PoliticalGraveyard.com
The Political Graveyard: A Database of American History
The Internet's Most Comprehensive Source of U.S. Political Biography
(or, The Web Site that Tells Where the Dead Politicians are Buried)
Created and maintained by Lawrence Kestenbaum

Politicians with Physical Disabilities
(blindness, paralysis, loss of limb, etc.)

in alphabetical order

  Michael Aaronsohn (1896-1976) — of Cincinnati, Hamilton County, Ohio. Born in Baltimore, Md., July 5, 1896. Republican. Served in the U.S. Army during World War I; blinded in action; rabbi; college professor; offered prayer, Republican National Convention, 1940. Jewish. Died, in Jewish Hospital, Cincinnati, Hamilton County, Ohio, February 25, 1976 (age 79 years, 235 days). Interment at Clifton United Jewish Cemetery, Cincinnati, Ohio.
  Relatives: Married to Rachel Zemon (1897-1967).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Gregory Wayne Abbott (b. 1957) — also known as Greg Abbott — of Austin, Travis County, Tex. Born in Wichita Falls, Wichita County, Tex., November 13, 1957. Republican. Justice of Texas state supreme court, 1995-2002; appointed 1995; Texas state attorney general, 2002-15; delegate to Republican National Convention from Texas, 2008, 2012; Governor of Texas, 2015-. Injured in 1984 when a tree fell on him while jogging, partially paralyzed, and confined to a wheelchair. Still living as of 2017.
  See also Wikipedia article
  David Christopher Ahearn (1879-1925) — also known as David C. Ahearn — of Framingham, Middlesex County, Mass.; Glenwood Springs, Garfield County, Colo.; Denver, Colo. Born in Rotherham, England, November 4, 1879. Lawyer; member of Massachusetts state house of representatives, 1910-11; trustee, Framingham Hospital, 1910-16; selectman, Framingham, 1912-13; pioneer in Colorado oil shale industry; founder and president of the Yarg Producing & Refining Corporation. Catholic. Member, Elks. Crippled as a boy, had minimal use of both legs, and used canes or crutches. Died in Denver, Colo., November 30, 1925 (age 46 years, 26 days). Interment somewhere in Framingham, Mass.
  Relatives: Son of John Ahearn and Mary (Kerwin) Ahearn; married, December 27, 1909, to Jane Francis Shea.
  Frank T. Albright (1843-1908) — of Mason, Ingham County, Mich.; Lansing, Ingham County, Mich. Born in Ypsilanti, Washtenaw County, Mich., September 23, 1843. Republican. Served in the Union Army during the Civil War; injured in the battle at Cold Harbor, Va., 1864, and lost part of his right arm; postmaster at Mason, Mich., 1871-83. Member, Grand Army of the Republic; Royal Arcanum. Died, from Bright's disease, in Lansing, Ingham County, Mich., December 10, 1908 (age 65 years, 78 days). Interment at Mt. Hope Cemetery, Lansing, Mich.
  Relatives: Son of Henry Albright and Catherine (Miller) Albright.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Arthur William Aleshire (1900-1940) — also known as Arthur W. Aleshire — of Springfield, Clark County, Ohio. Born near Luray, Page County, Va., February 15, 1900. Democrat. Grocer; gasoline station business; His legs were paralyzed as the result of an accident in 1923; used a wheelchair; U.S. Representative from Ohio 7th District, 1937-39; defeated, 1938. Member, Knights of Pythias. Died, from uremia and heart disease, in a hospital at Springfield, Clark County, Ohio, March 11, 1940 (age 40 years, 25 days). Interment at Ferncliff Cemetery, Springfield, Ohio.
  Relatives: Son of James William Aleshire and Ada Aleshire; married, May 11, 1921, to Myrtle G. Marsh.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Michela Alioto-Pier (b. 1968) — also known as Michela A. Alioto — of San Francisco, Calif. Born in San Francisco, Calif., April 29, 1968. Democrat. Candidate for U.S. Representative from California 1st District, 1996; Democratic candidate for secretary of state of California, 1998, 2002 (primary); delegate to Democratic National Convention from California, 2000; candidate for mayor of San Francisco, Calif., 2011. Female. Her legs were paralyzed in a 1981 ski-lift accident. Still living as of 2011.
  Relatives: Daughter of Joseph Michael Alioto; married to Thomas Pier; niece of Angela Mia Alioto; step-granddaughter of Kathleen Sullivan Alioto (1944?-); granddaughter of Joseph Lawrence Alioto.
  Political family: Alioto family of San Francisco, California.
  See also Wikipedia article
  Ephraim Foster Anderson (1838-1877) — of Maryland. Born in Bedford County, Pa., 1838. Republican. Colonel in the Union Army during the Civil War; lawyer; member of Maryland state house of delegates, 1865; delegate to Republican National Convention from Maryland, 1868. Crippled by wounds received during the Civil War. Died April 5, 1877 (age about 38 years). Original interment at Presbyterian Church (which no longer exists), Anderson, Md.; reinterment to unknown location.
  Benjamin William Arnett (1838-1906) — also known as Benjamin W. Arnett — of Wilberforce, Greene County, Ohio. Born in Brownsville, Fayette County, Pa., March 16, 1838. Republican. School teacher and principal; ordained minister; member of Ohio state house of representatives from Greene County, 1886-87; first Black state legislator elected to represent a majority white constituency; bishop; offered prayer, Republican National Convention, 1896. African Methodist Episcopal. African, Scottish, American Indian, and Irish ancestry. Lost a leg due to a tumor in 1858. Died, of uremia, in Wilberforce, Greene County, Ohio, October 7, 1906 (age 68 years, 205 days). Interment at Wilberforce Cemetery, Wilberforce, Ohio.
  Relatives: Son of Samuel G. Arnett and Mary Louisa Arnett; married, May 25, 1858, to Mary Louisa Gordon.
  Arnett Hall, at Wilberforce University, Wilberforce, Ohio, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  William Hollingsworth Attwood (1919-1989) — also known as William Attwood — of New Canaan, Fairfield County, Conn. Born in Paris, France, July 14, 1919. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army during World War II; newspaper correspondent; newspaper editor and publisher; U.S. Ambassador to Guinea, 1961-63; Kenya, 1964-66. He became partially lame due to polio he caught in Africa. Died, from congestive heart failure, in New Canaan, Fairfield County, Conn., April 15, 1989 (age 69 years, 275 days). Interment somewhere in New Canaan, Conn.
  Relatives: Son of Frederic Attwood and Gladys (Hollingsworth) Attwood; married, June 22, 1950, to Simone Cadgene.
  See also Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary
  Books by William Attwood: Still the Most Exciting Country (1955) — The Twilight Struggle : Tales of the Cold War (1987) — The Reds and the Blacks : A Personal Adventure (1967)
  James Addams Beaver (1837-1914) — also known as James A. Beaver — of Bellefonte, Centre County, Pa. Born in Millerstown, Perry County, Pa., October 21, 1837. Republican. Lawyer; general in the Union Army during the Civil War; delegate to Republican National Convention from Pennsylvania, 1880; Governor of Pennsylvania, 1887-91; defeated, 1882; superior court judge in Pennsylvania, 1896-1906. Presbyterian. Lost a leg in the battle of Ream's Station, August 24, 1864. Died in Bellefonte, Centre County, Pa., January 31, 1914 (age 76 years, 102 days). Interment at Union Cemetery, Bellefonte, Pa.
  Relatives: Married, December 26, 1865, to Mary A. McAllister.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
Julius S. Berg Julius S. Berg (1895-1938) — of Bronx, Bronx County, N.Y. Born in New York, New York County, N.Y., July 15, 1895. Democrat. Lawyer; served in the U.S. Army during World War I; injured in combat and lost a leg; member of New York state assembly from Bronx County 3rd District, 1923-30; member of New York state senate 22nd District, 1931-38; died in office 1938. Jewish. Member, American Legion; Jewish War Veterans; Veterans of Foreign Wars; Disabled American Veterans; Freemasons; Elks; Knights of Pythias. Indicted on charges of receiving money for his aid in procuring liquor licenses and arranging for concessions at the New York World's Fair; that same day, he killed himself by gunshot, in his law office, Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., July 20, 1938 (age 43 years, 5 days). Interment at Mt. Ararat Cemetery, East Farmingdale, Long Island, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Morris Berg and Celia (Weinstein) Berg; married, June 20, 1920, to Rose Schram.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: New York Red Book 1936
  Abraham Bernstein (1918-1990) — of Bronx, Bronx County, N.Y. Born in Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., May 1, 1918. Democrat. Lawyer; served in the U.S. Army during World War II; member of New York state senate, 1961-90 (28th District 1961-65, 36th District 1966, 32nd District 1967-90); died in office 1990. Jewish. Member, American Jewish Congress; Zionist Organization of America; B'nai B'rith. One leg was amputated in 1977 due to phlebitis. Died, following a heart attack, in Albert Einstein Medical Center, Bronx, Bronx County, N.Y., March 4, 1990 (age 71 years, 307 days). Interment at New Mt. Lebanon Cemetery, Iselin, N.J.
  Relatives: Married to Ruth Schub and Gretchen Diamond.
  James Henderson Berry (1841-1913) — also known as James H. Berry — of Bentonville, Benton County, Ark. Born in Jackson County, Ala., May 15, 1841. Democrat. Served in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; wounded at the battle of Corinth, Miss., October 4, 1862, and lost a leg; lawyer; member of Arkansas state house of representatives, 1866, 1872-74; Speaker of the Arkansas State House of Representatives, 1874; circuit judge in Arkansas, 1879-83; Governor of Arkansas, 1883-85; U.S. Senator from Arkansas, 1885-1907; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Arkansas, 1900, 1904. Died in Bentonville, Benton County, Ark., January 30, 1913 (age 71 years, 260 days). Interment at Knights of Pythias Cemetery, Bentonville, Ark.
  Relatives: Cousin *** of Campbell Polson Berry (1834-1901).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  Roswell Peter Bishop (1843-1920) — also known as Roswell P. Bishop — of Ann Arbor, Washtenaw County, Mich.; Ludington, Mason County, Mich. Born in Sidney, Delaware County, N.Y., January 6, 1843. Republican. Served in the Union Army during the Civil War; wounded during the war at Lees Mills, Va., and lost his right arm; lawyer; Mason County Prosecuting Attorney, 1877-80, 1885-86; member of Michigan state house of representatives from Mason County, 1883-84, 1893-94; U.S. Representative from Michigan 9th District, 1895-1907; defeated, 1906; delegate to Michigan state constitutional convention 26th District, 1907. Died in Pacific Grove, Monterey County, Calif., March 4, 1920 (age 77 years, 58 days). Interment at El Carmelo Cemetery, Pacific Grove, Calif.
  Relatives: Son of Edward Bishop and Anna (Andrews) Bishop.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Mark Harden Blandford (1826-1902) — of Georgia. Born in Warren County, Ga., July 13, 1826. Served in the U.S. Army during the Mexican War; served in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; Representative from Georgia in the Confederate Congress, 1864-65; justice of Georgia state supreme court, 1883-90. Wounded during the Civil War, at McDowell, Va., and lost an arm. Died in Columbus, Muscogee County, Ga., January 31, 1902 (age 75 years, 202 days). Interment at Linwood Cemetery, Columbus, Ga.
  Ellis Barkett Bodron (1923-1997) — of Vicksburg, Warren County, Miss. Born in Vicksburg, Warren County, Miss., October 25, 1923. Member of Mississippi state house of representatives, 1948-52; member of Mississippi state senate, 1952-84; candidate for U.S. Representative from Mississippi, 1972. Member, American Bar Association; Lions; Jaycees. Blind from childhood. Died, of brain cancer, in Jackson, Hinds County, Miss., February 17, 1997 (age 73 years, 115 days). Burial location unknown.
  Alexander Campbell Botkin (1842-1905) — also known as Alexander C. Botkin — of Helena, Lewis and Clark County, Mont. Born in Madison, Dane County, Wis., October 13, 1842. Republican. Candidate for Delegate to U.S. Congress from Montana Territory, 1882; Lieutenant Governor of Montana, 1893-97; candidate for Governor of Montana, 1896. Suffered for twenty-five years from paralysis caused by exposure in a storm in 1880. Died in Washington, D.C., November 1, 1905 (age 63 years, 19 days). Interment at Forest Hill Cemetery, Madison, Wis.
  Relatives: Son of Alexander Botkin (1801-1857); married, June 11, 1872, to Harriet E. Sherman.
  William Huggins Brawley (1841-1916) — also known as William H. Brawley — of Chester, Chester District (now Chester County), S.C.; Charleston, Charleston County, S.C. Born in Chester, Chester District (now Chester County), S.C., May 13, 1841. Democrat. Served in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; wounded at the Battle of Seven Pines, Va., 1862, and lost an arm; lawyer; member of South Carolina state house of representatives, 1882-90; U.S. Representative from South Carolina 1st District, 1891-94; resigned 1894; U.S. District Judge for South Carolina, 1894-1911; retired 1911. Died in Charleston, Charleston County, S.C., November 15, 1916 (age 75 years, 186 days). Interment at Magnolia Cemetery, Charleston, S.C.
  Relatives: Married to Marion Emma Porter (1843-1906) and Mildred Boykin Frost (1878-1951); granduncle of Robert Witherspoon Hemphill (1915-1983); cousin *** of John James Hemphill.
  Political family: Hemphill family of Chester, South Carolina.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — federal judicial profile — Find-A-Grave memorial
  George E. Brennan (b. 1865) — also known as "Boss" — of Chicago, Cook County, Ill. Born in Cayuga County, N.Y., 1865. Democrat. Insurance business; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Illinois, 1904, 1908, 1912, 1920, 1924, 1928; candidate for U.S. Senator from Illinois, 1926. Lost a leg as a boy. Burial location unknown.
  Maurice L. Britt (1919-1995) — also known as Footsie Britt — of Arkansas. Born in Carlisle, Lonoke County, Ark., June 29, 1919. Republican. Served in the U.S. Army during World War II; Lieutenant Governor of Arkansas, 1967-71; candidate for Governor of Arkansas, 1986. Baptist. Member, American Legion; Rotary; Kiwanis. Professional football player for the Detroit Lions. Wounded during World War II and lost his right arm. Received the Medal of Honor for action at Mignano, Italy, in November 1943. Died November 26, 1995 (age 76 years, 150 days). Interment at National Cemetery, Little Rock, Ark.
  Wilmot W. Brookings (1830-1905) — of Sioux Falls, Minnehaha County, Dakota Territory (now S.Dak.). Born in Woolwich, Sagadahoc County, Maine, October 23, 1830. Lawyer; in February 1858, he was out in a blizzard and lost both feet; member Dakota territorial council, 1862-63, 1867-69; President of the Dakota Territorial Council, 1868; member of Dakota territorial House of Representatives, 1863-66; Speaker of the Dakota Territory House of Representatives, 1864-65; justice of Dakota territorial supreme court, 1869-73; delegate to South Dakota state constitutional convention, 1883, 1885. Died in Boston, Suffolk County, Mass., 1905 (age about 74 years). Burial location unknown.
  Brookings County, S.Dak. is named for him.
  Preston Smith Brooks (1819-1857) — also known as Preston S. Brooks — of Ninety Six, Edgefield District (now Greenwood County), S.C. Born in Edgefield, Edgefield District (now Edgefield County), S.C., August 5, 1819. Lawyer; member of South Carolina state house of representatives, 1844; U.S. Representative from South Carolina 4th District, 1853-56, 1856-57; died in office 1857. Suffered a hip wound in a duel with Louis T. Wigfall, 1839, and could walk only with a cane for the rest of his life. In May, 1856, furious over an anti-slavery speech, he went to the Senate and beat Senator Charles Sumner with a cane, causing severe injuries; an attempt to expel him from Congress failed for lack of the necessary two-thirds vote, but he resigned; re-elected to his own vacancy. Died in Washington, D.C., January 27, 1857 (age 37 years, 175 days). Interment at Willow Brook Cemetery, Edgefield, S.C.; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery, Washington, D.C.
  Relatives: Son of Whitefield Brooks and Mary P. (Carroll) Brooks; married 1841 to Caroline Means (1820-1843); married 1843 to Martha Means; cousin *** of Milledge Luke Bonham (1813-1890).
  Political family: Bonham family of Edgefield, South Carolina.
  Cross-reference: L. M. Keitt
  Brooks County, Ga. is named for him.
  The city of Brooksville, Florida, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Charles Elwood Brown (1834-1904) — also known as Charles E. Brown — of Cincinnati, Hamilton County, Ohio. Born in Cincinnati, Hamilton County, Ohio, July 4, 1834. Republican. General in the Union Army during the Civil War; U.S. Representative from Ohio 2nd District, 1885-89; member of Ohio state senate, 1890. Wounded during the Civil War, while fighting in Georgia, 1864, and lost a leg. Died in College Hill (now part of Cincinnati), Hamilton County, Ohio, May 22, 1904 (age 69 years, 323 days). Interment at Spring Grove Cemetery, Cincinnati, Ohio.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Jesse Brown (1944-2002) — Born in Detroit, Wayne County, Mich., March 27, 1944. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Marine Corps during the Vietnam War; U.S. Secretary of Veterans Affairs, 1993-97; speaker, Democratic National Convention, 1996. African ancestry. Member, Disabled American Veterans. His arm was partially paralyzed as a result of a combat injury in Vietnam, 1965. Died, from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, in Warrenton, Fauquier County, Va., August 15, 2002 (age 58 years, 141 days). Interment at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Va.
