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The Political Graveyard: A Database of American History
Politicians in Trouble or Disgrace

Politicians in Trouble or Disgrace: Protests
Anti-war, civil rights, picketing, strikes, draft resistance

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in chronological order

  Albert Lange (1801-1869) — of Terre Haute, Vigo County, Ind. Born in Charlottenburg, Prussia (now part of Berlin, Germany), December 16, 1801. Republican. He belonged to a secret society which advocated a constitutional government for the German Empire; in 1824, the conspiracy was uncovered; he was convicted of treason and sentenced to fifteen years in in prison; pardoned in 1829, and left Germany for the United States; U.S. Consul in Amsterdam, 1849-50; Indiana state auditor, 1861-63; mayor of Terre Haute, Ind., 1863-67. Died in Terre Haute, Vigo County, Ind., July 25, 1869 (age 67 years, 221 days). Interment at Woodlawn Cemetery, Terre Haute, Ind.
  Lange Elementary School (now closed), in Terre Haute, Indiana, was named for him.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
Eugene V. Debs Eugene Victor Debs (1855-1926) — also known as Eugene V. Debs — of Terre Haute, Vigo County, Ind. Born in Terre Haute, Vigo County, Ind., November 5, 1855. Socialist. Locomotive fireman on the Terre Haute and Indianapolis Railroad; secretary-treasurer of the Brotherhood of Locomotive Firemen in 1880-93; member of Indiana state house of representatives, 1885; founder in 1893 and president (1893-97) of the American Railway Union; arrested during a strike in 1894 and charged with conspiracy to commit murder; the charges were dropped, but he was jailed for six months for contempt of court; became a Socialist while incarcerated; candidate for President of the United States, 1900 (Social Democratic), 1904 (Socialist), 1908 (Socialist), 1912 (Socialist), 1920 (Socialist); in 1905, was a founder of the Industrial Workers of the World ("Wobblies"), which hoped to organize all workers in "One Big Union"; convicted under the Sedition and Espionage Act for an anti-war speech he made in 1918, and sentenced to ten years in federal prison; released in 1921. Member, Knights of Pythias; American Civil Liberties Union. Died in Lindlahr Sanitarium, Elmhurst, DuPage County, Ill., October 20, 1926 (age 70 years, 349 days). Interment at Highland Lawn Cemetery, Terre Haute, Ind.
  Relatives: Son of Daniel Debs and Marguerite (Betterich) Debs; married, June 9, 1885, to Katherine 'Kate' Metzel (step-sister-in-law of Bertha D. Baur (1870-1967)).
  Cross-reference: Victor L. Berger — William A. Cunnea
  See also NNDB dossier
  Books about Eugene V. Debs: James Chace, 1912 : Wilson, Roosevelt, Taft and Debs : The Election that Changed the Country — Charles W. Carey, Jr., Eugene V. Debs : Outspoken Labor Leader and Socialist (for young readers)
  Image source: American Monthly Review of Reviews, September 1908
  Hyman Costrell (b. 1890) — also known as Jack Robbins — of New Haven, New Haven County, Conn.; New York. Born in Kurenitz, Russia (now Belarus), October 19, 1890. Communist. Arrested in 1905 in Russia and jailed three months for demonstrating and distributing circulars against the Czarist government; naturalized U.S. citizen; plumber; candidate for U.S. Representative from New York 8th District, 1934. Jewish. Burial location unknown.
  Upton Beall Sinclair (1878-1968) — also known as Upton Sinclair — of California. Born in Baltimore, Md., September 20, 1878. Novelist and social crusader; author of The Jungle, about the meat-packing industry in Chicago; arrested in 1914 for picketing in front of the Standard Oil Building in New York; Socialist candidate for U.S. Representative from California 10th District, 1920; Socialist candidate for U.S. Senator from California, 1922; candidate for Governor of California, 1926 (Socialist), 1930 (Socialist), 1934 (Democratic); Socialist candidate for Presidential Elector for California, 1928, 1932; received the Pulitzer Prize for fiction in 1943 for the novel Dragon's Teeth. Member, United World Federalists; League for Industrial Democracy; American Civil Liberties Union. Died in Bound Brook, Somerset County, N.J., November 25, 1968 (age 90 years, 66 days). Interment at Rock Creek Cemetery, Washington, D.C.
  Cross-reference: Harry W. Laidler
  Campaign slogan (1934): "End Poverty in California."
  See also NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile
  Books by Upton Sinclair: I, Candidate for Governor and How I Got Licked (1934)
  Fiction by Upton Sinclair: The Jungle — Oil! A Novel — The Moneychangers — Dragons Teeth — Wide is the Gate
  Books about Upton Sinclair: Lauren Coodley, ed., Land of Orange Groves and Jails: Upton Sinclair's California — Greg Mitchell, The Campaign of the Century: Upton Sinclair's E.P.I.C. Race for Governor of California and the Birth of Media Politics — Kevin Mattson, Upton Sinclair and the Other American Century — Anthony Arthur, Radical Innocent: Upton Sinclair
  Arthur Elmer Reimer (1882-1969) — also known as Arthur E. Reimer — of Massachusetts. Born in Boston, Suffolk County, Mass., January 15, 1882. Socialist. Tailor; lawyer; Socialist Labor candidate for President of the United States, 1912, 1916; Socialist Labor candidate for Governor of Massachusetts, 1913, 1914; jailed in Butte, Montana, 1916, for making a radical speech. Died in 1969 (age about 87 years). Burial location unknown.
  See also Wikipedia article
  Caleb Harrison — of Illinois. Socialist. Socialist Labor candidate for Vice President of the United States, 1916; jailed in Homestead, Pennsylvania in 1916 for making a radical speech. Burial location unknown.
  Earl Russel Browder (1891-1973) — also known as Earl Browder — of Yonkers, Westchester County, N.Y. Born in Wichita, Sedgwick County, Kan., May 20, 1891. Communist. As a result of his opposition to U.S. participation in World War I, he was convicted in 1917 of conspiracy against the draft laws and sentenced to sixteen months in prison; imprisoned again in 1919; pardoned in 1933; candidate for U.S. Representative from New York, 1930 (6th District), 1932 (20th District), 1940 (14th District); General Secretary of the Communist Party of the U.S., 1934-44; candidate for President of the United States, 1936, 1940; arrested in 1939 for a passport violation, convicted, and sentenced to four years in prison (sentence commuted after fourteen months); expelled from the Communist Party, 1946. Died in Princeton, Mercer County, N.J., June 27, 1973 (age 82 years, 38 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of William Browder and Martha (Hankins) Browder; married 1926 to Raissa Berkman.
  Cross-reference: George E. Powers
  See also Wikipedia article
  J. Louis Engdahl (1884-1932) — of Chicago, Cook County, Ill.; Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born in Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minn., November 11, 1884. Writer and editor for Socialist and Communist newspapers; indicted in Chicago, 1918, along with former U.S. Rep. Victor L. Berger, and three others, for making speeches that encouraged disloyalty and obstructed military recruitment; tried and convicted; sentenced to twenty years in prison; the conviction was later overturned; Socialist candidate for U.S. Representative from Illinois 7th District, 1918; delegate to Socialist National Convention from Illinois, 1920; candidate for U.S. Senator from Illinois, 1924 (Workers), 1926 (Workers Communist); Communist candidate for Lieutenant Governor of New York, 1930; Communist candidate for U.S. Representative from New York 7th District, 1931. Swedish ancestry. Died, of pneumonia, in Moscow, Russia, November 21, 1932 (age 48 years, 10 days). Burial location unknown.
