fourth great-grandson of Peleg Sanford; first cousin twice removed of Stephen Daniel Tilden; second cousin once removed of Daniel Rose Tilden (1804-1890) and Edwin Carpenter Pinney; third cousin of Claude Carpenter Pinney; third cousin once removed of Harold B. Pinney; fourth cousin once removed of Eli Thayer.
  Political families: Kellogg-Adams-Seymour-Chapin family of Connecticut and New York; Otis family of Connecticut (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  The World War II Liberty ship SS Harry A. Garfield (built 1943 at South Portland, Maine; transferred to the Belgian government and renamed Belgian Dynasty; scrapped 1965) was originally named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Books about Harry A. Garfield: Lucretia Garfield Comer, Harry Garfield's First Forty Years: Man Of Action In A Troubled World
  Henry George (1839-1897) — of New York. Born in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., September 2, 1839. Economist; candidate for mayor of New York City, N.Y., 1886; candidate for secretary of state of New York, 1887. Author of Progress and Poverty. Died October 29, 1897 (age 58 years, 57 days). Interment at Green-Wood Cemetery, Brooklyn, N.Y.
  Relatives: Married to Annie Corsina Fox (1845-1904); father of Henry George Jr. (1862-1916).
  Cross-reference: Willis J. Abbot
  The World War II Liberty ship SS Henry George (built 1942 at Portland, Oregon; scrapped 1968) was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  John Goode Jr. (1829-1909) — of Norfolk, Va. Born near Liberty (now Bedford), Bedford County, Va., May 27, 1829. Democrat. Lawyer; member of Virginia state house of delegates, 1851; Presidential Elector for Virginia, 1852, 1856, 1884; delegate to Virginia secession convention, 1861; colonel in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; Representative from Virginia in the Confederate Congress, 1862-65; member of Virginia state legislature, 1866; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Virginia, 1868, 1892; U.S. Representative from Virginia 2nd District, 1875-81; member of Democratic National Committee from Virginia, 1876; U.S. Solicitor General, 1885-86; delegate to Virginia state constitutional convention from Bedford County, 1901-02. Slaveowner. Died in Norfolk, Va., July 14, 1909 (age 80 years, 48 days). Interment at Longwood Cemetery, Bedford, Va.
  The World War II Liberty ship SS John Goode (built 1943 at Terminal Island, California; sold 1947, scrapped 1967) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  John Brown Gordon (1832-1904) — also known as John B. Gordon — of Atlanta, Fulton County, Ga. Born in Upson County, Ga., February 6, 1832. Democrat. General in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Georgia, 1868; U.S. Senator from Georgia, 1873-80, 1891-97; Governor of Georgia, 1886-90. Slaveowner. Died in Miami, Dade County (now Miami-Dade County), Fla., January 9, 1904 (age 71 years, 337 days). Interment at Oakland Cemetery, Atlanta, Ga.
  Gordon State College, Barnesville, Georgia, is named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS John B. Gordon (built 1943 at Brunswick, Georgia; scrapped 1961) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article
John Gorrie John Gorrie (1803-1855) — of Apalachicola, Franklin County, Fla. Born in Nevis, October 3, 1803. Physician; postmaster at Apalachicola, Fla., 1834-38; mayor of Apalachicola, Fla., 1837-38; banker; inventor of the first ice-making machine, patented in 1851. Episcopalian. Scottish ancestry. Member, Freemasons. Died in Apalachicola, Franklin County, Fla., June 29, 1855 (age 51 years, 269 days). Original interment at Magnolia Cemetery, Apalachicola, Fla.; reinterment at Gorrie Square, Apalachicola, Fla.
  Relatives: Married 1838 to Caroline Frances Myrick (1805-1864).
  The John Gorrie Memorial Bridge (built 1935; rebuilt 1988), which carries U.S. highways 98 and 319 across Apalachicola Bay, from Apalachicola to Eastpoint, in Franklin County, Florida, is named for him.  — John Gorrie Junior High School (built 1923; closed 1997; now an apartment building called The John Gorrie), in Jacksonville, Florida, was named for him.  — Gorrie Elementary School (built 1889 as Hyde Park School; renamed 1915), in Tampa, Florida, is named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS John Gorrie (built 1942-43 at Jacksonville, Florida; scrapped 1967) was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: Palm Beach (Fla.) Post, October 17, 1993
Horace Gray Horace Gray (1828-1902) — of Massachusetts. Born in Boston, Suffolk County, Mass., March 24, 1828. Lawyer; justice of Massachusetts state supreme court, 1864-81; chief justice of Massachusetts supreme judicial court, 1873-81; Associate Justice of U.S. Supreme Court, 1881-1902; died in office 1902. Unitarian. Died in Nahant, Essex County, Mass., September 15, 1902 (age 74 years, 175 days). Interment at Mt. Auburn Cemetery, Cambridge, Mass.
  Relatives: Son of Horace Gray and Harriett (Upham) Gray; married to Jane Matthews (1860-1949; daughter of Stanley Matthews); descendant *** of William Gray (1750-1825).
  Political family: Gray-Matthews family of Boston, Massachusetts (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Cross-reference: Louis D. Brandeis
  The World War II Liberty ship SS Horace Gray (built 1942-43 at Baltimore, Maryland; torpedoed and wrecked in Kola Inlet, 1945) was named for him.
  See also federal judicial profile — Wikipedia article — Ballotpedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: American Monthly Review of Reviews, September 1902
Horace Greeley Horace Greeley (1811-1872) — also known as "Old Honesty"; "Old White Hat" — of New York, New York County, N.Y.; Chappaqua, Westchester County, N.Y. Born in Amherst, Hillsborough County, N.H., February 3, 1811. Founder and editor of the New York Tribune newspaper; U.S. Representative from New York 6th District, 1848-49; defeated (Republican), 1870; delegate to Republican National Convention from Oregon, 1860; after the Civil War, became advocate of universal amnesty for Confederates; offered bail in May 1867 for Jefferson Davis; member of Republican National Committee from New York, 1866-70; delegate to New York state constitutional convention, 1867; candidate for New York state comptroller, 1869; Democratic candidate for President of the United States, 1872. Died in Pleasantville, Westchester County, N.Y., November 29, 1872 (age 61 years, 300 days). Interment at Green-Wood Cemetery, Brooklyn, N.Y.; statue at City Hall Park, Manhattan, N.Y.; statue at Herald Square, Manhattan, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Zaccheus Greeley (1782-1867) and Mary (Woodburn) Greeley (1788-1855); married, July 5, 1836, to Mary Y. Cheney (1811-1872); second cousin of Wallace M. Greeley (born1838).
  Cross-reference: Josiah B. Grinnell
  Greeley counties in Kan. and Neb. are named for him.
  The city of Greeley, Colorado, is named for him.  — Horace Greeley High School, in Chappaqua, New York, is named for him.  — Mount Horace Greeley, in Keweenaw County, Michigan, is named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS Horace Greeley (built 1942 at Terminal Island, California; scuttled with obsolete ammunition in the North Atlantic Ocean, 1966) was named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: Horace G. SnoverHorace G. KnowlesHorace Greeley Dawson, Jr.
  Personal motto: "Go West, young man."
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Books by Horace Greeley: American conflict: A history of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-1865 (1869) — Recollections Of A Busy Life
  Books about Horace Greeley: Glyndon G. Van Deusen, Horace Greeley, Nineteenth Century Crusader — Harry J. Maihafer, The General and the Journalists: Ulysses S. Grant, Horace Greeley, and Charles Dana — Wilbur J. Granberg, Spread the truth : The life of Horace Greeley — Doris Faber, Horace Greeley: The People's Editor — Coy F. Cross, Go West Young Man! : Horace Greeley's Vision for America — J. Parton, The Life of Horace Greeley, Editor of the New York Tribune
  Image source: Life and Work of James G. Blaine (1893)
  James Wilson Grimes (1816-1872) — also known as James W. Grimes — of Burlington, Des Moines County, Iowa. Born in Deering, Hillsborough County, N.H., October 20, 1816. Member of Iowa territorial legislature, 1838-43; member of Iowa state legislature, 1852-54; Governor of Iowa, 1854-58; U.S. Senator from Iowa, 1859-69. Congregationalist. Died in Burlington, Des Moines County, Iowa, February 7, 1872 (age 55 years, 110 days). Interment at Aspen Grove Cemetery, Burlington, Iowa.
  Relatives: Son of John Grimes (1772-1851) and Betsey (Wilson) Grimes (1773-1850); married 1846 to Elizabeth Sarah Neally (died 1890).
  The city of Grimes, Iowa, is named for him.  — Grimes Elementary School, in Burlington, Iowa, is named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS James W. Grimes (built 1943 at Portland, Oregon; scrapped 1972) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Mariano Guadalupe Vallejo (1808-1890) — Born in Monterey, Monterey County, Calif., July 7, 1808. Rancher; member of California state senate, 1850. Spanish ancestry. Died in Sonoma, Sonoma County, Calif., January 18, 1890 (age 81 years, 195 days). Interment at Mountain Cemetery, Sonoma, Calif.
  Relatives: Son of Ignacio Vicente Ferrer Vallejo (1748-1832) and Maria Antonia Isabela (Lugo) Vallejo (1776-1855); married to Francisca Maria Felipa Benicia Carrillo y Lopez (1815-1891).
  The city of Vallejo, California, is named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS General Vallejo (built 1943 at Terminal Island, Los Angeles, California; scrapped 1974) was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  James Gunn (1753-1801) — of Georgia. Born in Virginia, March 13, 1753. Served in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; lawyer; Delegate to Continental Congress from Georgia, 1787; U.S. Senator from Georgia, 1789-1801. Died in Louisville, Jefferson County, Ga., July 30, 1801 (age 48 years, 139 days). Interment at Revolutionary War Cemetery, Louisville, Ga.
  The World War II Liberty ship SS James Gunn (built 1942 at Baltimore, Maryland; scrapped 1970) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  James Guthrie (1792-1869) — of Louisville, Jefferson County, Ky. Born near Bardstown, Nelson County, Ky., December 5, 1792. Democrat. Lawyer; member of Kentucky state house of representatives, 1827-29; member of Kentucky state senate, 1831-40; delegate to Kentucky state constitutional convention, 1849; U.S. Secretary of the Treasury, 1853-57; president, Louisville and Nashville Railroad, 1860-68; president, University of Louisville; candidate for Democratic nomination for President, 1860; candidate for Democratic nomination for Vice President, 1864; U.S. Senator from Kentucky, 1865-68. Slaveowner. Died in Louisville, Jefferson County, Ky., March 13, 1869 (age 76 years, 98 days). Interment at Cave Hill Cemetery, Louisville, Ky.
  The World War II Liberty ship SS James Guthrie (built 1943 at Richmond, California; mined and wrecked in the Mediterranean Sea, 1945) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Paul Hamilton (1762-1816) — of South Carolina. Born in South Carolina, October 16, 1762. Served in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; planter; member of South Carolina state house of representatives, 1787; member of South Carolina state senate, 1794; Governor of South Carolina, 1804-06; U.S. Secretary of the Navy, 1809-12. Died in Beaufort, Beaufort District (now Beaufort County), S.C., June 30, 1816 (age 53 years, 258 days). Interment a private or family graveyard, Beaufort County, S.C.
  Relatives: Married 1782 to Mary Wilkinson (1763-1827).
  The city of Hamilton, Georgia, is named for him.  — Three Navy destroyers, each one called USS Paul Hamilton, were named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS Paul Hamilton (built 1942 at Wilmington, North Carolina; torpedoed and sank 1944 in the Mediterranean Sea) was named for him.
  See also National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
Hannibal Hamlin Hannibal Hamlin (1809-1891) — of Hampden, Penobscot County, Maine; Bangor, Penobscot County, Maine. Born in Paris, Oxford County, Maine, August 27, 1809. Farmer; surveyor; compositor; lawyer; member of Maine state house of representatives, 1836-41, 1847; Speaker of the Maine State House of Representatives, 1837, 1839-40; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Maine, 1840; U.S. Representative from Maine 6th District, 1843-47; U.S. Senator from Maine, 1848-57, 1857-61, 1869-81; Governor of Maine, 1857; Vice President of the United States, 1861-65; candidate for Republican nomination for Vice President, 1864, 1868; U.S. Collector of Customs, 1865-66; U.S. Minister to Spain, 1881-82. Died in Bangor, Penobscot County, Maine, July 4, 1891 (age 81 years, 311 days). Interment at Mt. Hope Cemetery, Bangor, Maine; statue at Kenduskeag Parkway, Bangor, Maine.
  Relatives: Son of Cyrus Hamlin (1769-1829) and Anna (Livermore) Hamlin (1775-1852); brother of Elijah Livermore Hamlin; married, December 10, 1833, to Sarah Jane Emery (1815-1855; daughter of Stephen Emery (1790-1863)); married, September 25, 1856, to Ellen Vesta Emery (daughter of Stephen Emery (1790-1863)); father of Charles Hamlin and Hannibal Emery Hamlin (1858-1938); granduncle of Isaiah Kidder Stetson; great-granduncle of Clarence Cutting Stetson; first cousin once removed of John Appleton; first cousin twice removed of Charles Sumner Hamlin; third cousin once removed of David Sears; fourth cousin of George Pickering Bemis; fourth cousin once removed of Henry Fisk Janes, John Mason Jr., William Henry Harrison Stowell, Walter S. Bemis and Eldred C. Pitkin.
  Political families: Hamlin-Bemis family of Bangor, Maine; Kellogg-Adams-Seymour-Chapin family of Connecticut and New York (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Hamlin County, S.Dak. is named for him.
  The town of Hamlin, Maine, is named for him.  — The town of Hamlin, New York, is named for him.  — The city of Hamlin, Kansas, is named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS Hannibal Hamlin (built 1942-43 at South Portland, Maine; scrapped 1971) was named for him.  — Hannibal Hamlin Hall, at the University of Maine, Orono, Maine, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Books about Hannibal Hamlin: Charles Eugene Hamlin, The Life and Times of Hannibal Hamlin — Mark Scroggins, Hannibal
  Image source: James G. Blaine, Twenty Years of Congress, vol. 2 (1886)
  John Hays Hammond (1855-1936) — of San Francisco, Calif.; South Africa; Washington, D.C.; Gloucester, Essex County, Mass. Born in San Francisco, Calif., March 31, 1855. Republican. Mining engineer; worked on mines in Mexico and South Africa; worked for Cecil Rhodes; in 1895, he took part in the Jameson raid, an attempt to overthrow the Boer government in South Africa; was arrested with other leaders and sentenced to be hanged; his sentence was commuted, and he was eventually released to return to the U.S.; candidate for Republican nomination for Vice President, 1908; chair, U.S. Coal Commission, 1922-23. Member, American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Died, from coronary occlusion, in Gloucester, Essex County, Mass., June 8, 1936 (age 81 years, 69 days). Interment at Green-Wood Cemetery, Brooklyn, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Richard Pindell Hammond (1820-1891) and Sarah Elizabeth (Hays) Hammond (1822-1867); married, January 1, 1881, to Natalie Harris (1859-1931).
  The World War II Liberty ship SS John H. Hammond (built 1944 at Brunswick, Georgia; mined and wrecked in Tyrrhenian Sea, 1945) was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  John Hancock (1737-1793) — of Massachusetts. Born in Braintree (part now in Quincy), Norfolk County, Mass., January 23, 1737. Delegate to Continental Congress from Massachusetts, 1775-78; signer, Declaration of Independence, 1776; Governor of Massachusetts, 1780-85, 1787-93; died in office 1793; received 4 electoral votes, 1789. Congregationalist. Irish ancestry. Member, Freemasons; American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Died in Quincy, Norfolk County, Mass., October 8, 1793 (age 56 years, 258 days). Interment at Old Granary Burying Ground, Boston, Mass.; memorial monument at Constitution Gardens, Washington, D.C.
