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Politicians in Trouble or Disgrace

Politicians in Trouble or Disgrace: Military
Offenses specific to military service

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in chronological order

  Richard Valentine Morris (1768-1815) — also known as Richard V. Morris — of Westchester County, N.Y. Born in Morrisania, Westchester County (now part of Bronx, Bronx County), N.Y., March 8, 1768. U.S. Navy Captain, starting in 1798; criticized by his superiors for his inaction as commander during an attempted blockade of Tripoli in 1803; he faced a Naval Court of Inquiry in 1804 and was dismissed from the Navy; member of New York state assembly from Westchester County, 1813-14. Died in New York, New York County, N.Y., May 13, 1815 (age 47 years, 66 days). Interment at St. Anne's Episcopal Churchyard, Bronx, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Lewis Morris (1726-1798) and Mary (Walton) Morris (1727-1794); married, January 24, 1797, to Anne Walton (1773-1858); nephew of Richard Morris (1730-1810) and Gouverneur Morris (1752-1816); grandnephew of Robert Hunter Morris; great-grandson of Lewis Morris (1671-1746); great-granduncle of Gouverneur Morris Carnochan (1865-1915); second great-granduncle of Gouverneur Morris Carnochan (1892-1943); first cousin of Lewis Richard Morris; first cousin once removed of Gouverneur Morris (1809-1894).
  Political family: Morris-Ingersoll family of New York and Connecticut (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  William Hull (1753-1825) — Born in Derby, New Haven County, Conn., June 24, 1753. Colonel in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; member of Massachusetts state senate, 1798-1805; Governor of Michigan Territory, 1805-12; general in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812. Following his surrender of Detroit to the British in 1812, was found guilty by a court-martial of cowardice, neglect of duty, and unofficerlike conduct, and sentenced to death; President Madison accepted this decision but remitted the sentence. Died in Newton, Middlesex County, Mass., November 29, 1825 (age 72 years, 158 days). Interment at Newton Cemetery, Newton, Mass.
John C. Fremont John Charles Frémont (1813-1890) — also known as "The Pathfinder"; "The Champion of Freedom" — Born in Savannah, Chatham County, Ga., January 21, 1813. Republican. Explorer; Military Governor of California, 1847; arrested for mutiny, 1847; court-martialed; found guilty of mutiny, disobedience, and conduct prejudicial to order; penalty remitted by Pres. James K. Polk; U.S. Senator from California, 1850-51; candidate for President of the United States, 1856; general in the Union Army during the Civil War; Governor of Arizona Territory, 1878-81; speaker, Republican National Convention, 1888. Episcopalian. French ancestry. Died, of peritonitis, in a hotel room at New York, New York County, N.Y., July 13, 1890 (age 77 years, 173 days). Original interment at Trinity Cemetery, Manhattan, N.Y.; reinterment in 1891 at Rockland Cemetery, Nyack, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Jean Charles Frémont and Ann Whiting (Pryor) Frémont; married, October 19, 1841, to Jessie Benton (daughter of Thomas Hart Benton (1782-1858)).
  Political families: Benton family; Breckinridge-Preston-Cabell-Henry family of Virginia (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Cross-reference: Selah Hill
  Fremont County, Colo., Fremont County, Idaho, Fremont County, Iowa and Fremont County, Wyo. are named for him.
  Fremont Peak, in Monterey County and San Benito County, California, is named for him.  — Fremont Peak, in Coconino County, Arizona, is named for him.  — The city of Fremont, California, is named for him.  — The city of Fremont, Ohio, is named for him.  — The city of Fremont, Nebraska, is named for him.
  Politician named for him: John F. Hill
  Campaign slogan (1856): "Free Soil, Free Men, Fremont."
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books by John C. Fremont: Memoirs of My Life and Times
  Books about John C. Fremont: Tom Chaffin, Pathfinder: John Charles Fremont and the Course of American Empire — David Roberts, A Newer World : Kit Carson, John C. Fremont and the Claiming of the American West — Andrew Rolle, John Charles Fremont: Character As Destiny
  Image source: Life and Work of James G. Blaine (1893)
  Charles Edward Travis (1829-1860) — also known as Charles E. Travis — Born in Alabama, August 8, 1829. Member of Texas state house of representatives, 1853-54. Court-martialed and discharged from the U.S. Cavalry, on charges of conduct unbecoming an officer and a gentleman, based on incidents of alleged slander, unauthorized absence, and cheating at cards. Died, of consumption (tuberculosis) in Washington County, Tex., 1860 (age about 30 years). Interment at Masonic Cemetery, Chappell Hill, Tex.