  See also Wikipedia article
Victor L. Berger Victor Luitpold Berger (1860-1929) — also known as Victor L. Berger — of Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, Wis. Born in Nieder-Rehbach, Austria, February 28, 1860. Socialist. Emigrated to the United States in 1878; school teacher; newspaper editor; U.S. Representative from Wisconsin 5th District, 1911-13, 1919, 1923-29; defeated, 1904, 1920; candidate for U.S. Senator from Wisconsin, 1918; delegate to Socialist National Convention from Wisconsin, 1920; Chairman of Socialist Party, 1927-29. Jewish ancestry. Member, International Typographical Union. He and Eugene V. Debs founded the Socialist Party. He opposed U.S. entry into World War I; in Chicago in 1918, he was tried and convicted under the Espionage Act, and sentenced to twenty years in prison; elected to Congress anyway, he was denied a seat in 1919-21 to to alleged disloyalty. In 1921, the U.S. Supreme Court reversed his conviction; the cases against him were withdrawn; he resumed his seat in Congress in 1923. Injured in a streetcar accident, and subsequently died, in Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, Wis., August 7, 1929 (age 69 years, 160 days). Interment at Forest Home Cemetery, Milwaukee, Wis.
  Relatives: Son of Ignatz Berger and Julia Berger; married, December 4, 1897, to Meta Schlicting.
  Cross-reference: William F. Kruse — Adolph Germer — J. Louis Engdahl — Irwin St. John Tucker
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: Marxists Internet Archive
  William Bross Lloyd (1875-1946) — also known as William B. Lloyd; "The Millionaire Socialist" — of Winnetka, Cook County, Ill. Born in Chicago, Cook County, Ill., February 27, 1875. Socialist. Candidate for U.S. Senator from Illinois, 1918; arrested in downtown Chicago, 1918, for refusing to remove a red flag from his limo; co-founder of Communist Labor Party, 1919; indicted for sedition, 1920; represented at trial by Clarence Darrow; convicted, sentenced to 1-5 years in prison; his sentence was commuted in 1922. Died, of cancer, in the Ritz-Carlton Hotel, Boston, Suffolk County, Mass., June 30, 1946 (age 71 years, 123 days). Cremated; ashes scattered in North Atlantic Ocean.
  Relatives: Son of Henry Demarest Lloyd (social reformer, author) and Jessie (Bross) Lloyd; married to Lola Maverick (divorced 1916) and Madge Bird; grandson of William Bross (1825?-?).
  William F. Kruse (1894-1952) — also known as Bill Kruse — of Illinois. Born in Hoboken, Hudson County, N.J., 1894. Bookkeeper; indicted in Chicago, 1918, along with former U.S. Rep. Victor L. Berger, and three others, for making speeches that encouraged disloyalty and obstructed military recruitment; tried and convicted; sentenced to twenty years in prison; the conviction was later overturned; Socialist candidate for U.S. Representative from Illinois 6th District, 1918, 1920; delegate to Socialist National Convention from Illinois, 1920; Socialist candidate for secretary of state of Illinois, 1921; Workers candidate for Governor of Illinois, 1928. German and Danish ancestry. Died in 1952 (age about 58 years). Burial location unknown.
  See also Wikipedia article
  Irwin St. John Tucker — of Illinois. Socialist. Lecturer; indicted in Chicago, 1918, along with former U.S. Rep. Victor L. Berger, and three others, for making speeches that encouraged disloyalty and obstructed military recruitment; tried and convicted; sentenced to twenty years in prison; the conviction was later overturned; candidate for U.S. Representative from Illinois 10th District, 1918; delegate to Socialist National Convention from Illinois, 1920. Burial location unknown.
  Adolph Germer (1881-1966) — of Belleville, St. Clair County, Ill.; Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born in Wehlau, East Prussia (now Znamensk, Kaliningrad Oblast), January 15, 1881. Socialist. Miner; union official in various capacities for the United Mine Workers of America, 1906-16; member of Socialist National Committee from Illinois, 1911; candidate for Illinois state house of representatives, 1912; candidate for U.S. Senator from Illinois, 1914; National Executive Secretary, Socialist Party of America, 1916-19; indicted in Chicago, 1918, along with former U.S. Rep. Victor L. Berger, and three others, for making speeches that encouraged disloyalty and obstructed military recruitment; tried and convicted; sentenced to twenty years in prison; the conviction was later overturned; candidate for New York state assembly from New York County 16th District, 1921. Member, United Mine Workers. Died in Rockford, Winnebago County, Ill., May, 1966 (age 85 years, 0 days). Burial location unknown.
  See also Wikipedia article
  Maurice Sugar (1891-1974) — of Detroit, Wayne County, Mich. Born in Brimley, Chippewa County, Mich., August 8, 1891. Lawyer; Socialist candidate for circuit judge in Michigan 3rd Circuit, 1917; Socialist candidate for justice of Michigan state supreme court, 1917; candidate for U.S. Representative from Michigan 13th District, 1918 (Socialist), 1936 (Farmer-Labor); convicted in 1918 for resisting the draft, sentenced to a year in prison, and disbarred; readmitted to the Bar in 1923; pardoned in 1933; general counsel to the United Automobile Workers, 1937-46; Progressive candidate for Presidential Elector for Michigan, 1948. Jewish and Lithuanian ancestry. Member, National Lawyers Guild. Died in Cheboygan County, Mich., February 15, 1974 (age 82 years, 191 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Kalman Sugar and Mary Sugar; married 1914 to Jane Mayer Sugar (1878?-?).
  See also Wikipedia article
  James B. Furber (c.1868-1930) — of Rahway, Union County, N.J.; Linden, Union County, N.J. Born in Allegan, Allegan County, Mich., about 1868. Traveling salesman for National Cash Register Company; newspaper publisher; real estate developer; lawyer; mayor of Rahway, N.J., 1906, 1922-24; resigned 1906; charged with assault in connection with his participation in a Socialist rally in Rahway, N.J., May 31, 1919, which was ended by spraying the speaker and audience with a fire hose; Socialist candidate for U.S. Representative from New Jersey 5th District, 1920; Progressive candidate for Presidential Elector for New Jersey, 1924; elected (Democratic) mayor of Linden, N.J. 1930, but died before taking office. Suffered a paralytic stroke, while addressing a meeting of the Parent Democratic Club, and died soon after in St. Elizabeth Hospital, Elizabeth, Union County, N.J., November 12, 1930 (age about 62 years). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Father of Helen Josephine Furber (niece by marriage of George McGillivray (1871?-1959)).
  Frederick J. Harwood — of Newark, Essex County, N.J.; New York. Socialist. State Secretary, New Jersey Socialist Party, 1919; when attempting to speak to a Socialist rally in Rahway, N.J., May 31, 1919, he was sprayed with a fire hose by Mayor David H. Trembley; charged with opposing and obstructing a police officer, and fined $50; candidate for U.S. Representative from New York 24th District, 1938. Burial location unknown.
