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Politicians in Trouble or Disgrace

Politicians in Trouble or Disgrace: Diplomatic offenses
Persona non grata; violation of neutrality

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in chronological order

  John Louis O'Sullivan (1813-1895) — also known as John L. O'Sullivan — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Born, of American parents, in the North Atlantic Ocean off the coast of Gibraltar, November 15, 1813. Democrat. Member of New York state assembly from New York County, 1841-42; delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1844; U.S. Charge d'Affaires to Portugal, 1854; U.S. Minister to Portugal, 1854-58. Episcopalian; later Catholic. Cofounder and editor of The United States Magazine and Democratic Review, a journal that published the works of Emerson, Hawthorne and Whitman, as well as political essays on Jacksonian Democracy, 1837-46. Early advocate in 1840s for abolition of the death penalty. Invented the term "manifest destiny" to explain and justify the westward expansion of the United States. Took part in the failed expedition of Narcisco Lopez to take Cuba from Spanish rule; as a result, was charged in federal court in New York with violation of the Neutrality Act; tried and acquitted in March 1852. Died, of influenza and the effects of an earlier stroke, in a residential hotel in New York, New York County, N.Y., March 24, 1895 (age 81 years, 129 days). Interment at Moravian Cemetery, New Dorp, Staten Island, N.Y.
  See also U.S. State Dept career summary
  Albert Hiram Lennox (1842-1907) — also known as Albert H. Lennox; Albert Hiram Lenox — of Camden, Camden County, N.J. Born in Trenton, Mercer County, N.J., December 22, 1842. Shipbroker; commission merchant; Vice-Consul for Haiti in Philadelphia, Pa., 1877-83; Consul for Greece in Philadelphia, Pa., 1881-91; Consul for Haiti in Philadelphia, Pa., 1883-91; in 1891, he and other officers of some mutual benefit associations were charged in Philadelphia with obtaining money under false pretenses; in 1894, he resisted eviction for non-payment of rent; he was no longer consul, but falsely claimd diplomatic immunity; the government of Haiti contradicted his claim, and a scandal resulted. Died in Camden, Camden County, N.J., July 4, 1907 (age 64 years, 194 days). Interment at Colestown Cemetery, Cherry Hill Township, Camden County, N.J.
  Relatives: Son of Elizabeth Jane Lenox and Hiram Lenox (1818-1892); married to Emma Stoy (1846-1923).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Charles Miot — U.S. Consular Agent in SAINT Marc, 1897-1908; Dismissed from his consular position in 1908 by the U.S. State Department for allegedly aiding Haitian rebels. Burial location unknown.
  Washington G. Lithgow (1840-1925) — also known as Washington Lithgow — of Charlestown, Middlesex County (now part of Boston, Suffolk County), Mass.; Plainfield, Union County, N.J.; Puerto Plata, Dominican Republic. Born, of American parents, in Puerto Plata, Santo Domingo (now Dominican Republic), July 4, 1840. Republican. U.S. Vice Consul in Puerto Plata, 1875-99; alternate delegate to Republican National Convention from New Jersey, 1880; Consul-General for Dominican Republic in San Juan, P.R., 1899; in 1912, due to his alleged support for rebels, he was ordered expelled from the Dominican Republic; the U.S. State Department interceded in his behalf, and the order was revoked. Died in Puerto Plata, Dominican Republic, December 8, 1925 (age 85 years, 157 days). Interment somewhere in Puerto Plata, Dominican Republic.
  Relatives: Married, July 17, 1863, to Ellen Prentiss Peirce; grandfather of Arthur Washington Lithgow (1915-2004; actor and director); great-grandfather of John Arthur Lithgow (born 1945; American actor in theater, television, and movies).
  James Mark Sullivan (1873-1933) — also known as James M. Sullivan — of New York. Born in Ireland, 1873. U.S. Minister to Dominican Republic, 1913-15. Participated in the 1916 Easter Uprising in Ireland; arrested by the British authorities, but not executed due to his American diplomatic passport. Died in 1933 (age about 60 years). Interment at Glasnevin Cemetery, Dublin, Ireland.