  Relatives: Son of Rev. John Hancock (1702-1744) and Mary (Hawke) Hancock; married, August 28, 1775, to Dorothy 'Dolly'(Quincy) Scott (1747-1830).
  Hancock counties in Ga., Ill., Ind., Iowa, Ky., Maine, Miss., Ohio, Tenn. and W.Va. are named for him.
  The town of Hancock, Massachusetts, is named for him.  — Mount Hancock, in the White Mountains, Grafton County, New Hampshire, is named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS John Hancock (built 1941 at Portland, Oregon; torpedoed and lost in the Caribbean Sea, 1942) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about John Hancock: Harlow Giles Unger, John Hancock : Merchant King and American Patriot — Harlow Giles Unger, John Hancock: Merchant King & American Patriot
  George Handley (1752-1793) — of Richmond County, Ga. Born in Sheffield, Yorkshire, England, February 9, 1752. Colonel in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; delegate to Georgia convention to ratify U.S. constitution, 1788; Governor of Georgia, 1788-89; Richmond County Sheriff, 1790-93. Died near Augusta, Richmond County, Ga., September 17, 1793 (age 41 years, 220 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Married to Sarah Howe.
  The World War II Liberty ship SS George Handley (built 1942 at Savannah, Georgia; scrapped 1964) was named for him.
  See also National Governors Association biography
Marcus A. Hanna Marcus Alonzo Hanna (1837-1904) — also known as Marcus A. Hanna; Mark Hanna; "Dollar Mark" — of Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, Ohio. Born in New Lisbon (now Lisbon), Columbiana County, Ohio, September 24, 1837. Republican. Partner in wholesale grocery; head of M. A. Hanna and Co., coal dealers; director, Globe Ship Manufacturing Co.; president, Union National Bank; president, Cleveland City Railroad Co. president, Chapin Mining Co.; Chairman of Republican National Committee, 1896-1904; U.S. Senator from Ohio, 1897-1904; died in office 1904. Died in Washington, D.C., February 15, 1904 (age 66 years, 144 days). Entombed at Lake View Cemetery, Cleveland, Ohio.
  Relatives: Son of Dr. Leonard Hanna (1806-1862) and Samantha Maria (Converse) Hanna (1813-1897); married, September 27, 1864, to Charlotte Augusta Rhodes (1844-1921); father of Ruth Hanna McCormick (1880-1944) (who married Joseph Medill McCormick).
  Political family: McCormick-Guggenheim-Morton-Medill family of Illinois and New York.
  The World War II Liberty ship SS Mark Hanna (built 1942 at Portland, Oregon; scrapped 1961) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: Library of Congress
  John Hanson (1721-1783) — of Maryland. Born near Port Tobacco, Charles County, Md., April 14, 1721. Planter; member of Maryland state senate, 1757-73; Delegate to Continental Congress from Maryland, 1779-82; signer, Articles of Confederation, 1781. Swedish ancestry. Died in Oxon Hill, Prince George's County, Md., November 22, 1783 (age 62 years, 222 days). Interment a private or family graveyard, Prince George's County, Md.; statue at Frederick County Courthouse Grounds, Frederick, Md.
  Relatives: Son of Samuel Hanson (c.1685-1740) and Elizabeth (Storey) Hanson (c.1688-1764); married 1747 to Jane Contee (1728-1812); father of Jane Contee Hanson (1747-1781; who married Philip Thomas), Peter Contee Hanson (1748-1776; killed in battle of Fort Washington during the U.S. Revolutionary War) and Alexander Contee Hanson (1749-1806); grandfather of Rebecca Bellicum Thomas (1777-1814; who married Alexander Contee Magruder (1779-1853)) and Alexander Contee Hanson (1786-1819).
  Political families: Lee-Randolph family; Carroll family of Maryland (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  The World War II Liberty ship SS John Hanson (built 1944 at Baltimore, Maryland; sold 1947, scrapped 1965) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  James Harlan (1820-1899) — of Mt. Pleasant, Henry County, Iowa. Born in Clark County, Ill., August 26, 1820. Republican. Iowa superintendent of public instruction, 1847; president of Iowa Wesleyan College, 1853-55, 1869-70; U.S. Senator from Iowa, 1855-57, 1857-65, 1867-73; U.S. Secretary of the Interior, 1865-66; candidate for Republican nomination for Vice President, 1868. Methodist. Died in Mt. Pleasant, Henry County, Iowa, October 5, 1899 (age 79 years, 40 days). Interment at Forest Home Cemetery, Mt. Pleasant, Iowa.
  Relatives: Father of Mary Harlan (who married Robert Todd Lincoln (1843-1926)).
  Political families: Lee-Randolph family; Lincoln-Lee family; Walker-Helm-Lincoln-Brown family of Kentucky (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  The city of Harlan, Iowa, was named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS James Harlan (built 1943 at Richmond, California; wrecked and scrapped 1962) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
John Marshall Harlan John Marshall Harlan (1833-1911) — of Kentucky. Born in Boyle County, Ky., June 1, 1833. Republican. Lawyer; county judge in Kentucky, 1858-59; U.S. Attorney for Kentucky, 1861-63; Kentucky state attorney general, 1861-65; colonel in the Union Army during the Civil War; candidate for Governor of Kentucky, 1871; delegate to Republican National Convention from Kentucky, 1876 (delegation chair); Associate Justice of U.S. Supreme Court, 1877-1911. Presbyterian. Died October 14, 1911 (age 78 years, 135 days). Interment at Rock Creek Cemetery, Washington, D.C.
  Presumably named for: John Marshall
  Relatives: Son of James Harlan and Elizabeth Shannon (Davenport) Harlan (1805-1870); brother of Laura Harlan (1835-1870; who married Francis Landon Cleveland); married, December 23, 1856, to Malvina French Shanklin (1839-1916); father of John Maynard Harlan; uncle of James Harlan Cleveland; grandfather of John Marshall Harlan (1899-1971); granduncle of James Harlan Cleveland Jr.; great-granduncle of Joseph Wheeler Bloodgood.
  Political family: Kellogg-Adams-Seymour-Chapin family of Connecticut and New York (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Cross-reference: Benjamin H. Bristow — Augustus E. Willson
  The World War II Liberty ship SS John M. Harlan (built 1943 at Brunswick, Georgia; scrapped 1966) was named for him.
  See also NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about John Marshall Harlan: Linda Przybyszewski, The Republic According to John Marshall Harlan
  Image source: The Parties and The Men (1896)
  Judson Harmon (1846-1927) — of Wyoming, Hamilton County, Ohio; Cincinnati, Hamilton County, Ohio. Born in Newtown, Hamilton County, Ohio, February 3, 1846. Democrat. Lawyer; common pleas court judge in Ohio, 1876-77; superior court judge in Ohio, 1878-87; U.S. Attorney General, 1895-97; receiver of bankrupt railways, 1905-09; Governor of Ohio, 1909-13; candidate for Democratic nomination for President, 1912; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Ohio, 1916, 1924; candidate for Presidential Elector for Ohio, 1924. Baptist. Died in Cincinnati, Hamilton County, Ohio, February 22, 1927 (age 81 years, 19 days). Interment at Spring Grove Cemetery, Cincinnati, Ohio.
  Relatives: Son of Rev. B. F. Harmon and Julia (Bronson) Harmon.
  Harmon County, Okla. is named for him.
  The World War II Liberty ship SS Harmon Judson (built 1943 at Richmond, California; launched as Samwash; renamed 1947 as Maplebank; renamed 1957 as African Lord; scrapped 1969) was originally named for him.
  See also National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article
  John Hart (c.1713-1779) — also known as "Honest John" — of Hopewell, Hunterdon County (now Mercer County), N.J. Born about 1713. Hunterdon County Judge, 1768-75; Delegate to Continental Congress from New Jersey, 1776; signer, Declaration of Independence, 1776; member of New Jersey state house of assembly from Hunterdon County, 1776-78; Speaker of the New Jersey State House of Assembly, 1776-78. Died, from kidney failure, in Hopewell, Hunterdon County (now Mercer County), N.J., May 11, 1779 (age about 66 years). Original interment at a private or family graveyard, Mercer County, N.J.; reinterment in 1865 at First Baptist Church Cemetery, Hopewell, N.J.; memorial monument at Constitution Gardens, Washington, D.C.
  Relatives: Son of Edward Hart (1683-1752) and Martha (Furman) Hart (1691-1745); married 1741 to Deborah Scudder (1712-1776); second great-grandfather of John Hart Brewer and Lummie J. Earle; first cousin thrice removed of Absalom Price Lanning; first cousin four times removed of William Mershon Lanning; second cousin twice removed of Hanford Nichols Lockwood; second cousin thrice removed of James Lockwood Conger and Homer Nichols Lockwood; second cousin four times removed of Frederick B. Piatt; second cousin five times removed of Alfred Collins Lockwood (1875-1951).
  Political families: Conger family of New York; Kellogg-Adams-Seymour-Chapin family of Connecticut and New York; Lockwood-Lanning family of New Jersey (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  The World War II Liberty ship SS John Hart (built 1941-42 at Portland, Oregon; scrapped 1966) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  John Hathorn (1749-1825) — of Orange County, N.Y. Born in Wilmington, New Castle County, Del., January 9, 1749. Member of New York state assembly from Orange County, 1777-78, 1779-80, 1781-85, 1794-95, 1804-05; member of New York state senate Middle District, 1786-89, 1799-1803; member of New York council of appointment, 1787, 1789; U.S. Representative from New York 4th District, 1789-91, 1795-97. Slaveowner. Died February 19, 1825 (age 76 years, 41 days). Original interment in private or family graveyard; reinterment at Warwick Cemetery, Warwick, N.Y.
  The World War II Liberty ship SS John Hathorn (built 1942 at Terminal Island, California; scrapped 1972) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
John Hay John Milton Hay (1838-1905) — also known as John Hay — of Washington, D.C. Born in Salem, Washington County, Ind., October 8, 1838. Private secretary and assistant to President Abraham Lincoln; U.S. Ambassador to Great Britain, 1893-98; U.S. Secretary of State, 1898-1905; died in office 1905. Died in Newbury, Merrimack County, N.H., July 1, 1905 (age 66 years, 266 days). Interment at Lake View Cemetery, Cleveland, Ohio.
  Relatives: Son of Helen (Leonard) Hay (1803-1893) and Dr. Charles Hay (1807-1893); married, February 4, 1874, to Clara Louise Stone (1849-1914); father of Adelbert Stone Hay and Alice Evelyn Hay (1880-1960; who married James Wolcott Wadsworth Jr.); grandfather of John Hay Whitney and James Jermiah Wadsworth (1905-1984); great-grandfather of James Wadsworth Symington; second cousin thrice removed of James Hodges; third cousin twice removed of James Leonard Hodges; fourth cousin once removed of William Dean Kellogg and Marcus Morton.
  Political families: Wolcott-Wadsworth family of Connecticut; Whitney-Nye-Lincoln-Hay family; Kellogg-Adams-Seymour-Chapin family of Connecticut and New York; Pendleton-Lee family of Maryland; Morton family (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Cross-reference: Spencer F. Eddy
  The World War II Liberty ship SS John Hay (built 1943 at Panama City, Florida; scrapped 1961) was named for him.
  Epitaph: "The Fruit of Righteousness is sown in peace of they that make peace."
  See also Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier
  Books about John Milton Hay: Michael Burlingame, ed., At Lincoln's Side : John Hay's Civil War Correspondence and Selected Writings — Robert L. Gale, John Hay — Howard I. Kushner, John Milton Hay : The Union of Poetry and Politics — Michael Burlingame, ed., Abraham Lincoln: The Observations of John G. Nicolay and John Hay — John Taliaferro, All the Great Prizes: The Life of John Hay, from Lincoln to Roosevelt
  Image source: Munsey's Magazine, October 1903
  Hans Christian Heg (1829-1863) — of Wisconsin. Born in Lierbyen, Norway, December 21, 1829. Went to California for the 1849 Gold Rush; abolitionist; Wisconsin state prison commissioner, elected 1859; colonel in the Union Army during the Civil War. Norwegian ancestry. Suffered wounds in battle, and died the next day, at Chickamauga, Walker County, Ga., September 20, 1863 (age 33 years, 273 days). Interment at Norway Lutheran Cemetery, Wind Lake, Wis.; statue at State Capitol Grounds, Madison, Wis.
  Relatives: Son of Even Heg (1789-1850) and Sigrid (Kallerud) Heg (1799-1842); married to Gunhild Einong (1833-1922).
  Heg Memorial Park, in Wind Lake, Wisconsin, is named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS Hans Heg (built 1944 at Richmond, California; scrapped 1961) was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
Hinton Rowan Helper Hinton Rowan Helper (1829-1909) — of North Carolina; New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in Mocksville, Davie County, N.C., December 27, 1829. Author and publisher of The Impending Crisis of the South (1857), an attack on the institution of slavery as holding the South back economically; the book caused a furor, and was banned in the South; U.S. Consul in Buenos Aires, 1861-66. Killed himself with illuminating gas, in Washington, D.C., March 9, 1909 (age 79 years, 72 days). Interment at Cedar Hill Cemetery, Suitland, Md.
  The World War II Liberty ship SS Hinton R. Helper (built 1942 at Terminal Island, California; scrapped 1961) was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about Hinton Rowan Helper: David Brown, Southern Outcast: Hinton Rowan Helper And the Impending Crisis of the South
  Image source: The Impending Crisis of the South (1860)
  James Pinckney Henderson (1808-1858) — also known as J. Pinckney Henderson — of Marshville (unknown county), Tex. Born in Lincolnton, Lincoln County, N.C., March 31, 1808. Lawyer; general in the Texas Army during the Texas War of Independence; Attorney General of the Texas Republic, 1836-37; Texas Republic Secretary of State, 1837; delegate to Texas state constitutional convention, 1845; Governor of Texas, 1846-47; general in the U.S. Army during the Mexican War; U.S. Senator from Texas, 1857-58; died in office 1858. Slaveowner. Died in Washington, D.C., June 4, 1858 (age 50 years, 65 days). Original interment and cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery, Washington, D.C.; reinterment in 1930 at Texas State Cemetery, Austin, Tex.
  Henderson County, Tex. is named for him.
  The World War II Liberty ship SS J. Pinckney Henderson (built 1943 at Houston, Texas; collided and burned in the North Atlantic Ocean, 1943) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — National Governors Association biography
  John Henry (1750-1798) — of Maryland. Born in Dorchester County, Md., November, 1750. Democrat. Lawyer; member of Maryland state house of delegates, 1777-80; Delegate to Continental Congress from Maryland, 1778-80, 1785-86; member of Maryland state senate, 1780-90; U.S. Senator from Maryland, 1789-97; received 2 electoral votes, 1796; Governor of Maryland, 1797-98. Episcopalian. Died in Dorchester County, Md., December 16, 1798 (age 48 years, 0 days). Interment at Christ Episcopal Church Cemetery, Cambridge, Md.
  Relatives: Son of Col. John Henry Henry and Dorothy (Rider) Henry; married to Margaret Campbell; great-grandfather of Henry Lloyd (1852-1920).
  Political families: Pendleton-Lee family of Maryland; Goldsborough-Henry family of Cambridge, Maryland; Lee-Randolph family; Harrison-Randolph-Marshall-Cabell family of Virginia (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  The World War II Liberty ship SS John Henry (built 1942 at Baltimore, Maryland; scrapped 1972) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — National Governors Association biography
Hilary A. Herbert Hilary Abner Herbert (1834-1919) — also known as Hilary A. Herbert — of Greenville, Butler County, Ala.; Montgomery, Montgomery County, Ala.; Washington, D.C. Born in Laurensville, Laurens District (now Laurens, Laurens County), S.C., March 12, 1834. Democrat. Lawyer; colonel in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; U.S. Representative from Alabama 2nd District, 1877-93; U.S. Secretary of the Navy, 1893-97. Slaveowner. Died March 6, 1919 (age 84 years, 359 days). Interment at Oakwood Cemetery, Montgomery, Ala.