  Relatives: Son of David Brown and Lucille (Marsh) Brown.
  Epitaph: "Champion of Veterans. Beloved son, brother, husband, father and grandfather."
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Reagan V. Brown (c.1921-1999) — of Texas. Born about 1921. Served in the U.S. Army during World War II; Texas commissioner of agriculture, 1977-82. Lost a finger in an accident when he was young. Died in a farm tractor accident, in Brazoria County, Tex., November 16, 1999 (age about 78 years). Burial location unknown.
  Walter Boyd Brown, Sr. (1920-1998) — also known as Walter Brown, Sr.; W. B. Brown — of Winnsboro, Fairfield County, S.C. Born in Smallwood, Fairfield County, S.C., May 16, 1920. Democrat. Member of South Carolina state house of representatives, 1950; delegate to Democratic National Convention from South Carolina, 1960, 1964, 1968; first director of South Carolina Department of General Services; vice-president of Norfolk Southern Corporation (formerly Southern Railway). Presbyterian. Blind in one eye. Died, following a stroke, at Fairfield Memorial Hospital, Winnsboro, Fairfield County, S.C., March 9, 1998 (age 77 years, 297 days). Interment at Bethel Cemetery, Winnsboro, S.C.
  Relatives: Son of Boyd Brown (1897-1949).
  Thomas P. Burnett (1800-1845) — of Mt. Hope Township, Grant County, Wis. Born in Pittsylvania County, Va., September 3, 1800. Lawyer; walked with a limp due to a leg injury during a fire; present for the surrender of Black Hawk (Indian chief), August 2, 1832; member Wisconsin territorial council, 1836. Methodist. Member, Freemasons. Died, of typhoid, in Mt. Hope Township, Grant County, Wis., November 7, 1845 (age 45 years, 65 days). Interment at Hermitage Cemetery, Mt. Hope Township, Grant County, Wis.
  Relatives: Son of John Burnett and Judith Burnett; married, December 29, 1836, to Lucia Maria Brunson.
  Burnett County, Wis. is named for him.
Nicholas Murray Butler Nicholas Murray Butler (1862-1947) — of Paterson, Passaic County, N.J.; Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born in Elizabeth, Union County, N.J., April 2, 1862. Republican. University professor; alternate delegate to Republican National Convention from New Jersey, 1888; President of Columbia University, 1901-45; delegate to Republican National Convention from New York, 1904, 1912, 1916, 1920, 1924, 1928 (speaker), 1932; candidate for Vice President of the United States, 1912; candidate for Republican nomination for President, 1920, 1928; co-recipient of Nobel Peace Prize in 1931; elected (Wet) delegate to New York convention to ratify 21st amendment 1933, but did not serve; blind in his later years. Episcopalian. Member, American Philosophical Society; American Historical Association; Psi Upsilon; Phi Beta Kappa. Died, of bronchio-pneumonia, in St. Luke's Hospital, Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., December 7, 1947 (age 85 years, 249 days). Interment at Cedar Lawn Cemetery, Paterson, N.J.
  Relatives: Son of Henry L. Butler and Mary J. (Murray) Butler; married 1887 to Susanna Edwards Schuyler (died 1903); married, March 5, 1907, to Kate La Montagne (sister-in-law of Francis Key Pendleton (1850-1930)).
  Political families: Pendleton-Lee family; Key family of Maryland (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Cross-reference: Thomas Burke
  Campaign slogan (1920): "Pick Nick as President for a Picnic in November."
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: American Monthly Review of Reviews, February 1902
  Allen Daniel Candler (1834-1910) — also known as Allen D. Candler; "The One-Eyed Ploughboy from Pigeon Roost" — of Jonesboro, Clayton County, Ga.; Gainesville, Hall County, Ga. Born in Auraria, Lumpkin County, Ga., November 4, 1834. Democrat. Colonel in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; in the battle of Jonesboro, 1864, he was wounded, and lost an eye; railroad president; mayor of Gainesville, Ga., 1872; member of Georgia state house of representatives, 1873-77; member of Georgia state senate, 1878-79; U.S. Representative from Georgia 9th District, 1883-91; secretary of state of Georgia, 1894-98; Governor of Georgia, 1898-1902. Presbyterian. Member, Freemasons. Died in Atlanta, Fulton County, Ga., October 26, 1910 (age 75 years, 356 days). Interment at Alta Vista Cemetery, Gainesville, Ga.
  Relatives: Son of Nancy Caroline (Matthews) Candler and Daniel Gill Candler (1812-1887?); married, January 12, 1864, to Eugenia Williams; nephew of Samuel Charles Candler and Ezekiel Slaughter Candler; great-grandson of William Candler; first cousin of Milton Anthony Candler, Asa Griggs Candler and John Slaughter Candler; first cousin once removed of Charles Murphey Candler, Ezekiel Samuel Candler, Jr. and Thomas Slaughter Candler; second cousin once removed of Mark Anthony Cooper; third cousin once removed of Joseph Meriwether Terrell.
  Political family: Candler family of Georgia.
  Candler County, Ga. is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  Frederick W. Carberry (1875-1938) — of Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, Wis. Born in Dubuque, Dubuque County, Iowa, February 3, 1875. Republican. Music teacher; musical instrument dealer; director of community singing; performed, Republican National Convention, 1920 ; blind in his later years. Died, from heart disease, in Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, Wis., January 27, 1938 (age 62 years, 358 days). Interment at Linwood Cemetery, Dubuque, Iowa.
  Relatives: Married to Alma Charlotte Schwanke.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Isaac Swartwood Catlin (1835-1916) — also known as Isaac S. Catlin — of Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y. Born in Owego, Tioga County, N.Y., July 8, 1835. Republican. Mayor of Owego, N.Y., 1860-61; colonel in the Union Army during the Civil War; wounded during Battle of the Crater, Petersburg, Va., July 1864, and lost his right leg; received the Medal of Honor for his actions that day; lawyer; candidate for mayor of Brooklyn, N.Y., 1885. Suffered a stroke, and died a week later, in the Hotel St. George, Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y., January 19, 1916 (age 80 years, 195 days). Interment at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Va.
  Relatives: Son of Nathaniel Catlin and Jane (Brodhead) Catlin; brother of Delinda Catlin (who married Benjamin Franklin Tracy (1830-1915)); married 1862 to Virginia H. S. Bacon (1842-1913).
  Political family: Coudert-Catlin-Tracy family of New York City, New York.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Sidney Johnston Catts (1863-1936) — also known as Sidney J. Catts — of Florida. Born in Pleasant Hill, Dallas County, Ala., July 31, 1863. Democrat. Lawyer; pastor; insurance agent; Governor of Florida, 1917-21; defeated in primary, 1924, 1928. Member, Freemasons; Knights of Pythias; Woodmen of the World. Lost his right eye in a childhood accident. Died in DeFuniak Springs, Walton County, Fla., March 9, 1936 (age 72 years, 222 days). Interment at Magnolia Cemetery, DeFuniak Springs, Fla.
  Relatives: Son of Samuel Walker Catts and Adeline Rebecca (Smyly) Catts; married, November 18, 1886, to Alice May Campbell (1863-1949); father of Sidney Johnston Catts, Jr. (1894-1969).
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about Sidney J. Catts: Wayne Flynt, Cracker Messiah : Governor Sidney J. Catts of Florida
  William Astor Chanler (1867-1934) — of New York, New York County, N.Y.; Barrytown, Dutchess County, N.Y.; Paris, France. Born in Newport, Newport County, R.I., June 11, 1867. Democrat. Explorer; author; member of New York state assembly from New York County 5th District, 1898; served in the U.S. Army during the Spanish-American War; U.S. Representative from New York 14th District, 1899-1901. Member, Tammany Hall. Injured in an automobile accident in France, 1915, and lost a lower leg. Died in Mentone (Menton), France, March 4, 1934 (age 66 years, 266 days). Interment at Trinity Cemetery, Manhattan, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of John Winthrop Chanler and Margaret Astor (Ward) Chanler (1838-1875); brother of Lewis Stuyvesant Chanler (1869-1942); married 1903 to Minnie 'Beatrice' Ashley (actress, comedienne, sculptor); grandnephew of John Jacob Astor III; second great-grandson of John Armstrong, Jr.; second great-grandnephew of Robert R. Livingston (1746-1813), James Armstrong and Edward Livingston; third great-grandson of John Armstrong and Robert R. Livingston (1718-1775); fourth great-grandson of Robert Livingston (1688-1775); fourth great-grandnephew of John Livingston and Gilbert Livingston; fifth great-grandson of Robert Livingston the Elder and Robert Livingston the Younger; fifth great-grandnephew of Johannes Schuyler (1668-1747); sixth great-grandson of Pieter Schuyler (1657-1724); first cousin once removed of William Waldorf Astor; first cousin five times removed of Robert Livingston (1708-1790), Peter Van Brugh Livingston, Robert Gilbert Livingston, Philip Livingston, William Livingston, Jeremiah Van Rensselaer, Robert Van Rensselaer and James Livingston; first cousin six times removed of Johannes Schuyler (1697-1746) and Philip P. Schuyler; first cousin seven times removed of David Davidse Schuyler and Myndert Davidtse Schuyler; second cousin four times removed of Peter Robert Livingston (1737-1794), Walter Livingston, Philip Peter Livingston, Henry Brockholst Livingston, Pierre Van Cortlandt, Jr., Peter Robert Livingston (1766-1847), Jacob Rutsen Van Rensselaer, Philip Jeremiah Schuyler and Maturin Livingston; second cousin five times removed of Stephanus Bayard, Philip John Schuyler, Stephen John Schuyler, Pieter Schuyler (1746-1792) and Peter Samuel Schuyler; third cousin thrice removed of Stephen Van Rensselaer, Philip Schuyler Van Rensselaer, Henry Walter Livingston, Peter Augustus Jay, Rensselaer Westerlo, Edward Philip Livingston, Philip Schuyler, James Alexander Hamilton, Peter Robert Livingston (1789-1859), William Jay, Gerrit Smith, Charles Ludlow Livingston, Hamilton Fish and Elizabeth Cady Stanton; fourth cousin of Robert Reginald Livingston.
  Political family: Livingston-Schuyler family of New York (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Robert Keaton Christenberry (1899-1973) — also known as Robert K. Christenberry — of Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, Ohio; Detroit, Wayne County, Mich.; Peoria, Peoria County, Ill.; Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, Pa.; Manhattan, New York County, N.Y.; Fort Lauderdale, Broward County, Fla. Born in Huntingdon, Carroll County, Tenn., January 27, 1899. Republican. Served in the U.S. Marine Corps during World War I; lost his right hand and wrist in a grenade explosion; U.S. Vice Consul in Vladivostok, as of 1919; hotel manager and executive; candidate for mayor of New York City, N.Y., 1957; postmaster at New York City, N.Y., 1958-66 (acting, 1958-59). Presbyterian. Member, Disabled American Veterans; American Legion; Veterans of Foreign Wars; Freemasons; Shriners; Jesters. Suffered a stroke, and died two months later, in Methodist Hospital, Memphis, Shelby County, Tenn., April 13, 1973 (age 74 years, 76 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of William Calvin Christenberry and Rebecca Arminta (Keaton) Christenberry; married, August 14, 1929, to Edna Joan LeRoy.
  Joseph Maxwell Cleland (b. 1942) — also known as Max Cleland — of Lithonia, DeKalb County, Ga. Born in Atlanta, Fulton County, Ga., August 24, 1942. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army during the Vietnam war; member of Georgia state senate, 1971-75; candidate for Lieutenant Governor of Georgia, 1974; secretary of state of Georgia, 1983-96; U.S. Senator from Georgia, 1997-2003; defeated, 2002; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Georgia, 2000. Lost both legs and part of one arm in Vietnam. Still living as of 2014.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — votes in Congress from the Washington Post — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Books by Max Cleland: Strong at the Broken Places — Going for the Max! : 12 Principles for Living Life to the Fullest (2000) — Heart of a Patriot: How I Found the Courage to Survive Vietnam, Walter Reed and Karl Rove, with Ben Raines (2009)
John F. Collins John F. Collins (1919-1995) — of Boston, Suffolk County, Mass. Born in Roxbury, Boston, Suffolk County, Mass., 1919. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army during World War II; member of Massachusetts state house of representatives, 1950; member of Massachusetts state senate, 1950; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Massachusetts, 1952, 1960, 1964; mayor of Boston, Mass., 1960-68. Catholic. His legs were paralyzed due to polio. Died at Vencor Hospital, Boston, Suffolk County, Mass., November 23, 1995 (age about 76 years). Interment at St. Joseph's Cemetery, West Roxbury, Boston, Mass.
  See also NNDB dossier
  Image source: Time Magazine, March 23, 1962
  Louis P. Cooke (1811-1849) — of Texas. Born in Tennessee, 1811. Colonel in the Texas Army during the Texas War of Independence; member of Texas Republic House of Representatives, 1838-39, 1841-42; Texas Republic Secretary of the Navy, 1839-41. Charged in 1843 with the murder of Captain Mark Lewis; at trial, the jury deadlocked, and he escaped before a second trial could be held. Wounded in an Indian raid on Corpus Christi in 1844 and lost an eye. Died, of cholera, in Brownsville, Cameron County, Tex., 1849 (age about 38 years). Interment somewhere in New Orleans, La.
  Thomas F. Cosgrove (b. 1892) — of West New Brighton, Staten Island, Richmond County, N.Y. Born in New York, New York County, N.Y., June 16, 1892. Democrat. Lawyer; served in the U.S. Army during World War I; wounded in battle at Argonne Forest, October 21, 1918, and lost a leg; member of New York state assembly from Richmond County 1st District, 1920-23. Interment at St. Peter's Cemetery, Grassmere, Staten Island, N.Y.
  Edwin Bryant Crocker (1818-1875) — also known as Edwin B. Crocker — of Sacramento, Sacramento County, Calif. Born in Jamesville, Onondaga County, N.Y., April 26, 1818. Lawyer; justice of California state supreme court, 1863; chief counsel, Central Pacific Railroad, 1864-69. Founder of the Crocker Art Museum; partially paralyzed following an 1869 stroke. Died in Sacramento, Sacramento County, Calif., June 24, 1875 (age 57 years, 59 days). Interment at Sacramento City Cemetery, Sacramento, Calif.
  Relatives: Son of Isaac Crocker and (mother) Crocker; brother of Charles Crocker (1822-1888); married, September 3, 1845, to Mary Norton (1821-1847); married, July 8, 1852, to Margaret Eleanor Rhodes (1822-1901); father of Jennie Louise Crocker (1860-1939; who married Jacob Sloat Fassett); uncle of Charles Frederick Crocker and William Henry Crocker.
  Political families: Rockefeller family of New York City, New York; Crocker-Whitehouse family (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Robert H. Curry (1842-1892) — of Bossier Parish, La. Born in Fairfield District (now Fairfield County), S.C., November 26, 1842. Member of Louisiana state house of representatives, 1887. Presbyterian. Member, Grange; Knights of Pythias. Shot in the right ankle during the Battle of Manassas, and crippled for the rest of his life. Died June 24, 1892 (age 49 years, 211 days). Interment at Rocky Mount Cemetery, Rocky Mount, La.
  Laurence Curtis (1893-1989) — also known as Lawrence Curtis — of Boston, Suffolk County, Mass. Born in Boston, Suffolk County, Mass., September 3, 1893. Republican. Served in the U.S. Navy during World War I; lost a leg during Navy training exercises; lawyer; secretary to U.S. Supreme Court Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr., 1921-22; member of Massachusetts state house of representatives, 1933-36; member of Massachusetts state senate, 1936-41; delegate to Republican National Convention from Massachusetts, 1944 (alternate), 1960; Massachusetts state treasurer, 1947-48; defeated, 1948; U.S. Representative from Massachusetts 10th District, 1953-63. Episcopalian. Member, Disabled American Veterans; American Bar Association; Freemasons. Died July 11, 1989 (age 95 years, 311 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Louis Curtis and Fanny Leland (Richardson) Curtis.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Booker Dalton (1869-1948) — of Stuart, Patrick County, Va. Born, in a log house, in Patrick County, Va., December 13, 1869. Farmer; District Commissioner of Revenue, 1910-12, 1923-26; member of Virginia state house of delegates from Patrick County, 1914-15; Patrick County Commissioner of Revenue, 1927-39. Primitive Baptist. Lost one eye in an accident. Died, from a stroke, in Stuart, Patrick County, Va., December 13, 1948 (age 79 years, 0 days). Interment at Stuart Cemetery, Stuart, Va.
  Relatives: Son of Willis Dalton (1836-1909) and Lucy Ann (Howell) Dalton (1844-1916); married, February 14, 1894, to Lilla Susan Shockley (1875-1970); father of Grady W. Dalton (1908-1986).