  David H. Trembley (b. 1858) — of Rahway, Union County, N.J. Born in New Jersey, 1858. Carriage painter; mayor of Rahway, N.J., 1918-22; on May 31, 1919, he prevented a Socialist orator, Frederick Harwood, from speaking, by spraying him and his audience with a fire hose; subsequently arrested and charged with assault and inciting to riot; retaliated by arresting Justice of the Peace Gustav Theimer, who had indicted him, and arraigned him on a charge of improper procedure. French Huguenot ancestry. Burial location unknown.
  Charlotte Anita Whitney (c.1868-1955) — also known as Anita Whitney — of California. Born about 1868. Communist. Social worker; in 1919, she gave a radical speech in Oakland, California; as a result, she was arrested, tried, and found guilty of violating the state's syndicalism law; pardoned by Governor C. C. Young.; candidate for U.S. Senator from California, 1928, 1940 (Communist). Female. Died in San Francisco, Calif., February 4, 1955 (age about 87 years). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Daughter of George E. Whitney (1838?-?); niece of Stephen Johnson Field.
  Political family: Whitney-Field-Brewer-Wells family of California.
  G. August Gerber — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Socialist. Arrested for making seditious utterances on March 26, 1920, in Philadelphia, when police broke up a protest meeting, and charged with inciting to riot; released when the charges were dropped the next day; candidate for New York state assembly from New York County 18th District, 1921, 1922; candidate for U.S. Representative from New York, 1930 (19th District), 1932 (at-large). Burial location unknown.
  Mary Winsor (b. 1873) — of Lower Merion Township, Montgomery County, Pa. Born in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., March 28, 1873. Socialist. Suffragette; participant in the first U.S. birth control conference, New York City, November 1921; on November 13, police arrived to forcibly shut down the event, and she was arrested, along with Margaret Sanger, for attempting to speak; charged with disorderly conduct, but released soon after; candidate for Pennsylvania secretary of internal affairs, 1922; candidate for Lieutenant Governor of Pennsylvania, 1930; candidate for U.S. Representative from Pennsylvania 17th District, 1932. Female. Member, Women's International League for Peace and Freedom; American Civil Liberties Union. Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Daughter of James Davis Winsor and Rebecca (Chapman) Winsor; second cousin five times removed of Simeon Baldwin; third cousin twice removed of George Bailey Loring; fourth cousin once removed of Charles Grenfill Washburn (1857-1928).
  Political families: Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York; Adams-Baldwin-Otis family of Boston, Massachusetts (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also OurCampaigns candidate detail
  John C. Butterworth (1870-1952) — of Paterson, Passaic County, N.J. Born in Macclesfield, Cheshire, England, 1870. Socialist. Naturalized U.S. citizen; silk weaver; Socialist Labor candidate for Governor of New Jersey, 1913, 1916, 1919, 1925, 1928, 1931, 1937, 1940, 1943, 1949; on October 6, 1924, during a strike at the silk mills in Paterson, N.J., while the city was under martial law, he and other strikers and supporters were arrested and convicted of unlawful assembly; the convictions were later overturned by the New Jersey Supreme Court; Socialist Labor candidate for U.S. Senator from New Jersey, 1924, 1932, 1934, 1938, 1942, 1944, 1946; Socialist Labor candidate for Presidential Elector for New Jersey, 1940, 1948, 1952. English ancestry. Member, Freemasons; Industrial Workers of the World. Died in Paterson, Passaic County, N.J., October 17, 1952 (age about 82 years). Burial location unknown.
  Max Schachtman (1904-1972) — of Floral Park, Nassau County, Long Island, N.Y. Born in Warsaw, Poland, September 10, 1904. Naturalized U.S. citizen; arrested during a demonstration on Wall Street in New York City, July 3, 1928, but charges against him were dismissed; became an open supporter of Leon Trotsky's opposition to Stalin about 1928, and was expelled from the Communist Party; became a major Trotskyist leader and theoretician, and one of the founders of the Socialist Workers Party; editor of The Militant newspaper; Workers candidate for U.S. Representative from New York, 1940 (23rd District), 1946 (15th District); Workers candidate for mayor of New York City, N.Y., 1941; broke with Trotskyism in 1948, and became more conservative in later life. Jewish ancestry. Member, League for Industrial Democracy. Died, in Long Island Jewish Hospital, New Hyde Park, Nassau County, Long Island, N.Y., November 4, 1972 (age 68 years, 55 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Benjamin Schachtman and Sarah Schachtman; married to Billie Ramloff, Edith Harvey and Yetta Barsh (1925-1996).
  See also Wikipedia article
  William Zebulon Foster (1881-1961) — also known as William Z. Foster; William Edward Foster — of Bronx, Bronx County, N.Y. Born in Taunton, Bristol County, Mass., February 25, 1881. Communist. Labor organizer; helped lead steelworkers strike in 1919; candidate for President of the United States, 1924, 1928, 1932; candidate for Governor of New York, 1930; arrested after a demonstration in 1930, and jailed for six months; indicted on July 20, 1948 under the Smith Act, and charged with conspiring to advocate the overthrow of the government; never tried due to illness. Irish ancestry. Died, in a sanatorium at Moscow, Russia, September 1, 1961 (age 80 years, 188 days). Cremated; ashes interred at Kremlin Wall Necropolis, Moscow, Russia; cenotaph at Forest Home Cemetery, Forest Park, Ill.
  Relatives: Son of James Foster; married to Ester Abramovitch.
  Epitaph: "Working Class Leader. Tireless Fighter for Socialism."
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Sammie A. Abbott (1908-1990) — of New York; Takoma Park, Montgomery County, Md. Born April 25, 1908. Communist. Activist and labor organizer; arrested about 50 times in connection with demonstrations and strikes; candidate for U.S. Representative from New York 37th District, 1934; mayor of Takoma Park, Md., 1980-85; defeated, 1985. Died December 15, 1990 (age 82 years, 234 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Married 1938 to Ruth Gracie Yalsic (1920-2009).
  George Edward Powers (b. 1892) — also known as George E. Powers — of Watertown, Middlesex County, Mass.; Astoria, Queens, Queens County, N.Y.; Detroit, Wayne County, Mich. Born in Boston, Suffolk County, Mass., February 15, 1892. Sheet metal worker; candidate for borough president of Queens, New York, 1929 (Workers), 1933 (Communist); Workers candidate for U.S. Senator from Michigan, 1930; in April 1932, he was arrested at City Hall Park, during a demonstration which was characaterized as "riot"; convicted of unlawful assembly, but the sentence was suspended; also in 1932, he was publicly accused of taking part in an alleged Communist conspiracy to cause bank failures in Chicago by spreading rumors (in a "whispering campaign" of "anti-bank propaganda"); he denied this; Communist candidate for chief judge of New York Court of Appeals, 1932; vice-president, International Workers Order; following the Hitler-Stalin pact in 1939, he resigned from the Communist Party, took part in anti-Communist organizations; at Earl Browder's trial for passport fraud in 1940, he testified for the prosecution; Liberal candidate for New York state senate 7th District, 1948, 1950. Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of George E. Powers and Sarah Powers.