  Relatives: Son of Rosanna (Cato) Travis and William Barret Travis (1809-1836).
  Robert Murphy Mayo (1836-1896) — also known as Robert M. Mayo — of Virginia. Born in Hague, Westmoreland County, Va., April 28, 1836. Colonel in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; court martialed in the Confederate Army, 1863, for drunkenness, and reduced in rank; lawyer; member of Virginia state house of delegates, 1881-82, 1885-88; U.S. Representative from Virginia 1st District, 1883-84. Member, American Bar Association. Died in Hague, Westmoreland County, Va., March 29, 1896 (age 59 years, 336 days). Interment at Yeocomico Cemetery, Kinsale, Va.
  Relatives: Son of Robert Mayo and Emily Ann (Campbell) Mayo; married, December 3, 1867, to Emily Claybrook; nephew of Joseph Carrington Mayo (1795-1872).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Nathan Bedford Forrest (1821-1877) — also known as "Wizard of the Saddle" — of Memphis, Shelby County, Tenn. Born near Chapel Hill, Bedford County (now Marshall County), Tenn., July 13, 1821. Democrat. Cotton planter; slave trader; general in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; in April 1864, after the Battle of Fort Pillow, Tennessee, Confederate troops under his command massacred African-American Union soldiers, not accepting them as prisoners, since the Confederacy refused to recognize ex-slaves as legitimate combatants; this event, seen as a war crime, sparked outrage across the North, and a congressional inquiry; in 1867, he became involved in the Ku Klux Klan and was elected Grand Wizard; the organization used violent tactics to intimidate Black voters and suppress their votes; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Tennessee, 1868; in 1869, he had a change of heart, and issued a letter ordering that the Klan be dissolved and its costumes destroyed; he went on to denounce the group and its crimes; in 1875, he gave a "friendly speech" to a meeting of an African-American organization in Memphis, calling for peace, harmony, and economic advancement of former slaves; for this speech, he was vehemently denounced in the Southern press. English ancestry. Member, Ku Klux Klan. After his death, he became a folk hero among white Southerners, particularly during the imposition of Jim Crow segregation laws in the early 20th century, and later, in reaction to the Civil Rights movement in the 1950s and 1960s. Died, from complications of diabetes, in Memphis, Shelby County, Tenn., October 29, 1877 (age 56 years, 108 days). Original interment at Elmwood Cemetery, Memphis, Tenn.; reinterment in 1904 at Health Sciences Park, Memphis, Tenn.; memorial monument at Myrtle Hill Cemetery, Rome, Ga.; memorial monument at Live Oak Cemetery, Selma, Ala.
  Relatives: Son of William B. Forrest (1801-1837) and Miriam (Beck) Forrest (1802-1867); married 1845 to Mary Ann Montgomery (1826-1893).
  Forrest County, Miss. is named for him.
  The city of Forrest City, Arkansas, is named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS Nathan B. Forrest (built 1943, scrapped 1973) was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Robert William Wilcox (1855-1903) — also known as Robert W. Wilcox — of Honolulu, Island of Oahu, Honolulu County, Hawaii. Born in Kahalu, Honuaula, Island of Maui, Maui County, Hawaii, February 15, 1855. Delegate to U.S. Congress from Hawaii Territory, 1900-03. Leader of the Hawaiian revolution of 1889; tried for treason, but acquitted by a jury. Was involved in the rebellion of 1895 and subsequently court-martialed, found guilty, and sentenced to death; the sentence was later commuted to 35 years; pardoned by the Hawaiian president in 1898. Died in Honolulu, Island of Oahu, Honolulu County, Hawaii, October 23, 1903 (age 48 years, 250 days). Interment at Catholic Cemetery, Honolulu, Island of Oahu, Hawaii.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Benjamin Franklin Tilley (1848-1907) — also known as B. F. Tilley — Born in Bristol, Bristol County, R.I., March 29, 1848. U.S. Navy commander; Governor of American Samoa; court martialed in 1901 on charges of immorality and drunkenness; tried and found not guilty. Died, of pneumonia, in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., March 18, 1907 (age 58 years, 354 days). Interment at Naval Academy Cemetery, Annapolis, Md.
  Presumably named for: Benjamin Franklin
  Relatives: Son of Benjamin Tilley and Sarah W. (Esterbrooks) Tilley; married, June 6, 1878, to Emily Edelin Williamson (1856-1931).