  Relatives: Son of Thomas E. Herbert and Dorothy Teague (Young) Herbert; married, April 23, 1867, to Ella B. Smith.
  The World War II Liberty ship SS Hilary A. Herbert (built 1943 at Wilmington, North Carolina; scrapped 1967) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Image source: Men of Mark in America (1906)
  Abram Stevens Hewitt (1822-1903) — also known as Abram S. Hewitt — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in Haverstraw, Rockland County, N.Y., July 31, 1822. Democrat. School teacher; lawyer; early manufacturer of wrought iron; U.S. Representative from New York 10th District, 1875-79, 1881-87; Chairman of Democratic National Committee, 1876; delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1876; member of Democratic National Committee from New York, 1880; candidate for Presidential Elector for New York, 1880; mayor of New York City, N.Y., 1887-88. English and French Huguenot ancestry. Died in Ringwood, Passaic County, N.J., January 18, 1903 (age 80 years, 171 days). Interment at Green-Wood Cemetery, Brooklyn, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of John Hewitt (1777-1857) and Ann (Gurnee) Hewitt (1784-1870); married 1855 to Sarah Amelia Cooper (daughter of Peter Cooper; sister of Edward Cooper); father of Edward Ringwood Hewitt (1866-1957; son-in-law of James Mitchell Ashley (1824-1896)).
  Political family: Cooper-Ashley family of New York City, New York.
  The World War II Liberty ship SS Abram S. Hewitt (built 1943-44 at Richmond, California; sold 1947 and renamed, ultimately as the Golfo di Trieste; sank 1964 in the South China Sea) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Gilbert Monell Hitchcock (1859-1934) — also known as Gilbert M. Hitchcock — of Omaha, Douglas County, Neb. Born in Omaha, Douglas County, Neb., September 18, 1859. Democrat. U.S. Representative from Nebraska 2nd District, 1903-05, 1907-11; U.S. Senator from Nebraska, 1911-23; defeated, 1922, 1930; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Nebraska, 1912 (Honorary Vice-President; speaker), 1924 (member, Platform and Resolutions Committee), 1932; candidate for Democratic nomination for President, 1920. Died in Washington, D.C., February 3, 1934 (age 74 years, 138 days). Interment at Forest Lawn Memorial Park, Omaha, Neb.
  Relatives: Son of Phineas Warren Hitchcock (1831-1881).
  The World War II Liberty ship SS Gilbert M. Hitchcock (built 1944 at Richmond, California; scrapped 1967) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  James Stephen Hogg (1851-1906) — also known as Jim Hogg — of Wood County, Tex. Born in a log cabin, near Rusk, Cherokee County, Tex., March 24, 1851. Democrat. Wood County Attorney, 1878-80; District Attorney, 7th District, 1880-84; Texas state attorney general, 1886-90; Governor of Texas, 1891-95. Died March 3, 1906 (age 54 years, 344 days). Interment at Oakwood Cemetery, Austin, Tex.
  Relatives: Father of Ima Hogg (philanthropist and social figure).
  Jim Hogg County, Tex. is named for him.
  The World War II Liberty ship SS James S. Hogg (built 1943 at Houston, Texas; scrapped 1972) was named for him.
  See also National Governors Association biography
  Cyrus Kurtz Holliday (1826-1900) — also known as Cyrus K. Holliday — of Topeka, Shawnee County, Kan. Born in Cumberland County, Pa., April 3, 1826. Republican. Mayor of Topeka, Kan., 1859-60, 1867-68, 1869-70; first president of the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway, 1860-63; member of Kansas state senate, 1861; Adjutant General of Kansas, 1864-65; candidate for U.S. Representative from Kansas, 1874. Member, Freemasons. Died in Topeka, Shawnee County, Kan., March 29, 1900 (age 73 years, 360 days). Interment at Topeka Cemetery, Topeka, Kan.
  Relatives: Married to Mary Dillon Jones.
  The town of Holliday, now the site of a landfill within the city of Shawnee, Kansas, was named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS Cyrus K. Holliday (built 1943 at Terminal Island, Los Angeles, California; scrapped 1966) was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  John Holmes (1773-1843) — of Alfred, York County, Maine. Born in Kingston, Plymouth County, Mass., March 14, 1773. Democrat. Lawyer; member of Massachusetts state house of representatives, 1802-03, 1812; member of Massachusetts state senate, 1813-14; U.S. Representative from Massachusetts 1st District, 1817-20; delegate to Maine state constitutional convention, 1819; U.S. Senator from Maine, 1820-27, 1829-33; member of Maine state house of representatives, 1836-37; U.S. Attorney for Maine, 1841-43; died in office 1843. Died July 7, 1843 (age 70 years, 115 days). Entombed at Eastern Cemetery, Portland, Maine; cenotaph at Parish Cemetery, Alfred, Maine.
  Relatives: Married to Sally Brooks; father-in-law of Daniel Goodenow (born c.1791); grandfather of John Holmes Goodenow.
  Political family: Goodenow-Holmes family of Alfred, Maine.
  The World War II Liberty ship SS John Holmes (built 1943 at South Portland, Maine; sold 1947, scrapped 1969) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
Alanson B. Houghton Alanson Bigelow Houghton (1863-1941) — also known as Alanson B. Houghton — of Corning, Steuben County, N.Y. Born in Cambridge, Middlesex County, Mass., October 10, 1863. Republican. President, Corning Glass Works, 1910-18; vice-president, Ephraim Creek Coal and Coke Company; director, Metropolitan Life Insurance Company; delegate to Republican National Convention from New York, 1912, 1924, 1928 (member, Resolutions Committee); Presidential Elector for New York, 1916; U.S. Representative from New York 37th District, 1919-22; U.S. Ambassador to Germany, 1922-25; Great Britain, 1925-29; candidate for U.S. Senator from New York, 1928. Died in South Dartmouth, Dartmouth, Bristol County, Mass., September 15, 1941 (age 77 years, 340 days). Interment at Hope Cemetery Annex, Corning, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Amory Houghton, Jr. (1837-1909) and Ellen Ann (Bigelow) Houghton (1840-1918); married, June 25, 1890, to Adelaide Wellington (1867-1945); father of Amory Houghton (1899-1981); grandfather of Amory Houghton Jr.; first cousin once removed of Frederick Oakes Houghton.
  Political family: Houghton family of Corning, New York (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Cross-reference: Guy W. Cheney
  The World War II Liberty ship SS Alanson B. Houghton (built 1944 at Panama City, Florida; scrapped 1972) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about Alanson B. Houghton: Jeffrey J. Matthews, Alanson B. Houghton : Ambassador of the New Era
  Image source: Time Magazine, April 5, 1926
Sam Houston Samuel Houston (1793-1863) — also known as Sam Houston — of Nashville, Davidson County, Tenn.; Huntsville, Walker County, Tex. Born near Lexington, Rockbridge County, Va., March 2, 1793. Democrat. U.S. Representative from Tennessee, 1823-27 (at-large 1823-25, 7th District 1825-27); Governor of Tennessee, 1827-29; delegate to Texas Convention of 1833 from District of Nacogdoches, 1833; delegate to Texas Consultation of 1835 from District of San Augustine, 1835; delegate to Texas Republic Republic constitutional convention from District of Refugio, 1836; signer, Texas Declaration of Independence, 1836; President of the Texas Republic, 1836-38, 1841-44; member of Texas Republic House of Representatives, 1838; U.S. Senator from Texas, 1846-59; Governor of Texas, 1859-61. Member, Freemasons. Slaveowner. Died of pneumonia, in Huntsville, Walker County, Tex., July 26, 1863 (age 70 years, 146 days). Interment at Oakwood Cemetery, Huntsville, Tex.; statue erected 1925 at Herman Park, Houston, Tex.
  Relatives: Father of Andrew Jackson Houston (1854-1941); second great-grandfather of Jean Houston Baldwin (who married Marion Price Daniel); third great-grandfather of Marion Price Daniel Jr.; cousin *** of David Hubbard.
  Political family: Daniel-Houston family of Texas.
  Houston counties in Minn., Tenn. and Tex. are named for him.
  The city of Houston, Texas, is named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ships SS Sam Houston (built 1941, at Houston, Texas; torpedoed and sunk 1942 in the Atlantic Ocean) and SS Sam Houston II (built 1943 at the same shipyard; scrapped 1959) were named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: Houston JusticeSam H. JonesSam Houston Clinton, Jr.Sam H. Melton, Jr.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about Sam Houston: James L. Haley, Sam Houston — Marquis James, The Raven : A Biography of Sam Houston — Randolph B. Campbell, Sam Houston and the American Southwest — Jean Fritz, Make Way for Sam Houston (for young readers)
  Image source: Library of Congress
  John Wesley Hoyt (1831-1912) — also known as John W. Hoyt — of Madison, Dane County, Wis. Born near Worthington, Franklin County, Ohio, October 13, 1831. Wisconsin railroad commissioner, 1874-76; Governor of Wyoming Territory, 1878-82. Methodist. Died in Chevy Chase, Montgomery County, Md., May 23, 1912 (age 80 years, 223 days). Interment at Glenwood Cemetery, Washington, D.C.
  Presumably named for: John Wesley
  Hoyt Peak, in Yellowstone National Park, Park County, Wyoming, is named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS John W. Hoyt (built 1943 at Richmond, California; scrapped 1961) was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Henry Edwards Huntington (1850-1927) — also known as Henry E. Huntington — of Oneonta, Otsego County, N.Y.; San Francisco, Calif.; San Marino, Los Angeles County, Calif. Born in Oneonta, Otsego County, N.Y., February 27, 1850. Republican. Owned and expanded the streetcar and trolley system in Southern California; real estate developer; Presidential Elector for New York, 1908. Member, Sons of the Revolution. Died, from kidney disease and pneumonia, in Lankenau Hospital, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., May 23, 1927 (age 77 years, 85 days). Entombed in mausoleum at Huntington Library and Botanical Gardens, San Marino, Calif.
  Relatives: Son of Solon Huntington (1812-1890) and Harriet (Saunders) Huntington (1821-1906); married 1873 to Mary Alice Prentice (1852-1916); married 1913 to Arabella Duval 'Belle' (Yarrington) Huntington (1850-1924; his uncle's widow).
  The city of Huntington Beach, California, is named for him.  — The city of Huntington Park, California, is named for him.  — Huntington Lake, in Fresno County, California, is named for him.  — The Huntington Hotel (built 1907 as Hotel Wentworth; expanded and reopened 1914 as the Huntington Hotel; demolished 1989 and rebuilt; now Langham Huntington hotel) in Pasadena, California, is named for him.  — The Huntington Library, Art Museum, and Botanical Gardens, on his former estate, in San Marino, California, is named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS Henry E. Huntington (built 1943-44 at Terminal Island, California; scrapped 1961) was named for him.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
John J. Ingalls John James Ingalls (1833-1900) — also known as John J. Ingalls — of Atchison, Atchison County, Kan. Born in Middleton, Essex County, Mass., December 29, 1833. Republican. Lawyer; newspaper editor; member of Kansas state senate, 1862; candidate for Lieutenant Governor of Kansas, 1862, 1864; U.S. Senator from Kansas, 1873-91. Died in Las Vegas, San Miguel County, N.M., August 16, 1900 (age 66 years, 230 days). Interment at Mt. Vernon Cemetery, Atchison, Kan.
  The former town of Ingalls, Oklahoma, was named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS John J. Ingalls (built 1943 at Terminal Island, California; scrapped 1961) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: The Parties and The Men (1896)
  Jared Ingersoll (1749-1822) — of Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa. Born in New Haven, New Haven County, Conn., October 24, 1749. Lawyer; Delegate to Continental Congress from Pennsylvania, 1780-81; member, U.S. Constitutional Convention, 1787; Pennsylvania state attorney general, 1791-1800, 1811-16; U.S. Attorney for Pennsylvania, 1800-01; candidate for Vice President of the United States, 1812; district judge in Pennsylvania, 1821-22. Presbyterian. Died in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., October 31, 1822 (age 73 years, 7 days). Interment at Old Pine Street Presbyterian Church Cemetery, Philadelphia, Pa.
  Relatives: Son of Hannah (Whiting) Ingersoll (1712-1779) and Jared Ingersoll (1722-1781); married, December 6, 1781, to Elizabeth Pettit (1758-1816); father of Charles Jared Ingersoll and Joseph Reed Ingersoll; great-grandfather of Charles Edward Ingersoll; first cousin of Jonathan Ingersoll (1747-1823); first cousin once removed of Ralph Isaacs Ingersoll and Charles Anthony Ingersoll; first cousin twice removed of Colin Macrae Ingersoll and Charles Roberts Ingersoll; first cousin thrice removed of George Pratt Ingersoll; second cousin twice removed of Laman Ingersoll; second cousin thrice removed of Ebon Clarke Ingersoll and Robert Green Ingersoll; second cousin four times removed of Charles Phelps and John Carter Ingersoll; third cousin once removed of Elijah Hunt Mills; third cousin twice removed of Elisha Hunt Allen, Gouverneur Morris and William Dean Kellogg; third cousin thrice removed of Bennet Bicknell, William Fessenden Allen and Frederick Hobbes Allen; fourth cousin of Jonathan Brace; fourth cousin once removed of Thomas Kimberly Brace, Greene Carrier Bronson and John Russell Kellogg.
  Political families: Kellogg-Adams-Seymour-Chapin family of Connecticut and New York; Morris-Ingersoll family of New York and Connecticut; Livingston-Schuyler family of New York (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  The World War II Liberty ship SS Jared Ingersoll (built 1942 at Baltimore, Maryland; scrapped 1964) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  James Iredell (1751-1799) — of North Carolina. Born in England, October 5, 1751. State court judge in North Carolina, 1778; North Carolina state attorney general, 1779-82; Associate Justice of U.S. Supreme Court, 1790-99; received 3 electoral votes, 1796. Episcopalian. Died October 20, 1799 (age 48 years, 15 days). Interment at Johnston Burial Ground, Edenton, N.C.
  Relatives: Married to Hannah Johnston (1748-1826; sister of Samuel Johnston (1733-1816)); father of James Iredell Jr.; grandfather of Margaret Tredwell Iredell (1833-1903; who married William Marcus Shipp).
  Political family: Iredell-Johnston-Cameron family of North Carolina.
  The World War II Liberty ship SS James Iredell (built 1942 at Wilmington, North Carolina; damaged by air attack and scuttled in the English Channel, 1944) was named for him.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about James Iredell: Willis P. Whichard, Justice James Iredell
  John Ireland (1827-1896) — also known as "Oxcart John" — of Texas. Born near Millerstown, Grayson County, Ky., January 21, 1827. Democrat. Mayor of Seguin, Tex., 1858; delegate to Texas secession convention, 1861; colonel in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; delegate to Texas state constitutional convention, 1866; district judge in Texas, 1866-67; member of Texas state house of representatives, 1870; member of Texas state senate, 1870; justice of Texas state supreme court, 1875-76; candidate for U.S. Representative from Texas, 1878; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Texas, 1880 (member, Resolutions Committee); Governor of Texas, 1883-87. Presbyterian. Member, Freemasons. Died March 5, 1896 (age 69 years, 44 days). Interment at Texas State Cemetery, Austin, Tex.
  The World War II Liberty ship SS John Ireland (built 1944 at Houston, Texas; scrapped 1967) was named for him.