  See also U.S. State Dept career summary
  Olney Arnold (1861-1916) — of Providence, Providence County, R.I. Born in Cumberland, Providence County, R.I., September 8, 1861. Democrat. Treasurer and manager Rogers Screw Company; president, Angell Land Company; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Rhode Island, 1888; member of Rhode Island state house of representatives, 1908; candidate for Governor of Rhode Island, 1908, 1909; U.S. Diplomatic Agent to Egypt, 1913-16, died in office 1916; U.S. Consul General in Cairo, 1914-16, died in office 1916; under investigation in 1916 on charges of making unneutral utterances. Unitarian. Died in Lisbon, Portugal, March 5, 1916 (age 54 years, 179 days). Interment at Swan Point Cemetery, Providence, R.I.
  Relatives: Son of William G. Arnold and Lucy M. (Aldrich) Arnold; married, April 12, 1889, to Grace Angell.
  See also U.S. State Dept career summary — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Victor Hugo Duras — also known as Victor H. Duras — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born in Nebraska. Republican. Candidate for U.S. Representative from New York, 1908 (12th District), 1910 (14th District); alternate delegate to Republican National Convention from New York, 1912; U.S. Vice & Deputy Consul in Liège, 1913-14; U.S. Vice Consul in Petrograd, 1914-15; arrested in August, 1916, in Russia, on suspicion of being a German spy; freed in 1917. Burial location unknown.
  Presumably named for: Victor Hugo
  Roger Culver Tredwell (1885-1961) — also known as Roger C. Tredwell — of Bloomington, Monroe County, Ind.; Washington, D.C.; Ridgefield, Fairfield County, Conn. Born in Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y., January 12, 1885. U.S. Vice & Deputy Consul General in Yokohama, 1910-11; U.S. Deputy Consul General in London, 1911; U.S. Vice & Deputy Consul in Burslem, 1911-12; Dresden, 1912; U.S. Consul in Bristol, 1913-14; Amsterdam, 1914; Naples, 1914; Leghorn, 1914-15; Turin, 1915-16; Rome, 1916-17; while working as American consul, he was arrested and imprisoned by the Russian Bolshevik authorities in Tashkent, 1918-19; U.S. Consul General in Hong Kong, 1925-29; Stockholm, as of 1932. Died in Ridgefield, Fairfield County, Conn., July 12, 1961 (age 76 years, 181 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Alanson Tredwell and Frances Vail (Culver) Tredwell; married to Winifred van Shaick Reed (died 1921).
  See also Wikipedia article
  George Frost Kennan (1904-2005) — also known as George F. Kennan — of Pennsylvania. Born in Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, Wis., February 16, 1904. Foreign Service officer; U.S. Vice Consul in Tallinn, as of 1929; U.S. Consul in Berlin, as of 1932; U.S. Ambassador to Soviet Union, 1952; Yugoslavia, 1961; the government of the Soviet Union declared him persona non grata on October 3, 1952; received the 1956 Pulitzer Prize in History for his book Russia Leaves the War; received the 1968 Pulitzer Prize in Biography for his Memoirs; received the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1989. Member, Council on Foreign Relations. Died in Princeton, Mercer County, N.J., March 17, 2005 (age 101 years, 29 days). Interment at Princeton Cemetery, Princeton, N.J.
  See also U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about George Kenan: Walter Isaacson, The Wise Men : Six Friends and the World They Made — John Lewis Gaddis, George F. Kennan: An American Life
  Charles Wheeler Thayer (1910-1969) — also known as Charles W. Thayer — of Villanova, Delaware County, Pa.; Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa. Born in Villanova, Delaware County, Pa., February 9, 1910. U.S. Vice Consul in Moscow, 1937, 1940; Berlin, 1937-38; Hamburg, 1939-40; Kabul, as of 1943; colonel in the U.S. Army during World War II; head of the State Department's international broadcasting division, including the "Voice of America", 1947-49; U.S. Consul General in Munich, 1952-53; in March 1953, when attacks on his loyalty by U.S. Sen. Joseph R. McCarthy inspired a State Department investigation into his diplomatic career, he resigned from the Foreign Service; writer. Died, during heart surgery, in Salzburg, Austria, August 27, 1969 (age 59 years, 199 days). Interment at Church of the Redeemer Cemetery, Bryn Mawr, Pa.