  See also Wikipedia article
  James Harrison Oliver (1857-1928) — also known as J. H. Oliver — of Shirley, Charles City County, Va. Born in Houston County, Ga., January 15, 1857. As a naval commander, he was arrested and court-martialed over his role in a 1904 collision in Delaware Bay; acquitted and reinstated; Governor of U.S. Virgin Islands. Died, of heart disease, in Charles City County, Va., April 6, 1928 (age 71 years, 82 days). Interment at Shirley Plantation Cemetery, Shirley, Va.
  Relatives: Son of Thaddeus Oliver and Sarah Penelope (Lawson) Oliver; married, December 7, 1893, to Marion Carter (1856-1952).
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Shirley M. Crawford (1872-1917) — of Louisville, Jefferson County, Ky.; Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, Calif.; San Francisco, Calif. Born in Louisville, Jefferson County, Ky., August 5, 1872. Republican. Actor; newspaper writer; served in the U.S. Army during the Spanish-American War; lawyer; law partner of Augustus E. Willson; Honorary Consul for Guatemala in Louisville, Ky., 1901-07; in February 1905, amidst a controversy over the appointment of a new Colonel, a military court of inquiry was convened to investigate the officers of the First Kentucky regiment, including a Major and six Captains, for willful disobedience; all were releived of duty, but Capt. Crawford was singled out as "an agitator and fomenter of strife, disloyal and insubordinate to his superior officers," and ordered court-martialed; secretary-treasurer and director, Kentucky-Arizona Copper Company (engaged in mining and smelting). Hit by a car while crossing a street, suffered a fractured leg and pneumonia, and died two weeks later, in German Hospital, San Francisco, Calif., September 6, 1917 (age 45 years, 32 days). Cremated; ashes interred at San Francisco National Cemetery, San Francisco, Calif.
  Relatives: Married, September 20, 1902, to Reina Melcher (divorced 1906).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  William F. Kruse (1894-1952) — also known as Bill Kruse — of Illinois. Born in Hoboken, Hudson County, N.J., 1894. Bookkeeper; indicted in Chicago, 1918, along with former U.S. Rep. Victor L. Berger, and three others, for making speeches that encouraged disloyalty and obstructed military recruitment; tried and convicted; sentenced to twenty years in prison; the conviction was later overturned; Socialist candidate for U.S. Representative from Illinois 6th District, 1918, 1920; delegate to Socialist National Convention from Illinois, 1920; Socialist candidate for secretary of state of Illinois, 1921; Workers candidate for Governor of Illinois, 1928. German and Danish ancestry. Died in 1952 (age about 58 years). Burial location unknown.
  See also Wikipedia article
  J. Louis Engdahl (1884-1932) — of Chicago, Cook County, Ill.; Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born in Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minn., November 11, 1884. Writer and editor for Socialist and Communist newspapers; indicted in Chicago, 1918, along with former U.S. Rep. Victor L. Berger, and three others, for making speeches that encouraged disloyalty and obstructed military recruitment; tried and convicted; sentenced to twenty years in prison; the conviction was later overturned; Socialist candidate for U.S. Representative from Illinois 7th District, 1918; delegate to Socialist National Convention from Illinois, 1920; candidate for U.S. Senator from Illinois, 1924 (Workers), 1926 (Workers Communist); Communist candidate for Lieutenant Governor of New York, 1930; Communist candidate for U.S. Representative from New York 7th District, 1931. Swedish ancestry. Died, of pneumonia, in Moscow, Russia, November 21, 1932 (age 48 years, 10 days). Burial location unknown.
  See also Wikipedia article
  Irwin St. John Tucker — of Illinois. Socialist. Lecturer; indicted in Chicago, 1918, along with former U.S. Rep. Victor L. Berger, and three others, for making speeches that encouraged disloyalty and obstructed military recruitment; tried and convicted; sentenced to twenty years in prison; the conviction was later overturned; candidate for U.S. Representative from Illinois 10th District, 1918; delegate to Socialist National Convention from Illinois, 1920. Burial location unknown.
  Adolph Germer (1881-1966) — of Belleville, St. Clair County, Ill.; Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born in Wehlau, East Prussia (now Znamensk, Kaliningrad Oblast), January 15, 1881. Socialist. Miner; union official in various capacities for the United Mine Workers of America, 1906-16; member of Socialist National Committee from Illinois, 1911; candidate for Illinois state house of representatives, 1912; candidate for U.S. Senator from Illinois, 1914; National Executive Secretary, Socialist Party of America, 1916-19; indicted in Chicago, 1918, along with former U.S. Rep. Victor L. Berger, and three others, for making speeches that encouraged disloyalty and obstructed military recruitment; tried and convicted; sentenced to twenty years in prison; the conviction was later overturned; candidate for New York state assembly from New York County 16th District, 1921. Member, United Mine Workers. Died in Rockford, Winnebago County, Ill., May, 1966 (age 85 years, 0 days). Burial location unknown.