  See also National Governors Association biography
  Howell Edmunds Jackson (1832-1895) — of Tennessee. Born in Paris, Henry County, Tenn., April 8, 1832. Democrat. State court judge in Tennessee, 1875; member of Tennessee state house of representatives, 1880; U.S. Senator from Tennessee, 1881-86; federal judge, 1886; Associate Justice of U.S. Supreme Court, 1893-95; died in office 1895. Baptist. Died in Nashville, Davidson County, Tenn., August 8, 1895 (age 63 years, 122 days). Interment at Mt. Olivet Cemetery, Nashville, Tenn.
  Relatives: Son of Alexander Jackson (1805-1879) and Mary (Hurt) Jackson (1805-1840); married, May 31, 1859, to Sophia Molloy (1837-1873); married, April 30, 1874, to Mary Elizabeth Harding (1850-1913); second cousin of William Randolph Barksdale (1849-1925) and Champe Terrell Barksdale; second cousin once removed of Alfred Dickinson Barksdale.
  Political family: Barksdale family of Virginia.
  The World War II Liberty ship SS Howell E. Jackson (built 1943 at Brunswick, Georgia; scrapped 1962) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — federal judicial profile — Wikipedia article — Ballotpedia article — NNDB dossier
  James Jackson (1757-1806) — of Georgia. Born in Devon, England, September 21, 1757. Delegate to Georgia state constitutional convention, 1777; U.S. Representative from Georgia at-large, 1789-91; U.S. Senator from Georgia, 1793-95, 1801-06; died in office 1806; Governor of Georgia, 1798-1801. Killed George Wells in a duel in 1780; injured in both knees. Died in Washington, D.C., March 19, 1806 (age 48 years, 179 days). Original interment at Rock Creek Cemetery, Washington, D.C.; reinterment in 1832 at Congressional Cemetery, Washington, D.C.
  Relatives: Father of Jabez Young Jackson (born1790); grandfather of James Jackson.
  Political family: Jackson family of Georgia.
  Jackson County, Ga. is named for him.
  The World War II Liberty ship SS James Jackson (built 1942 at Savannah, Georgia; scrapped 1973) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
John Jay John Jay (1745-1829) — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in New York, New York County, N.Y., December 12, 1745. Lawyer; law partner of Robert R. Livingston; Delegate to Continental Congress from New York, 1774-76, 1778-79; state court judge in New York, 1777; U.S. Minister to Spain, 1779-82; delegate to New York convention to ratify U.S. constitution from New York County, 1788; received 9 electoral votes, 1789; received 5 electoral votes, 1796; received one electoral vote, 1800; Chief Justice of U.S. Supreme Court, 1789-95; resigned 1795; U.S. Secretary of State, 1789-90; Governor of New York, 1795-1801; defeated, 1792. Episcopalian. French Huguenot and Dutch ancestry. Died in Bedford, Westchester County, N.Y., May 17, 1829 (age 83 years, 156 days). Interment at Jay Family Cemetery, Rye, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Pierre 'Peter' Jay (1704-1782) and Mary (Van Cortlandt) Jay (1705-1777); brother of James Jay (1732-1815) and Frederick Jay; married to Sarah Van Brugh Livingston (1756-1802; daughter of William Livingston; sister-in-law of John Cleves Symmes; sister of Henry Brockholst Livingston; niece of Robert Livingston, Peter Van Brugh Livingston and Philip Livingston; first cousin of Peter Robert Livingston, Walter Livingston and Philip Peter Livingston); father of Peter Augustus Jay (1776-1843) and William Jay; grandson of Jacobus Van Cortlandt; grandfather of John Jay II; grandnephew of Stephanus Van Cortlandt; second great-grandfather of Peter Augustus Jay (1877-1933); second cousin of Stephanus Bayard, Pierre Van Cortlandt, Philip John Schuyler and Stephen John Schuyler; second cousin once removed of Volkert Petrus Douw, Nicholas Bayard, Philip P. Schuyler, Jeremiah Van Rensselaer, Robert Van Rensselaer, Hendrick Kiliaen Van Rensselaer, Pieter Schuyler, Philip Van Cortlandt, Pierre Van Cortlandt Jr., Killian Killian Van Rensselaer, Philip Jeremiah Schuyler, James Parker and Hamilton Fish (1808-1893); second cousin twice removed of Leonard Gansevoort, Leonard Gansevoort Jr., Peter Samuel Schuyler, Stephen Van Rensselaer, Philip Schuyler Van Rensselaer, Jacob Rutsen Van Rensselaer, Henry Walter Livingston, Philip Schuyler, James Alexander Hamilton, John Cortlandt Parker, Nicholas Fish and Hamilton Fish Jr. (1849-1936); second cousin thrice removed of Peter Gansevoort, Edward Livingston, Henry Bell Van Rensselaer, James Adams Ekin, Richard Wayne Parker, Charles Wolcott Parker, Jonathan Mayhew Wainwright and Hamilton Fish Jr. (1888-1991); second cousin four times removed of Kiliaen Van Rensselaer, Robert Ray Hamilton, John Sluyter Wirt, Cortlandt Schuyler Van Rensselaer, Charles Ludlow Livingston and Hamilton Fish Jr. (1926-1996); second cousin five times removed of John Eliot Thayer Jr., Bronson Murray Cutting, Brockholst Livingston, Hamilton Fish (born1951) and Alexa Fish Ward.
  Political family: Livingston-Schuyler family of New York (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Jay County, Ind. is named for him.
  The World War II Liberty ship SS John Jay (built 1941-42 at Portland, Oregon; scrapped 1960) was named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: John J. WalbridgeJohn Jay JacksonJohn Jay Jackson, Jr.John Jay HartJohn J. GoodJohn Jay KnoxJohn J. KleinerJohn J. CartonJohn J. McCarthyJohn J. DormanJohn Jay HopkinsJohn J. McCloyJohn Jay JusticeJohn Jay PilarJohn Jay HookerJohn Jay LaValleJohn Jay Myers
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — federal judicial profile — National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — Ballotpedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about John Jay: Walter Stahr, John Jay : Founding Father — Phil Webster, Can a Chief Justice Love God? The Life of John Jay
  Image source: U.S. postage stamp (1958)
James Weldon Johnson James Weldon Johnson (1871-1938) — also known as James W. Johnson; James William Johnson — of Jacksonville, Duval County, Fla. Born in Jacksonville, Duval County, Fla., June 17, 1871. School principal; author; lawyer; U.S. Consul in Puerto Cabello, 1906-07; Dakar, 1907-08; Corinto, 1908-09; university professor. African ancestry. Member, NAACP; Sigma Pi Phi; Phi Beta Sigma; Freemasons. Author of the words to the song "Lift Every Voice and Sing," which became known as the "Negro National Anthem". Killed in a car-train collision, in Wiscasset, Lincoln County, Maine, June 26, 1938 (age 67 years, 9 days). Interment at Green-Wood Cemetery, Brooklyn, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of James Johnson and Helen Louise (Dillet) Johnson; married 1910 to Grace Nail (1885-1976).
  The World War II Liberty ship SS James W. Johnson (built 1943 at Terminal Island, Los Angeles, California; scrapped 1971) was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: U.S. postage stamp (1988)
  George Washington Julian (1817-1899) — also known as George W. Julian — of Centerville, Wayne County, Ind. Born near Centerville, Wayne County, Ind., May 5, 1817. Member of Indiana state house of representatives, 1845; U.S. Representative from Indiana, 1849-51, 1861-71 (4th District 1849-51, 5th District 1861-69, 4th District 1869-71); Free Soil candidate for Vice President of the United States, 1852; received 5 electoral votes for Vice-President, 1872. Died July 7, 1899 (age 82 years, 63 days). Interment at Crown Hill Cemetery, Indianapolis, Ind.
  Presumably named for: George Washington
  The World War II Liberty ship SS George W. Julian (built 1943 at Portland, Oregon; scrapped 1961) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Joseph Warren Keifer (1836-1932) — also known as J. Warren Keifer — of Springfield, Clark County, Ohio. Born in Bethel Township, Clark County, Ohio, January 30, 1836. Republican. Lawyer; banker; general in the Union Army during the Civil War; member of Ohio state senate, 1868-69; delegate to Republican National Convention from Ohio, 1876, 1908; U.S. Representative from Ohio, 1877-85, 1905-11 (8th District 1877-79, 4th District 1879-81, 8th District 1881-85, 7th District 1905-11); defeated, 1910; Speaker of the U.S. House, 1881-83; general in the U.S. Army during the Spanish-American War. Member, Phi Kappa Psi; Grand Army of the Republic; Loyal Legion; United Spanish War Veterans. Died April 22, 1932 (age 96 years, 83 days). Interment at Ferncliff Cemetery, Springfield, Ohio.
  Relatives: Son of Joseph Keifer and Mary (Smith) Keifer; married, March 22, 1860, to Eliza Stout.
  The World War II Liberty ship SS J. Warren Keifer (built 1943 at Portland, Oregon; scrapped 1961) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  James Kerr Kelly (1819-1903) — also known as James K. Kelly — of Clackamas County, Ore.; Portland, Multnomah County, Ore. Born in Blanchard, Centre County, Pa., February 16, 1819. Democrat. Went to California for the 1849 Gold Rush; lawyer; member of Oregon territorial legislature, 1853; delegate to Oregon state constitutional convention from Clackamas County, 1857; member of Oregon state senate, 1860; U.S. Attorney for Oregon, 1860-62; U.S. Senator from Oregon, 1871-77; member of Democratic National Committee from Oregon, 1876; justice of Oregon state supreme court, 1878-80; chief justice of Oregon state supreme court, 1878-80; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Oregon, 1888. Died in Washington, D.C., September 15, 1903 (age 84 years, 211 days). Interment at Rock Creek Cemetery, Washington, D.C.
  The World War II Liberty ship SS James K. Kelly (built 1943 at Portland, Oregon; scrapped 1963) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  John Benjamin Kendrick (1857-1933) — also known as John B. Kendrick — of Sheridan, Sheridan County, Wyo. Born near Jacksonville, Cherokee County, Tex., September 6, 1857. Democrat. Rancher; member of Wyoming state senate, 1910; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Wyoming, 1916, 1924; Honorary Vice-President, 1912; member, Platform and Resolutions Committee, 1916, 1924; Governor of Wyoming, 1915-17; U.S. Senator from Wyoming, 1917-33; died in office 1933. Methodist. Member, Freemasons. Died in Sheridan, Sheridan County, Wyo., November 3, 1933 (age 76 years, 58 days). Interment at Sheridan Municipal Cemetery, Sheridan, Wyo.
  Relatives: Son of John Harvey Kendrick and Anna (Maye) Kendrick; married, January 20, 1891, to Eula Wulfjen.
  The World War II Liberty ship SS John B. Kendrick (built 1943 at Portland, Oregon; sold 1947, scrapped 1967) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — National Governors Association biography — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
Hugh Judson Kilpatrick Hugh Judson Kilpatrick (1836-1881) — also known as Judson Kilpatrick; "Kilcavalry" — of New Jersey. Born near Deckertown (now Sussex), Sussex County, N.J., January 14, 1836. Republican. General in the Union Army during the Civil War; U.S. Minister to Chile, 1866-70, 1881, died in office 1881; candidate for U.S. Representative from New Jersey, 1880. Died of a kidney ailment, in Santiago, Chile, December 2, 1881 (age 45 years, 322 days). Interment at United States Military Academy Cemetery, West Point, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Simon Kilpatrick and Julia (Wickham) Kilpatrick; father of Laura Kilpatrick (who married Harry Hays Morgan (born1860)).
  Political family: Morgan-Kilpatrick family of Louisiana.
  The World War II Liberty ship SS Hugh J. Kilpatrick (built 1944 at Jacksonville, Florida; scrapped 1969) was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: William C. Roberts, Leading Orators (1884)
  James Gore King (1791-1853) — also known as James G. King — of Hoboken, Hudson County, N.J. Born in New York, New York County, N.Y., May 8, 1791. Whig. Banker; president, Erie Railroad, 1835-37; U.S. Representative from New Jersey 5th District, 1849-51. Died, from congestion of the lungs, in Weehawken, Hudson County, N.J., October 3, 1853 (age 62 years, 148 days). Interment at Grace Church Cemetery, Jamaica, Queens, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Rufus King (1755-1827) and Mary (Alsop) King (1769-1819); brother of John Alsop King and Edward King; married to Sarah Rogers Gracie (1791-1878); father of Caroline King (1813-1863; who married Denning Duer); nephew of William King and Cyrus King; uncle of Rufus King (1814-1876) and Rufus King (1817-1891); grandson of John Alsop (1724-1794); second cousin once removed of Ebenezer Hazard; third cousin of Erskine Hazard.
  Political families: Conger family of New York; Kellogg-Adams-Seymour-Chapin family of Connecticut and New York; King-Hazard family; Wildman family of Danbury, Connecticut; Saltonstall-Davis-Frelinghuysen-Appleton family of Massachusetts (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  The World War II Liberty ship SS James King (built 1943 at Richmond, California; scrapped 1961) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  John Henry Kinkead (1826-1904) — also known as John H. Kinkead — of Carson City, Nev.; Sitka, Alaska; Unionville, Pershing County, Nev. Born in Smithfield, Somerset County, Pa., December 10, 1826. Republican. Dry goods merchant; treasurer of Nevada Territory, 1862-64; delegate to Nevada state constitutional convention, 1863; postmaster at Sitka, Alaska, 1867-69; Governor of Nevada, 1879-83; Governor of Alaska District, 1884-85. Died in Carson City, Nev., August 15, 1904 (age 77 years, 249 days). Interment at Lone Mountain Cemetery, Carson City, Nev.
  Relatives: Married 1856 to Elizabeth Fall (1837-1907).
  The Kinkead state office building, in Carson City, Nevada, is named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS J. H. Kinkaid (built 1943 at Richmond, California; scrapped 1966) was named for him.
  See also National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Henry Knox (1750-1806) — Born in Boston, Suffolk County, Mass., July 25, 1750. General in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; U.S. Secretary of War, 1789-94. Member, Society of the Cincinnati; American Philosophical Society. He brought 59 cannon from Fort Ticonderoga to Dorchester, Mass., leading the British forces to evacuate Boston on March 17, 1776. Swallowed a small chicken bone that damaged his intestines, and died three days later of peritonitis, in Thomaston, Knox County, Maine, October 21, 1806 (age 56 years, 88 days). Interment at Thomaston Village Cemetery, Thomaston, Maine.
  Knox counties in Ill., Ind., Ky., Maine, Mo., Neb., Ohio, Tenn. and Tex. are named for him.
  The city of Knoxville, Tennessee, is named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS Henry Knox (built 1941-42 at Terminal Island, California; torpedoed and lost in the Indian Ocean, 1943) was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
Philander C. Knox Philander Chase Knox (1853-1921) — also known as Philander C. Knox — of Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, Pa. Born in Brownsville, Fayette County, Pa., May 6, 1853. Republican. Lawyer; law partner of James H. Reed, 1877-1902; U.S. Attorney General, 1901-04; U.S. Senator from Pennsylvania, 1904-09, 1917-21; resigned 1909; died in office 1921; candidate for Republican nomination for President, 1908, 1916; U.S. Secretary of State, 1909-13; delegate to Republican National Convention from Pennsylvania, 1920. Died, from a stroke of apoplexy, in Washington, D.C., October 12, 1921 (age 68 years, 159 days). Interment at Washington Memorial Cemetery, Valley Forge, Pa.
  Relatives: Son of David Smith Knox (1805-1872) and Rebecca (Page) Knox (1814-1889); married 1880 to Lillian 'Lillie' Smith.
  The World War II Liberty ship SS Philander C. Knox (built 1943 at New Orleans, Louisiana; scrapped 1961) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: American Monthly Review of Reviews, April 1902
  Harry Lane (1855-1917) — of Portland, Multnomah County, Ore. Born in Corvallis, Benton County, Ore., August 28, 1855. Democrat. Mayor of Portland, Ore., 1905-09; U.S. Senator from Oregon, 1913-17; died in office 1917. Died May 23, 1917 (age 61 years, 268 days). Interment at Lone Fir Cemetery, Portland, Ore.