  Relatives: Son of George C. Thayer and Gertrude May (Wheeler) Thayer (c.1870-1964); brother of Avis Howard Thayer (1912-1981; who married Charles Eustis Bohlen); married, March 27, 1950, to Cynthia (Dunn) Cochrane (daughter of James Clement Dunn); uncle of Avis Thayer Bohlen (1940-).
  Political family: Bohlen-Eustis-Thayer family of Bryn Mawr and Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Anthony Dryden Marshall (1924-2014) — also known as Anthony D. Marshall; Tony Marshall; Anthony Dryden Kuser — of Providence, Providence County, R.I.; Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born in Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., May 30, 1924. Republican. Served in the U.S. Marine Corps during World War II; U.S. Consul in Istanbul, as of 1958-59; U.S. Ambassador to Malagasy Republic, 1969-71; Trinidad and Tobago, 1972-73; Kenya, 1973-77; Seychelles, 1976-77; in 1971, he was accused in press reports of involvement in a supposed plot to overthrow the President, Philibert Tsiranana; the Malagasy government declared him persona non grata, and expelled him fron the country; theatrical producer; guardian of his ailing mother, Brooke Astor; alleged to have diverted millions of dollars to his own theatrical productions, and removed works of art from her apartment; his son Philip sued, alleging abuse and demanding his removal as guardian; an independent investigation found no evidence for abuse, but revealed financial misconduct; indicted in 2007, and tried on 16 charges in 2009; the trial lasted six months; ultimately convicted and sentenced to one to three years in prison; served eight weeks and was released on medical parole. Member, Rotary. Died, at New York Presbyterian Hospital, Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., November 30, 2014 (age 90 years, 184 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Step-son of Charles H. Marshall and Vincent Astor; son of John Dryden Kuser (1897-1964) and Brooke (Russell) Marshall (1902-2007); married, July 26, 1947, to Elizabeth Cynthia Cryan; married, December 29, 1962, to Thelma Hoegnell (divorced 1992); married 1992 to Charlene (Tyler) Gilbert; great-grandson of John Fairfield Dryden.
  Political family: Dryden-Marshall family of New York City, New York.
  See also U.S. State Dept career summary — Internet Movie Database profile — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about Anthony D. Marshall: Meryl Gordon, Mrs. Astor Regrets: The Hidden Betrayals of a Family Beyond Reproach
  Deane Roesch Hinton (1923-2017) — also known as Deane R. Hinton — of Illinois. Born in Fort Missoula, Missoula County, Mont., March 12, 1923. Served in the U.S. Army during World War II; Foreign Service officer; U.S. Ambassador to Zaire, 1974-75; El Salvador, 1981-83; Pakistan, 1983-86; Costa Rica, 1987-90; Panama, 1990-94; declared persona non grata by the government of Zaire, June 18, 1975. Died in San Jose, Costa Rica, March 28, 2017 (age 94 years, 16 days). Cremated; ashes interred at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Va.
  Relatives: Son of Joe A. Hinton and Doris (Roesch) Hinton.