  See also Wikipedia article
  Clark Daniel Stearns (b. 1870) — of Miami, Dade County (now Miami-Dade County), Fla. Born in 1870. U.S. Navy officer; Governor of American Samoa; in 1921, he was relieved of duty as commander of the U.S. Navy ship Michigan, for allowing the men under his command to organize committees; in 1923, he was chief of emergency relief work following an earthquake in Japan, and received a medal from the Japanese Red Cross; after the Pearl Harbor attack in 1941, he sent the medal back to Japan. Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Married to Edith S. Stearns (1878?-1958).
  Smedley Darlington Butler (1881-1940) — also known as Smedley Butler; "The Fighting Quaker"; "Old Gimlet Eye" — of Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa. Born in West Chester, Chester County, Pa., July 30, 1881. Republican. Major general in U.S. Marine Corps; received a Medal of Honor for the capture of Veracruz, Mexico, 1914; received another for the capture of Fort Riviere, Haiti, 1915; Philadelphia police commissioner, 1924-25; arrested and court-martialed in 1931 over his unauthorized disclosure of an incident unflattering to Italian dictator Italian Benito Mussolini; retired from the service rather than apologize to Mussolini; candidate in primary for U.S. Senator from Pennsylvania, 1932. Quaker. Died in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., June 21, 1940 (age 58 years, 327 days). Interment at Oaklands Cemetery, West Chester, Pa.
  Relatives: Son of Thomas Stalker Butler and Maud Mary (Darlington) Butler; married, June 30, 1905, to Ethel Conway Peters (1879-1962); grandson of Smedley Darlington and Samuel Butler; second great-grandnephew of Edward Darlington (1755-1825); first cousin thrice removed of Isaac Darlington, William Darlington (1782-1863), Esther Darlington (1793-1877; who married James B. Roberts), Edward Darlington (1795-1884) and William Darlington (1804-1879); second cousin twice removed of Edward C. Darlington; fourth cousin of Darlington Hoopes (1896-1989).
  Political family: Darlington-Butler family of West Chester, Pennsylvania.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Felix L. Sparks — of Colorado. Colonel in the U.S. Army during World War II; one of the heroes of the Anzio beachhead in 1944; on April 29, 1945, he captured the Dachau concentration camp, and under orders to permit no one in or out, refused entry to a brigadier general from another unit; court-martial charges were drawn up, and Sparks was arrested; the charges were dismissed by General Patton; justice of Colorado state supreme court, 1956. Presumed deceased. Burial location unknown.
  Elliott Roosevelt (1910-1990) — of Fort Worth, Tarrant County, Tex.; Buford, Rio Blanco County, Colo.; Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minn.; Miami Beach, Dade County (now Miami-Dade County), Fla.; Seattle, King County, Wash.; Palm Springs, Riverside County, Calif.; Scottsdale, Maricopa County, Ariz. Born in Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., September 23, 1910. Democrat. Delegate to Democratic National Convention from Texas, 1940; served in the U.S. Army Air Force in World War II; investigated and called to testify by a U.S. Senate subcommittee in 1947 over lavish entertainment in Hollywood and Manhattan, many paid escorts, and paid hotel bills provided to Roosevelt and others, in a successful effort to persuade them to recommend Hughes reconnaissance aircraft for purchase by the U.S. military; owned a radio station in Texas; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Colorado, 1960; mayor of Miami Beach, Fla., 1965-69; member of Democratic National Committee from Florida, 1968; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Florida, 1968. Died, of congestive heart failure, in Scottsdale, Maricopa County, Ariz., October 27, 1990 (age 80 years, 34 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Franklin Delano Roosevelt and Eleanor Roosevelt; brother of James Roosevelt and Franklin Delano Roosevelt, Jr.; married, January 16, 1932, to Elizabeth Browning Donner (divorced 1933); married, July 22, 1933, to Ruth Josephine Googins (divorced 1944); married, December 3, 1944, to Faye Margaret Emerson (divorced 1950); married, March 15, 1951, to Minnewa (Bell) Gray Burnside Ross (divorced 1960); married, November 3, 1960, to Patricia (Peabody) Whithead; grandnephew of Corinne Roosevelt Robinson and Theodore Roosevelt; great-grandnephew of Robert Barnwell Roosevelt; second great-grandnephew of James I. Roosevelt; third great-grandson of Edward Hutchinson Robbins; third great-grandnephew of William Bellinger Bulloch; fourth great-grandson of Archibald Bulloch (1730?-1777); first cousin once removed of Theodore Douglas Robinson, Alice Lee Roosevelt Longworth, Warren Delano Robbins, Corinne Robinson Alsop, Theodore Roosevelt, Jr. and William Sheffield Cowles; first cousin five times removed of Ebenezer Huntington; first cousin seven times removed of Benjamin Huntington; second cousin of Corinne A. Chubb and John deKoven Alsop; second cousin four times removed of Nicholas Roosevelt, Jr., Philip DePeyster and Jabez Williams Huntington.