John W. Daniel John Warwick Daniel (1842-1910) — also known as John W. Daniel; "The Lame Lion of Lynchburg" — of Lynchburg, Va. Born in Lynchburg, Va., September 5, 1842. Democrat. Major in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; permanently disabled by a war injury; lawyer; member of Virginia state house of delegates, 1869-72; member of Virginia state senate, 1875-81; Presidential Elector for Virginia, 1876; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Virginia, 1880 (Convention Vice-President), 1888, 1896 (Permanent Chair), 1904; candidate for Governor of Virginia, 1881; U.S. Representative from Virginia 6th District, 1885-87; U.S. Senator from Virginia, 1887-1910; died in office 1910; delegate to Virginia state constitutional convention from Campbell County, 1901-02. Died in Lynchburg, Va., June 29, 1910 (age 67 years, 297 days). Interment at Spring Hill Cemetery, Lynchburg, Va.
  Relatives: Son of William Daniel (1806-1873) and Sarah Ann (Warwick) Daniel (1845-1918); married 1869 to Julia Elizabeth Murrell (1850-1937); first cousin of Henry Martin Daniel.
  Political family: Daniel family of Lynchburg, Virginia.
  Epitaph: "The memory of the just is blessed."
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: The Parties and The Men (1896)
  Sammy Davis, Jr. (1925-1990) — also known as Samuel George Davis — Born in Harlem, Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., December 8, 1925. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army during World War II; singer; dancer; actor; injured in an automobile accident in 1954, and lost his left eye; honored guest, Democratic National Convention, 1960. Jewish. African and Cuban ancestry. Received the Spingarn Medal in 1968. Died, from complications of throat cancer, in Beverly Hills, Los Angeles County, Calif., May 16, 1990 (age 64 years, 159 days). Interment at Forest Lawn Memorial Park, Glendale, Calif.
  Relatives: Son of Samuel George Davis (1900-1988) and Elvera (Sanchez) Davis (1905-2000); married, January 10, 1958, to Loray White (divorced 1959); married, November 13, 1960, to May Britt (divorced 1968); married, May 11, 1970, to Altovise Gore (1943-2009).
  Epitaph: "The Entertainer -- He Did It All"
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Gerald DeRuiter — of Grand Rapids, Kent County, Mich.; Kentwood, Kent County, Mich. Born in Wyoming Township (now Wyoming), Kent County, Mich. Republican. Presidential Elector for Michigan, 1972; mayor of Kentwood, Mich., 1981-92; resigned 1992. Injured in a hunting accident in 1969, and lost a leg. Still living as of 1992.
  Roscoe D. Dix (1839-1912) — of Berrien Springs, Berrien County, Mich. Born in Jefferson County, N.Y., June 11, 1839. Republican. Served in the Union Army during the Civil War; permanently disabled by injuries suffered in the battle at Knoxville, November 24, 1863; barber; real estate business; banker; Michigan land commissioner, 1887-90; Michigan state auditor general, 1897-1900. Member, Grand Army of the Republic. Died in Berrien Springs, Berrien County, Mich., September 5, 1912 (age 73 years, 86 days). Interment at Rose Hill Cemetery, Berrien Springs, Mich.
  Relatives: Son of Dexter Ozias Dix (1807-1882) and Mary Elizabeth (Rudd) Dix (1809-1889); married, January 2, 1867, to Virginia M. Kephart (1844-1915); sixth great-grandnephew of Robert Treat; second cousin of John Alden Dix (1860-1928).
  Political family: Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Frank Murray Dixon (1892-1965) — also known as Frank M. Dixon — of Alabama. Born in Oakland, Alameda County, Calif., July 25, 1892. Democrat. Lawyer; served in the U.S. Army during World War I; injured during the war and lost his right leg; delegate to Alabama convention to ratify 21st amendment at-large, 1933; Governor of Alabama, 1939-43; defeated in primary, 1934. Baptist. Member, American Bar Association; American Legion; Veterans of Foreign Wars; Disabled American Veterans; Kappa Alpha Order; Phi Delta Phi; Freemasons; Kiwanis. Died in Birmingham, Jefferson County, Ala., October 11, 1965 (age 73 years, 78 days). Interment at Oak Hill Cemetery, Birmingham, Ala.
  William Wade Dudley (b. 1842) — of Richmond, Wayne County, Ind.; Washington, D.C. Born in Weathersfield Bow, Weathersfield, Windsor County, Vt., August 27, 1842. Republican. Colonel in the Union Army during the Civil War; wounded at the battle of Gettysburg, 1863, and lost his right leg; Wayne County Clerk of Courts, 1866-74; milling business; lawyer; banker; U.S. Marshal, District of Indiana, 1879-81; U.S. Commissioner of Pensions, 1881-85; Treasurer of Republican National Committee, 1888. Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Married 1864 to Theresa Fiske.
  Matthew Anthony Dunn (1886-1942) — also known as Matthew A. Dunn — of Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, Pa. Born in Braddock, Allegheny County, Pa., August 15, 1886. News dealer; insurance broker; member of Pennsylvania state house of representatives from Allegheny County 12th District, 1926-32; U.S. Representative from Pennsylvania 34th District, 1933-41. Lost sight in his left eye at age 12; became blind with when he lost sight in his right eye at age 20. Died in Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, Pa., February 13, 1942 (age 55 years, 182 days). Interment at Homewood Cemetery, Pittsburgh, Pa.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Nehemiah Hezekiah Earll (1787-1872) — of New York. Born in Whitehall, Washington County, N.Y., October 5, 1787. Democrat. County judge in New York, 1823-31; U.S. Representative from New York 23rd District, 1839-41; defeated, 1840. Blind for many years. Died in Mottville, Onondaga County, N.Y., August 26, 1872 (age 84 years, 326 days). Interment at Oakwood Cemetery, Syracuse, N.Y.
  Relatives: Cousin *** of Jonas Earll, Jr. (1786-1846).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  John Porter East (1931-1986) — also known as John P. East — of North Carolina. Born in Springfield, Sangamon County, Ill., May 5, 1931. Republican. Candidate for secretary of state of North Carolina, 1968; Presidential Elector for North Carolina, 1972; U.S. Senator from North Carolina, 1981-86; died in office 1986. Presbyterian. His legs were paralyzed due to polio. Killed himself by carbon monoxide poisoning, in Greenville, Pitt County, N.C., June 29, 1986 (age 55 years, 55 days). Interment at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Va.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Matthew Duncan Ector (1822-1879) — Born in Putnam County, Ga., February 28, 1822. Member of Georgia state legislature, 1850; member of Texas state legislature, 1855; general in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; Judge, Texas Court of Appeals, 1866-79; died in office 1879. Wounded during the Civil War, and lost a leg. Died October 29, 1879 (age 57 years, 243 days). Interment at Greenwood Cemetery, Marshall, Tex.
  Ector County, Tex. is named for him.
  Lucius Fairchild (1831-1896) — of Madison, Dane County, Wis. Born in Franklin Mill (unknown county), Ohio, December 27, 1831. Republican. General in the Union Army during the Civil War; wounded at the battle of Gettysburg, 1863, and lost an arm; secretary of state of Wisconsin, 1864-66; Governor of Wisconsin, 1866-72; U.S. Consul General in Paris, as of 1879; U.S. Minister to Spain, 1880-81; Presidential Elector for Wisconsin, 1888. Died May 23, 1896 (age 64 years, 148 days). Interment at Forest Hill Cemetery, Madison, Wis.
  Relatives: Son of Jairus C. Fairchild; brother of Cassius Fairchild (1829-1868).
  Political family: Fairchild family of Madison, Wisconsin.
  Cross-reference: John C. Spooner
  See also U.S. State Dept career summary
  Paul Farthing (b. 1887) — of East St. Louis, St. Clair County, Ill.; Belleville, St. Clair County, Ill. Born in Odin, Marion County, Ill., April 12, 1887. Democrat. Lawyer; St. Clair County Judge, 1930-33; justice of Illinois state supreme court, 1933-42; defeated, 1924; chief justice of Illinois state supreme court, 1937-38; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Illinois, 1936. Presbyterian. Member, Optimist Club; Sons of the Revolution; Redmen; Phi Delta Phi; Order of the Coif. Blind since age 12, when his eyes were shot out by another boy. Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of William Dudley Farthing and Sarah (Boyd) Farthing; married, June 18, 1914, to Harriet Helen Garrigues.
  James Herbert Fay (1899-1948) — also known as James H. Fay — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born in Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., April 29, 1899. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army during World War I; wounded and lost his left leg; secretary to the president of Bellevue and Allied Hospitals, 1923-29; deputy commissioner of hospitals, 1929-33; U.S. Representative from New York 16th District, 1939-41, 1943-45; defeated, 1934, 1940; delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1940; chair of New York County Democratic Party, 1942; insurance and advertising business. Catholic. Member, Tammany Hall; American Legion. Died in Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., September 10, 1948 (age 49 years, 134 days). Interment at Long Island National Cemetery, East Farmingdale, Long Island, N.Y.
  Relatives: Married to Hazel De Witt Kelly (1905-1978).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Louis Fechter, Sr. (1851-1921) — of Buffalo, Erie County, N.Y. Born in Alsace-Lorraine, France, 1851. Republican. Employed on Lake Shore and Michigan Southern Railroad; lost an arm in an 1877 railroad accident; carting business; organized Buffalo Rendering Co.; manager, Buffalo Fertilizer Co.; president, Minnehaha Mining and Smelting Co.; president, Fechter-Elliott Agency, real estate and insurance; member of New York state senate 48th District, 1905-06. Catholic. Died in Buffalo, Erie County, N.Y., April 16, 1921 (age about 69 years). Interment at United German and French Cemetery, Cheektowaga, N.Y.
  Francis Fessenden (1839-1906) — of Portland, Cumberland County, Maine. Born in Portland, Cumberland County, Maine, March 18, 1839. Republican. General in the Union Army during the Civil War; suffered a battlefield injury which resulted in a leg amputation; lawyer; mayor of Portland, Maine, 1876-77. Died in Portland, Cumberland County, Maine, January 2, 1906 (age 66 years, 290 days). Interment at Evergreen Cemetery, Portland, Maine.
  Relatives: Son of William Pitt Fessenden and Ellen Maria (Deering) Fessenden (1807-1857); brother of James Deering Fessenden and Samuel Fessenden (1841-1862; killed in Civil War); nephew of Samuel Clement Fessenden (1815-1882), Thomas Amory Deblois Fessenden and Joseph Palmer Fessenden; grandson of Samuel Clement Fessenden (1784-1869); first cousin of Joshua Abbe Fessenden, Samuel Fessenden (1847-1908) and Oliver Grosvenor Fessenden; first cousin once removed of Charles Milton Fessenden; third cousin once removed of William Fessenden Allen; third cousin twice removed of Benjamin Fessenden, John Milton Fessenden and Charles Backus Hyde Fessenden; fourth cousin once removed of Walter Fessenden and Samuel Fessenden (1845-1903).
  Political families: Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York; Eastman family; Fessenden family (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Larry Flynt (b. 1942) — also known as "The King of Smut" — of California. Born in Salyersville, Magoffin County, Ky., November 1, 1942. Democrat. Owner of night clubs; publisher of Hustler, a pornographic magazine; convicted in Cincinnati, Ohio, 1977 on obscenity and organized crime charges, and sentenced to 25 years in prison, but the verdict was overturned on appeal; shot by a sniper in Lawrenceville, Georgia, 1978, and paralyzed from the waist down; candidate for Governor of California, 2003. Atheist. Still living as of 2014.
  Relatives: Married 1976 to Althea Leasure (1953-1987).
  Campaign slogan (2003): "Vote For a Smut-Peddler Who Cares."
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile
  Ray Louis Forshee (1884-1974) — also known as Ray L. Forshee — of Pittsfield Township, Washtenaw County, Mich.; Ann Arbor, Washtenaw County, Mich. Born in Michigan, March 19, 1884. Democrat. Clothing salesman; candidate for supervisor of Pittsfield Township, Michigan, 1941. Irish and German ancestry. His legs were amputated due to arteriosclerosis. Died, of pneumonia, in Whitehall Convalescent Center, Pittsfield Township, Washtenaw County, Mich., January 5, 1974 (age 89 years, 292 days). Interment at St. Thomas Cemetery, Ann Arbor, Mich.
  Relatives: Son of John Henry Forshee (1854-1941) and Virginia (Cowan) Forshee (1857-1933); brother of Frank J. Forshee (1896-1991); married to Ida Dorothy Lerg (1887-1982); first cousin once removed of David E. Waite.
  Political family: Adams-Waite-Forshee-Cowan family of Dexter, Michigan (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Benjamin Wynn Fortson, Jr. (b. 1904) — also known as Ben W. Fortson, Jr. — of Wilkes County, Ga. Born in Tignall, Wilkes County, Ga., December 19, 1904. Democrat. Member of Georgia state senate, 1939-42; member of Georgia state house of representatives from Wilkes County, 1943-46; secretary of state of Georgia, 1946-79. Methodist. Member, Pi Sigma Alpha; Freemasons; Moose. Confined to a wheelchair since an automobile accident in 1929. Burial location unknown.
  James Emerson Fraser (1916-1950) — also known as James E. Fraser; "Sonny" — of Atlantic City, Atlantic County, N.J. Born August 4, 1916. Deputy sheriff; secretary to State Sen. Frank S. Farley, 1944; member of New Jersey state house of assembly from Atlantic County, 1948-50; died in office 1950; Speaker of the New Jersey State House of Assembly, 1950; died in office 1950. Champion amateur golfer. Confined to a wheelchair starting in 1949. Died, from Hodgkin's disease, in Atlantic City, Atlantic County, N.J., August 29, 1950 (age 34 years, 25 days). Interment at Absecon Presbyterian Church Cemetery, Absecon, N.J.
  Relatives: Son of Jim 'Jolly Jim' Fraser and Milly Fraser; married 1944 to Madolin Martha Vautrinot (1913-1962).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
Homer H. Fuller Homer H. Fuller (1900-1984) — of Euless, Tarrant County, Tex. Born in Euless, Tarrant County, Tex., 1900. Grocer; mayor of Euless, Tex., 1951-53. Walked with difficulty due to childhood polio. Died in Euless, Tarrant County, Tex., 1984 (age about 84 years). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of James R. Fuller and Annie Fuller; brother of Warren Fuller; uncle of Earnest Millican, Jr. (1923-).
  Political family: Fuller family of Euless, Texas.
  Image source: City of Euless
Oramel B. Fuller Oramel B. Fuller (1858-1935) — of Ford River, Delta County, Mich. Born in Jersey City, Hudson County, N.J., January 22, 1858. Republican. Lumber business; member of Michigan state house of representatives from Delta District, 1893-98; member of Michigan state senate 30th District, 1901-04, 1907-08; injured in a fall at the entrance to his home, about 1905, and paralyzed; used a wheelchair for the rest of his life; Michigan state auditor general, 1909-32; defeated, 1932. Member, Freemasons; Shriners; Knights of Pythias; Elks. Died in Lansing, Ingham County, Mich., November 4, 1935 (age 77 years, 286 days). Interment at Oakwood Cemetery, Muskegon, Mich.
  Relatives: Married 1887 to Jennie L. Van Zalingen (1862-1922).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: Michigan Manual 1911
  Peter Charles Gaillard (1812-1889) — also known as Peter C. Gaillard — of Charleston, Charleston County, S.C. Born in Berkeley County, S.C., December 29, 1812. Lawyer; colonel in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; hit by a shell during the war, and lost his left arm; mayor of Charleston, S.C., 1865-68. Died in Charleston, Charleston County, S.C., January 11, 1889 (age 76 years, 13 days). Interment at Magnolia Cemetery, Charleston, S.C.
  Relatives: Son of James Porcher Gaillard (1788-1871) and Harriet (Porcher) Gaillard (1792-1825); married to Anne Lawrence Snowden (1819-1871); great-grandfather of John Palmer Gaillard, Jr.; first cousin of Peter Gaillard Snowden and Franklin Gaillard; first cousin once removed of John Gaillard; first cousin twice removed of Thomas Porcher Stoney; second cousin of Theodore Gaillard Hunt and Peter Porcher Bonneau; fourth cousin of Francis James Porcher and William Porcher Miles (1822-1899).
  Political family: Gaillard family of Charleston, South Carolina.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Charles J. Gardner (1843-1901) — of Warsaw, Wyoming County, N.Y. Born in Attica, Wyoming County, N.Y., May 12, 1843. Republican. Served in the Union Army during the Civil War; wounded in the war, and lost his right leg; postmaster at Warsaw, N.Y., 1884-88; Wyoming County Sheriff, 1888-90; member of New York state assembly from Wyoming County, 1900-01; died in office 1901. Member, Grand Army of the Republic. Died, from uremic poisoning, in Warsaw, Wyoming County, N.Y., May 7, 1901 (age 57 years, 360 days). Interment at Warsaw Cemetery, Warsaw, N.Y.