  Ernest A. Moross (c.1874-1949) — of Mosherville, Hillsdale County, Mich. Born about 1874. Manager for Indianapolis Speedway, and for many early 20th century race car drivers; retired from automobile racing in 1916; candidate in Republican primary for Michigan state house of representatives from Hillsdale County, 1930; Communist candidate for Michigan state senate 10th District, 1932; in 1933, he refused to renew his car's license plates as a protest against the cost; when his car was seized, he and his wife locked the doors and remained inside it for a month; finally police broke into the car and arrested them; convicted of resisting arrest, and sentenced to 30 days in jail. Died in Long Beach, Los Angeles County, Calif., April 4, 1949 (age about 75 years). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Brother-in-law of Robert Oakman (1859?-?).
Williana J. Burroughs Williana Jones Burroughs (1882-1945) — also known as Williana J. Burroughs; Williana Jones; Mary Adams — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y.; Moscow, Russia. Born in Petersburg, Va., December 26, 1882. Communist. School teacher; joined the Communist party in 1926; used the pseudonym "Mary Adams"; in 1933, she led a demonstration to the New York City Board of Education, and as a result, she was fired from her teaching job; candidate for Lieutenant Governor of New York, 1934; announcer and editor for the English-language broadcasts of Radio Moscow, 1937-45. African ancestry. Died, from a heart ailment, in the Staten Island Area Hospital, Staten Island, Richmond County, N.Y., December 24, 1945 (age 62 years, 363 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Married 1909 to Charles Burroughs.
  See also Wikipedia article
  Image source: The Daily Worker, October 1933
Corliss Lamont Corliss Lamont (1902-1995) — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born in Englewood, Bergen County, N.J., March 28, 1902. Socialist. Author; lecturer; arrested on June 27, 1934, while picketing in support of a labor union at a furniture plant in Jersey City, N.J.; president, National Council of American-Soviet Friendship; this organization and its leaders were investigated for subversion by the U.S. House Committee on Un-American Activities; charged in 1946 with contempt of Congress for his refusal to provide records demanded by the committee; in 1951, the U.S. State Department denied a passport to him, based on his membership in what were deemed "Communist-front organizations"; on August 17, 1954, the U.S. Senate cited him with contempt of Congress for refusing to testify before Sen. Joseph R. McCarthy's subcommittee; subsequently indicted; pleaded not guilty; the indictment was dismissed in 1955; the Court of Appeals upheld the dismissal in 1956; candidate for U.S. Senator from New York, 1952 (American Labor), 1958 (Independent Socialist). Member, American Civil Liberties Union; NAACP; Phi Beta Kappa; American Academy of Political and Social Science. Died, of heart failure, in Ossining, Westchester County, N.Y., April 26, 1995 (age 93 years, 29 days). Interment at Brookside Cemetery, Englewood, N.J.
  Relatives: Son of Thomas William Lamont (1870-1948) and Florence Haskell (Corliss) Lamont (died 1952); married, June 8, 1928, to Margaret Hayes Irish (c.1905-1977); married 1962 to Helen Lamb (died 1975); married 1986 to Beth Keehner; granduncle of Ned Lamont (1966?-).
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: The Militant, November 3, 1958
Abdul Hamid Sufi Abdul Hamid (1903-1938) — also known as Abdul Hamid; Eugene Brown; "The Black Hitler"; "The Harlem Hitler"; "Bishop Amiru-Al-Mu-Minim Sufi Abdul Hamid" — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born in Lowell, Middlesex County, Mass., January 6, 1903. Self-styled cleric; labor leader; claimed to be from Egypt or Sudan; wore a turban and a green velvet cloak with gold braid; led picketing of stores in Harlem whose proprietors refused to hire African-American employees; conducted street rallies in Harlem where he denounced Jews; said he was "the only one fit to carry on the war against the Jews"; Americo-Spanish candidate for New York state assembly from New York County 17th District, 1933; arrested in october 1934; tried and found guilty on misdemeanor charges of making a public speech without a permit, and selling books without a license, and sentenced to ten days in jail; later suspected of inciting the 1935 riot in Harlem, which led to injunctions against his activities; in January 1938, his estranged wife, Stephanie St. Clair, ambushed him outside his house, and shot at him five times, but he was not seriously hurt; founded the Buddhist Universal Holy Temple of Tranquility. Buddhist or Muslim. African ancestry. Killed, along with his pilot, when his Cessna J-5 airplane ran out of fuel and crashed near Wantagh, Nassau County, Long Island, N.Y., July 30, 1938 (age 35 years, 205 days). Burial location unknown.
  See also Wikipedia article — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Image source: New York Times, August 1, 1938
  George Breitman (1916-1986) — also known as Albert Parker; Philip Blake; Chester Hofla; Anthony Massini; John F. Petrone; G. Sloane — of Newark, Essex County, N.J.; Detroit, Wayne County, Mich.; Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born in Newark, Essex County, N.J., February 28, 1916. Socialist. Became a socialist agitator in Newark, N.J., 1935; arrested about 1936 and charged with inciting riots; jailed for a week; founding member of the Socialist Workers Party, 1937; member of its National Committee, 1939-81; Socialist Workers candidate for U.S. Senator from New Jersey, 1940, 1942, 1946, 1948, 1954; editor-in-chief of the weekly newspaper, The Militant, 1941-43, 1946-54; writer under several different pen names; Socialist Workers candidate for Presidential Elector for New Jersey, 1952; Socialist Workers candidate for Presidential Elector for Michigan, 1960, 1964. Member, International Typographical Union. Expelled from the Socialist Workers Party for "disloyalty," 1984. Died, following a heart attack, in Beekman Downtown Hospital, Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., April 19, 1986 (age 70 years, 50 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Benjamin Breitman and Pauline (Trattler) Breitman; married 1940 to Dorothea Katz (1914-2004).
  See also Wikipedia article
  George Thomas Bardwell (1901-1947) — also known as George Bardwell; Thomas George Bardwell — of Denver, Colo. Born in Lake City, Hinsdale County, Colo., October 18, 1901. Communist. Candidate for U.S. Representative from Colorado 1st District, 1934; arrested and prosecuted in the 1930s in connection with a strike; acquitted. Died in a hospital, Denver, Colo., January 19, 1947 (age 45 years, 93 days). Interment at Mt. Olivet Cemetery, Wheat Ridge, Colo.
  Relatives: Son of George D. Bardwell (1866-1908) and Hannah J. (Cunningham) Bardwell (1873-1924); married, April 4, 1923, to Avelina Rella (divorced 1934).
  Ernest Lee Jahncke (1877-1960) — also known as "Commodore" — of New Orleans, Orleans Parish, La. Born in New Orleans, Orleans Parish, La., October 13, 1877. Republican. Engineer; president, Jahncke Dry Docks, New Orleans; U.S. assistant secretary of the Navy, 1929-33; named a Commodore in 1931, and a Rear Admiral in the naval reserve in 1955; delegate to Republican National Convention from Louisiana, 1932, 1936 (alternate). Episcopalian. German ancestry. Member, Sigma Alpha Epsilon. Expelled from the International Olympic Committee in July 1936 after taking a strong stand against the Nazi-organized Berlin Games. Died in Pass Christian, Harrison County, Miss., November 16, 1960 (age 83 years, 34 days). Entombed at Metairie Cemetery, New Orleans, La.
  Relatives: Son of Frederick 'Fritz' Jahncke (1847-1911) and Margaret (Lee) Jahncke (1853-1913); brother of Walter Frederick Jahncke (1880-1947); married, June 1, 1907, to Cora Van Voorhis 'Mimi' Stanton (1883-1970; granddaughter of Edwin McMasters Stanton).