  Relatives: Nephew of La Fayette Lane (1842-1896); grandson of Joseph Lane.
  Political family: Lane-Colquitt family of North Carolina.
  The World War II Liberty ship SS Harry Lane (built 1942 at Portland, Oregon; scrapped 1962) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Henry Smith Lane (1811-1881) — also known as Henry S. Lane — of Crawfordsville, Montgomery County, Ind. Born near Sharbsburg, Bath County, Ky., February 24, 1811. Republican. Member of Indiana state house of representatives, 1837-38; U.S. Representative from Indiana 7th District, 1840-43; candidate for Presidential Elector for Indiana, 1844; colonel in the U.S. Army during the Mexican War; delegate to Republican National Convention from Indiana, 1856 (Permanent Chair; speaker), 1868; Governor of Indiana, 1861; U.S. Senator from Indiana, 1861-67. Methodist. Died in Crawfordsville, Montgomery County, Ind., June 18, 1881 (age 70 years, 114 days). Interment at Oak Hill Cemetery, Crawfordsville, Ind.
  Relatives: Brother of Higgins Lane; uncle of Edwin T. Lane (born1851).
  Political family: Lane family of Indiana.
  The World War II Liberty ship SS Henry S. Lane (built 1943 at Portland, Oregon; scrapped 1964) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article
  James Henry Lane (1814-1866) — also known as James H. Lane; "Liberator of Kansas"; "Fighting Jim" — of Lawrenceburg, Dearborn County, Ind.; Lawrence, Douglas County, Kan. Born in Lawrenceburg, Dearborn County, Ind., June 22, 1814. Served in the U.S. Army during the Mexican War; Lieutenant Governor of Indiana, 1849-53; U.S. Representative from Indiana 4th District, 1853-55; delegate to Kansas state constitutional convention, 1855, 1857; Kansas Democratic state chair, 1855; U.S. Senator from Kansas, 1861-66; died in office 1866; general in the Union Army during the Civil War. Member, Freemasons. Deranged, and charged with financial irregularities, he was mortally wounded by a self-inflicted gunshot on July 1, 1866, and died ten days later, near Fort Leavenworth, Leavenworth County, Kan., July 11, 1866 (age 52 years, 19 days). Interment at Oak Hill Cemetery, Lawrence, Kan.
  Relatives: Son of Amos Lane (1778-1849) and Mary (Foote) Lane; brother of George W. Lane; married 1842 to Mary E. Baldridge (granddaughter of Arthur St. Clair).
  Political family: Lane family of Lawrenceburg, Indiana.
  Lane County, Kan. is named for him.
  The World War II Liberty ship SS James H. Lane (built 1943 at Portland, Oregon; wrecked and scrapped 1957) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  John Langdon (1741-1819) — of Portsmouth, Rockingham County, N.H. Born in Portsmouth, Rockingham County, N.H., June 26, 1741. Democrat. Delegate to Continental Congress from New Hampshire, 1775-76, 1787; served in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; member of New Hampshire state senate from Rockingham County, 1784-85; President of New Hampshire, 1785-86, 1788-89; member, U.S. Constitutional Convention, 1787; U.S. Senator from New Hampshire, 1789-1801; Governor of New Hampshire, 1805-09, 1810-12; received 9 electoral votes for Vice-President, 1808. Congregationalist. Died in Portsmouth, Rockingham County, N.H., September 18, 1819 (age 78 years, 84 days). Entombed at North Cemetery, Portsmouth, N.H.
  Relatives: Son of John Langdon (1707-1780) and Mary Woodbury (Hall) Langdon (1717-1789); brother of Woodbury Langdon (1739-1805); married 1777 to Elizabeth Sherburne (1761-1813); great-granduncle of Amasa Junius Parker Jr.; second great-granduncle of Parker Corning and Edwin Corning; third great-granduncle of Erastus Corning II and Edwin Corning Jr..
  Political family: Corning family of Albany, New York (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  The World War II Liberty ship SS John Langdon (built 1942 at Terminal Island, California; sold and renamed Tblisi; scrapped 1977) was originally named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  John Laurance (1750-1810) — of New York. Born near Falmouth, England, 1750. Lawyer; served in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; Delegate to Continental Congress from New York, 1785-87; member of New York state senate Southern District, 1787-89; U.S. Representative from New York 2nd District, 1789-93; U.S. District Judge for New York, 1794-96; resigned 1796; U.S. Senator from New York, 1796-1800. Died in New York, New York County, N.Y., November 11, 1810 (age about 60 years). Interment at First Presbyterian Churchyard, Manhattan, N.Y.
  The World War II Liberty ship SS John Laurence (built 1942 at Houston, Texas; scrapped 1963) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — federal judicial profile — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
Hugh S. Legaré Hugh Swinton Legaré (1797-1843) — also known as Hugh S. Legaré — of South Carolina. Born in Charleston, Charleston County, S.C., January 2, 1797. Member of South Carolina state house of representatives, 1820-21, 1824-30; South Carolina state attorney general, 1830-32; U.S. Charge d'Affaires to Belgium, 1832-36; U.S. Representative from South Carolina 5th District, 1837-39; U.S. Attorney General, 1841-43; died in office 1843. Scottish and French Huguenot ancestry. Slaveowner. Died in Boston, Suffolk County, Mass., June 20, 1843 (age 46 years, 169 days). Original interment at Mt. Auburn Cemetery, Cambridge, Mass.; reinterment at Magnolia Cemetery, Charleston, S.C.
  Relatives: Son of Solomon Legare (1770-1799) and Mary (Swinton) Legare (1771-1843); granduncle of George Swinton Legaré (1869-1913); great-granduncle of William Storen Legaré and Thomas Allen Legaré Jr..
  Political family: Seabrook-Legare family of Charleston, South Carolina.
  The World War II Liberty ship SS Hugh S. Legare (built 1942 at Terminal Island, California; scrapped 1959) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: The South in the Building of the Nation (1909)
  Asbury Francis Lever (1875-1940) — also known as A. Frank Lever — of Lexington, Lexington County, S.C.; Columbia, Richland County, S.C. Born near Springhill, Lexington County, S.C., January 5, 1875. Democrat. Lawyer; private secretary to U.S. Rep. J. William Stokes, 1897-1901; member of South Carolina state house of representatives from Lexington County, 1900-01; resigned 1901; U.S. Representative from South Carolina 7th District, 1901-19. Member, Freemasons. Died in Lexington County, S.C., April 28, 1940 (age 65 years, 114 days). Interment at Woodland Cemetery, Clemson, S.C.
  Relatives: Son of Asbury Washington Lever and Mary Elvira (Derrick) Lever; married, July 5, 1911, to Lucile Scurry Butler (1889-1957); father of Asbury Francis Lever Jr. (1918-2000).
  Lever Hall, at Clemson University, Clemson, South Carolina, is named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS A. Frank Lever. (built 1943 at Savannah, Georgia; scrapped 1968) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  John Alexander Lillington (c.1725-1786) — also known as Alexander Lillington — Born in North Carolina, about 1725. Member of North Carolina house of commons, 1777; general in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War. Died in New Hanover County (part now in Pender County), N.C., April, 1786 (age about 61 years). Interment at Lillington Cemetery, Rocky Point, N.C.
  Relatives: Son of John Lillington and Sarah (Porter) Lillington; married to Sarah Waters.
  The town of Lillington, North Carolina, is named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS Alexander Lillington (built 1942 at Wilmington, North Carolina; scrapped 1961) was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  John Lind (1854-1930) — of New Ulm, Brown County, Minn.; Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minn. Born in Kanna, Smaland, Sweden, March 25, 1854. School teacher; superintendent of schools; lawyer; U.S. Representative from Minnesota, 1887-93, 1903-05 (2nd District 1887-93, 5th District 1903-05); served in the U.S. Army during the Spanish-American War; Governor of Minnesota, 1899-1901; defeated (Democratic), 1896, 1900; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Minnesota, 1904; Prohibition candidate for Minnesota railroad and warehouse commission, 1916. Unitarian. Swedish ancestry. Lost his left hand in a boyhood accident. Died in Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minn., September 18, 1930 (age 76 years, 177 days). Cremated; ashes interred at Lakewood Cemetery, Minneapolis, Minn.
  Relatives: Married, September 1, 1879, to Alice A. Shepard.
  The World War II Liberty ship SS John Lind (built 1943 at Richmond, California; scrapped 1972) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Henry Dickinson Lindsley (1872-1938) — also known as Henry D. Lindsley — of Dallas, Dallas County, Tex. Born in Nashville, Davidson County, Tenn., February 29, 1872. Mayor of Dallas, Tex., 1915-17; colonel in the U.S. Army during World War I. Member, American Legion. Died in Dallas, Dallas County, Tex., November 18, 1938 (age 66 years, 0 days). Interment at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Va.
  Relatives: Son of Philip Lindsley (1842-1911) and Louise Grundy (Dickinson) Lindsley (1848-1935); married, December 3, 1892, to Ruth H. Bower (1872-1956); married, May 14, 1936, to Marguerite Berwick (1897-1969); nephew of Jacob McGavock Dickinson (1851-1928).
  The World War II Liberty ship SS Henry D. Lindsley (built 1944 at Houston, Texas; scrapped 1970) was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Glenard Paul Lipscomb (1915-1970) — also known as Glenard P. Lipscomb — of Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, Calif. Born in Jackson, Jackson County, Mich., August 19, 1915. Republican. Accountant; served in the U.S. Army during World War II; member of California state assembly, 1947-53; U.S. Representative from California 24th District, 1953-70; died in office 1970; delegate to Republican National Convention from California, 1956, 1960 (member, Resolutions Committee). Baptist. Member, American Legion; Freemasons; Kiwanis; Elks. Died, of intestinal cancer, at Bethesda Naval Hospital, Bethesda, Montgomery County, Md., February 1, 1970 (age 54 years, 166 days). Interment at Forest Lawn Memorial Park - Hollywood Hills, Los Angeles, Calif.
  The nuclear-powered U.S. Navy submarine USS Glenard P. Lipscomb (launched 1973, scrapped 1997) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
John A. Logan John Alexander Logan (1826-1886) — also known as John A. Logan; "Black Jack"; "Black Eagle of Illinois" — of Benton, Franklin County, Ill.; Chicago, Cook County, Ill. Born in Murphysboro, Jackson County, Ill., February 9, 1826. Member of Illinois state house of representatives, 1852; Presidential Elector for Illinois, 1856; U.S. Representative from Illinois, 1859-62, 1867-71 (9th District 1859-62, at-large 1867-71); general in the Union Army during the Civil War; delegate to Republican National Convention from Illinois, 1868, 1880; U.S. Senator from Illinois, 1871-77, 1879-86; died in office 1886; candidate for Republican nomination for President, 1884; Republican candidate for Vice President of the United States, 1884. Member, Freemasons. Conceived the idea of Memorial Day and inaugurated the observance in May 1868. Died in Washington, D.C., December 26, 1886 (age 60 years, 320 days). Entombed at U.S. Soldiers' & Airmen's Home National Cemetery, Washington, D.C.
  Relatives: Son of John Logan (born c.1800).
  Logan counties in Colo., Kan., Neb., N.Dak. and Okla. are named for him.
  Fort Logan (established 1887, closed 1946), and Fort Logan National Cemetery (established 1950 on part of the same site) in Denver, Colorado, were named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS John A. Logan (built 1942-43 at Richmond, California; renamed USS Alnitah; scrapped 1961) was originally named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about John A. Logan: James Pickett Jones, John A. Logan : Stalwart Republican from Illinois
  Image source: Life and Work of James G. Blaine (1893)
  Jack Griffith London (1876-1916) — also known as Jack London; John Griffith Chaney — of Oakland, Alameda County, Calif.; Glen Ellen, Sonoma County, Calif. Born in San Francisco, Calif., January 12, 1876. Socialist. Novelist; candidate for mayor of Oakland, Calif., 1901 (Social Democratic), 1905 (Socialist). Died in Glen Ellen, Sonoma County, Calif., November 22, 1916 (age 40 years, 315 days). Interment at Jack London State Historic Park Cemetery, Glen Ellen, Calif.
  Relatives: Son of William Henry Chaney (1821-1903) and Flora (Wellman) London (1843-1922); married 1900 to Elizabeth May Maddern (1876-1947); married 1905 to Charmian 'Clara' Kittredge (1871-1955).
  Mount London, on the border between British Columbia, Canada, and Haines Borough, Alaska, is named for him.  — Jack London Square (entertainment and business development), and the surrounding Jack London District neighborhood, in Oakland, California, are named for him.  — Jack London Lake (Ozero Dzheja Londona), and the surrounding Jack London Nature Park, in Magadan Oblast, Russia, are named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS Jack London (built 1943 at Sausalito, California; scrapped 1968) was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  James Longstreet (1821-1904) — also known as "Old Pete" — of New Orleans, Orleans Parish, La.; Gainesville, Hall County, Ga. Born in Edgefield District (now Edgefield County), S.C., January 8, 1821. Major in the U.S. Army during the Mexican War; general in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; U.S. Minister to Turkey, 1880-81. Died in Gainesville, Hall County, Ga., January 2, 1904 (age 82 years, 359 days). Interment at Alta Vista Cemetery, Gainesville, Ga.
  The World War II Liberty ship SS James Longstreet (built 1942 at Houston, Texas; wrecked 1943, used as target until 1970, sunk 1996 in Cape Cod Bay) was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier
James Russell Lowell James Russell Lowell (1819-1891) — of Cambridge, Middlesex County, Mass. Born in Cambridge, Middlesex County, Mass., February 22, 1819. Writer, poet, critic, professor, and abolitionist; U.S. Minister to Spain, 1877-80; Great Britain, 1880-85. Elected to the Hall of Fame for Great Americans in 1905. Died of cancer, in Cambridge, Middlesex County, Mass., August 12, 1891 (age 72 years, 171 days). Interment at Mt. Auburn Cemetery, Cambridge, Mass.
  Relatives: Married, December 26, 1844, to Maria White (1821-1853); married, September 16, 1857, to Frances Dunlap (1826-1885; niece of Robert Pinckney Dunlap); father of Mabel Lowell (who married Edward Burnett (1849-1925)).
  Political family: Lowell-Dunlap family of Massachusetts.
  The World War II Liberty ship SS James Russell Lowell (built 1942 at Portland, Oregon; torpedoed in the Mediterranean Sea, 1943; beached, later towed and scuttled) was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: U.S. postage stamp (1940)
  Horace Harmon Lurton (1844-1914) — of Clarksville, Montgomery County, Tenn.; Nashville, Davidson County, Tenn. Born in Newport, Campbell County, Ky., February 26, 1844. Served in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; lawyer; justice of Tennessee state supreme court, 1886-93; Judge of U.S. Court of Appeals for the 6th Circuit, 1893-1909; law professor; Associate Justice of U.S. Supreme Court, 1909-14; died in office 1914. Episcopalian. Died in Atlantic City, Atlantic County, N.J., July 12, 1914 (age 70 years, 136 days). Interment at Greenwood Cemetery, Clarksville, Tenn.
  Relatives: Son of Lycurgus L. Lurton and Sarah (Harmon) Lurton; married 1867 to Frances Owen.
  The World War II Liberty ship SS Horace H. Lurton (built 1943 at Brunswick, Georgia; scrapped 1968) was named for him.