  Relatives: Married, July 30, 1865, to Annette R. Terry (1841-1924).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Samuel Jameson Gholson (1808-1883) — of Mississippi. Born near Richmond, Madison County, Ky., May 19, 1808. Democrat. Member of Mississippi state house of representatives, 1835; U.S. Representative from Mississippi at-large, 1836-37, 1837-39; federal judge, 1839; general in the Confederate Army during the Civil War. Wounded during the Civil War and lost an arm. Died in Aberdeen, Monroe County, Miss., October 16, 1883 (age 75 years, 150 days). Interment at Odd Fellows Cemetery, Aberdeen, Miss.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
Thomas P. Gore Thomas Pryor Gore (1870-1949) — also known as Thomas P. Gore — of Texas; Lawton, Comanche County, Okla.; Oklahoma City, Oklahoma County, Okla. Born near Embry, Webster County, Miss., December 10, 1870. Democrat. Lawyer; candidate for U.S. Representative from Texas, 1898; member Oklahoma territorial council, 1903-05; U.S. Senator from Oklahoma, 1907-21, 1931-37; defeated, 1920, 1936; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Oklahoma, 1912 (speaker), 1928; member of Democratic National Committee from Oklahoma, 1912-16. Member, Knights of Pythias; Moose; Woodmen; Elks. Blind due to an accident suffered when he was a boy; first blind member of the U.S. Senate. Died March 16, 1949 (age 78 years, 96 days). Originally entombed at Rose Hill Burial Park, Oklahoma City, Okla.; later interred in 1949 at Fairlawn Cemetery, Oklahoma City, Okla.
  Relatives: Son of Tom M. Gore and Carrie E. (Wingo) Gore; married, December 27, 1900, to Nina Kay; father of Nina Gore Auchincloss (who married Hugh Dudley Auchincloss); grandfather of Eugene Luther Gore Vidal, Jr. (1925-2012).
  Political family: Kennedy family.
  The town of Gore, Oklahoma, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: Library of Congress
  Robert Budd Gould (1937-1997) — of Montana. Born in Pasadena, Los Angeles County, Calif., May 10, 1937. Member of Montana state house of representatives, 1974-81, 1985-91. Blinded by diabetes in 1970. Died of complications of diabetes. June 2, 1997 (age 60 years, 23 days). Interment at Missoula Cemetery, Missoula, Mont.
  Denmark Groover, Jr. (1922-2001) — of Macon, Bibb County, Ga. Born in Quitman, Brooks County, Ga., June 30, 1922. Served in the U.S. Marine Corps during World War II; lawyer; member of Georgia state house of representatives from Bibb County, 1953-57, 1963-65, 1971-75, 1983-95. Methodist. Member, Phi Delta Theta; Association of Trial Lawyers of America. During World War II, served as a pilot in the "Black Sheep Squadron"; an injury left his right arm partially paralyzed. Sponsored the bill to put the Confederate battle flag on the Georgia state flag in 1956; supported the removal of the emblem in 2001. Died in Macon, Bibb County, Ga., April 18, 2001 (age 78 years, 292 days). Interment at Riverside Cemetery, Macon, Ga.
  David McKee Hall (1918-1960) — of Sylva, Jackson County, N.C. Born in Sylva, Jackson County, N.C., May 16, 1918. Democrat. Lawyer; member of North Carolina state senate, 1955; U.S. Representative from North Carolina 12th District, 1959-60; died in office 1960. Methodist. Member, American Bar Association; Phi Delta Phi; Rotary. Paraplegic. Died in Sylva, Jackson County, N.C., January 29, 1960 (age 41 years, 258 days). Interment at Webster Methodist Church Cemetery, Webster, N.C.
  Relatives: Son of David M. Hall and Edith (Moore) Hall; married, July 14, 1944, to Sarah McCollum.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
Wade Hampton Wade Hampton III (1818-1902) — also known as "Savior of South Carolina" — of Columbia, Richland County, S.C.; Charleston, Charleston County, S.C. Born in Charleston, Charleston County, S.C., March 28, 1818. Democrat. Member of South Carolina state senate, 1858; general in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; Governor of South Carolina, 1876-79; defeated, 1865; U.S. Senator from South Carolina, 1879-91; delegate to Democratic National Convention from South Carolina, 1880; U.S. Railroad Commissioner, 1893-97. Episcopalian. Awarded the Confederate Medal of Honor by the Sons of Confederate Veterans. Lost a leg in an accident in 1878. Died in Columbia, Richland County, S.C., April 11, 1902 (age 84 years, 14 days). Interment at Trinity Episcopal Cathedral Cemetery, Columbia, S.C.; statue at State House Grounds, Columbia, S.C.
  Relatives: Son of Wade Hampton (1791-1858) and Ann (FitzSimons) Hampton; married, October 10, 1838, to Margaret Buchanan Frances Preston (1818-1852; daughter of Francis Smith Preston; sister of William Campbell Preston (1794-1860)); married 1858 to Mary Singleton McDuffie (1830-1874; daughter of George McDuffie); grandson of Wade Hampton (1752-1835).
  Political families: Breckinridge-Preston-Cabell-Henry family of Virginia; Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Hampton County, S.C. is named for him.
  The town of Hampton, South Carolina, is named for him.  — Wade Hampton High School (built 1960, rebuilt 2006), in Greenville, South Carolina, is named for him.  — The Wade Hampton State Office Building (opened 1940), in Columbia, South Carolina, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Books about Wade Hampton: Walter Brian Cisco, Wade Hampton: Confederate Warrior, Conservative Statesman
  Image source: William C. Roberts, Leading Orators (1884)
  Henry Baldwin Harshaw (1842-1900) — also known as Henry B. Harshaw — of Oshkosh, Winnebago County, Wis. Born in Argyle, Washington County, N.Y., June 14, 1842. Republican. Served in the Union Army during the Civil War; postmaster at Oshkosh, Wis., 1877-86; Wisconsin state treasurer, 1887-91. Member, Elks; Grand Army of the Republic; Loyal Legion; Odd Fellows; Knights of Pythias. Wounded at the battle of Laurel Hill, Va., 1864, and lost his left arm as a result. Died, of tongue cancer, in Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, Wis., December 25, 1900 (age 58 years, 194 days). Cremated; ashes interred at Riverside Cemetery, Oshkosh, Wis.
David B. Henderson David Bremner Henderson (1840-1906) — also known as David B. Henderson — of Dubuque, Dubuque County, Iowa. Born in Old Deer, Aberdeenshire, Scotland, March 14, 1840. Republican. Colonel in the Union Army during the Civil War; lawyer; U.S. Collector of Internal Revenue for the 3rd Iowa District, 1865-69; delegate to Republican National Convention from Iowa, 1880, 1888, 1896 (speaker); U.S. Representative from Iowa 3rd District, 1883-1903; Speaker of the U.S. House, 1899-1903. Scottish ancestry. Wounded during the Civil War, in 1863, and lost a leg. Died in Dubuque, Dubuque County, Iowa, February 25, 1906 (age 65 years, 348 days). Interment at Linwood Cemetery, Dubuque, Iowa.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: Autobiographies and Portraits of the President, Cabinet, etc. (1899)
  Frederick William Mackey Holliday (1828-1899) — of Virginia. Born in Winchester, Va., February 22, 1828. Democrat. Lawyer; colonel in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; wounded in battle and lost his right arm; Representative from Virginia in the Confederate Congress, 1864-65; Governor of Virginia, 1878-82. Suffered a stroke, and died two weeks later, in Winchester, Va., May 29, 1899 (age 71 years, 96 days). Interment at Mt. Hebron Cemetery, Winchester, Va.
  Relatives: Son of R. J. Holliday and Mary Catherine (Taylor) Holliday.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Charles H. Houghton — of Metuchen, Middlesex County, N.J. Born in New York. Colonel in the Union Army during the Civil War; lost a leg in a Civil War battle; U.S. Collector of Customs, 1875-82. Member, Grand Army of the Republic. Arrested in May 1882, and charged with embezzlement, fraud, and forgery; tried, convicted, and fined. Burial location unknown.
  Daniel Ken Inouye (1924-2012) — also known as Daniel K. Inouye — of Honolulu, Island of Oahu, Honolulu County, Hawaii. Born in Honolulu, Island of Oahu, Honolulu County, Hawaii, September 7, 1924. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army during World War II; lawyer; member of Hawaii territorial House of Representatives, 1954-58; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Hawaii Territory, 1956; member of Hawaii territorial senate, 1958-59; U.S. Representative from Hawaii at-large, 1959-63; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Hawaii, 1960, 1972, 1980, 1996, 2000, 2004, 2008 (delegation chair); Temporary Chair, 1968; speaker, 1968; Co-Chair, 1984; U.S. Senator from Hawaii, 1963-. Methodist. Japanese ancestry. Member, American Bar Association; Disabled American Veterans; Phi Delta Phi; Lions. Lost his right arm as the result of a combat injury in Italy during World War II. His Distinguished Service Cross was upgraded in 2000 to a Medal of Honor. First American of Japanese descent to serve in Congress. Died, from respiratory failure, in Walter Reed Hospital, Bethesda, Montgomery County, Md., December 17, 2012 (age 88 years, 101 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Hyotaro I. Inouye and Kame Imanaga Inouye; married, June 12, 1949, to Margaret Shinobu Awamura.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — votes in Congress from the Washington Post — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile
  Thomas Jordan Jarvis (1836-1915) — also known as Thomas J. Jarvis — of Greenville, Pitt County, N.C. Born in Jarvisburg, Currituck County, N.C., January 18, 1836. Democrat. Lawyer; served in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; lost his right arm; delegate to North Carolina state constitutional convention, 1865, 1875; member of North Carolina state house of representatives, 1868-71; Presidential Elector for North Carolina, 1868, 1872; Lieutenant Governor of North Carolina, 1877-79; Governor of North Carolina, 1879-85; U.S. Minister to Brazil, 1885-88; U.S. Senator from North Carolina, 1894-95; delegate to Democratic National Convention from North Carolina, 1896. Died June 17, 1915 (age 79 years, 150 days). Interment at Cherry Hill Cemetery, Greenville, N.C.
  Relatives: Son of Rev. B. H. Jarvis and Elizabeth Jarvis; married, December 23, 1874, to Mary Woodson.
  Cross-reference: Lee S. Overman
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary
  Jonathan Kearsley (1786-1859) — of Detroit, Wayne County, Mich. Born in Middletown, Dauphin County, Pa., August 20, 1786. Major in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812; lost a leg in the Battle of Chippawa, Canada; mayor of Detroit, Mich., 1826, 1829. Died in Detroit, Wayne County, Mich., 1859 (age about 72 years). Interment at Elmwood Cemetery, Detroit, Mich.
  Relatives: Married 1815 to Margaret Hetich (died 1821); married to Rachel Valentine.
  See also Wikipedia article
Harry F. Kelly Harry Francis Kelly (1895-1971) — also known as Harry F. Kelly; Henry Francis Kelly — of Detroit, Wayne County, Mich.; Gaylord, Otsego County, Mich. Born in Ottawa, La Salle County, Ill., April 19, 1895. Republican. Served in the U.S. Army during World War I; lost part of his left leg in France; lawyer; La Salle County State's Attorney, 1919-23; secretary of state of Michigan, 1939-42; Governor of Michigan, 1943-46; defeated, 1950; delegate to Republican National Convention from Michigan, 1944; justice of Michigan state supreme court, 1954-70. Died February 8, 1971 (age 75 years, 295 days). Interment at Holy Sepulchre Cemetery, Southfield, Mich.
  Relatives: Son of Henry Michael Kelly (1865-1946) and Mollie (Morrissey) Kelly (1869-1950); married, May 4, 1929, to Anne Veronica O'Brien.
  Image source: Michigan Manual 1939
  John Worth Kern, Jr. (1900-1971) — also known as John W. Kern — of Indianapolis, Marion County, Ind. Born in Indianapolis, Marion County, Ind., July 7, 1900. Democrat. Lawyer; superior court judge in Indiana, 1931-34; mayor of Indianapolis, Ind., 1935-37; resigned 1937. Presbyterian. Member, Phi Gamma Delta; Freemasons. At age 8, his legs were paralyzed by polio. Died January 29, 1971 (age 70 years, 206 days). Interment at Crown Hill Cemetery, Indianapolis, Ind.
  Relatives: Son of John Worth Kern and Araminta Cooper Kern (1866?-1951); married, April 30, 1927, to Bernice Winn.
  Political family: Kern family of Indianapolis, Indiana.
  Joseph Robert Kerrey (b. 1943) — also known as Bob Kerrey — of Nebraska. Born in Lincoln, Lancaster County, Neb., August 27, 1943. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Navy during the Vietnam War; Governor of Nebraska, 1983-87; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Nebraska, 1996, 2000; speaker, 1988; U.S. Senator from Nebraska, 1989-; candidate for Democratic nomination for President, 1992. Congregationalist. Member, Veterans of Foreign Wars; Disabled American Veterans; American Legion; Lions; Sertoma. Received the Medal of Honor for action at Nha Trang Bay, Vietnam, 1969, when he lost a leg. Still living as of 2014.
  The Bob Kerrey Pedestrian Bridge (opened 2008), across the Missouri River between Omaha, Nebraska and Council Bluffs, Iowa, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — votes in Congress from the Washington Post — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile
  Books by Bob Kerrey: When I Was A Young Man : A Memoir by Bob Kerrey (2002)
  Books about Bob Kerrey: Gregory L. Vistica, The Education of Lieutenant Kerrey
  Robert Charles Killough, Jr. (1906-1961) — also known as Robert C. Killough, Jr. — of Watervliet, Albany County, N.Y.; Loudonville, Albany County, N.Y. Born in Watervliet, Albany County, N.Y., November 8, 1906. Republican. Lawyer; exempted from military service because childhood polio resulted in atrophy of lower leg muscles and feet, though he learned to walk almost normally using orthopedic shoes; candidate for New York state assembly from Albany County 3rd District, 1930; Assistant Commissioner for Professional Education, New York State Education Department. Presbyterian. Irish and English ancestry. Member, American Bar Association. Died, of cancer, in Loudonville, Albany County, N.Y., November 14, 1961 (age 55 years, 6 days). Interment at St. Agnes Cemetery, Menands, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Robert C. Killough (1880-1914) and Anna E. (Iverson) Killough (1883-1941); married, April 3, 1937, to Margaret Agnes Casey (1908-1994).
  Elaine King-Miller — of Amarillo, Potter County, Tex. Democrat. Certified clinical mental health counselor; visually impaired; candidate for Texas state senate 31st District, 2004. Female. African ancestry. Still living as of 2006.
John T. Kostuck John T. Kostuck (1892-1960) — of Stevens Point, Portage County, Wis. Born in Stevens Point, Portage County, Wis., October 7, 1892. Piano dealer; piano tuner; member of Wisconsin state assembly from Portage County, 1931-60. A blasting accident made him blind at age 14. Died in 1960 (age about 67 years). Interment at Guardian Angel Cemetery, Stevens Point, Wis.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: Wisconsin Blue Book 1940
  John D. Kruse (1893-1971) — also known as Jack Kruse — of Manistee, Manistee County, Mich. Born in Manistee, Manistee County, Mich., June 24, 1893. Republican. Served in the U.S. Army during World War I; Manistee County Clerk, 1921-30; member of Michigan state house of representatives, 1943-54 (Manistee County 1943-44, Manistee District 1945-54); defeated in primary, 1954. Member, Disabled American Veterans; American Legion; Veterans of Foreign Wars; Elks; Eagles; Odd Fellows; Freemasons. Crippled by an injury in 1919. Died in 1971 (age about 78 years). Burial location unknown.
  James R. Langevin (b. 1964) — also known as Jim Langevin — of Warwick, Kent County, R.I.; East Greenwich, Kent County, R.I. Born in Providence, Providence County, R.I., April 22, 1964. Democrat. Member of Rhode Island state house of representatives, 1988-94; secretary of state of Rhode Island, 1995-2001; U.S. Representative from Rhode Island 2nd District, 2001-; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Rhode Island, 2004, 2008, 2012. Catholic. Paralyzed from the waist down due to an accidental shooting in 1980. Still living as of 2014.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — votes in Congress from the Washington Post — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Henry E. Lanius (c.1885-1943) — of York County, Pa. Born in York County, Pa., about 1885. Democrat. Farmer; member of Pennsylvania state house of representatives, 1913-20; member of Pennsylvania state senate 28th District, 1923-43; died in office 1943. Became blind in 1903. Died May 30, 1943 (age about 58 years). Burial location unknown.
  William Larrabee (1832-1912) — of Iowa. Born in Ledyard, New London County, Conn., January 20, 1832. School teacher; grain miller; banker; member of Iowa state senate, 1867; Governor of Iowa, 1886-90. Methodist. French Huguenot ancestry. Blinded in his right eye by a gun accident at age 15. Died November 16, 1912 (age 80 years, 301 days). Interment at God's Acre Cemetery, Clermont, Iowa.
  Relatives: Son of Adam Larrabee (1787-1869) and Hannah Gallup (Lester) Larrabee (1798-1837); married, September 12, 1861, to Anna Matilda Appleman (1842-1931); father of Julia Larrabee (1867-1937; who married Don Lathrop Love (1863-1940)).
  Cross-reference: Frederick W. Hossfeld
  See also Wikipedia article
  Orin Lehman (1920-2008) — also known as "Father Nature" — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born January 14, 1920. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army during World War II; injured during the Battle of the Bulge and lost a leg; newspaper publisher; chairman, Colgreen Broadcasting Group, owner of radio stations; founder, Just One Break, Inc., not-for-profit employment service for people with disabilities; campaign manager, John J. Burns for Lieutenant Governor, 1962; delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1964; candidate for U.S. Representative from New York 17th District, 1966; producer of several popular off-Broadway plays; New York State Commissioner of Parks, Recreation, and Historic Preservation, 1975-93. Jewish. Member, American Jewish Committee; Council on Foreign Relations; Urban League; NAACP. Died, of pneumonia, in Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., February 22, 2008 (age 88 years, 39 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Allan Sigmund Lehman (1885-1952) and Evelyn 'Eve' (Schiffer) Lehman (c.1892-1970); married, July 23, 1962, to Jane (Bagley) Long; married, October 24, 1970, to Wendy Vanderbilt (niece of William Henry Vanderbilt III (1901-1981)); grandnephew of Herbert Henry Lehman.