  Political family: Jahncke-Stanton family of New Orleans, Louisiana.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Joseph Ellsberry McWilliams (1904-1996) — also known as Joe McWilliams — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born in Hitchcock, Blaine County, Okla., 1904. Gave street-corner speeches in New York City, in which he denounced Jews and praised Adolf Hitler; arrested in 1940 when one of his speeches caused a riot; charged with sedition in 1944, as part of an alleged Nazi conspiracy; tried along with many others, but after seven months, a mistrial was declared; candidate in Republican primary for U.S. Representative from New York 18th District, 1940. Died in 1996 (age about 92 years). Burial location unknown.
  See also Wikipedia article
  Nathan Pressman (1912-1993) — of Ellenville, Ulster County, N.Y. Born in Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y., June 24, 1912. Socialist. Longtime Socialist Labor Party activist; jailed briefly during World War II for draft resistance, but subsequently accepted induction into the U.S. Army; several time candidate for mayor of Ellenville, N.Y.; Socialist Labor candidate for Presidential Elector for New York, 1972; expelled from Socialist Labor Party, 1984. Died, in Ellenville Community Hospital, Ellenville, Ulster County, N.Y., September 25, 1993 (age 81 years, 93 days). Interment at Workmen's Circle Cemetery, Wawarsing town, Ulster County, N.Y.
  Robert Morss Lovett (1870-1956) — of Chicago, Cook County, Ill.; Lake Zurich, Lake County, Ill. Born in Boston, Suffolk County, Mass., December 25, 1870. Progressive. University professor; novelist; playwright; candidate for Presidential Elector for Illinois, 1924; secretary of the U.S. Virgin Islands, 1939-43; Governor of U.S. Virgin Islands, 1940-41; removed from office as Secretary of the Virgin Islands, and barred from federal employment, by action of the U.S. Congress in 1943, over his ties to left-wing and purportedly Communist individuals and groups; the action was later struck down by the U.S. Supreme Court as an unconstitutional bill of attainder, and he received about $2,000 in salary owed to him. Atheist. Died, in St. Joseph's Hospital, Chicago, Cook County, Ill., February 8, 1956 (age 85 years, 45 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Augustus Sidney Lovett and Elizabeth (Russell) Lovett; married, June 4, 1895, to Ida Mott-Smith.
  See also Wikipedia article
  Glen Hearst Taylor (1904-1984) — also known as Glen H. Taylor — of Pocatello, Bannock County, Idaho. Born in Portland, Multnomah County, Ore., April 12, 1904. Country-western singer; candidate for U.S. Representative from Idaho, 1938; U.S. Senator from Idaho, 1945-51; defeated, 1940 (Democratic), 1942 (Democratic), 1956 (Independent); arrested on May 1, 1948, in Birmingham, Alabama, for attempting to use a door reserved for Negroes, rather than the whites-only door; convicted in 1949 of disorderly conduct; Progressive candidate for Vice President of the United States, 1948. Member, United World Federalists. Died April 28, 1984 (age 80 years, 16 days). Interment at Skylawn Memorial Park, San Mateo, Calif.
  Relatives: Son of Pleasant John Taylor and Olive Oatman (Higgins) Taylor; married, March 31, 1931, to Dora Marie Pike.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
Anne Braden Anne McCarty Braden (1924-2006) — also known as Anne Braden; Anne McCarty — of Louisville, Jefferson County, Ky. Born in Louisville, Jefferson County, Ky., July 28, 1924. Newspaper reporter; labor organizer; civil rights activist starting in the 1940s; in May 1954, to fight segregation, she and her husband bought a house in a white neighborhood on behalf of a Black family; this sparked furious and violent opposition and the bombing of the house; she and others were charged with sedition; her husband was the first to be convicted, but then, in 1956, all state sedition laws were struck down; Communist candidate for Presidential Elector for Kentucky, 1972. Female. Episcopalian. Died in Louisville, Jefferson County, Ky., March 6, 2006 (age 81 years, 221 days). Interment at Eminence Cemetery, Eminence, Ky.
  Relatives: Married 1948 to Carl Braden (1914-1975).
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: Kentucky Center for African-American Heritage
  Clennon Washington King, Jr. (c.1921-2000) — also known as Clennon King; "The Black Don Quixote" — of Miami, Miami-Dade County, Fla. Born about 1921. Minister; Independent Afro-American candidate for President of the United States, 1960; candidate for mayor of Miami, Fla., 1996. African ancestry. Attempted to enroll in the then-all-white University of Mississippi in 1958, and was sent to the state's insane asylum; attempted to join and integrate Jimmy Carter's all-white Baptist Church in Plains, Ga., on the eve of the 1976 presidential election. Jailed on numerous occasions for his flamboyant tactics. Died, of prostate cancer, in Miami, Miami-Dade County, Fla., February 12, 2000 (age about 79 years). Interment at Riverside Cemetery, Albany, Ga.
  Byron Mark Baer (1929-2007) — also known as Byron M. Baer — of Englewood, Bergen County, N.J. Born October 8, 1929. Democrat. Member of New Jersey state house of assembly, 1972-93 (District 13-B 1972-73, 37th District 1974-93); member of New Jersey state senate 37th District, 1994-2005; resigned 2005; delegate to Democratic National Convention from New Jersey, 1996, 2000. While working as a Freedom Rider, registering voters in Mississippi in 1961, was arrested and jailed for 45 days. Died, from complications of congestive heart failure, in an assisted living facility, Englewood, Bergen County, N.J., June 24, 2007 (age 77 years, 259 days). Cremated.
  Relatives: Married to Linda Pollitt (1948?-).
  Cross-reference: June B. Montag
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  George Lincoln Rockwell (1918-1967) — of Arlington, Arlington County, Va. Born in Bloomington, McLean County, Ill., March 9, 1918. Served in the U.S. Navy during World War II; served in the U.S. Navy during the Korean conflict; founder, in 1959, of the National Committee to Free America from Jewish Domination (later known as the American Nazi Party); arrested at various demonstrations during the 1960s; American Nazi candidate for Governor of Virginia, 1965. Shot and killed by a sniper, later identified as John Patler, while driving his car in the parking lot of Dominion Hills Shopping Center, Arlington, Arlington County, Va., August 25, 1967 (age 49 years, 169 days); Patler was convicted of the murder and sentenced to 20 years in prison. Rockwell's funeral procession was not allowed into Culpeper National Cemetery because of Nazi emblems worn by his supporters. Cremated.
  Relatives: Son of George Lovejoy 'Doc' Rockwell (1889-1978; vaudeville and radio comedian) and Claire (Schade) Rockwell; third cousin twice removed of Oliver Morgan Hungerford (1827-1888).