  Political families: Roosevelt family of New York City, New York; Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also Wikipedia article
  Bobby Seale (b. 1936) — also known as Robert George Seale — of Oakland, Alameda County, Calif. Born in Dallas, Dallas County, Tex., October 22, 1936. Joined U.S. Air Force in 1955; charged with insubordination and being AWOL, and dishonorably discharged; sheet metal worker; co-founder, with Huey Newton, of the Black Panther Party, 1966; one of eight defendants charged in 1969 with crossing state lines to incite a riot at the 1968 Democratic National Convention in Chicago; the judge ordered him bound and gagged during the trial, and sentenced him to four years in prison for contempt of court; Peace and Freedom candidate for California state assembly 17th District, 1968; in 1970, he was charged in New Haven, Conn., with ordering the murder of Alex Rackley, a Black Panther who had confessed to being a police informant; the jury was unable to reach a verdict, and the charges were eventually dropped; candidate for mayor of Oakland, Calif., 1973. African ancestry. Still living as of 2014.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Maurice Larry Lawrence (1926-1996) — also known as M. Larry Lawrence — of San Diego, San Diego County, Calif.; Coronado, San Diego County, Calif. Born in Chicago, Cook County, Ill., August 16, 1926. Democrat. Delegate to Democratic National Convention from California, 1964, 1972; candidate for Presidential Elector for California, 1972; U.S. Ambassador to Switzerland, 1994-96, died in office 1996. Jewish. Member, Zeta Beta Tau. Falsely claimed to have served and been injured in the Merchant Marine during World War II; this was discovered a year after his death. Died, of leukemia and blood dyscrasia, in Berne, Switzerland, January 9, 1996 (age 69 years, 146 days). Original interment at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Va.; reinterment in 1997 at El Camino Cemetery, San Diego, Calif.
  Relatives: Son of Sidney A. Lawrence and Tillie P. Astor Lawrence; married 1949 to Geraldine Polland.
  See also Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary
  Gordon James Klingenschmitt (b. 1968) — also known as Gordon Klingenschmitt — Born in Buffalo, Erie County, N.Y., June 5, 1968. Republican. Chaplain; wore his Navy uniform at a 2006 political protest, with Roy Moore, in front of the White House; subsequently court-martialed for disobeying a lawful order; he had been prohibited from appearing at political events in uniform; ultimately discharged from the Navy; member of Colorado state house of representatives, 2015-16; candidate in primary for Colorado state senate, 2016. Evangelical Christian. Still living as of 2016.
  See also Wikipedia article — Encyclopedia of American Loons
  Robert W. Levy (b. 1947) — also known as Bob Levy — of Atlantic City, Atlantic County, N.J. Born in Atlantic City, Atlantic County, N.J., May 16, 1947. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army during the Vietnam war; mayor of Atlantic City, N.J., 2005-07; resigned 2007. Falsely claimed to have served in the U.S. Army U.S. Army Special Forces (Green Berets); admitted that he used false information in his service record to obtain benefits; disappeared on September 26, 2007; his lawyer announced on October 10 that he had resigned; pleaded guilty in November to defrauding the Department of Veterans Affairs, sentenced to three years probation, fined, and ordered to pay restitution. Still living as of 2008.
  Relatives: Married 1964 to Hazel Washington.
  See also Wikipedia article
"Enjoy the hospitable entertainment of a political graveyard."
Henry L. Clinton, Apollo Hall, New York City, February 3, 1872
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The Political Graveyard is a web site about U.S. political history and cemeteries. Founded in 1996, it is the Internet's most comprehensive free source for American political biography, listing 312,576 politicians, living and dead.
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