  Political families: Whitney-Nye family of Massachusetts and New York; Belmont-Perry family of New York City, New York; Vanderbilt-Tuck-Pickering-Webster family; Morgenthau-Lehman family of New York City, New York; Vanderbilt-Colby-Burden-French family of New York City, New York (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  George Nelson Lester (1824-1892) — of Georgia. Born in Abbeville District (now Abbeville County), S.C., March 13, 1824. Member of Georgia state house of representatives, 1858; served in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; Representative from Georgia in the Confederate Congress, 1864-65; Georgia state attorney general, 1890-92; died in office 1892. Wounded during the Civil War, in Kentucky, 1862, and lost an arm. Died March 30, 1892 (age 68 years, 17 days). Interment at Marietta City Cemetery, Marietta, Ga.
  Relatives: Brother-in-law of Hiram Parks Bell (1827-1907).
  John Lind (1854-1930) — of New Ulm, Brown County, Minn.; Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minn. Born in Kanna, Smaland, Sweden, March 25, 1854. Lawyer; U.S. Representative from Minnesota, 1887-93, 1903-05 (2nd District 1887-93, 5th District 1903-05); served in the U.S. Army during the Spanish-American War; Governor of Minnesota, 1899-1901; defeated (Democratic), 1896, 1900; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Minnesota, 1904; Prohibition candidate for Minnesota railroad and warehouse commission, 1916. Unitarian. Swedish ancestry. Lost his left hand in a boyhood accident. Died in Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minn., September 18, 1930 (age 76 years, 177 days). Cremated; ashes interred at Lakewood Cemetery, Minneapolis, Minn.
  Relatives: Married, September 1, 1879, to Alice A. Shepard.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  H. Wales Lines (1838-1927) — of Meriden, New Haven County, Conn. Born in Naugatuck, New Haven County, Conn., June 3, 1838. Republican. Building contractor; member of Connecticut state house of representatives, 1869; mayor of Meriden, Conn., 1877-79; member of Connecticut state senate 6th District, 1879-80; candidate for U.S. Representative from Connecticut 2nd District, 1888. Member, Freemasons; Knights Templar; Order of the Eastern Star; Shriners. Blind after 1900. Died in Meriden, New Haven County, Conn., January 11, 1927 (age 88 years, 222 days). Interment at Walnut Grove Cemetery, Meriden, Conn.
  Relatives: Son of Henry Willis Lines and Harriet (Bunnell) Lines; married 1861 to Sarah Congdon Munger (1838-1926).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
Harold Lloyd Harold Clayton Lloyd (1893-1971) — also known as Harold Lloyd — of Beverly Hills, Los Angeles County, Calif. Born in Burchard, Pawnee County, Neb., April 20, 1893. Republican. Actor, comedian, film producer; appeared in over 200 motion pictures; one of the founders, in 1927, of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences; alternate delegate to Republican National Convention from California, 1948, 1952. Member, Freemasons; Shriners. Lost two fingers in a 1919 accident. Died, of prostate cancer, in Beverly Hills, Los Angeles County, Calif., March 8, 1971 (age 77 years, 322 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of James Darsie Lloyd and Sarah Elizabeth (Fraser) Lloyd; married 1923 to Mildred Davis.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile
  Image source: Time Magazine, July 25, 1949
  Steven Mark Lonegan (b. 1956) — also known as Steve Lonegan — of Bogota, Bergen County, N.J. Born in Holy Name Medical Center, Teaneck, Bergen County, N.J., April 27, 1956. Republican. Mayor of Bogota, N.J., 1995-2007; candidate for New Jersey state senate 37th District, 1997; candidate for U.S. Representative from New Jersey 9th District, 1998; candidate in primary for Governor of New Jersey, 2005, 2009; candidate for U.S. Senator from New Jersey, 2013. Catholic. Irish and Italian ancestry. Legally blind due to retinitis pigmentosa. Still living as of 2016.
  Campaign slogan (2005): "Republicans for Conservative Leadership."
  Campaign slogan (2009): "Conservative Republicans Putting Taxpayers First."
  See also Wikipedia article — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Charles Dean Long (1841-1902) — of Flint, Genesee County, Mich.; Lansing, Ingham County, Mich. Born in Grand Blanc Township, Genesee County, Mich., June 14, 1841. Served in the Union Army during the Civil War; in the battle of Wilmington Island, Georgia, April 16, 1862, he lost his left arm; justice of Michigan state supreme court, 1888-1902; died in office 1902. Member, Grand Army of the Republic. Died June 27, 1902 (age 61 years, 13 days). Interment somewhere in Flint, Mich.
  Melvin Joseph Maas (1898-1964) — also known as Melvin J. Maas — of St. Paul, Ramsey County, Minn.; Chevy Chase, Montgomery County, Md. Born in Duluth, St. Louis County, Minn., May 14, 1898. Served in the U.S. Marine Corps during World War I; insurance business; U.S. Representative from Minnesota 4th District, 1927-33, 1935-45; defeated, 1932 (Independent, at-large), 1944 (Republican, 4th District); served in the U.S. Marine Corps during World War II. Catholic. Member, Military Order of the World Wars; Disabled American Veterans; Knights of Columbus; Woodmen; Moose; Eagles. Stricken with total blindness in August 1951. Died in Bethesda, Montgomery County, Md., April 13, 1964 (age 65 years, 335 days). Interment at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Va.
  Relatives: Son of Frank Newton Maas and Rose (Brady) Maas; married, October 9, 1920, to Katherine Bole; married, December 1, 1934, to Katherine Endress.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Robert D. Mahoney (b. 1921) — of Detroit, Wayne County, Mich. Born in Duluth, St. Louis County, Minn., October 16, 1921. Democrat. Salesman; member of Michigan state house of representatives, 1955-72 (Wayne County 3rd District 1955-64, 6th District 1965-72); defeated in primary, 1972. Catholic. Member, Moose. Blind from the age of 16. Presumed deceased. Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Married 1941 to Jennie Kubinger.
  Zophar Mack Mansur (1843-1914) — also known as Zophar M. Mansur — of Island Pond, Brighton, Essex County, Vt. Born in Morgan, Orleans County, Vt., November 23, 1843. Republican. Served in the Union Army during the Civil War; lost his right arm in the battle of Opequon Creek, Virginia; lawyer; postmaster; lumber business; member of Vermont state house of representatives from Brighton, 1886; member of Vermont state senate from Essex County, 1888; Lieutenant Governor of Vermont, 1894-96; director and president, Derby Line National Bank. Methodist. Member, Freemasons; Grand Army of the Republic; Sons of the American Revolution. Died in Island Pond, Brighton, Essex County, Vt., March 12, 1914 (age 70 years, 109 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Warren Mansur (1800-1885) and Jane (Morse) Mansur (1808-1891); married 1867 to Ellen L. Newhill.
  Charles W. Masterson (c.1862-1958) — of Washington. Born about 1862. Democrat. Piano tuner; candidate for U.S. Representative from Washington 4th District, 1916. Blind from age eight, due to an overdose of quinine (used to treat cholera). Died in Walla Walla, Walla Walla County, Wash., 1958 (age about 96 years). Interment somewhere in Walla Walla, Wash.
  Relatives: Uncle of Salathiel Charles Masterson (1911-1990).
  Dabney Herndon Maury (1822-1900) — also known as Dabney H. Maury — of Virginia. Born in Fredericksburg, Va., May 21, 1822. Served in the U.S. Army during the Mexican War; general in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; U.S. Minister to Colombia, 1886-89. His left arm was crippled by a Mexican War injury. Founder in 1868 of the Southern Historical Society. Died in Peoria, Peoria County, Ill., January 11, 1900 (age 77 years, 235 days). Interment at Fredericksburg Cemetery, Fredericksburg, Va.
  Relatives: Son of John Minor Maury (1795-1823) and Elizabeth (Herndon) Maury; grandnephew of James Maury; second cousin of John Walker Maury; second cousin once removed of Abram Poindexter Maury; second cousin twice removed of Fontaine Maury Maverick (1895-1954); second cousin thrice removed of Fontaine Maury Maverick, Jr..
  Political family: Maury-Maverick family of San Antonio, Texas.
  See also U.S. State Dept career summary
  O. C. Maxwell (1837-1871) — of Ohio. Born in Franklin, Warren County, Ohio, February 7, 1837. Republican. Colonel in the Union Army during the Civil War; wounded in the leg at Perryville, and crippled for life; delegate to Republican National Convention from Ohio, 1868. Died, in a state of desperation from financial difficulties, from a self-inflicted gunshot, in Dayton, Montgomery County, Ohio, December 5, 1871 (age 34 years, 301 days). Interment at Lebanon Cemetery, Lebanon, Ohio.
  James McCleery (1837-1871) — of Louisiana. Born in Mecca Township, Trumbull County, Ohio, December 2, 1837. Republican. U.S. Representative from Louisiana 4th District, 1871; died in office 1871. Wounded at the Battle of Shiloh during the Civil War, and lost his right arm. Died in New York, New York County, N.Y., November 5, 1871 (age 33 years, 338 days). Interment at Christian Church Cemetery, Cortland, Ohio.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Joseph Wayne Mercer (1845-1906) — of Independence, Jackson County, Mo. Born in Platte County, Mo., February 25, 1845. Served in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; Missouri state treasurer, 1875-77; mayor of Independence, Mo., 1891. Wounded during the Civil War, and lost his right arm. Died in Independence, Jackson County, Mo., March 13, 1906 (age 61 years, 16 days). Interment at Mt. Washington Cemetery, Independence, Mo.
  William David Meyering (b. 1892) — also known as William Meyering — of Chicago, Cook County, Ill. Born in Chicago, Cook County, Ill., August 10, 1892. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army during World War I; Cook County Sheriff, 1930-34; alternate delegate to Democratic National Convention from Illinois, 1932. Member, Veterans of Foreign Wars; Knights of Columbus. Wounded in action during World War I and lost his right hand. Burial location unknown.
  William Jennings Miller (1899-1950) — also known as William J. Miller — of Wethersfield, Hartford County, Conn. Born in North Andover, Essex County, Mass., March 12, 1899. Republican. Served in the U.S. Army during World War I; insurance business; U.S. Representative from Connecticut 1st District, 1939-41, 1943-45, 1947-49; defeated, 1940, 1944, 1948. Member, American Legion; Rotary. Injured in an airplane crash in 1918 and lost both legs. Died in Wethersfield, Hartford County, Conn., November 22, 1950 (age 51 years, 255 days). Interment at Jordan Cemetery, Waterford, Conn.
  Relatives: Married to Marguerite Parrish (1900-1969).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Allen Benton Morse (1839-1921) — also known as Allen B. Morse — of Ionia, Ionia County, Mich. Born in Otisco, Ionia County, Mich., January 7, 1839. Democrat. Served in the Union Army during the Civil War; Ionia County Prosecuting Attorney, 1867-71; member of Michigan state senate 27th District, 1875-76; candidate for Michigan state attorney general, 1878; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Michigan, 1880; mayor of Ionia, Mich., 1882; justice of Michigan state supreme court, 1885-92; chief justice of Michigan state supreme court, 1885, 1892; candidate for Governor of Michigan, 1892; U.S. Consul in Glasgow, 1893-97; candidate for Michigan state house of representatives, 1906. Wounded during the Civil War, and lost his left arm. Died July 5, 1921 (age 82 years, 179 days). Interment at Highland Park Cemetery, Ionia, Mich.
  Relatives: Son of John L. Morse (1800?-?); married 1874 to Frances Marion Van Allen (died 1884); married 1888 to Anna Babcock.
  Oliver Hazard Perry Throck Morton (1823-1877) — also known as Oliver P. Morton — of Indianapolis, Marion County, Ind. Born in Salisbury, Wayne County, Ind., August 4, 1823. Republican. Circuit judge in Indiana, 1852; Lieutenant Governor of Indiana, 1861; Governor of Indiana, 1861-67; defeated, 1856; U.S. Senator from Indiana, 1867-77; died in office 1877; member of Republican National Committee from Indiana, 1872-; candidate for Republican nomination for President, 1876. His legs were paralyzed after a stroke in 1865; suffered another stroke in 1877, and died soon after, in Indianapolis, Marion County, Ind., November 1, 1877 (age 54 years, 89 days). Interment at Crown Hill Cemetery, Indianapolis, Ind.; statue at Vicksburg National Military Park, Vicksburg, Miss.; statue at Statehouse Grounds, Indianapolis, Ind.
  Presumably named for: Oliver Hazard Perry
  Relatives: Married, May 15, 1845, to Lucinda Maria Burbank (1825-1907; sister of John Albyne Burbank (1827-1905)); father of John M. Morton.
  Political family: Burbank-Morton-Kibbey-Cunningham family of Indiana.
  Cross-reference: William R. Holloway
  Morton counties in Kan. and N.Dak. are named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Thomas W. Myton (b. 1842) — of Huntingdon, Huntingdon County, Pa. Born in West Township, Huntingdon County, Pa., February 13, 1842. Served in the Union Army during the Civil War; wounded in the battle of Chancellorsville, 1863, and lost his left arm; lawyer; member of Pennsylvania state house of representatives from Huntingdon County, 1883-84. Methodist. English and Scotch-Irish ancestry. Member, Grand Army of the Republic. Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Samuel Myton and Eleanor (Montgomery) Myton; married, December 27, 1870, to Ella E. Davis.
  Henry Martin Nevius (1841-1911) — also known as Henry M. Nevius — of Monmouth County, N.J. Born in Freehold, Monmouth County, N.J., January 30, 1841. Major in the Union Army during the Civil War; lawyer; member of New Jersey state senate from Monmouth County, 1888-90. Member, Grand Army of the Republic. Wounded several times during the Civil War and lost his left arm. Died, of a stroke, January 30, 1911 (age 70 years, 0 days). Interment at Fair View Cemetery, Middletown, N.J.
Francis T. Nicholls Francis Redding Tillou Nicholls (1834-1912) — also known as Francis T. Nicholls — of Napoleonville, Assumption Parish, La.; New Orleans, Orleans Parish, La. Born in Donaldsonville, Ascension Parish, La., August 20, 1834. Democrat. Lawyer; general in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; lost an arm in the battle of Winchester, Va.; lost a foot at Chancellorsville; Governor of Louisiana, 1877-80, 1888-92; chief justice of Louisiana state supreme court, 1892-1904; appointed 1892; justice of Louisiana state supreme court, 1904-11; resigned 1911. Died near Thibodaux, Lafourche Parish, La., January 4, 1912 (age 77 years, 137 days). Entombed at St. John's Episcopal Cemetery, Thibodaux, La.
  Relatives: Son of Thomas Clark Nicholls and Louisa Hannah (Drake) Nicholls; married 1861 to Caroline Zilpha Guion.
  Nicholls State University (founded 1948 as Francis T. Nicholls Junior College; became a state college 1956; became a university 1970) in Thibodaux, Louisiana, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article
  Image source: Life and Work of James G. Blaine (1893)
  Eugene Hoffman Nickerson (1918-2002) — also known as Eugene H. Nickerson — of Roslyn Harbor, Nassau County, Long Island, N.Y. Born in Orange, Essex County, N.J., August 2, 1918. Democrat. Lawyer; law clerk for U.S. Circuit Judge Augustus N. Hand, 1943-44, and for U.S. Supreme Court Justice Harlan F. Stone, 1944-46; Nassau County Executive, 1962-70; delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1964, 1972; U.S. District Judge for the Eastern District of New York, 1977-94; took senior status 1994; senior judge, 1994-2002. His right arm was paralyzed by polio in his youth. Died, from complications of ulcer surgery, in St. Luke's Hospital, Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., January 1, 2002 (age 83 years, 152 days). Interment at St. Philip's Cemetery, Garrison, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Hoffman Nickerson (1888-1965) and Ruth Constance (Comstock) Nickerson (1892-1988); married to Marie-Louise Steiner (1920-2003).
  Nickerson Beach Park, in Lido Beach, New York, is named for him.
  See also federal judicial profile — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Mike O'Callaghan (1929-2004) — also known as Donal Neil O'Callaghan — of Henderson, Clark County, Nev. Born in La Crosse, La Crosse County, Wis., September 10, 1929. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army during the Korean conflict; hit by a mortar round and lost his lower left leg; legislative aide to U.S. Sen. Howard W. Cannon; Governor of Nevada, 1971-79; executive editor, Las Vegas Sun newspaper. Catholic. Suffered a heart attack at St. Viator Catholic Church, and died soon after in a hospital, Las Vegas, Clark County, Nev., March 5, 2004 (age 74 years, 177 days). Interment at Southern Nevada Veterans Memorial Cemetery, Boulder City, Nev.
  The Mike O'Callaghan-Pat Tillman Bridge (opened 2010), over the Colorado River between Mohave County, Arizona and Clark County, Nevada, was partly named for him.