  See also Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier
  Charles Arthur Hayes (1918-1997) — also known as Charles A. Hayes — of Chicago, Cook County, Ill. Born in Cairo, Alexander County, Ill., February 17, 1918. Democrat. U.S. Representative from Illinois 1st District, 1983-93; defeated in primary, 1992; arrested during an anti-apartheid protest outside the South African Embassy in Washington, 1984. African ancestry. Member, United Food and Commercial Workers. Died, from complications of lung cancer, at South Suburban Hospital, Hazel Crest, Cook County, Ill., April 8, 1997 (age 79 years, 50 days). Burial location unknown.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — votes in Congress from the Washington Post — NNDB dossier
  William Donlon Edwards (1915-2015) — also known as Don Edwards — of San Jose, Santa Clara County, Calif. Born in San Jose, Santa Clara County, Calif., January 6, 1915. Democrat. Lawyer; served in the U.S. Navy during World War II; U.S. Representative from California, 1963-95 (9th District 1963-75, 10th District 1975-93, 16th District 1993-95); delegate to Democratic National Convention from California, 1964, 1968, 1988; arrested during an anti-apartheid protest outside the South African Embassy in Washington, 1984. Unitarian. Member, Americans for Democratic Action. Died in San Jose, Santa Clara County, Calif., October 1, 2015 (age 100 years, 268 days). Burial location unknown.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — votes in Congress from the Washington Post — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Ronald Vernie Dellums (1935-2018) — also known as Ronald V. Dellums — of Berkeley, Alameda County, Calif.; Oakland, Alameda County, Calif. Born in Oakland, Alameda County, Calif., November 24, 1935. Democrat. Social worker; U.S. Representative from California, 1971-98 (7th District 1971-75, 8th District 1975-93, 9th District 1993-98); arrested during an anti-apartheid protest outside the South African Embassy in Washington, 1984; delegate to Democratic National Convention from California, 1988, 1996, 2008; mayor of Oakland, Calif., 2007-11. Protestant. African ancestry. Member, Alpha Phi Alpha. Died in Washington, D.C., July 30, 2018 (age 82 years, 248 days). Interment at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Va.
  Relatives: Married to Leola Roscoe Higgs.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — votes in Congress from the Washington Post — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Walter Edward Fauntroy (b. 1933) — also known as Walter E. Fauntroy — of Washington, D.C. Born in Washington, D.C., February 6, 1933. Democrat. Baptist minister; Delegate to U.S. Congress from the District of Columbia, 1971-91; candidate for Democratic nomination for President, 1972; delegate to Democratic National Convention from District of Columbia, 1972, 1980; arrested during an anti-apartheid sit-in at the South African Embassy in Washington, 1984; candidate in primary for mayor of Washington, D.C., 1990. Baptist. African ancestry. Member, Kappa Alpha Psi. Charged in federal court on March 22, 1995 with making false statements on financial disclosure forms, including a claimed donation of almost $24,000 to the New Bethel Baptist Church where he served as pastor, to make it appear that he had complied with House rules limiting outside income, and that he had failed to disclose a June 1988 loan of $24,200. Pleaded guilty to one felony count, and sentenced to probation. Still living as of 2014.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  George William Crockett, Jr. (1909-1997) — also known as George W. Crockett, Jr. — of Detroit, Wayne County, Mich. Born in Jacksonville, Duval County, Fla., August 10, 1909. Democrat. Recorder's court judge in Michigan, 1966-78; U.S. Representative from Michigan 13th District, 1980-91; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Michigan, 1984, 1988; arrested during an anti-apartheid protest outside the South African Embassy in Washington, 1984. Baptist. African ancestry. Member, Kappa Alpha Psi; National Lawyers Guild. Served four months in federal prison for contempt of court in 1950, following his defense of a Communist leader on trial in New York for advocating the overthrow of the government. Among the founders of the nation's first interracial law firm. Ill with bone cancer in 1997, he suffered a stroke and died five days later, in Washington Home and Hospice, Washington, D.C., September 7, 1997 (age 88 years, 28 days). Cremated.
  Relatives: Father of George W. Crockett III (1926?-).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  Joseph Echols Lowery (b. 1921) — also known as Joseph E. Lowery — of Atlanta, Fulton County, Ga. Born in Huntsville, Madison County, Ala., October 6, 1921. Democrat. Pastor; leader in the civil rights movement; co-founder of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference; escaped death in 1963 when his hotel room in Birmingham, Ala., was bombed, and in 1979 when Klansmen in Decatur, Ala., opened fire on Lowery and other protesters; arrested while demonstrating in support of a garbage workers' strike in Atlanta, 1968; arrested during protests in Cullman, Ala., 1978; arrested while protesting apartheid at the South African Embassy in Washington, D.C., 1984; offered prayer, Democratic National Convention, 1988 ; delivered eulogies at the funerals of Rosa Parks and Coretta Scott King; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Georgia, 2008. Methodist. African ancestry. Still living as of 2014.