  See also federal judicial profile — Wikipedia article — Ballotpedia article — NNDB dossier
James Madison James Madison (1751-1836) — also known as "Father of the Constitution and the Bill of Rights" — of Virginia. Born in Port Conway, King George County, Va., March 16, 1751. Democrat. Served in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; member of Virginia state legislature, 1776; Delegate to Continental Congress from Virginia, 1780-83, 1787-88; member, U.S. Constitutional Convention, 1787; U.S. Representative from Virginia, 1789-97 (at-large 1789-91, 5th District 1791-93, 15th District 1793-97); U.S. Secretary of State, 1801-09; President of the United States, 1809-17. Episcopalian. English ancestry. He was elected in 1905 to the Hall of Fame for Great Americans. Slaveowner. Died in Montpelier, Orange County, Va., June 28, 1836 (age 85 years, 104 days). Interment at Montpelier Plantation, Montpelier Station, Va.
  Relatives: Son of James Madison (1723-1801) and Eleanor Rose (Conway) Madison (1731-1829); brother of William Taylor Madison; married, September 15, 1794, to Dolley Todd (sister-in-law of Richard Cutts and John George Jackson); first cousin once removed of George Madison; first cousin twice removed of Edmund Pendleton; second cousin of Zachary Taylor; second cousin once removed of John Penn, John Pendleton Jr., Nathaniel Pendleton and Coleby Chew; second cousin twice removed of Henry Gaines Johnson, John Strother Pendleton, Albert Gallatin Pendleton and Samuel Bullitt Churchill; second cousin thrice removed of George Cassety Pendleton, Hubbard T. Smith, Charles M. Pendleton, Elliot Woolfolk Major, Edgar Bailey Woolfolk and Daniel Micajah Pendleton; second cousin four times removed of Charles Sumner Pendleton and Sidney Fletcher Taliaferro; third cousin of Clement F. Dorsey, Philip Clayton Pendleton, Edmund Henry Pendleton and Nathanael Greene Pendleton; third cousin once removed of Gabriel Slaughter, Andrew Dorsey, Philip Coleman Pendleton, George Hunt Pendleton and Joseph Henry Pendleton; third cousin twice removed of Robert Pryor Henry, John Flournoy Henry, Gustavus Adolphus Henry, David Shelby Walker, Alexander Warfield Dorsey, William Barret Pendleton, Francis Key Pendleton, Charles Rittenhouse Pendleton and John Overton Pendleton; third cousin thrice removed of Charles Rice Slaughter (1819-1862), James David Walker, David Shelby Walker Jr. and Eli Huston Brown Jr.; fourth cousin once removed of Charles Willing Byrd.
  Political families: Blackburn-Slaughter-Buckner-Madison family of Kentucky; Pendleton-Lee family of Maryland (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Madison counties in Ala., Ark., Fla., Ga., Idaho, Ill., Ind., Iowa, Ky., La., Miss., Mo., Mont., Neb., N.Y., N.C., Ohio, Tenn., Tex. and Va. are named for him.
  The city of Madison, Wisconsin, is named for him.  — Mount Madison, in the White Mountains, Coos County, New Hampshire, is named for him.  — Fort Madison (1808-13), and the subsequent city of Fort Madison, Iowa, were named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS James Madison (built 1942 at Houston, Texas; scrapped 1966) was named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: James Madison BroomJames Madison Hite BealeJames Madison PorterJames M. BuchananJames Madison GreggJ. Madison WellsJames M. TarletonJames Madison HughesJames M. MarvinJames Madison GaylordJames M. LeachJames TurnerJames M. HarveyJames M. SeymourJames Madison BarkerJames Madison MullenJames M. CandlerJames Madison McKinneyJames M. MortonJames Madison Barrett, Sr.James M. Gudger, Jr.James Madison Morton, Jr.James Madison WoodardJames M. Waddell, Jr.
  Coins and currency: His portrait appeared on the U.S. $5,000 bill in 1915-46.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Books about James Madison: Ralph Louis Ketcham, James Madison : A Biography — Garry Wills, James Madison — Robert Allen Rutland, The Presidency of James Madison — Charles Cerami, Young Patriots: The Remarkable Story of Two Men. Their Impossible Plan and The Revolution That Created The Constitution — Samuel Kernell, ed., James Madison: The Theory and Practice of Republican Government — Kevin R. C. Gutzman, James Madison and the Making of America
  Image source: Portrait & Biographical Album of Washtenaw County (1891)
James G. Maguire James George Maguire (1853-1920) — also known as James G. Maguire — of San Francisco, Calif. Born in Boston, Suffolk County, Mass., February 22, 1853. Democrat. Lawyer; member of California state assembly 13th District, 1875-77; superior court judge in California, 1882-88; U.S. Representative from California 4th District, 1893-99; candidate for Governor of California, 1898; delegate to Democratic National Convention from California, 1900, 1912 (member, Committee on Rules and Order of Business). Died in San Francisco, Calif., June 20, 1920 (age 67 years, 119 days). Interment at Greenlawn Memorial Park, Colma, Calif.
  Relatives: Married, March 6, 1881, to Louisa J. Joyce.
  The World War II Liberty ship SS James G. Maguire (built 1943 at Richmond, California; scrapped 1972) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: Autobiographies and Portraits of the President, Cabinet, etc. (1899)
Horace Mann Horace Mann (1796-1859) — also known as "The Father of American Public Education" — of Dedham, Norfolk County, Mass.; Boston, Suffolk County, Mass. Born in Franklin, Norfolk County, Mass., May 4, 1796. Lawyer; member of Massachusetts state house of representatives, 1827-33; member of Massachusetts state senate, 1833-37; secretary, Massachusetts Board of Education, 1837-48; founder and editor of The Common School Journal; became a national leader in improving and reforming public schools; U.S. Representative from Massachusetts 8th District, 1848-53; Free Soil candidate for Governor of Massachusetts, 1852; president and professor at Antioch College, 1852-59. Elected to the Hall of Fame for Great Americans in 1900. Died in Yellow Springs, Greene County, Ohio, August 2, 1859 (age 63 years, 90 days). Original interment somewhere in Yellow Springs, Ohio; reinterment at North Burial Ground, Providence, R.I.; statue at State House Grounds, Boston, Mass.
  Relatives: Married 1830 to Charlotte Messer (1809-1832); married, May 1, 1843, to Mary Tyler Peabody (1806-1887; sister-in-law of Nathaniel Hawthorne (1804-1864)).
  Political families: Roosevelt family of New York; Deming family of Maryland and New York (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  The World War II Liberty ship SS Horace Mann (built 1942 at Terminal Island, California; scrapped 1970) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: U.S. postage stamp (1940)
  James Manning (1738-1791) — of Providence, Providence County, R.I. Born in Elizabethtown, Essex County (now Elizabeth, Union County), N.J., October 22, 1738. Delegate to Continental Congress from Rhode Island, 1786. Baptist. Co-founder, in 1764, of Rhode Island College (now Brown University). Died in Providence, Providence County, R.I., July 29, 1791 (age 52 years, 280 days). Interment at North Burial Ground, Providence, R.I.
  The World War II Liberty ship SS James Manning (built 1943 at South Portland, Maine; scrapped 1961) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
John Marshall John Marshall (1755-1835) — of Virginia. Born in Germantown, Fauquier County, Va., September 24, 1755. Served in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; lawyer; member of Virginia state house of delegates, 1782-96; U.S. Attorney for Virginia, 1789; U.S. Representative from Virginia at-large, 1799-1800; U.S. Secretary of State, 1800-01; Chief Justice of U.S. Supreme Court, 1801-35; died in office 1835; received 4 electoral votes for Vice-President, 1816. Episcopalian. Scottish ancestry. Member, Freemasons; Phi Beta Kappa. Elected to the Hall of Fame for Great Americans in 1900. Slaveowner. Died in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., July 6, 1835 (age 79 years, 285 days). Interment at Shockoe Hill Cemetery, Richmond, Va.
  Relatives: Son of Thomas Marshall (1730-1802) and Mary Randolph (Keith) Marshall (1737-1809); brother-in-law of William McClung, George Keith Taylor and Joseph Hamilton Daviess; brother of James Markham Marshall and Alexander Keith Marshall (1770-1825); married, January 3, 1783, to Mary Willis Ambler (1766-1831; daughter of Jacquelin Ambler); father of Thomas Marshall (1784-1835), Mary Marshall (who married Jacquelin Burwell Harvie) and James Keith Marshall; uncle and first cousin once removed of Thomas Alexander Marshall; uncle of Edward Colston, Thomas Francis Marshall, Alexander Keith Marshall (1808-1884), Alexander Keith McClung, Charles Alexander Marshall and Edward Colston Marshall; granduncle by marriage of Humphrey Marshall (1812-1872); granduncle of John Augustine Marshall; great-grandfather of Lewis Minor Coleman; great-grandnephew of Richard Randolph; great-granduncle of Hudson Snowden Marshall (1870-1931), William Marshall Bullitt and Alexander Scott Bullitt; first cousin and brother-in-law of Humphrey Marshall (1760-1841); first cousin once removed of William Marshall Anderson and Charles Anderson; first cousin twice removed of Richard Bland and Peyton Randolph (1721-1775); second cousin of Thomas Mann Randolph Jr.; second cousin once removed of Theodorick Bland, Thomas Jefferson, Edmund Jenings Randolph, Beverley Randolph, John Randolph of Roanoke, Benjamin Franklin Randolph, Meriwether Lewis Randolph and George Wythe Randolph; second cousin twice removed of Thomas Jefferson Coolidge; second cousin thrice removed of John Gardner Coolidge; third cousin of Henry Lee, Charles Lee, Edmund Jennings Lee, Martha Jefferson Randolph, Dabney Carr, Peyton Randolph (1779-1828) and Henry St. George Tucker; third cousin once removed of Francis Wayles Eppes, Dabney Smith Carr, Edmund Randolph, Nathaniel Beverly Tucker and Carter Henry Harrison; third cousin twice removed of Fitzhugh Lee, Carter Henry Harrison II and Frederick Madison Roberts; third cousin thrice removed of Edith Wilson and Francis Beverley Biddle; fourth cousin of John Wayles Eppes.
  Political families: Harrison-Randolph-Marshall-Cabell family of Virginia; Tuck-Claude family of Annapolis, Maryland (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Marshall counties in Ala., Ill., Ind., Iowa, Ky., Miss., Tenn. and W.Va. are named for him.
  The World War II Liberty ship SS John Marshall (built 1941-42 at Mobile, Alabama; scrapped 1971) was named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: John Marshall StoneJohn Marshall MartinJohn Marshall HarlanJ. Marshall HagansJohn M. ClaiborneJohn M. HamiltonJohn M. RaymondJohn M. RoseJohn M. SlatonJohn M. WolvertonJohn M. RobsionJohn Marshall HutchesonJohn M. ButlerJohn Marshall HarlanJohn M. Robsion, Jr.John Marshall BrileyJohn Marshall Lindley
  Coins and currency: His portrait appeared on the $20 U.S. Treasury note in the 1880s, and on the $500 bill in the early 20th century.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — federal judicial profile — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial — Biographical Directory of Federal Judges
  Books about John Marshall: Jean Edward Smith, John Marshall : Definer of a Nation — Charles F. Hobson, The Great Chief Justice : John Marshall and the Rule of Law — Albert J. Beveridge, The Life of John Marshall: The Building of the Nation 1815-1835 — Albert J. Beveridge, The Life of John Marshall: Conflict and Construction 1800-1815 — Albert J. Beveridge, The Life of John Marshall: Politician, Diplomatist, Statesman 1789-1801 — Albert J. Beveridge, The Life of John Marshall: Frontiersman, Soldier, Lawmaker — David Scott Robarge, A Chief Justice's Progress: John Marshall from Revolutionary Virginia to the Supreme Court — R. Kent Newmyer, John Marshall and the Heroic Age of the Supreme Court
  Image source: New York Public Library
  Alexander Martin (1740-1807) — of Guilford County, N.C. Born in Hunterdon County, N.J., 1740. Lawyer; Governor of North Carolina, 1782-85, 1789-92; Delegate to Continental Congress from North Carolina, 1786; member, U.S. Constitutional Convention, 1787; U.S. Senator from North Carolina, 1793-99. Slaveowner. Died in Rockingham County, N.C., November 2, 1807 (age about 67 years). Interment a private or family graveyard, Stokes County, N.C.
  The World War II Liberty ship SS Alexander Martin (built 1942 at Wilmington, North Carolina; scrapped 1963) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
George B. McClellan George Brinton McClellan (1826-1885) — also known as George B. McClellan; "Little Mac" — of New Jersey. Born in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., December 3, 1826. Democrat. General in the Union Army during the Civil War; candidate for President of the United States, 1864; Governor of New Jersey, 1878-81. Member, Freemasons; Loyal Legion. Died October 29, 1885 (age 58 years, 330 days). Interment at Riverview Cemetery, Trenton, N.J.; statue erected 1907 at Connecticut Avenue, Washington, D.C.
  Relatives: Son of George McClellan and Elizabeth Steinmetz (Brinton) McClellan; married to Mary Ellen Marcy (daughter of Gen. Randolph Barnes Marcy (1812-1887); granddaughter of Laban Marcy); father of George Brinton McClellan (1865-1940).
  Political family: Howe family of Massachusetts.
  The World War II Liberty ship SS George B. McClellan (built 1942 at Richmond, California; scrapped 1973) was named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: George HarveyGeorge B. HudnallGeorge B. McClellan
  See also National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Books about George B. McClellan: Stephen W. Sears, George B. McClellan : The Young Napoleon
  Image source: Life and Work of James G. Blaine (1893)
  George Washington McCrary (1835-1890) — of Iowa. Born near Evansville, Vanderburgh County, Ind., August 29, 1835. Republican. Member of Iowa state house of representatives, 1857; member of Iowa state senate, 1861-65; U.S. Representative from Iowa 1st District, 1869-77; member of Republican National Committee from Iowa, 1870-72; U.S. Secretary of War, 1877-79; Judge of U.S. Circuit Court for the 8th Circuit, 1879-84; resigned 1884. Died in St. Joseph, Buchanan County, Mo., June 23, 1890 (age 54 years, 298 days). Interment at Oakland Cemetery, Keokuk, Iowa.
  Presumably named for: George Washington
  The World War II Liberty ship SS George W. McCrary (built 1942 at Richmond, California; scrapped 1967) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — federal judicial profile — Wikipedia article — Biographical Directory of Federal Judges
Hugh McCulloch Hugh McCulloch (1808-1895) — of Fort Wayne, Allen County, Ind.; Washington, D.C.; Vansville, Prince George's County, Md. Born in Kennebunk, York County, Maine, December 7, 1808. Republican. Lawyer; banker; U.S. Comptroller of the Currency, 1863-65; U.S. Secretary of the Treasury, 1865-69, 1884-85. Died in Vansville, Prince George's County, Md., May 24, 1895 (age 86 years, 168 days). Interment at Rock Creek Cemetery, Washington, D.C.
  Relatives: Son of Hugh McCulloch (1773-1830) and Abigail (Perkins) McCulloch (1774-1846); married, June 23, 1834, to Eunice Hardy (1816-1836); married, March 21, 1838, to Susan Maria Man (1818-1898).
  McCulloch Hall (dormitory, built 1926), at Harvard University Business School, Boston, Massachusetts, is named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS Hugh McCulloch (built 1943 at Richmond, California; scrapped 1962) was named for him.
  Coins and currency: His portrait appeared on $20 U.S. national bank notes in 1902.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial — Comptrollers of the Currency
  Image source: Life and Work of James G. Blaine (1893)
  James McHenry (1753-1816) — of Maryland. Born in Ballymena, County Antrim, Ireland (now Northern Ireland), November 16, 1753. Major in Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; member of Maryland state senate, 1781-85, 1791-95; Delegate to Continental Congress from Maryland, 1783-85; member, U.S. Constitutional Convention, 1787; member of Maryland state house of delegates, 1788-89; U.S. Secretary of War, 1796-1800. Presbyterian. Scotch-Irish ancestry. Member, Freemasons. Died near Baltimore (unknown county), Md., May 3, 1816 (age 62 years, 169 days). Interment at Westminster Burying Ground, Baltimore, Md.