  See also NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  David Alexander Paterson (b. 1954) — also known as David A. Paterson — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born in Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y., May 20, 1954. Democrat. Lawyer; delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1996, 2004, 2008; member of New York state senate 30th District; elected 2002, 2004; Lieutenant Governor of New York, 2007-08; Governor of New York, 2008-10. African ancestry. Legally blind. Still living as of 2014.
  Relatives: Son of Basil Alexander Paterson (1926-); married 1992 to Michelle Paige.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
Jason E. Payne Jason Elihu Payne (1874-1941) — also known as Jason E. Payne — of Vermillion, Clay County, S.Dak. Born in Clay County, S.Dak., January 22, 1874. Republican. Lost his right arm as a youth, in an accident with a runaway team of horses; college instructor; lawyer; law professor; member of South Dakota state senate 2nd District, 1903-06. Episcopalian. Member, Phi Delta Theta; Delta Theta Phi; American Bar Association. An enraged litigant, Ozzie Kirby, tried to kill him in in 1940; Kirby also shot and killed Payne's law partner. Injured in an automobile accident, and died several weeks later as a result, in a hospital at Vermillion, Clay County, S.Dak., September 11, 1941 (age 67 years, 232 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Byron Spencer Payne (1839-1925) and Charlotte Elizabeth (Woodworth) Payne (1846-1926); brother of Byron Samuel Payne (1876-?); married, July 20, 1905, to Iwae E. Sheppard.
  Image source: South Dakota Legislative Manual, 1903
  William Barret Pendleton (1838-1914) — also known as William B. Pendleton — of Cuckoo, Louisa County, Va. Born in Louisa County, Va., January 12, 1838. Served in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; lost his left leg in the battle of Cedar Mountain, 1862; member of Virginia state house of delegates from Louisa County, 1897-99. Died January 17, 1914 (age 76 years, 5 days). Interment at Gilboa Christian Church Cemetery, Cuckoo, Va.
  Relatives: Son of Elizabeth Kimbrough (Barret) Pendleton (1807-1898) and Madison Pendleton (1809-1872); married, May 3, 1870, to Juliana Meredith (1839-1926); second great-grandnephew of Edmund Pendleton; first cousin once removed of Joseph Henry Pendleton; first cousin thrice removed of Nathaniel Pendleton; second cousin of John Overton Pendleton; second cousin twice removed of Philip Clayton Pendleton, Edmund Henry Pendleton and Nathanael Greene Pendleton; third cousin once removed of John Strother Pendleton, Albert Gallatin Pendleton, Philip Coleman Pendleton and George Hunt Pendleton; third cousin twice removed of James Madison, William Taylor Madison and Zachary Taylor; fourth cousin of Francis Key Pendleton and Charles Rittenhouse Pendleton (1850-1914); fourth cousin once removed of Coleby Chew and Sidney Fletcher Taliaferro.
  Political family: Pendleton-Lee family (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Reino A. Perala (1915-2002) — of Superior, Douglas County, Wis.; South Range, Douglas County, Wis. Born in Maple, Douglas County, Wis., August 28, 1915. Democrat. Blind; lawyer; hotelier; member of Wisconsin state assembly from Douglas County 1st District, 1953-68. Died February 25, 2002 (age 86 years, 181 days). Burial location unknown.
  Frank Littleton Pitts (1841-1905) — also known as Frank L. Pitts — of Monroe County, Mo. Born in Shelby County, Mo., 1841. Democrat. Served in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; wounded in battle and lost his right arm; Missouri state treasurer, 1897-1901. Died, from catarrhal pneumonia, in San Antonio, Bexar County, Tex., February 4, 1905 (age about 63 years). Interment at Walnut Grove Cemetery, Paris, Mo.
  Relatives: Married to Laura F. Boulware (1852-1923).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Marshall Tate Polk (1831-1884) — also known as M. T. Polk — of Bolivar, Hardeman County, Tenn. Born in Charlotte, Mecklenburg County, N.C., May 15, 1831. Democrat. Colonel in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Tennessee, 1876; Tennessee state treasurer, 1877-83. Wounded at the Battle of Shiloh, during the Civil War, and lost a leg. In 1883, a $400,000 shortfall was was discovered in the state treasury. Polk fled to Texas, was arrested there, and brought back to Nashville for trial. Charged with embezzlement, he pleaded not guilty -- his lawyer argued he was only guilty of "default of pay" -- but was convicted, sentenced to twenty years in prison, and fined. Imprisonment was delayed pending his appeal, and he died in the meantime. Died in Bolivar, Hardeman County, Tenn., February 20, 1884 (age 52 years, 281 days). Interment at Polk Cemetery, Bolivar, Tenn.
  Relatives: Son of Marshall Tate Polk (1805-1831) and Laura Theresa (Wilson) Polk (1808-1848); married to Evelina McNeal Bills (1836-1926); nephew of James Knox Polk and William Hawkins Polk; first cousin of Tasker Polk; second cousin of Edwin Fitzhugh Polk; third cousin of Mary Adelaide Polk (1817-1863; who married George Davis) and Richard Tyler Polk; third cousin once removed of Rufus King Polk and Frank Lyon Polk (1871-1943); third cousin twice removed of Charles Polk and Elizabeth Polk Guest; third cousin thrice removed of Raymond R. Guest; fourth cousin of Augustus Caesar Dodge; fourth cousin once removed of Trusten Polk.
  Political families: Ashe-Polk family of North Carolina; Polk family; Manly-Haywood-Polk family of Raleigh, North Carolina (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Epitaph: "Every one that loveth is born of God."
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Howard Wallace Pollock (1920-2011) — also known as Howard W. Pollock — of Anchorage, Alaska. Born in Chicago, Cook County, Ill., April 11, 1920. Republican. Served in the U.S. Navy during World War II; lost his right arm in a grenade explosion; lawyer; member of Alaska territorial House of Representatives 3rd District, 1953-54; U.S. Representative from Alaska at-large, 1967-71; alternate delegate to Republican National Convention from Alaska, 1972. Died in Coronado, San Diego County, Calif., January 9, 2011 (age 90 years, 273 days). Interment at Anchorage Memorial Park Cemetery, Anchorage, Alaska.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
  John Pope (1770-1845) — also known as "One-Arm Pope" — of Lexington, Fayette County, Ky.; Springfield, Washington County, Ky. Born in Prince William County, Va., 1770. Democrat. Lawyer; Presidential Elector for Kentucky, 1800, 1820; member of Kentucky state house of representatives, 1802, 1806-07; U.S. Senator from Kentucky, 1807-13; secretary of state of Kentucky, 1816-19; member of Kentucky state senate, 1825-29; Governor of Arkansas Territory, 1829-35; U.S. Representative from Kentucky 7th District, 1837-43. Lost his right arm as a youth. Died in Springfield, Washington County, Ky., July 12, 1845 (age about 75 years). Interment at Springfield Cemetery, Springfield, Ky.
  Relatives: Brother of Nathaniel Pope (1784-1850); married to Eliza Johnson (sister-in-law of John Quincy Adams).
  Political family: Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Pope County, Ark. is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
Charles E. Potter Charles Edward Potter (1916-1979) — also known as Charles E. Potter — of Cheboygan, Cheboygan County, Mich. Born in Lapeer, Lapeer County, Mich., October 30, 1916. Republican. Major in the U.S. Army during World War II; U.S. Representative from Michigan 11th District, 1947-52; resigned 1952; U.S. Senator from Michigan, 1952-59; defeated, 1958. Methodist. Member, Elks; Eagles; Kiwanis; American Legion; Disabled American Veterans; Veterans of Foreign Wars; Amvets. Wounded in World War II, and lost his legs. Died in Walter Reed Army Hospital, Washington, D.C., November 23, 1979 (age 63 years, 24 days). Interment at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Va.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Image source: Michigan Manual 1957-58
Seargent S. Prentiss Seargent Smith Prentiss (1808-1850) — also known as Seargent S. Prentiss — of Vicksburg, Warren County, Miss.; New Orleans, Orleans Parish, La. Born in Portland, Cumberland County, Maine, September 30, 1808. Lawyer; famed for his oratory; member of Mississippi state house of representatives, 1836-37; U.S. Representative from Mississippi at-large, 1838-39. His right leg was "lame and feeble" due to childhood disease. Died near Natchez, Adams County, Miss., July 1, 1850 (age 41 years, 274 days). Interment at Gloucester Plantation Cemetery, Natchez, Miss.
  Relatives: Son of Capt. William Prentiss; married to Mary Jane Williams (1824-1891).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: New York Public Library
  James Patton Preston (1774-1853) — also known as James P. Preston — of Richmond, Va. Born in Montgomery County, Va., June 21, 1774. Colonel in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812; crippled by injuries received in the war; member of Virginia state house of delegates, 1816; Governor of Virginia, 1816-19; postmaster at Richmond, Va., 1824-37. Died in Montgomery County, Va., May 4, 1853 (age 78 years, 317 days). Interment at Preston Cemetery at Smithfield Plantation, Blacksburg, Va.
  Relatives: Son of William Preston and Susanna (Smith) Preston (1740-1823); brother of Francis Smith Preston and Letitia Preston (1776-1852; who married John Floyd); married to Ann Barraud Taylor (1778-1861); father of William Ballard Preston; uncle of William Campbell Preston, James McDowell, John Buchanan Floyd, John Smith Preston and George Rogers Clark Floyd; granduncle of Robert Jefferson Breckinridge, Jr. and William Campbell Preston Breckinridge; great-granduncle of Levin Irving Handy, Desha Breckinridge and Henry Skillman Breckinridge; first cousin of John Breckinridge; first cousin once removed of Joseph Cabell Breckinridge and Robert Jefferson Breckinridge (1800-1871); first cousin twice removed of John Cabell Breckinridge and Peter Augustus Porter (1827-1864); first cousin thrice removed of Clifton Rodes Breckinridge and Peter Augustus Porter (1853-1925); second cousin once removed of James Douglas Breckinridge.
  Political families: Marshall-Harrison-Randolph-Cabell family of Virginia; Breckinridge-Preston-Cabell-Henry family of Virginia; Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York; Grayson-Breckinridge-Smallwood family of Virginia and Kentucky (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Preston County, W.Va. is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Lewis Burwell Puller, Jr. (1945-1994) — of Mt. Vernon, Fairfax County, Va. Born in Jacksonville, Onslow County, N.C., August 18, 1945. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Marine Corps during the Vietnam War; lost both legs in the explosion of an improvised land mine in South Vietnam, 1968; candidate for U.S. Representative from Virginia 1st District, 1978; received a Pulitzer Prize in 1992 for his autobiography, Fortunate Son: The Healing of a Vietnam Vet. Killed by a self-inflicted gunshot, in Mt. Vernon, Fairfax County, Va., May 11, 1994 (age 48 years, 266 days). Interment at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Va.
  Relatives: Son of Lewis Burwell Puller (1898-1971) and Virginia Montague (Evans) Puller (1908-2006); married to Linda Todd Puller (1945-).
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  John P. Quimby (1935-2012) — of San Bernardino, San Bernardino County, Calif.; Rialto, San Bernardino County, Calif. Born in Prescott, Yavapai County, Ariz., February 12, 1935. Democrat. Radio announcer; disabled by polio, and used steel braces or a wheelchair; member of California state assembly 72nd District, 1963-74; delegate to Democratic National Convention from California, 1968; on August 23, 1970, he was shot in the chest with a pellet gun by his 15-year-old son, following an argument. Died, from complications of pneumonia, in a hospital near Sacramento, Sacramento County, Calif., December 23, 2012 (age 77 years, 315 days). Burial location unknown.
  See also Wikipedia article
  Thomas Euclid Rains, Sr. (c.1921-2000) — also known as T. Euclid Rains — of Alabama. Born about 1921. Broom manufacturer; member of Alabama state house of representatives 26th District, 1979-91. Methodist. Member, Lions. Became blind when he lost both eyes in an accident with a pair scissors as a boy. He was the only totally blind baseball coach in Little League history. Killed in an automobile accident, when the car in which he was a passenger went off a bridge in heavy rain, near Geraldine, Marshall County, Ala., August 27, 2000 (age about 79 years). Interment at Asbury Methodist Church Cemetery, Near Albertville, Marshall County, Ala.
  Christopher D'Olier Reeve (1952-2004) — also known as Christopher Reeve — Born in New York City (unknown county), N.Y., September 25, 1952. Democrat. Actor; paralyzed in a horseback-riding accident in 1995; speaker, Democratic National Convention, 1996. Died, from heart failure while being treated for an infection, in Northern Westchester Hospital, Mt. Kisco, Westchester County, N.Y., October 10, 2004 (age 52 years, 15 days). Cremated; ashes scattered.
  Relatives: Son of Franklin D'Olier Reeve and Barbara Pitney (Lamb) Reeve; married, April 11, 1992, to Dana Morosini (1961-2006); great-grandson of Mahlon Pitney (1858-1924).
  Political family: Pitney family of New Jersey.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Arthur Waggener Rhorer (1885-1966) — also known as Arthur W. Rhorer — of Middlesboro, Bell County, Ky. Born in Columbia, Adair County, Ky., January 30, 1885. Democrat. Delegate to Democratic National Convention from Kentucky, 1920. Presbyterian. Member, Elks. Lost a leg as a young boy. Died in Middlesboro, Bell County, Ky., September 24, 1966 (age 81 years, 237 days). Interment at Middlesboro Cemetery, Middlesboro, Ky.
  Relatives: Son of Moses Hoover Rhorer (1852?-?).
  Bob Cowley Riley (1924-1994) — also known as Bob C. Riley — of Arkadelphia, Clark County, Ark. Born in Little Rock, Pulaski County, Ark., September 18, 1924. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Marine Corps during World War II; became blind due to war injuries; member of Arkansas state house of representatives, 1947-50; candidate for Arkansas state senate, 1950; university professor; mayor of Arkadelphia, Ark., 1966-67; alternate delegate to Democratic National Convention from Arkansas, 1968; Lieutenant Governor of Arkansas, 1971-75; Governor of Arkansas, 1975; defeated in primary, 1974. Died in Arkadelphia, Clark County, Ark., February 16, 1994 (age 69 years, 151 days). Interment at Rest Haven Memorial Gardens, Arkadelphia, Ark.
  Relatives: Son of Columbus Allen Riley and Winnie Mae (Craig) Riley; married to Claudia Zimmerman.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
Franklin D. Roosevelt Franklin Delano Roosevelt (1882-1945) — also known as Franklin D. Roosevelt; "F.D.R." — of Hyde Park, Dutchess County, N.Y. Born in Hyde Park, Dutchess County, N.Y., January 30, 1882. Democrat. Lawyer; member of New York state senate 26th District, 1911-13; resigned 1913; U.S. Assistant Secretary of the Navy, 1913-20; candidate for Vice President of the United States, 1920; delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1920, 1924, 1928; speaker, 1944; contracted polio in the early 1920s; as a result, his legs were paralyzed for the rest of his life; Governor of New York, 1929-33; President of the United States, 1933-45; died in office 1945; on February 15, 1933, in Miami, Fla., he and Chicago mayor Anton J. Cermak were shot at by Guiseppe Zangara; Cermak was hit and mortally wounded. Episcopalian. Member, Freemasons; Alpha Delta Phi; Phi Beta Kappa; Elks; Grange; Knights of Pythias. Led the nation through the Depression and World War II. Died of a cerebral hemorrhage, in Warm Springs, Meriwether County, Ga., April 12, 1945 (age 63 years, 72 days). Interment at Roosevelt Home, Hyde Park, N.Y.; memorial monument at Federal Triangle, Washington, D.C.; memorial monument at West Potomac Park, Washington, D.C.
  Relatives: Son of James Roosevelt (1828-1900) and Sara (Delano) Roosevelt (1854-1941); married, March 17, 1905, to Eleanor Roosevelt (niece of Theodore Roosevelt (1858-1919); first cousin of Corinne Douglas Robinson); father of James Roosevelt (1907-1991), Elliott Roosevelt and Franklin Delano Roosevelt, Jr.; half-uncle of Helen Roosevelt Robinson; second great-grandson of Edward Hutchinson Robbins; first cousin of Warren Delano Robbins (1885-1935) and Katharine Price Collier St. George; first cousin once removed of Helen Lloyd Aspinwall (1863-1929; who married Francis Emanuel Shober); first cousin four times removed of Ebenezer Huntington; first cousin six times removed of Benjamin Huntington; second cousin of Caroline Astor Drayton (who married William Phillips); second cousin thrice removed of Nicholas Roosevelt, Jr. and Jabez Williams Huntington; second cousin five times removed of Samuel Huntington, George Washington, Joshua Coit, Henry Huntington, Gurdon Huntington and Samuel Gager; third cousin twice removed of Philip DePeyster and James I. Roosevelt; third cousin thrice removed of Sulifand Sutherland Ross; fourth cousin once removed of Ulysses Simpson Grant, Robert Barnwell Roosevelt, Roger Wolcott and Theodore Roosevelt (1858-1919).