  Political families: Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York; Morris-Ingersoll family of New York and Connecticut; Conger-Hungerford family (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Hosea Lorenzo Williams (1926-2000) — also known as Hosea Williams — of Savannah, Chatham County, Ga.; Atlanta, Fulton County, Ga.; Decatur, DeKalb County, Ga. Born in Attapulgus, Decatur County, Ga., January 5, 1926. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army during World War II; walked with a cane due to wartime injury; ordained minister; candidate in primary for U.S. Senator from Georgia, 1972; member of Georgia state house of representatives 54th District, 1975-85; candidate for mayor of Atlanta, Ga., 1989. African ancestry. Member, NAACP; Phi Beta Sigma; Elks; Freemasons; Veterans of Foreign Wars; Disabled American Veterans; American Legion. Civil rights leader; active in sit-ins and protest marches in Savannah and elsewhere; arrested at least 135 times. As Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.'s "field general" in the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, led the 1965 Selma-to-Montgomery march which helped galvanize support for Black voting rights. In 1968, he was present at the Lorraine Motel in Memphis, Tenn., when King was assassinated. Convicted in 1981 of leaving the scene of an accident, and jailed for six months. Died, of cancer, at Piedmont Hospital, Atlanta, Fulton County, Ga., November 16, 2000 (age 74 years, 316 days). Entombed at Lincoln Cemetery, Atlanta, Ga.
  Relatives: Married to Juanita Elizabeth Terry Williams (1925-2000).
  Personal motto: "Unbought and unbossed."
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Norman Kingsley Mailer (1923-2007) — also known as Norman Mailer — of Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y. Born in Long Branch, Monmouth County, N.J., January 31, 1923. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army during World War II; novelist, essayist, magazine editor, Hollywood screenwriter, director, and actor; among the founders of the Village Voice newspaper newspaper in New York City; in November, 1960, while drunk at a party, he stabbed and wounded his wife, Adele; he was arrested and held for psychiatric evaluation, and eventually pleaded guilty to third-degree assault; arrested and jailed in 1967 in connection with an antiwar protest; candidate in primary for mayor of New York City, N.Y., 1969. Jewish ancestry. Won the Pulitzer Prize for nonfiction in 1969 and for fiction in 1980. Died, from acute renal failure, in Mount Sinai Hospital, Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., November 10, 2007 (age 84 years, 283 days). Interment at Provincetown Cemetery, Provincetown, Mass.
  Relatives: Son of Isaac Barnett 'Barney' Mailer and Fanny (Schneider) Mailer; married 1944 to Beatrice 'Bea' Silverman (divorced 1952); married 1954 to Adele Morales (divorced 1962); married 1962 to Jeanne Campbell (divorced 1963); married 1963 to Beverly Bentley (divorced 1980); married 1980 to Carol Stevens (divorced 1980); married 1981 to Norris Church (1949-2010); father of Michael Mailer (film producer).
  See also NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Books by Norman Mailer: The Executioner's Song — The Fight
  Fiction by Norman Mailer: The Deer Park — The Naked and the Dead — An American Dream — The Gospel According to the Son
  Books about Norman Mailer: Mary V. Dearborn, Mailer : A Biography — Barry H. Leeds, The Enduring Vision of Norman Mailer — Carl Rollyson, The Lives of Norman Mailer : A Biography — Jennifer Bailey, Norman Mailer: Quick Change Artist
  Critical books about Norman Mailer: Bernard Goldberg, 100 People Who Are Screwing Up America (And Al Franken Is #37)
  Mortimer Thomas Furay (1910-1972) — also known as Mort Furay — of Detroit, Wayne County, Mich. Born in Detroit, Wayne County, Mich., July 23, 1910. Democrat. President, Local 705, Hotel and Restaurant Employees Union; vice-president, AFL-CIO Union Label Trade Department; candidate in primary for Michigan state house of representatives from Wayne County 1st District, 1944; candidate in primary for mayor of Detroit, Mich., 1949; in 1967, at an intersection in Highland Park, Mich., he witnessed a woman being beaten by her husband, and summoned police; when the police officers decided not to arrest the man, he protested, and was arrested for interfering with police; he pleaded not guilty, and a trial date was set, but apparently the case was dropped. Died, probably from a heart attack, in Detroit, Wayne County, Mich., March 12, 1972 (age 61 years, 233 days); body was donated to Wayne State University Medical School.
  Relatives: Son of Mortimer John Furay (1884-1944) and Florence Bell (Kratz) Furay (1885-1959); married 1932 to Corinne Kelly (1911-1975).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Brian J. Coyle (1944-1991) — of Moorhead, Clay County, Minn.; Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minn. Born in Great Falls, Cascade County, Mont., June 25, 1944. College instructor; in 1968, he was indicted and tried for his refusal to comply with the military draft, but was acquitted as a conscientious objector; Independent candidate for U.S. Senator from Minnesota, 1978; candidate for mayor of Minneapolis, Minn., 1979; president, Minneapolis city council. Gay. One of Minnesota's first openly-gay politicians. Died, from AIDS-related complications, August 23, 1991 (age 47 years, 59 days). Burial location unknown.
  Joseph Echols Lowery (b. 1921) — also known as Joseph E. Lowery — of Atlanta, Fulton County, Ga. Born in Huntsville, Madison County, Ala., October 6, 1921. Democrat. Pastor; leader in the civil rights movement; co-founder of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference; escaped death in 1963 when his hotel room in Birmingham, Ala., was bombed, and in 1979 when Klansmen in Decatur, Ala., opened fire on Lowery and other protesters; arrested while demonstrating in support of a garbage workers' strike in Atlanta, 1968; arrested during protests in Cullman, Ala., 1978; arrested while protesting apartheid at the South African Embassy in Washington, D.C., 1984; offered prayer, Democratic National Convention, 1988 ; delivered eulogies at the funerals of Rosa Parks and Coretta Scott King; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Georgia, 2008. Methodist. African ancestry. Still living as of 2014.
  Relatives: Married 1950 to Evelyn Gibson.
  Joseph E. Lowery Boulevard, in Atlanta, Georgia, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Bobby Seale (b. 1936) — also known as Robert George Seale — of Oakland, Alameda County, Calif. Born in Dallas, Dallas County, Tex., October 22, 1936. Joined U.S. Air Force in 1955; charged with insubordination and being AWOL, and dishonorably discharged; sheet metal worker; co-founder, with Huey Newton, of the Black Panther Party, 1966; one of eight defendants charged in 1969 with crossing state lines to incite a riot at the 1968 Democratic National Convention in Chicago; the judge ordered him bound and gagged during the trial, and sentenced him to four years in prison for contempt of court; Peace and Freedom candidate for California state assembly 17th District, 1968; in 1970, he was charged in New Haven, Conn., with ordering the murder of Alex Rackley, a Black Panther who had confessed to being a police informant; the jury was unable to reach a verdict, and the charges were eventually dropped; candidate for mayor of Oakland, Calif., 1973. African ancestry. Still living as of 2014.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Paul David Wellstone (1944-2002) — also known as Paul Wellstone; "Senator Welfare" — of Minnesota. Born in Washington, D.C., July 21, 1944. Democrat. College professor; arrested during a Vietnam War protest at the federal building in Minneapolis, 1970; arrested again during a protest of farm foreclosures at a bank in Paynesville, Minn., 1984; candidate for Minnesota state auditor, 1982; member of Democratic National Committee from Minnesota, 1984-91; U.S. Senator from Minnesota, 1991-2002; died in office 2002; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Minnesota, 1996, 2000. Jewish. Member, Phi Beta Kappa. Killed in a plane crash, along with his wife and daughter, near Eveleth, St. Louis County, Minn., October 25, 2002 (age 58 years, 96 days). Interment at Lakewood Cemetery, Minneapolis, Minn.