  The World War II Liberty ship SS James McHenry (built 1943 at New Orleans, Louisiana; scrapped 1970) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  James Iver McKay (1792-1853) — also known as James I. McKay — of Elizabethtown, Bladen County, N.C. Born near Elizabethtown, Bladen County, N.C., July 17, 1792. Democrat. Member of North Carolina state senate, 1815-19, 1822, 1826, 1830; U.S. Representative from North Carolina, 1831-49 (5th District 1831-43, 6th District 1843-47, 7th District 1847-49). Slaveowner. Died in Goldsboro, Wayne County, N.C., September 14, 1853 (age 61 years, 59 days). Interment at James Iver McKay Cemetery, Bladen County, N.C.
  The World War II Liberty ship SS James I. McKay (built 1943 at Wilmington, North Carolina; scrapped 1967) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  John McKinley (1780-1852) — of Huntsville, Madison County, Ala.; Florence, Lauderdale County, Ala. Born in Culpeper County, Va., May 1, 1780. Member of Alabama state legislature, 1820; U.S. Senator from Alabama, 1826-31, 1837; U.S. Representative from Alabama 2nd District, 1833-35; Associate Justice of U.S. Supreme Court, 1837-52; died in office 1852. Slaveowner. Died in Louisville, Jefferson County, Ky., July 19, 1852 (age 72 years, 79 days). Interment at Cave Hill Cemetery, Louisville, Ky.
  The World War II Liberty ship SS John McKinley (built 1943 at Brunswick, Georgia; scrapped 1967) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — federal judicial profile — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Biographical Directory of Federal Judges
  John McLean (1785-1861) — of Ridgeville, Warren County, Ohio; Clifton (now part of Cincinnati), Hamilton County, Ohio. Born in Morris County, N.J., March 11, 1785. Republican. Lawyer; newspaper editor and publisher; U.S. Representative from Ohio 1st District, 1813-16; justice of Ohio state supreme court, 1816-22; Commissioner of the General Land Office, 1822-23; U.S. Postmaster General, 1823-29; Associate Justice of U.S. Supreme Court, 1829-61; died in office 1861; candidate for Republican nomination for President, 1856, 1860. Methodist. Slaveowner. Died in Clifton (now part of Cincinnati), Hamilton County, Ohio, April 4, 1861 (age 76 years, 24 days). Interment at Spring Grove Cemetery, Cincinnati, Ohio.
  Relatives: Son of Fergus McLean (1746-1837) and Sophia (Blackford) McLean (1755-1839); brother of William McLean (1794-1839); married to Rebecca Edwards (1786-1841) and Sarah Bella (Ludlow) Garrard (1802-1882).
  The World War II Liberty ship SS John McLean (built 1942 at Richmond, California; sold 1947, scrapped 1970) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — federal judicial profile — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial — Biographical Directory of Federal Judges
  John W. Meldrum (1843-1936) — of Laramie, Albany County, Wyo. Born in Caledonia, Livingston County, N.Y., September 17, 1843. Republican. Served in the Union Army during the Civil War; carpenter; wagon maker; candidate for Delegate to U.S. Congress from Wyoming Territory, 1882; delegate to Republican National Convention from Wyoming Territory, 1884; Surveyor General of Wyoming Territory, 1884-85; secretary of Wyoming Territory, 1889-90; U.S. Commissioner in Yellowstone National Park, 1894-1935. Died in Denver, Colo., February 27, 1936 (age 92 years, 163 days). Burial location unknown.
  Meldrum Mountain, in Gallatin County, Montana, is named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS John W. Meldrum (built 1943 at Richmond, California; scrapped 1971) was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article
  Jesse Houghton Metcalf (1860-1942) — also known as Jesse H. Metcalf — of Providence, Providence County, R.I. Born in Providence, Providence County, R.I., November 16, 1860. President of a woolen manufacturing company; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Rhode Island, 1888 (member, Resolutions Committee); member of Rhode Island state house of representatives, 1889-91, 1907; U.S. Senator from Rhode Island, 1924-37; defeated (Republican), 1936; delegate to Republican National Convention from Rhode Island, 1928 (member, Resolutions Committee); member of Republican National Committee from Rhode Island, 1935-40. Unitarian. Died in Providence, Providence County, R.I., October 9, 1942 (age 81 years, 327 days). Interment at Swan Point Cemetery, Providence, R.I.
  Relatives: Married to Harriet Deshon Thurston (1862-1903) and Lydia Dexter Sharpe; father of Cornelia Metcalf (who married Frederic Holdrege Bontecou (1893-1959)).
  Political families: Blodgett-Whedon family; Kellogg-Adams-Seymour-Chapin family of Connecticut and New York (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  The World War II Liberty ship SS Jesse H. Metcalf (built 1943-44 at Providence, Rhode Island; scrapped 1971) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  George von Lengerke Meyer (1858-1918) — also known as George V. L. Meyer — of Hamilton, Essex County, Mass. Born in Boston, Suffolk County, Mass., June 24, 1858. Member of Massachusetts state house of representatives, 1892-96; Speaker of the Massachusetts State House of Representatives, 1894-96; U.S. Ambassador to Italy, 1900-05; Russia, 1905-07; U.S. Postmaster General, 1907-09; U.S. Secretary of the Navy, 1909-13. Died March 9, 1918 (age 59 years, 258 days). Burial location unknown.
  Cross-reference: H. Custis Vezey
  The World War II Liberty ship SS George Von L. Meyer (built 1943 at Richmond, California; scrapped 1967) was named for him.
  See also U.S. State Dept career summary
  Henry Middleton (1717-1784) — of South Carolina. Born near Charleston, Charleston County, S.C., 1717. Delegate to Continental Congress from South Carolina, 1774; member of South Carolina state senate, 1778. Died in Charleston, Charleston County, S.C., June 13, 1784 (age about 66 years). Interment at Church of St. James, Charleston, S.C.
  Relatives: Son of Arthur Middleton (1681-1737) and Susan (Amory) Middleton (1690-1722); married 1741 to Mary Baker Williams (1721-1761); married 1762 to Maria Henrietta Bull; married 1776 to Lady Mary McKenzie; father of Arthur Middleton (1742-1787), Henrietta Middleton (1750-1792; who married Edward Rutledge) and Sarah Middleton (1756-1784; who married Charles Cotesworth Pinckney); uncle of Mary Middleton (1748-1790; who married Pierce Butler); grandfather of Henry Middleton; great-grandfather of John Izard Middleton, Williams Middleton, John Middleton Huger and John Drayton; second great-grandfather of Daniel Elliott Huger Smith; third great-grandfather of Benjamin Huger Rutledge and Francis Fisher Kane.
  Political families: Middleton-Huger-Rutledge-Drayton family of Charleston, South Carolina; Pinckney-Middleton family of Charleston, South Carolina; Shippen-Middleton family of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  The World War II Liberty ship SS Henry Middleton (built 1942 at Wilmington, North Carolina; scrapped 1971) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  John Milledge (1757-1818) — of Augusta, Richmond County, Ga. Born in Georgia, 1757. Georgia state attorney general, 1780-81; U.S. Representative from Georgia at-large, 1792-93, 1795-99, 1801-02; Governor of Georgia, 1802-06; U.S. Senator from Georgia, 1806-09. Slaveowner. Died February 9, 1818 (age about 60 years). Interment at Summerville Cemetery, Augusta, Ga.
  The World War II Liberty ship SS John Milledge (built 1942-43 at Savannah, Georgia; scrapped 1965) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article
John Purroy Mitchel John Purroy Mitchel (1879-1918) — of New York. Born in New York, New York County, N.Y., July 19, 1879. Lawyer; law partner of George V. Mullan, 1902-13; U.S. Collector of Customs, 1913; mayor of New York City, N.Y., 1914-17; defeated (Fusion), 1917; on April 17, 1914, at Park Row, New York, he was shot at by an Michael P. Mahoney, an unemployed carpenter; the bullet missed the mayor, but struck and wounded Frank L. Polk, the city's Corporation Counsel. Catholic. Irish ancestry. Killed in a plane crash during World War I military training, at Gerstner Field, near Holmwood, Calcasieu Parish, La., July 6, 1918 (age 38 years, 352 days). Interment at Woodlawn Cemetery, Bronx, N.Y.; memorial monument at Columbia University, Manhattan, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of James Mitchel and Mary (Purroy) Mitchel; married, April 5, 1909, to Olive Child; nephew of Henry D. Purroy (1848-1903).
  The World War II Liberty ship SS John P. Mitchel (built 1943 at Wilmington, North Carolina; scrapped 1971) was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article
  Image source: Library of Congress
  Alexander Mitchell (1817-1887) — of Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, Wis. Born in Ellon, Aberdeenshire, Scotland, October 17, 1817. Democrat. Banker; president, Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railway, 1864-87; U.S. Representative from Wisconsin, 1871-75 (1st District 1871-73, 4th District 1873-75); defeated, 1868; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Wisconsin, 1876 (member, Resolutions Committee). Scottish ancestry. Died in New York, New York County, N.Y., April 19, 1887 (age 69 years, 184 days). Interment at Forest Home Cemetery, Milwaukee, Wis.
  Relatives: Son of John Mitchell and Margaret (Lendrum) Mitchell; married to Martha Reed (1817-1902; sister of Harrison Reed (1813-1899)); father of John Lendrum Mitchell.
  Political family: Mitchell-Reed family of Milwaukee, Wisconsin.
  The city of Mitchell, South Dakota, is named for him.  — The city of Alexandria, South Dakota, is named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS Alexander Mitchell (built 1943 at Richmond, California; scrapped 1967) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
James Monroe James Monroe (1758-1831) — of Spotsylvania County, Va.; Loudoun County, Va. Born in Westmoreland County, Va., April 28, 1758. Colonel in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; lawyer; member of Virginia state house of delegates, 1782, 1786, 1810-11; Delegate to Continental Congress from Virginia, 1783-86; delegate to Virginia convention to ratify U.S. constitution from Spotsylvania County, 1788; U.S. Senator from Virginia, 1790-94; U.S. Minister to France, 1794-96; Great Britain, 1803-07; Governor of Virginia, 1799-1802, 1811; U.S. Secretary of State, 1811-17; U.S. Secretary of War, 1814-15; President of the United States, 1817-25; delegate to Virginia state constitutional convention, 1829. Episcopalian. English ancestry. Member, Freemasons. Elected to the Hall of Fame for Great Americans in 1930. Slaveowner. Died, probably of tuberculosis, in New York, New York County, N.Y., July 4, 1831 (age 73 years, 67 days). Originally entombed at New York Marble Cemetery, Manhattan, N.Y.; subsequently entombed at New York City Marble Cemetery, Manhattan, N.Y.; reinterment in 1858 at Hollywood Cemetery, Richmond, Va.
  Relatives: Son of Andrew Spence Monroe (1727-1774) and Elizabeth (Jones) Monroe (1727-1758); married, February 16, 1786, to Eliza Kortright (1768-1830) and Elizabeth Kortright; father of Eliza Kortright Monroe (1786-1840; who married George Hay (1765-1830)) and Maria Hester Monroe (1803-1850; who married Samuel Laurence Gouverneur); nephew of Joseph Jones; uncle of Thomas Bell Monroe and James Monroe; granduncle of Victor Monroe; great-grandnephew of Douglas Robinson (1855-1918; who married Corinne Roosevelt Robinson); second great-granduncle of Theodore Douglas Robinson and Corinne Robinson Alsop; third great-granduncle of Corinne A. Chubb and John deKoven Alsop; first cousin once removed of William Grayson; second cousin of Alfred William Grayson and Beverly Robinson Grayson; second cousin thrice removed of Carter Henry Harrison II and John Brady Grayson.
  Political family: Monroe-Grayson-Roosevelt-Breckinridge family of Virginia and Kentucky (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Monroe counties in Ala., Ark., Fla., Ga., Ill., Ind., Iowa, Ky., Mich., Miss., Mo., N.Y., Ohio, Pa., Tenn., W.Va. and Wis. are named for him.
  The city of Monrovia, Liberia, is named for him.  — Mount Monroe, in the White Mountains, Coos County, New Hampshire, is named for him.  — Fort Monroe (military installation 1819-2011), at Old Point Comfort, Hampton, Virginia, is named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS James Monroe (built 1942 at Terminal Island, California; scrapped 1970) was named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: James MonroeJames MonroeJames M. PendletonJames M. JacksonJames Monroe LettsJames M. RitchieJames M. RosseJames M. ComlyJames Monroe BufordJames M. SeibertJames M. LownJames M. MillerJames Monroe JonesJames Monroe HaleJames Monroe SpearsJ. M. AlfordJames M. Lown, Jr.James M. Miley
  Coins and currency: His portrait appeared on the U.S. $100 silver certificate in the 1880s and 1890s.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Books about James Monroe: Harry Ammon, James Monroe: The Quest for National Identity
  Image source: Portrait & Biographical Album of Washtenaw County (1891)
  John Motley Morehead (1796-1866) — of Guilford County, N.C. Born in Pittsylvania County, Va., July 4, 1796. Whig. Lawyer; railroad promoter; member of North Carolina house of commons, 1821, 1826-27, 1838; Governor of North Carolina, 1841-45; Delegate from North Carolina to the Confederate Provisional Congress, 1861-62. Died in Alum Springs, Greenbrier County, W.Va., August 27, 1866 (age 70 years, 54 days). Interment at First Presbyterian Churchyard, Greensboro, N.C.
  Relatives: Son of John Morehead and Obedience (Motley) Morehead; married, September 6, 1821, to Ann Lindsay; father of Corrina Mary Morehead (who married William Waigstill Avery (1816-1864)); cousin *** of James Turner Morehead.
  Political families: Kellogg-Adams-Seymour-Chapin family of Connecticut and New York; Morehead-Wintersmith family of Elizabethtown, Kentucky (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  The World War II Liberty ship SS John M. Morehead (built 1943 at Wilmington, North Carolina; sold 1947, scrapped 1966) was named for him.
  See also National Governors Association biography
John T. Morgan John Tyler Morgan (1824-1907) — also known as John T. Morgan — of Selma, Dallas County, Ala. Born in Athens, McMinn County, Tenn., June 20, 1824. Democrat. Lawyer; Presidential Elector for Alabama, 1860, 1876; delegate to Alabama secession convention, 1861; general in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Alabama, 1876, 1900; U.S. Senator from Alabama, 1877-1907; died in office 1907. Southern Methodist. Member, Freemasons; Knights Templar. Slaveowner. Died in Washington, D.C., June 11, 1907 (age 82 years, 356 days). Interment at Live Oak Cemetery, Selma, Ala.
  Relatives: Son of George Washington Morgan (1788-1884) and Frances (Irby) Morgan (1795-1857); brother of Mary Catherine Morgan (1814-1845; who married William Parish Chilton (1810-1871)); married, February 11, 1846, to Cornelia G. Willis (1827-1894); granduncle of Arthur Bounds Chilton.
  Political families: Pendleton-Lee family of Maryland; Jackson-Lee family (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  The World War II Liberty ship SS John Morgan (built 1943 at Baltimore, Maryland; collided, exploded, and sank in the North Atlantic Ocean, 1943) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: Men of Mark in America (1906)
  Gouverneur Morris (1752-1816) — also known as "Penman of the Constitution" — of Westchester County, N.Y.; Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa. Born in Morrisania, Westchester County (now part of Bronx, Bronx County), N.Y., January 31, 1752. Lawyer; Delegate to Continental Congress from New York, 1777; signer, Articles of Confederation, 1777; member of New York state assembly from Westchester County, 1777-78; member, U.S. Constitutional Convention, 1787; U.S. Minister to France, 1792-94; U.S. Senator from New York, 1800-03. Episcopalian. Died in Morrisania, Westchester County (now part of Bronx, Bronx County), N.Y., November 6, 1816 (age 64 years, 280 days). Interment at St. Anne's Episcopal Churchyard, Bronx, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Lewis Morris (1698-1762) and Sarah (Gouverneur) Morris (1714-1786); half-brother of Lewis Morris (1726-1798) and Richard Morris; married 1809 to Anne Cary 'Nancy' Randolph (1774-1837); nephew of Robert Hunter Morris; uncle of Lewis Richard Morris and Richard Valentine Morris; grandson of Lewis Morris (1671-1746); granduncle of Gouverneur Morris; second great-granduncle of Gouverneur Morris Carnochan (1865-1915); third great-granduncle of Gouverneur Morris Carnochan (1892-1943); relative *** of Wymberley DeRenne Coerr (1913-1996).