  Political families: Roosevelt family of New York City, New York; Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Cross-reference: Ross T. McIntire — Milton Lipson — W. W. Howes — Bruce Barton — Hamilton Fish, Jr. — Joseph W. Martin, Jr. — Samuel I. Rosenman — Rexford G. Tugwell — Raymond Moley — Adolf A. Berle — George E. Allen — Lorence E. Asman — Grenville T. Emmet — Eliot Janeway — Jonathan Daniels — Ralph Bellamy
  The Franklin Delano Roosevelt Bridge (opened 1962), over Lubec Narrows, between Lubec, Maine and Campobello Island, New Brunswick, Canada, is named for him.  — The borough of Roosevelt, New Jersey (originally Jersey Homesteads; renamed 1945), is named for him.
  Politician named for him: Frank Garrison
  Coins and currency: His portrait appears on the U.S. dime (ten cent coin).
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about Franklin D. Roosevelt: James MacGregor Burns & Susan Dunn, The Three Roosevelts: Patrician Leaders Who Transformed America — Doris Kearns Goodwin, No Ordinary Time : Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt: The Home Front in World War II — Joseph Alsop & Roland Gelatt, FDR : 1882-1945 — Bernard Bellush, Franklin Roosevelt as Governor of New York — Robert H. Jackson, That Man : An Insider's Portrait of Franklin D. Roosevelt — Jonas Klein, Beloved Island : Franklin & Eleanor and the Legacy of Campobello — Conrad Black, Franklin Delano Roosevelt : Champion of Freedom — Charles Peters, Five Days in Philadelphia: The Amazing "We Want Willkie!" Convention of 1940 and How It Freed FDR to Save the Western World — Steven Neal, Happy Days Are Here Again : The 1932 Democratic Convention, the Emergence of FDR--and How America Was Changed Forever — H. W. Brands, Traitor to His Class: The Privileged Life and Radical Presidency of Franklin Delano Roosevelt — Hazel Rowley, Franklin and Eleanor: An Extraordinary Marriage — Alan Brinkley, Franklin Delano Roosevelt — Stanley Weintraub, Young Mr. Roosevelt: FDR's Introduction to War, Politics, and Life — Karen Bornemann Spies, Franklin D. Roosevelt (for young readers)
  Critical books about Franklin D. Roosevelt: Jim Powell, FDR's Folly: How Roosevelt and His New Deal Prolonged the Great Depression — John T. Flynn, The Roosevelt Myth — Burton W. Folsom, New Deal or Raw Deal?: How FDR's Economic Legacy Has Damaged America
  Fiction about Franklin D. Roosevelt: Philip Roth, The Plot Against America: A Novel
  Image source: New York Red Book 1936
  George Washington Roosevelt (1844-1907) — also known as George W. Roosevelt — of Pennsylvania. Born in Chester, Delaware County, Pa., February 14, 1844. Served in the Union Army during the Civil War; U.S. Consular Agent in Sydney, as of 1877; U.S. Consul in Auckland, 1877-79; SAINT Helena, 1879-80; Matanzas, 1880-81; Bordeaux, 1881-89; Brussels, 1889-1905; U.S. Consul General in Brussels, as of 1906. Received the Medal of Honor in 1887 for action at Bull Run, Va., August 30, 1862, and at Gettysburg, Pa., July 2, 1863; severely wounded and lost a leg. Died in Brussels, Belgium, April 14, 1907 (age 63 years, 59 days). Interment at Oak Hill Cemetery, Washington, D.C.
  Presumably named for: George Washington
  Relatives: Son of Solomon Roosevelt (1807-1900) and Elizabeth (Morris) Roosevelt (1811-1859); great-grandson of Nicholas Roosevelt, Jr.; third cousin twice removed of Philip DePeyster and James I. Roosevelt; fourth cousin once removed of Robert Barnwell Roosevelt (1829-1906).
  Political families: Roosevelt family of New York City, New York; Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Charles Frederick Carson Ruff (1939-2000) — also known as Charles F. C. Ruff — of Washington, D.C. Born in Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, Ohio, August 1, 1939. Lawyer; his legs were paralyzed by illness in the mid-1960s; U.S. Attorney for the District of Columbia, 1979-81; President Bill Clinton's White House Counsel, 1997-99. Died, from a heart attack, in Washington, D.C., November 19, 2000 (age 61 years, 110 days). Burial location unknown.
  See also NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  J. H. St. Lawrence — also known as "The Blind Musician"; "The Blind Optimist"; "The Blind Orator" — of Pullman, Whitman County, Wash. Blind; mayor of Pullman, Wash., 1896. Burial location unknown.
Thomas D. Schall Thomas David Schall (1878-1935) — also known as Thomas D. Schall — of Excelsior, Hennepin County, Minn. Born in Reed City, Osceola County, Mich., June 4, 1878. Republican. Lawyer; U.S. Representative from Minnesota 10th District, 1915-25; delegate to Republican National Convention from Minnesota, 1920; U.S. Senator from Minnesota, 1925-35; defeated in primary, 1923; died in office 1935. Episcopalian. Member, Freemasons. Blinded by an electric shock from a cigar lighter, 1907. Hit by an automobile, on the Washington-Baltimore Boulevard, near Cottage City, Maryland, suffered severe injuries, and died three days later, in Casualty Hospital, Washington, D.C., December 22, 1935 (age 57 years, 201 days). Interment at Lakewood Cemetery, Minneapolis, Minn.
  Relatives: Son of David Schall and Mary Ellen (Jordan) Schall; married 1907 to Margaret Huntley.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: Minnesota Legislative Manual 1917
  Albert George Schmedeman (1864-1946) — also known as Albert G. Schmedeman — of Madison, Dane County, Wis. Born in Madison, Dane County, Wis., November 25, 1864. Democrat. U.S. Minister to Norway, 1913-21; mayor of Madison, Wis., 1926-32; Governor of Wisconsin, 1933-35; defeated, 1928, 1934. Episcopalian. Member, Freemasons. One leg was amputated as a result of gangrene infection in 1934. Died November 26, 1946 (age 82 years, 1 days). Interment at Forest Hill Cemetery, Madison, Wis.
  Relatives: Son of Henry Schmedeman and Wilhelmina (Camien) Schmedeman; married to Kate M. Regan.
  See also Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary
  George F. Shannon (c.1785-1836) — also known as "Peg Leg" — of St. Charles, St. Charles County, Mo. Born in a log cabin in Washington County, Pa., about 1785. Youngest member of the Lewis and Clark expedition, 1804-06; wounded in a skirmish with Indians in 1807 and lost a leg; lawyer; member of Kentucky state house of representatives, 1820-24; circuit judge in Kentucky, 1820; U.S. Attorney for Missouri, 1829-34. Irish ancestry. Member, Freemasons. Died, in a hotel at Palmyra, Marion County, Mo., August 30, 1836 (age about 51 years). Interment at Massey Mill Cemetery, Near Palmyra, Marion County, Mo.
  Relatives: Son of George David Shannon (1758-1803) and Jane (Milligan) Shannon (1758-1823); brother of Thomas Shannon, James Shannon (1791?-1832) and Wilson Shannon; married, September 18, 1813, to Ruth Snowden Price (1793-1833); granduncle of Isaac Charles Parker.
  Political family: Shannon-Shelby family.
  Shannon County, Mo. is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article
  Miles Osborne Sherill (b. 1841) — of Catawba County, N.C. Born in Catawba County, N.C., July 26, 1841. Democrat. Served in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; lost a leg at the battle of Spotsylvania Court House, 1864; probate judge in North Carolina, 1868; member of North Carolina state house of representatives, 1882-83; member of North Carolina state senate, 1885-86, 1893-94; North Carolina state librarian, 1913. Methodist. Member, Odd Fellows. Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Hiram Sherill and Sarah Sherill; married 1867 to Sarah R. Bost.
Henry Sherwood Henry Sherwood (b. 1844) — of Washington, D.C. Born in Avon, Livingston County, N.Y., 1844. Republican. Served in the Union Army during the Civil War; lost a leg at the Battle of Lattimers' Mills; postmaster at Washington, D.C., 1890-94. Burial location unknown.
  Image source: The Story of Our Post Office (1893)
Daniel E. Sickles Daniel Edgar Sickles (1819-1914) — also known as Daniel E. Sickles; "Devil Dan" — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in New York, New York County, N.Y., October 20, 1819. Lawyer; member of New York state assembly from New York County, 1847; member of New York state senate 3rd District, 1856-57; U.S. Representative from New York, 1857-61, 1893-95 (3rd District 1857-61, 10th District 1893-95); defeated (Democratic), 1894; general in the Union Army during the Civil War; delegate to Republican National Convention from New York, 1868; U.S. Minister to Spain, 1869-74; delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1892. Member, Grand Army of the Republic. Shot and killed Philip Barton Key, his wife's lover and the son of the author of the national anthem, at Lafayette Park, Washington, D.C, 1859; charged with murder, but with the help of his attorney Edwin M. Stanton, was acquitted after the first successful plea of temporary insanity in U.S. legal history. Received the Medal of Honor in 1897 for action at the Battle of Gettysburg, July 2, 1863; lost a leg in that battle; his amputated leg was displayed at the Army Medical Museum, where he frequently visited it in later years. Died in New York, New York County, N.Y., May 3, 1914 (age 94 years, 195 days). Interment at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Va.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — U.S. State Dept career summary
  Books about Daniel E. Sickles: Thomas M. Keneally, American Scoundrel : The Life of the Notorious Civil War General Dan Sickles
  Image source: Official NY: from Cleveland to Hughes (1911)
  Barbara Boggs Sigmund (1939-1990) — also known as Barbara B. Sigmund; "Mayor Barbara" — of Princeton, Mercer County, N.J. Born May 27, 1939. Democrat. Delegate to Democratic National Convention from New Jersey, 1980; candidate in primary for U.S. Senator from New Jersey, 1982; mayor of Princeton, N.J., 1984-90; died in office 1990; candidate in primary for Governor of New Jersey, 1989. Female. Lost her left eye to cancer in 1982. Died October 10, 1990 (age 51 years, 136 days). Interment at Princeton Cemetery, Princeton, N.J.
  Relatives: Daughter of Thomas Hale Boggs, Sr. and Corinne Claiborne Boggs; sister of Cokie Roberts (National Public Radio reporter and commentator) and Thomas Hale Boggs, Jr.; second great-grandniece of John Francis Hamtramck Claiborne; third great-granddaughter of Ferdinand Leigh Claiborne; third great-grandniece of William Charles Cole Claiborne and Nathaniel Herbert Claiborne; first cousin twice removed of Jacob Haight Morrison IV and de Lesseps Story Morrison; first cousin six times removed of Thomas Claiborne (1749-1812); second cousin five times removed of John Claiborne and Thomas Claiborne (1780-1856); third cousin once removed of Herbert Claiborne Pell, Jr. (1884-1961); fourth cousin of Claiborne de Borda Pell.
  Political family: Claiborne-Dallas family of Virginia and Louisiana (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Epitaph: "A passion for beauty and justice."
  See also Wikipedia article
  Dayton Burleigh Smalley (1878-1958) — of Vermont. Born in Waterbury, Washington County, Vt., April 13, 1878. Member of Vermont state house of representatives, 1937-39; member of Vermont state senate, 1941. Went blind while in office. Died in 1958 (age about 80 years). Interment at Lamoille View Cemetery, Johnson, Vt.
  Anastasia Somoza — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Democrat. Born with cerebral palsy and uses a wheelchair; delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 2004, 2008 (alternate). Female. Descendant of the Somoza family which ruled Nicaragua. Still living as of 2008.
  Doug Spade — of Adrian, Lenawee County, Mich. Democrat. Blind; member of Michigan state house of representatives 57th District; elected 1998. Still living as of 1998.
  Stephen J. Stilwell (1866-1942) — of Bronx, Bronx County, N.Y.; Mamaroneck, Westchester County, N.Y. Born in New York, May 10, 1866. Democrat. Lawyer; member of New York state senate 21st District, 1909-13; removed 1913; charged in 1913 with extorting a bribe of $3,500 from George H. Kendall, president of the New York Bank Note company, over a bill that Kendall supported; tried in the State Senate and found not guilty on April 15 by a vote of 28 to 21; indicted on May 12 by a grand jury for soliciting a bribe; tried soon after, and convicted on May 24; this removed him from office; sentenced to four to eight years in prison; after his release, he moved to Mamaroneck and entered the real estate business; indicted in 1934 on charges that he defrauded his former stenographer of $9,000 when she came to him seeking a Naval Academy appointment for her son, but the case did not go to trial; arrested in March 1941 and indicted in April on charges that he attempted to bribe a Mamaroneck village trustee $1,000 to obtain a police job for an associate; pleaded guilty, but never sentenced; while incarcerated, his legs were amputated. Died, while a prisoner awaiting sentence, in Grasslands Hospital, Valhalla, Westchester County, N.Y., April 20, 1942 (age 75 years, 345 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Mary Delia (Archer) Stilwell (1833-1925) and William Jewitt Stilwell; married, February 14, 1887, to Celia A. Blanck.
  James Bennett Stone (1823-1895) — also known as James B. Stone — of Calhoun County, Fla. Born in Montgomery County, Ala., November 29, 1823. Farmer; sawmill owner; Calhoun County Sheriff, 1855-59; member of Florida state house of representatives, 1868-70, 1877; delegate to Florida state constitutional convention, 1885. He lost a leg in a sawmill accident. Died in Calhoun County, Fla., February 25, 1895 (age 71 years, 88 days). Interment at Old Shiloh Cemetery, Calhoun County, Fla.
  Relatives: Son of David Cruger Stone and Lucinda (Evans) Stone; brother of Joseph Seaborn Stone; married to Jincy Ann Yon (1828-1894); father of Terrell Higdon Stone; nephew of Lackland McIntosh Stone (1801-1842); grandson of Henry Dessex Stone; first cousin of Lewis Maxwell Stone.
  Political family: Stone family of Florida.
  John Strong, Jr. (1830-1913) — also known as "Honest John" — of South Rockwood, Monroe County, Mich. Born, in a log cabin, in Greenfield Township (now part of Detroit), Wayne County, Mich., April 7, 1830. Democrat. Farmer; merchant; member of Michigan state house of representatives, 1861-62, 1879-80 (Wayne County 2nd District 1861-62, Monroe County 2nd District 1879-80); delegate to Democratic National Convention from Michigan, 1880 (alternate), 1892, 1912 (alternate); member of Michigan state senate 5th District, 1881-84; Lieutenant Governor of Michigan, 1891-92; Gold Democratic candidate for Presidential Elector for Michigan, 1896. Member, Freemasons. Founder of South Rockwood, Mich. Lost two fingers on his right hand in a sawmill accident. Died in South Rockwood, Monroe County, Mich., April 2, 1913 (age 82 years, 360 days). Interment at Riverside Cemetery, South Rockwood, Mich.
  Relatives: Son of John Strong, Sr.; nephew by marriage of Frederick Buhl and Christian Henry Buhl; uncle of John Strong Haggerty (1866-1950).
  Political family: Buhl-Strong family of Detroit, Michigan.
Peter Stuyvesant Pieter Stuyvesant (c.1612-1672) — also known as Peter Stuyvesant; "Old Silver Leg" — of Nieuw Amsterdam, Niew Neederlandt (now part of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y.); New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in Peperga, Friesland, Netherlands, about 1612. Dutch Director-General (colonial governor) of New Netherland, 1647-64. Frisian ancestry. Lost his right leg in battle in 1644. Died in New York, New York County, N.Y., 1672 (age about 60 years). Entombed at St. Mark's-in-the-Bowery Churchyard, Manhattan, N.Y.
  Relatives: Married to Judith Bayard (1608-1686); uncle of Nicholas Bayard (1644?-1707); great-granduncle of Stephanus Bayard; second great-grandfather of Elizabeth Stuyvesant (1775-1854; who married Nicholas Fish (1758-1833)) and Margaret Cornelia Winthrop (1801-1863; who married George Folsom); second great-granduncle of Nicholas Bayard (1736-1802) and John Bubenheim Bayard; third great-grandfather of Hamilton Fish (1808-1893); third great-granduncle of James Asheton Bayard, Sr.; fourth great-grandfather of Nicholas Fish (1848-1902) and Hamilton Fish, Jr. (1849-1936); fourth great-granduncle of Richard Henry Bayard, Littleton Kirkpatrick, James Asheton Bayard, Jr. and James Adams Ekin; fifth great-grandfather of Jonathan Mayhew Wainwright, Winifred Folsom (1882-1927; who married Edward Henry Delafield) and Hamilton Fish, Jr. (1888-1991); fifth great-granduncle of Thomas Francis Bayard, Sr., Andrew Kirkpatrick and John Sluyter Wirt; sixth great-grandfather of Hamilton Fish, Jr. (1926-1996); sixth great-granduncle of Thomas Francis Bayard, Jr.; seventh great-grandfather of Hamilton Fish (1951-) and Alexa Fish Ward; seventh great-granduncle of John Eliot Thayer, Jr., Bronson Murray Cutting, Thomas Francis Bayard III and Alexis Irenee du Pont Bayard (1918-1985).