  Relatives: Son of Leon Wexelstein and Minnie (Danishevsky) Wexelstein; married 1963 to Sheila Ison (1944-2002).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — votes in Congress from the Washington Post — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books by Paul Wellstone: The Conscience of a Liberal: Reclaiming the Compassionate Agenda (2001) — How the Rural Poor Got Power: Narrative of a Grass-Roots Organizer (1978) — Powerline: The First Battle of America's Energy War, with Barry M. Casper (1981)
  Books about Paul Wellstone: Terry Gydesen, Twelve Years and Thirteen Days: Remembering Paul and Sheila Wellstone — Dennis J. McGrath & Dane Smith, Professor Wellstone Goes to Washington: The Inside Story of a Grassroots U.S. Senate Campaign — Don Jacobs & James Fetzer, American Assassination: The Strange Death Of Senator Paul Wellstone
  John James Conyers, Jr. (1929-2019) — also known as John Conyers, Jr. — of Detroit, Wayne County, Mich. Born in Highland Park, Wayne County, Mich., May 16, 1929. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army during the Korean conflict; lawyer; U.S. Representative from Michigan, 1965-2017 (1st District 1965-93, 14th District 1993-2013, 13th District 2013-17); resigned 2017; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Michigan, 1968, 1972, 1976, 1984, 1988, 1996, 2000, 2004, 2008; arrested during an anti-apartheid protest outside the South African Embassy in Washington, 1984; candidate for mayor of Detroit, Mich., 1989; in 2017, it was reported that a former member of Conyers' staff had alleged that he had sexually harassed her, and had been paid a settlement of $27,000; subsequently, the House Ethics Committee started an investigation into multiple such allegations; he subsequently resigned from Congress. Baptist. African ancestry. Member, NAACP. Recipient of the Spingarn Medal, 2007. Died in Detroit, Wayne County, Mich., October 27, 2019 (age 90 years, 164 days). Entombed at Detroit Memorial Park East, Warren, Mich.
  Relatives: Son of John James Conyers (1905-1986) and Lucille Jane (Simpson) Conyers (1909-2000); brother of Nathan G. Conyers (1932-); married 1990 to Monica Esters.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — votes in Congress from the Washington Post — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Ronald Vernie Dellums (1935-2018) — also known as Ronald V. Dellums — of Berkeley, Alameda County, Calif.; Oakland, Alameda County, Calif. Born in Oakland, Alameda County, Calif., November 24, 1935. Democrat. Social worker; U.S. Representative from California, 1971-98 (7th District 1971-75, 8th District 1975-93, 9th District 1993-98); arrested during an anti-apartheid protest outside the South African Embassy in Washington, 1984; delegate to Democratic National Convention from California, 1988, 1996, 2008; mayor of Oakland, Calif., 2007-11. Protestant. African ancestry. Member, Alpha Phi Alpha. Died in Washington, D.C., July 30, 2018 (age 82 years, 248 days). Interment at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Va.
  Relatives: Married to Leola Roscoe Higgs.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — votes in Congress from the Washington Post — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  William Donlon Edwards (1915-2015) — also known as Don Edwards — of San Jose, Santa Clara County, Calif. Born in San Jose, Santa Clara County, Calif., January 6, 1915. Democrat. Lawyer; served in the U.S. Navy during World War II; U.S. Representative from California, 1963-95 (9th District 1963-75, 10th District 1975-93, 16th District 1993-95); delegate to Democratic National Convention from California, 1964, 1968, 1988; arrested during an anti-apartheid protest outside the South African Embassy in Washington, 1984. Unitarian. Member, Americans for Democratic Action. Died in San Jose, Santa Clara County, Calif., October 1, 2015 (age 100 years, 268 days). Burial location unknown.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — votes in Congress from the Washington Post — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Charles Arthur Hayes (1918-1997) — also known as Charles A. Hayes — of Chicago, Cook County, Ill. Born in Cairo, Alexander County, Ill., February 17, 1918. Democrat. U.S. Representative from Illinois 1st District, 1983-93; defeated in primary, 1992; arrested during an anti-apartheid protest outside the South African Embassy in Washington, 1984. African ancestry. Member, United Food and Commercial Workers. Died, from complications of lung cancer, at South Suburban Hospital, Hazel Crest, Cook County, Ill., April 8, 1997 (age 79 years, 50 days). Burial location unknown.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — votes in Congress from the Washington Post — NNDB dossier
  Walter Edward Fauntroy (b. 1933) — also known as Walter E. Fauntroy — of Washington, D.C. Born in Washington, D.C., February 6, 1933. Democrat. Baptist minister; Delegate to U.S. Congress from the District of Columbia, 1971-91; candidate for Democratic nomination for President, 1972; delegate to Democratic National Convention from District of Columbia, 1972, 1980; arrested during an anti-apartheid sit-in at the South African Embassy in Washington, 1984; candidate in primary for mayor of Washington, D.C., 1990. Baptist. African ancestry. Member, Kappa Alpha Psi. Charged in federal court on March 22, 1995 with making false statements on financial disclosure forms, including a claimed donation of almost $24,000 to the New Bethel Baptist Church where he served as pastor, to make it appear that he had complied with House rules limiting outside income, and that he had failed to disclose a June 1988 loan of $24,200. Pleaded guilty to one felony count, and sentenced to probation. Still living as of 2014.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  George William Crockett, Jr. (1909-1997) — also known as George W. Crockett, Jr. — of Detroit, Wayne County, Mich. Born in Jacksonville, Duval County, Fla., August 10, 1909. Democrat. Recorder's court judge in Michigan, 1966-78; U.S. Representative from Michigan 13th District, 1980-91; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Michigan, 1984, 1988; arrested during an anti-apartheid protest outside the South African Embassy in Washington, 1984. Baptist. African ancestry. Member, Kappa Alpha Psi; National Lawyers Guild. Served four months in federal prison for contempt of court in 1950, following his defense of a Communist leader on trial in New York for advocating the overthrow of the government. Among the founders of the nation's first interracial law firm. Ill with bone cancer in 1997, he suffered a stroke and died five days later, in Washington Home and Hospice, Washington, D.C., September 7, 1997 (age 88 years, 28 days). Cremated.
  Relatives: Father of George W. Crockett III (1926?-).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  William H. Simons — also known as Bill Simons — of Washington, D.C. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army during World War II; school teacher; delegate to Democratic National Convention from District of Columbia, 1968, 1980, 1996, 2000; president, Washington Teachers Union; vice-president, American Federation of Teachers; arrested during an anti-apartheid protest outside the South African Embassy in Washington, 1984; Presidential Elector for District of Columbia, 2000. African ancestry. Still living as of 2000.
  Mary Frances Berry (b. 1938) — Born in Nashville, Davidson County, Tenn., February 17, 1938. Lawyer; writer; university professor; member, U.S. Civil Rights Commission, 1978-2004; chair, U.S. Civil Rights Commission, 1993-99; arrested during an anti-apartheid sit-in at the South African Embassy in Washington, 1984. Female. African ancestry. Still living as of 2014.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile
  Ezola Broussard Foster (b. 1938) — also known as Ezola B. Foster; Ezola Broussard — of Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, Calif. Born in Maurice, Vermilion Parish, La., August 9, 1938. School teacher; Republican candidate for California state assembly, 1984; arrested with others while protesting recognition of the gay Log Cabin Republican organization, at the California Republican state convention, 1987; Reform candidate for Vice President of the United States, 2000. Female. Catholic. African ancestry. Member, John Birch Society. Still living as of 2018.