  Political family: Morris-Ingersoll family of New York and Connecticut (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  The town and village of Gouverneur, New York, is named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS Gouverneur Morris (built 1943 at Portland, Oregon; scrapped 1974) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier
  Books about Gouverneur Morris: Richard Brookhiser, Gentleman Revolutionary : Gouverneur Morris, the Rake Who Wrote the Constitution — William Adams, Gouverneur Morris: An Independent Life
  Ira Nelson Morris (1875-1942) — of Chicago, Cook County, Ill. Born in Chicago, Cook County, Ill., March 8, 1875. Democrat. U.S. Minister to Sweden, 1914-23; Consul-General for Romania in Chicago, Ill., 1929. Jewish. Died in Chicago, Cook County, Ill., January 15, 1942 (age 66 years, 313 days). Entombed at Rosehill Cemetery, Chicago, Ill.
  Relatives: Son of Nelson Morris (1838-1907) and Sarah (Vogel) Morris (1845-1909); married 1898 to Constance Lily Rothschild (1879-1954; aunt of Victor Henry Rothschild II (1908-1991)).
  Political family: McCormick-Guggenheim-Morton-Medill family of Illinois and New York.
  The World War II Liberty ship SS Ira Nelson Morris (built 1944 at Brunswick, Georgia; scrapped 1965) was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — Find-A-Grave memorial
  John Morton (c.1724-1777) — of Pennsylvania. Born in Ridley Township, Delaware County, Pa., about 1724. Delegate to Continental Congress from Pennsylvania, 1774-75; signer, Declaration of Independence, 1776. Anglican. Finnish ancestry. Died April 1, 1777 (age about 53 years). Interment at St. Paul's Churchyard, Chester, Pa.; memorial monument at Constitution Gardens, Washington, D.C.
  Relatives: Married to Ann Justis.
  The World War II Liberty ship SS John Morton (built 1942 at Richmond, California; scrapped 1972) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
J. Sterling Morton Julius Sterling Morton (1832-1902) — also known as J. Sterling Morton — of Otoe County, Neb. Born in Adams, Jefferson County, N.Y., April 22, 1832. Democrat. Newspaper editor; member of Nebraska territorial House of Representatives, 1855-57; secretary of Nebraska Territory, 1858-61; Governor of Nebraska Territory, 1858-59, 1861; candidate for Governor of Nebraska, 1866, 1882; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Nebraska, 1880 (member, Committee on Permanent Organization), 1888; U.S. Secretary of Agriculture, 1893-97. Episcopalian. Member, Chi Psi. Died in Lake Forest, Lake County, Ill., April 27, 1902 (age 70 years, 5 days). Interment at Wyuka Cemetery, Nebraska City, Neb.
  Relatives: Married 1854 to Caroline Joy French; father of Joy Morton (1855-1934; founder of Morton Salt; son-in-law of George B. Lake), Paul Morton and Mark Morton; grandfather of Pauline Morton Sabin (1887-1955) and Caroline Morton (who married Harry Frank Guggenheim).
  Political family: McCormick-Guggenheim-Morton-Medill family of Illinois and New York.
  The World War II Liberty ship SS J. Sterling Morton (built 1942 at Richmond, California; scrapped 1971) was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: New York World, March 5, 1893
  John Singleton Mosby (1833-1916) — also known as John S. Mosby; "The Gray Ghost" — of Bristol, Va.; Warrenton, Fauquier County, Va. Born in Powhatan County, Va., December 6, 1833. In 1852, he shot and wounded George R. Turpin, with whom he had quarreled; arrested and tried, ultimately convicted only of the misdemeanor charge of unlawful shooting and sentenced to one year in jail; pardoned by Gov. Joseph Johnson in 1853; colonel in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; U.S. Consul in Hong Kong, 1878-85. Scottish and Welsh ancestry. Died in Washington, D.C., May 30, 1916 (age 82 years, 176 days). Interment at Warrenton Cemetery, Warrenton, Va.
  Relatives: Son of Alfred Daniel Mosby and Virginia (McLaurine) Mosby; married, December 30, 1857, to Pauline Clarke (1837-1876; daughter of Beverly Leonidas Clarke (1809-1860)).
  The World War II Liberty ship SS John S. Mosby (built 1943 at Jacksonville, Florida; scrapped 1971) was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article
  John Lothrop Motley (1814-1877) — also known as J. Lothrop Motley — of Massachusetts. Born in Dorchester, Boston, Suffolk County, Mass., April 15, 1814. Member of Massachusetts state house of representatives, 1840; U.S. Minister to Austria, 1861-67; Great Britain, 1869-70. Elected to the Hall of Fame for Great Americans in 1910. Died in Dorset, England, May 29, 1877 (age 63 years, 44 days). Interment at Kensal Green Cemetery, London, England.
  The World War II Liberty ship SS John L. Motley (built 1943 at Baltimore, Maryland; bombed and sank in the harbor at Bari, Italy, 1943) was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier
  Abner Nash (1740-1786) — of Jones County, N.C. Born near Farmville, Prince Edward County, Va., August 8, 1740. Lawyer; member of Virginia House of Burgesses, 1761-65; member of North Carolina house of commons, 1777-78, 1782, 1784-85; member of North Carolina state senate from Jones County, 1779; Governor of North Carolina, 1780-81; Delegate to Continental Congress from North Carolina, 1782-86; died in office 1786. Welsh ancestry. Died while attending a session of the Continental Congress, in New York, New York County, N.Y., December 2, 1786 (age 46 years, 116 days). Original interment at St. Paul's Churchyard, Manhattan, N.Y.; reinterment at Pembroke Plantation Cemetery, New Bern, N.C.
  Relatives: Son of Abner Nash (1685-1732) and Elizabeth (Hinton) Nash (1688-1711); brother of Francis Nash (1742-1777); married 1766 to Justina Davis Dobbs (1747-1771); married 1774 to Mary Whiting Jones (1757-1799).
  The World War II Liberty ship SS Abner Nash (built 1942 at Wilmington, North Carolina; scrapped 1964) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  James Willis Nesmith (1820-1885) — also known as James W. Nesmith — of Salem, Marion County, Ore.; Rickreall, Polk County, Ore. Born in New Brunswick of American parents, July 23, 1820. Democrat. Lawyer; U.S. Senator from Oregon, 1861-67; U.S. Representative from Oregon at-large, 1873-75. Scotch-Irish ancestry. Died in Rickreall, Polk County, Ore., June 17, 1885 (age 64 years, 329 days). Interment at Nesmith Family Cemetery, Rickreall, Ore.
  Relatives: Father of Jennie Nesmith (who married Levi Ankeny) and Harriet K. Nesmith (who married Lewis Linn McArthur); grandfather of Clifton Nesmith McArthur (1879-1923); cousin *** of Joseph Gardner Wilson.
  Political family: Nesmith-McArthur family of Oregon.
  The World War II Liberty ship SS James W. Nesmith (built 1942 at Portland, Oregon; damaged by a torpedo and later scuttled in the North Sea, 1946) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  John George Nicolay (1832-1901) — also known as John G. Nicolay; Johann Georg — Born in Essingen, Germany, February 26, 1832. Newspaper editor; private secretary to President Abraham Lincoln, 1861-65; U.S. Consul in Paris, as of 1865-69. Died in Washington, D.C., September 26, 1901 (age 69 years, 212 days). Interment at Oak Hill Cemetery, Washington, D.C.
  The World War II Liberty ship SS John G. Nicolay (built 1943 at Richmond, California; sold 1947, scrapped 1967) was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about John G. Nicolay: Michael Burlingame, ed., Abraham Lincoln: The Observations of John G. Nicolay and John Hay
  John Ignatius Nolan (1874-1922) — also known as John I. Nolan — of San Francisco, Calif. Born in San Francisco, Calif., January 14, 1874. Republican. Iron molder; officer, International Iron Moulders Union; secretary, San Francisco Labor Council, 1912; U.S. Representative from California 5th District, 1913-22; died in office 1922. Died November 18, 1922 (age 48 years, 308 days). Interment at Holy Cross Catholic Cemetery, Colma, Calif.
  Relatives: Son of James Nolan and Sarah Nolan; married, March 23, 1913, to Mae Ella Hunt (1886-1973).
  The World War II Liberty ship SS John I. Nolan (built 1943 at Portland, Oregon; wrecked and scrapped 1947) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
George W. Norris George William Norris (1861-1944) — also known as George W. Norris — of McCook, Red Willow County, Neb. Born in Sandusky County, Ohio, July 11, 1861. Lawyer; district judge in Nebraska 14th District, 1896-1903; resigned 1903; U.S. Representative from Nebraska 5th District, 1903-13; U.S. Senator from Nebraska, 1913-43; defeated (Independent), 1942; candidate for Republican nomination for President, 1928. Methodist. Member, Freemasons. Died in McCook, Red Willow County, Neb., September 2, 1944 (age 83 years, 53 days). Interment at Memorial Park Cemetery, McCook, Neb.
  Relatives: Married 1890 to Pluma Lashley (died 1901); married 1903 to Ella Leonard; grandfather of Harvey Frans Nelson Jr. (born1924).
  Norris Dam (built 1933-36), on the Clinch River, in Anderson and Campbell counties, Tennessee, and the Norris Lake reservoir, which also extends into Claiborne, Grainger, and Union counties, are named for him.  — The city of Norris, Tennessee, is named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS George W. Norris (built 1944 at Brunswick, Georgia; wrecked and lost in the North Pacific Ocean, 1946) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — NNDB dossier
  Image source: U.S. postage stamp (1961)
  James Warren Nye (1814-1876) — also known as James W. Nye — of New York, New York County, N.Y.; Carson City, Nev. Born in DeRuyter, Madison County, N.Y., June 10, 1814. Republican. Lawyer; Madison County Surrogate, 1844-47; Madison County Judge, 1847-51; Free Soil candidate for U.S. Representative from New York 23rd District, 1848; delegate to Republican National Convention from New York, 1860; Governor of Nevada Territory, 1861-64; U.S. Senator from Nevada, 1864-73; member of Republican National Committee from Nevada, 1870-. Died in White Plains, Westchester County, N.Y., December 25, 1876 (age 62 years, 198 days). Interment at Woodlawn Cemetery, Bronx, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of James Nye (1778-1845) and Thankful (Crocker) Nye (1780-1844); married 1839 to Elsie Ann Benson (1815-1867).
  Nye County, Nev. is named for him.
  The World War II Liberty ship SS James W. Nye (built 1943 at Richmond, California; scrapped 1973) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Presley Neville O'Bannon (1776-1850) — also known as "The Hero of Deme" — of Russellville, Logan County, Ky. Born in Fauquier County, Va., 1776. During the war against the Barbary pirates, as lieutenant, he led a detachment of U.S. Marines and assorted mercenaries to Deme, in North Africa, in 1805, to rescue an American crew held captive by the Pasha of Tripoli; the words "to the shores of Tripoli" in the Marine Hymn commemorate these events; member of Kentucky state house of representatives, 1812, 1817, 1820-21; member of Kentucky state senate, 1824-26. Irish ancestry. Died in Henry County, Ky., September 12, 1850 (age about 74 years). Original interment in unknown location; reinterment in 1919 at Frankfort Cemetery, Frankfort, Ky.
  Relatives: Son of William O'Bannon and Anne (Neville) O'Bannon; ancestor *** of Lew O'Bannon, Robert Presley O'Bannon and Frank Lewis O'Bannon (1930-2003).
  Political family: O'Bannon family of Corydon, Indiana.
  Three U.S. Navy destroyers (launched in 1919, 1942, and 1978) were named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Jeremiah O'Brien (1744-1818) — of Machias, Washington County, Maine. Born in Kittery, York County, Maine, 1744. Captain in the Massachusetts State Navy; commanded ships during the Revolutionary War; U.S. Collector of Customs, 1811-18; died in office 1818. Irish ancestry. Died in Machias, Washington County, Maine, 1818 (age about 74 years). Interment at O'Brien Cemetery, Machias, Maine.
  Relatives: Son of Morris O'Brien and Mary O'Brien.
  The World War II Liberty ship SS Jeremiah O'Brien (built 1943 at South Portland, Maine; now a museum ship) is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article
  Harrison Gray Otis (1837-1917) — of Louisville, Jefferson County, Ky.; Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara County, Calif.; Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, Calif. Born in Washington County, Ohio, February 10, 1837. Republican. Delegate to Republican National Convention from Kentucky, 1860; colonel in the Union Army during the Civil War; newspaper publisher; alternate delegate to Republican National Convention from California, 1892; general in the U.S. Army during the Spanish-American War. Died, from a rupture of the heart, in Hollywood, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, Calif., July 30, 1917 (age 80 years, 170 days). Interment at Hollywood Forever Cemetery, Hollywood, Los Angeles, Calif.
  Relatives: Son of Sarah (Dyer) Otis (1789-1879) and Stephen Otis (born 1784); married, September 11, 1859, to Eliza A. Wetherby (died 1904); second cousin of Oran Gray Otis and David Perry Otis; second cousin once removed of Lauren Ford Otis; second cousin twice removed of Samuel Allyne Otis and Ralph Chester Otis; third cousin of Asa H. Otis; third cousin once removed of Harrison Gray Otis and Norton Prentiss Otis (1840-1905); fourth cousin of John Otis, William Shaw Chandler Otis, Harris F. Otis and James Otis.
  Political family: Otis family of Connecticut (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  The World War II Liberty ship SS Harrison Gray Otis (built 1942-43 at Terminal Island, California; mined and beached at Gibraltar, 1943) was named for him.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  John Owen (1787-1841) — of Bladen County, N.C. Born in Bladen County, N.C., 1787. Whig. Lawyer; planter; Governor of North Carolina, 1828-30; delegate to Whig National Convention from North Carolina, 1839 (Convention Vice-President; chair, Balloting Committee; member, Committee on Permanent Organization; chair, Committee to Notify Nominees; speaker). Died October 9, 1841 (age about 54 years). Interment somewhere in Pittsboro, N.C.
  The World War II Liberty ship SS John Owen (built 1943 at Wilmington, North Carolina; scrapped 1964) was named for him.
  See also National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article
  John Page (1743-1808) — of Virginia. Born in Gloucester County, Va., April 17, 1743. Democrat. Member of Virginia state legislature, 1780; U.S. Representative from Virginia, 1789-97 (at-large 1789-91, 10th District 1791-93, 12th District 1793-97); Governor of Virginia, 1802-05. Slaveowner. Died in Richmond, Va., October 11, 1808 (age 65 years, 177 days). Interment at St. John's Churchyard, Richmond, Va.
  Relatives: Brother of Mann Page (1749-1781).
  The World War II Liberty ship SS John Page (built 1942 at Terminal Island, California; scrapped 1959) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — National Governors Association biography
  Alexander Mitchell Palmer (1872-1936) — also known as A. Mitchell Palmer; "The Fighting Quaker" — of Stroudsburg, Monroe County, Pa.; Washington, D.C. Born in Moosehead, Luzerne County, Pa., May 4, 1872. Democrat. Lawyer; bank director; U.S. Representative from Pennsylvania 26th District, 1909-15; member of Democratic National Committee from Penn