  Political families: DuPont family of Wilmington, Delaware; Livingston-Schuyler family of New York; Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: New York Public Library
John B. Swainson John Burley Swainson (1925-1994) — also known as John B. Swainson — of Plymouth, Wayne County, Mich.; Detroit, Wayne County, Mich.; Manchester, Washtenaw County, Mich. Born in Windsor, Ontario, July 31, 1925. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army during World War II; lawyer; member of Michigan state senate 18th District, 1955-58; Lieutenant Governor of Michigan, 1959-60; Governor of Michigan, 1961-62; defeated, 1962; member of Democratic National Committee from Michigan, 1963; circuit judge in Michigan 3rd Circuit, 1965-70; justice of Michigan state supreme court, 1971-75; resigned 1975. Member, American Legion; Veterans of Foreign Wars; Disabled American Veterans; Delta Theta Phi; Amvets; Purple Heart; Lions; Elks. Lost both legs in a land mine explosion on November 15, 1944, near Metz, Alsace-Lorraine, during World War II. Charged in 1975 with accepting a bribe; found not guilty, but convicted of perjury over his testimony to the grand jury. Died, of a heart attack, in Manchester, Washtenaw County, Mich., May 13, 1994 (age 68 years, 286 days). Interment at Oak Grove Cemetery, Manchester, Mich.
  Relatives: Son of John Adam Carl Swainson (1904-1997).
  Cross-reference: Zolton A. Ferency
  See also NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about John Swainson: Lawrence M. Glazer, Wounded Warrior: The Rise and Fall of Michigan Governor John Swainson
  Image source: Michigan Manual 1957-58
  Peleg Tallman (1764-1840) — of Massachusetts. Born in Tiverton, Newport County, R.I., July 24, 1764. Democrat. Served in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; U.S. Representative from Massachusetts 16th District, 1811-13; member of Massachusetts state senate, 1821-22. Lost an arm during Revolutionary War service. Died in Bath, Sagadahoc County, Maine, March 12, 1840 (age 75 years, 232 days). Original interment at Maple Grove Cemetery, Bath, Maine; reinterment at Forest Hills Cemetery, Jamaica Plain, Boston, Mass.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Benjamin Ryan Tillman (1847-1918) — also known as Benjamin R. Tillman; "Pitchfork Ben"; "The One-Eyed Plowboy" — of Trenton, Edgefield County, S.C. Born in Edgefield District (now Edgefield County), S.C., August 11, 1847. Democrat. Served in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; lost an eye in 1864; farmer; Governor of South Carolina, 1890-94; delegate to South Carolina state constitutional convention, 1895; U.S. Senator from South Carolina, 1895-1918; died in office 1918; in Februry, 1902, he accused fellow South Carolina senator John McLaurin, of accepting a bribe (in the form of federal patronage) to support a treaty; McLaurin called Tillman a liar, and the two came to blows on the Senate floor; both were censured by the Senate; delegate to Democratic National Convention from South Carolina, 1904, 1912 (member, Platform and Resolutions Committee), 1916; member of Democratic National Committee from South Carolina, 1912-16. English ancestry. Died in Washington, D.C., July 3, 1918 (age 70 years, 326 days). Interment at Ebenezer Cemetery, Trenton, S.C.; statue at State House Grounds, Columbia, S.C.
  Relatives: Son of Benjamin Ryan Tillman, Sr. and Sophia (Hancock) Tillman; brother of George Dionysius Tillman (1826-1902); married 1868 to Sallie Starke.
  Cross-reference: Frazier B. Baker
  Tillman County, Okla. is named for him.
  Politician named for him: Ben T. Leppard
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  Books about Ben Tillman: Stephen Kantrowitz, Ben Tillman & the Reconstruction of White Supremacy
  Morris King Udall (1922-1998) — also known as Morris K. Udall; Mo Udall — of Tucson, Pima County, Ariz. Born in St. Johns, Apache County, Ariz., June 15, 1922. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army Air Force in World War II; played professional basketball with the Denver Nuggets, 1948-49; lawyer; co-founder and director, Bank of Tucson; Pima County Attorney, 1953-54; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Arizona, 1956, 1972; speaker, 1984, 1988; U.S. Representative from Arizona 2nd District, 1961-91; candidate for Democratic nomination for President, 1976. Mormon. Member, American Bar Association; American Judicature Society; American Legion; Phi Kappa Phi; Phi Delta Phi. Lost an eye in an accident when he was a boy. Received the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1996. Died, of Parkinson's disease, in the Veterans Administration Hospital, Washington, D.C., December 12, 1998 (age 76 years, 180 days). Cremated; ashes scattered in a private or family graveyard, Pima County, Ariz.; cenotaph at St. Johns Cemetery, St. Johns, Ariz.
  Relatives: Son of Levi Stewart Udall and Louise (Lee) Udall (1893-1974); brother of Stewart Lee Udall; married 1949 to Patricia Emery (1926-2003); married 1968 to Ella Royston Ward (1929-1988); father of Mark E. Udall; nephew of John Hunt Udall, Jesse Addison Udall and Don Taylor Udall; uncle of Thomas Stewart Udall (1948-); grandson of David King Udall; great-grandson of John Doyle Lee; first cousin of John Nicholas Udall, Lee Kenyon Udall and Rex E. Lee; first cousin once removed of Milan Dale Smith, Jr., Gordon Harold Smith and Mike Lee.
  Political family: Udall family of Arizona.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — votes in Congress from the Washington Post — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about Morris K. Udall: Donald W. Carson & James W. Johnson, Mo : The Life and Times of Morris K. Udall
  Clarence C. Vam Bell (born c.1910) — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born about 1910. Republican. Insurance broker; candidate for New York state assembly from New York County 3rd District, 1942, 1944, 1954, 1955, 1956, 1957; candidate for U.S. Representative from New York 20th District, 1952; Presidential Elector for New York, 1956, 1972; candidate for delegate to New York state constitutional convention 25th District, 1966. Became blind in the 1930s from an accident while playing semi-professional baseball. Burial location unknown.
  George Corley Wallace, Jr. (1919-1998) — also known as George C. Wallace — of Clayton, Barbour County, Ala.; Montgomery, Montgomery County, Ala. Born in Clio, Barbour County, Ala., August 25, 1919. Served in the U.S. Army Air Force in World War II; lawyer; member of Alabama state house of representatives, 1947-53; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Alabama, 1948 (alternate), 1956; circuit judge in Alabama, 1953-58; Governor of Alabama, 1963-67, 1971-72, 1972-79, 1983-87; defeated in Democratic primary, 1958; candidate for Democratic nomination for President, 1964, 1972, 1976; American Independent candidate for President of the United States, 1968. Methodist. Member, Freemasons; Knights Templar; Order of the Eastern Star; Shriners; Moose; Elks; Woodmen; Civitan; American Legion; Veterans of Foreign Wars; Disabled American Veterans. Worked as a professional boxer in the late 1930s. While campaigning in Maryland on May 15, 1972, was shot by Arthur Bremer; the injury paralyzed both legs. Along with Ohio's James A. Rhodes, he was the longest serving state governor in U.S. history. Died in Jackson Hospital, Montgomery, Montgomery County, Ala., September 13, 1998 (age 79 years, 19 days). Interment at Greenwood Cemetery, Montgomery, Ala.
  Relatives: Son of George C. Wallace and Mozell (Smith) Wallace; married, May 21, 1943, to Lurleen Brigham Burns; married, June 4, 1971, to Cornelia Ellis Snively (divorced 1978; niece of James Elisha Folsom; first cousin of James Elisha Folsom, Jr.); married 1981 to Lisa Taylor (divorced 1987); father of George C. Wallace, Jr. (1946?-).
  Political family: Wallace-Folsom family of Montgomery, Alabama.
  Cross-reference: Seybourn H. Lynne
  See also NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile
  Books about George C. Wallace: Stephan Lesher, George Wallace : American Populist — Dan T. Carter, The Politics of Rage : George Wallace, the Origins of the New Conservatism, and the Transformation of American Politics — Lloyd Rohler, George Wallace : Conservative Populist — Jeff Frederick, Stand Up for Alabama: Governor George C. Wallace
  Thomas William Ward (1807-1872) — also known as "Peg Leg" — of Austin, Travis County, Tex. Born in Ireland, 1807. Served in the Texas Army during the Texas War of Independence; mayor of Austin, Tex., 1840-41, 1853, 1865; Texas Republic Land Office Commissioner, 1840-46. Lost a leg in the storming of Bexar, 1835; lost his right arm while firing a cannon to celebrate Texas independence, 1841. Died of typhoid fever, in Austin, Travis County, Tex., November 25, 1872 (age about 65 years). Interment at Texas State Cemetery, Austin, Tex.
  Ward County, Tex. is named for him.
  John Franklin Westmoreland (1847-1913) — also known as J. F. Westmoreland — of Thomasville, Davidson County, N.C. Born in Stokes County, N.C., April 27, 1847. Served in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; printer; newspaper publisher; suffered a stroke in the 1890s which confined him to a wheelchair; member of North Carolina state senate 26th District, 1895-96. Campbellite. Died in Thomasville, Davidson County, N.C., May 13, 1913 (age 66 years, 16 days). Interment at City Cemetery, Thomasville, N.C.
  Relatives: Second great-grandfather of T. G. Westmoreland (1964-).
  See also OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Harrison H. Wheeler (1839-1896) — of Bay City, Bay County, Mich.; Ludington, Mason County, Mich. Born in Farmers Creek, Lapeer County, Mich., March 22, 1839. Democrat. Served in the Union Army during the Civil War; wounded, and lost the use of his left arm; Bay County Clerk, 1866; member of Michigan state senate, 1871-72, 1873-74 (27th District 1871-72, 24th District 1873-74); circuit judge in Michigan 19th Circuit, 1874-78; resigned 1878; postmaster at Ludington, Mich., 1878-82; U.S. Representative from Michigan 9th District, 1891-93; defeated, 1892. Died in Farmers Creek, Lapeer County, Mich., July 28, 1896 (age 57 years, 128 days). Interment at Lakeview Cemetery, Ludington, Mich.
  Relatives: Married to Jane B. Toncrey (1839-1910).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Daniel E. Whitmore (b. 1825) — of Marathon, Cortland County, N.Y. Born in Columbus, Chenango County, N.Y., January 6, 1825. School commissioner; wholesale produce dealer; fire insurance business; member of New York state assembly from Cortland County, 1875. Presbyterian. Lost a limb in an accident at age 10. Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Luther Whitmore (1792-1869) and Elsie (Perkins) Whitmore; brother of George B. Whitmore (1835?-?); married, July 9, 1850, to Lydia M. Shattuck; father of Daniel Webster Whitmore.
  Political family: Whitmore family of New York.
  Hosea Lorenzo Williams (1926-2000) — also known as Hosea Williams — of Savannah, Chatham County, Ga.; Atlanta, Fulton County, Ga.; Decatur, DeKalb County, Ga. Born in Attapulgus, Decatur County, Ga., January 5, 1926. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army during World War II; walked with a cane due to wartime injury; ordained minister; candidate in primary for U.S. Senator from Georgia, 1972; member of Georgia state house of representatives 54th District, 1975-85; candidate for mayor of Atlanta, Ga., 1989. African ancestry. Member, NAACP; Phi Beta Sigma; Elks; Freemasons; Veterans of Foreign Wars; Disabled American Veterans; American Legion. Civil rights leader; active in sit-ins and protest marches in Savannah and elsewhere; arrested at least 135 times. As Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.'s "field general" in the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, led the 1965 Selma-to-Montgomery march which helped galvanize support for Black voting rights. In 1968, he was present at the Lorraine Motel in Memphis, Tenn., when King was assassinated. Convicted in 1981 of leaving the scene of an accident, and jailed for six months. Died, of cancer, at Piedmont Hospital, Atlanta, Fulton County, Ga., November 16, 2000 (age 74 years, 316 days). Entombed at Lincoln Cemetery, Atlanta, Ga.
  Relatives: Married to Juanita Elizabeth Terry Williams (1925-2000).
  Personal motto: "Unbought and unbossed."
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  John Bell Williams (1918-1983) — of Raymond, Hinds County, Miss. Born in Raymond, Hinds County, Miss., December 4, 1918. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army Air Force in World War II; U.S. Representative from Mississippi, 1947-68 (7th District 1947-53, 4th District 1953-63, 3rd District 1963-68); delegate to Democratic National Convention from Mississippi, 1948, 1956, 1960; Governor of Mississippi, 1968-72. Baptist. Member, Freemasons. Lost his lower left arm in a bomber crash during World War II. Died in Brandon, Rankin County, Miss., March 25, 1983 (age 64 years, 111 days). Interment at Raymond Cemetery, Raymond, Miss.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — NNDB dossier
  Verne R. Wilson (b. 1893) — of Ava, Douglas County, Mo. Born in Ava, Douglas County, Mo., February 23, 1893. Republican. Served in the U.S. Army during World War I; automobile dealer; member of Missouri state house of representatives from Douglas County, 1921-22. Injured as a U.S. soldier in France during World War I, and lost his left arm. Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Married, April 9, 1921, to Irene Young.
  Warren Wing (b. 1842) — of Fremont Township, Isabella County, Mich.; Dushville (now Winn), Isabella County, Mich. Born in Chautauqua County, N.Y., May 5, 1842. Served in the Union Army during the Civil War; during the battle of the Wilderness, suffered a crippling wound to his elbow; farmer; Isabella County Drain Commissioner; member of Michigan People's Party State Central Committee, 1899. Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Wesley Wing and Salana (Wilcox) Wing; married 1865 to Lucinda Burt.
  John Witherspoon (1723-1794) — of Princeton, Somerset County (now Mercer County), N.J. Born in Gifford, Haddingtonshire, Scotland, February 5, 1723. Presbyterian minister; Delegate to Continental Congress from New Jersey, 1776; signer, Declaration of Independence, 1776; member of New Jersey state house of assembly from Somerset County, 1783, 1789; delegate to New Jersey convention to ratify U.S. constitution from Somerset County, 1787. Presbyterian. Scottish ancestry. Became blind in 1792. Died near Princeton, Mercer County, N.J., November 15, 1794 (age 71 years, 283 days). Interment at Princeton Cemetery, Princeton, N.J.
  Relatives: Married to Elizabeth Montgomery (1722-1789); married 1791 to Ann (Marshall) Dill (1768-1811); father of James Witherspoon (1751-1777; major in Continental army during the Revolutionary War; killed in action at the battle of Germantown, Pa.); great-grandfather of John Cabell Breckinridge (1821-1875); second great-grandfather of Clifton Rodes Breckinridge.
  Political families: Marshall-Harrison-Randolph-Cabell family of Virginia; Breckinridge-Preston-Cabell-Henry family of Virginia; Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Daniel Fooks Wolcott (1910-1973) — also known as Daniel F. Wolcott — of New Castle, New Castle County, Del. Born in Wilmington, New Castle County, Del., January 29, 1910. Democrat. Lawyer; served in the U.S. Navy during World War II; candidate for Delaware state attorney general, 1946; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Delaware, 1948; superior court judge in Delaware, 1949; chair of New Castle County Democratic Party, 1950; chancellor of Delaware court of chancery, 1950-51; justice of Delaware state supreme court, 1951-64; chief justice of Delaware state supreme court, 1964-73. Episcopalian. Member, Beta Theta Pi; Society of Colonial Wars. Lost his right leg during World War II, while commanding a combat demolition unit. Died July 10, 1973 (age 63 years, 162 days). Interment at Immanuel Churchyard, New Castle, Del.
  Relatives: Son of Josiah Oliver Wolcott (1877-1938) and Mary Rebecca (Fooks) Wolcott (1879-1956); brother of Josiah Oliver Wolcott (1912-1944; First Officer with the Merchant Marine during World War II, lost at sea when his tugboat capsized); married, March 31, 1941, to Eliza Rodney (1918-1977); grandson of James Lister Wolcott.
  Political family: Wolcott family of Dover, Delaware.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Urban Andrain Woodbury (1838-1915) — also known as Urban A. Woodbury — of Burlington, Chittenden County, Vt. Born in Acworth, Sullivan County, N.H., July 11, 1838. Republican. Served in the Union Army during the Civil War; wounded at the Battle of First Bull Run, and lost his right arm; lumber business; cotton manufacturer; hotel owner; mayor of Burlington, Vt., 1885-86; Lieutenant Governor of Vermont, 1888-90; Governor of Vermont, 1894-96. Congregationalist. Died in Burlington, Chittenden County, Vt., April 15, 1915 (age 76 years, 278 days). Interment at Lakeview Cemetery, Burlington, Vt.
  Relatives: Married to Pauline L. Darling (1842-1934).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Charles Sasha Zimmerman (1896-1983) — also known as Charles Zimmerman; Alexander Ubsushone — of Bronx, Bronx County, N.Y. Born in Talna, Russia (now Talne, Ukraine), 1896. Communist. Garment worker; Workers candidate for New York state assembly, 1925 (Bronx County 7th District), 1926 (Bronx County 5th District), 1928 (Bronx County 4th District); expelled from Communist Party, 1929; broke with Communism by mid-1930s, and became anti-Communist by 1946; vice-president, International Ladies Garment Workers Union, 1934-72; became blind in 1966. Jewish ancestry. Died June 3, 1983 (age about 86 years). Burial location unknown.
  See also Wikipedia article
"Enjoy the hospitable entertainment of a political graveyard."
Henry L. Clinton, Apollo Hall, New York City, February 3, 1872
The Political Graveyard

The Political Graveyard is a web site about U.S. political history and cemeteries. Founded in 1996, it is the Internet's most comprehensive free source for American political biography, listing 312,576 politicians, living and dead.
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