  Relatives: Married 1977 to Chuck Foster.
  See also Wikipedia article — Internet Movie Database profile — Encyclopedia of American Loons
  John Quinn Brisben (1934-2012) — also known as J. Quinn Brisben — of Chicago, Cook County, Ill. Born in Enid, Garfield County, Okla., September 6, 1934. Socialist. School teacher; poet; candidate for Vice President of the United States, 1976; briefly jailed in Florida as a result of his participation in a disability rights demonstration in Orlando, Fla., 1992; candidate for President of the United States, 1992. Member, American Federation of Teachers. Died in Chicago, Cook County, Ill., April 17, 2012 (age 77 years, 224 days). Burial location unknown.
  See also Wikipedia article
  David Nelson (b. 1962) — of Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Utah. Born, in a hospital at Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Utah, April 7, 1962. Democrat. Delegate to Democratic National Convention from Utah, 1996, 2000. Gay. Member, American Civil Liberties Union; National Rifle Association. Convicted on a misdemeanor act of civil disobedience, 1995 Recipient of Democratic National Committee's Lawrence O'Brien Achievement Award, 1998. Still living as of 2004.
  Relatives: Third great-grandnephew of George Quayle Cannon (1827-1901); first cousin four times removed of Frank Jenne Cannon.
  Political family: Cannon family of Salt Lake City, Utah.
  Michael Badnarik (b. 1954) — of Austin, Travis County, Tex. Born in Hammond, Lake County, Ind., August 1, 1954. Libertarian. Software engineer; candidate for Texas state house of representatives, 2000 (47th District), 2002 (48th District); candidate for President of the United States, 2004; candidate for U.S. Representative from Texas 10th District, 2006. Slovak ancestry. Arrested, in St. Louis, Mo., on October 8, 2004, along with Green Party presidential nominee David Cobb, while protesting their exclusion from presidential debates. Still living as of 2007.
  See also Wikipedia article — Internet Movie Database profile — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  David Keith Cobb (b. 1962) — also known as David Cobb — Born in San Leon, Galveston County, Tex., December 24, 1962. Green. Lawyer; candidate for Texas state attorney general, 2002; candidate for President of the United States, 2004. Arrested, in St. Louis, Mo., on October 8, 2004, along with Libertarian Party presidential nominee Michael Bednarik, while protesting their exclusion from presidential debates. Still living as of 2004.
  See also Wikipedia article — Internet Movie Database profile — OurCampaigns candidate detail
Leslie L. Farr II Leslie L. Farr II (born c.1978) — of St. Louis, Mo. Born about 1978. Republican. Train conductor; delegate to Republican National Convention from Missouri, 2004; Republican candidate for U.S. Representative from Missouri 1st District, 2004, 2006 (primary); suspended without pay in October 2004, for making a political statement (critical of Democratic presidential candidate John Kerry) over the public address system of an Amtrak train; political consultant. African ancestry. Still living as of 2011.
  See also OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Image source: St. Louis Magazine, November 2006
  Joshua Selassie Wolf (b. 1982) — also known as Josh Wolf — of San Francisco, Calif. Born in California, June 8, 1982. Video journalist; jailed 226 days by a federal court for his refusal to turn over to prosecutors his tapes of anarchist protesters clashing with police during a 2005 demonstration; released in April 2007; candidate for mayor of San Francisco, Calif., 2007. Jewish ancestry. Still living as of 2007.
  See also Wikipedia article
  Thomas Peter Lantos (1928-2008) — also known as Tom Lantos; Tamas Peter Lantos — of Millbrae, San Mateo County, Calif.; Hillsborough, San Mateo County, Calif.; San Mateo, San Mateo County, Calif. Born in Budapest, Hungary, February 1, 1928. Democrat. University professor; television news commentator; delegate to Democratic National Convention from California, 1976, 1988, 1996, 2000, 2004; U.S. Representative from California, 1981-2008 (11th District 1981-93, 12th District 1993-2008); died in office 2008. Jewish. Member, Phi Beta Kappa; Sigma Alpha Mu. Arrested for disorderly conduct in April 2006, while taking part civil disobedience action to protest genocide in Darfur, in front of the Sudanese embassy in Washington, D.C. Died, of cancer of the esophagus, in Bethesda Naval Medical Center, Bethesda, Montgomery County, Md., February 11, 2008 (age 80 years, 10 days). Interment at Congressional Cemetery, Washington, D.C.
  Relatives: Married 1950 to Annette Tillemann; father of Katrina Lantos (1952?-) (who married Richard Nelson Swett).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — votes in Congress from the Washington Post — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Gordon James Klingenschmitt (b. 1968) — also known as Gordon Klingenschmitt — Born in Buffalo, Erie County, N.Y., June 5, 1968. Republican. Chaplain; wore his Navy uniform at a 2006 political protest, with Roy Moore, in front of the White House; subsequently court-martialed for disobeying a lawful order; he had been prohibited from appearing at political events in uniform; ultimately discharged from the Navy; member of Colorado state house of representatives, 2015-16; candidate in primary for Colorado state senate, 2016. Evangelical Christian. Still living as of 2016.
  See also Wikipedia article — Encyclopedia of American Loons
  Addison Graves Wilson (b. 1947) — also known as Joe Wilson — of West Columbia, Lexington County, S.C.; Springdale, Lexington County, S.C. Born in Charleston, Charleston County, S.C., July 31, 1947. Republican. Staff for U.S. Sen. Strom Thurmond, and for U.S. Rep. Floyd Spence; lawyer; delegate to Republican National Convention from South Carolina, 1972, 2008; member of South Carolina state senate, 1984-2001; U.S. Representative from South Carolina 2nd District, 2001-; rebuked by the House of Representatives in September, 2009, for a breach of decorum; he had shouted "You Lie!" during an address by President Barack Obama. Presbyterian. Still living as of 2018.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — votes in Congress from the Washington Post — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
Yari Osorio Yari Osorio — of New York City (unknown county), N.Y. Born in Cali, Colombia. Socialist. Emergency medical technician; anti-war and social justice activist; arrested in October, 2011, along with hundreds of others, during an Occupy Wall Street demonstration on the Brooklyn Bridge in New York City; Socialism and Liberation candidate for Vice President of the United States, 2012. Colombian ancestry. Still living as of 2012.
  Image source: Campaign web site (2012)
"Enjoy the hospitable entertainment of a political graveyard."
Henry L. Clinton, Apollo Hall, New York City, February 3, 1872
The Political Graveyard

The Political Graveyard is a web site about U.S. political history and cemeteries. Founded in 1996, it is the Internet's most comprehensive free source for American political biography, listing 312,576 politicians, living and dead.
  The listings are incomplete; development of the database is a continually ongoing project.  
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Copyright notices: (1) Facts are not subject to copyright; see Feist v. Rural Telephone. (2) Politician portraits displayed on this site are 70-pixel-wide monochrome thumbnail images, which I believe to constitute fair use under applicable copyright law. Where possible, each image is linked to its online source. However, requests from owners of copyrighted images to delete them from this site are honored. (3) Original material, programming, selection and arrangement are © 1996-2019 Lawrence Kestenbaum. (4) This work is also licensed for free non-commercial re-use, with attribution, under a Creative Commons License.
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