  Relatives: Married 1950 to Evelyn Gibson.
  Joseph E. Lowery Boulevard, in Atlanta, Georgia, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  William H. Simons — also known as Bill Simons — of Washington, D.C. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army during World War II; school teacher; delegate to Democratic National Convention from District of Columbia, 1968, 1980, 1996, 2000; president, Washington Teachers Union; vice-president, American Federation of Teachers; arrested during an anti-apartheid protest outside the South African Embassy in Washington, 1984; Presidential Elector for District of Columbia, 2000. African ancestry. Still living as of 2000.
  Mary Frances Berry (b. 1938) — Born in Nashville, Davidson County, Tenn., February 17, 1938. Lawyer; writer; university professor; member, U.S. Civil Rights Commission, 1978-2004; chair, U.S. Civil Rights Commission, 1993-99; arrested during an anti-apartheid sit-in at the South African Embassy in Washington, 1984. Female. African ancestry. Still living as of 2014.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile
Oliver L. North Oliver Laurence North (b. 1943) — also known as Oliver L. North; Ollie North — of Virginia. Born in San Antonio, Bexar County, Tex., October 7, 1943. Republican. Served in the U.S. Marine Corps during the Vietnam War; central figure in the Iran-Contra scandal of 1986; he was in charge of a secret (and illegal) government operation to sell weapons to Iran and provide the profits to the then-unrecognized Nicaraguan "contras", who were fighting a civil war against the "Sandinista" government there; convicted in 1989 on federal charges of obstructing Congress, destroying documents, and accepting an illegal gratuity; an appeals court later overturned the guilty verdict; candidate for U.S. Senator from Virginia, 1994; host of a radio talk show in 1995-2003, and is a television commentator. Member, National Rifle Association. Still living as of 2014.
  Relatives: Married, November 13, 1968, to Betsy Stuart.
  Cross-reference: Harry E. Bergold, Jr.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile
  Image source: Time Magazine, July 13, 1987
  William A. Wilson (b. 1914) — of California. Born in 1914. U.S. Ambassador to Vatican, 1984-86; reprimanded by the State Department for his unauthorized diplomatic mission to Libya. Presumed deceased. Burial location unknown.
  See also U.S. State Dept career summary
  Thomas Peter Lantos (1928-2008) — also known as Tom Lantos; Tamas Peter Lantos — of Millbrae, San Mateo County, Calif.; Hillsborough, San Mateo County, Calif.; San Mateo, San Mateo County, Calif. Born in Budapest, Hungary, February 1, 1928. Democrat. University professor; television news commentator; delegate to Democratic National Convention from California, 1976, 1988, 1996, 2000, 2004; U.S. Representative from California, 1981-2008 (11th District 1981-93, 12th District 1993-2008); died in office 2008. Jewish. Member, Phi Beta Kappa; Sigma Alpha Mu. Arrested for disorderly conduct in April 2006, while taking part civil disobedience action to protest genocide in Darfur, in front of the Sudanese embassy in Washington, D.C. Died, of cancer of the esophagus, in Bethesda Naval Medical Center, Bethesda, Montgomery County, Md., February 11, 2008 (age 80 years, 10 days). Interment at Congressional Cemetery, Washington, D.C.
  Relatives: Married 1950 to Annette Tillemann; father of Katrina Lantos (1952?-) (who married Richard Nelson Swett).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — votes in Congress from the Washington Post — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — Find-A-Grave memorial
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The Political Graveyard is a web site about U.S. political history and cemeteries. Founded in 1996, it is the Internet's most comprehensive free source for American political biography, listing 312,576 politicians, living and dead.
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