PoliticalGraveyard.com
The Political Graveyard: A Database of American History
Politicians Who Received a Nobel Prize
(U.S. Politicians only)

in chronological order

Theodore Roosevelt Theodore Roosevelt (1858-1919) — also known as "T.R."; "Teddy"; "The Colonel"; "The Hero of San Juan Hill"; "The Rough Rider"; "Trust-Buster"; "The Happy Warrior"; "The Bull Moose" — of New York, New York County, N.Y.; Oyster Bay, Nassau County, Long Island, N.Y. Born in New York, New York County, N.Y., October 27, 1858. Member of New York state assembly from New York County 21st District, 1882-84; delegate to Republican National Convention from New York, 1884, 1900; candidate for mayor of New York City, N.Y., 1886; colonel in the U.S. Army during the Spanish-American War; Governor of New York, 1899-1901; Vice President of the United States, 1901; President of the United States, 1901-09; defeated (Progressive), 1912; candidate for Republican nomination for President, 1916. Christian Reformed. Dutch ancestry. Member, Freemasons; Phi Beta Kappa; Delta Kappa Epsilon; Alpha Delta Phi; Union League. Received the Medal of Honor for leading a charge up San Juan Hill during battle there, July 1, 1898. While campaigning for president in Milwaukee, Wis., on October 14, 1912, was shot in the chest by John F. Schrank; despite the injury, he continued his speech for another hour and a half before seeking medical attention. Awarded Nobel Peace Prize in 1906; elected to the Hall of Fame for Great Americans in 1950. Died in Oyster Bay, Nassau County, Long Island, N.Y., January 6, 1919 (age 60 years, 71 days). Interment at Youngs Memorial Cemetery, Oyster Bay, Long Island, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Theodore Roosevelt, Sr. (1831-1878) and Martha (Bulloch) Roosevelt (1835-1884); brother of Corinne Roosevelt Robinson and Anna L. Roosevelt (1855-1931; who married William Sheffield Cowles (1846-1923)); married, October 27, 1880, to Alice Hathaway Lee (1861-1884); married, December 2, 1886, to Edith Kermit Carow (1861-1948; first cousin once removed of Daniel Putnam Tyler); father of Alice Lee Roosevelt (who married Nicholas Longworth) and Theodore Roosevelt, Jr.; nephew of Robert Barnwell Roosevelt; uncle of Theodore Douglas Robinson (1883-1934), Eleanor Roosevelt (who married Franklin Delano Roosevelt (1882-1945)), Corinne Robinson Alsop and William Sheffield Cowles (1898-1986); grandnephew of James I. Roosevelt; granduncle of James Roosevelt, Elliott Roosevelt, Corinne A. Chubb, Franklin Delano Roosevelt, Jr. and John deKoven Alsop; great-grandfather-in-law of William Floyd Weld; great-grandnephew of William Bellinger Bulloch; second great-grandson of Archibald Bulloch; second cousin twice removed of Philip DePeyster; second cousin thrice removed of Nicholas Roosevelt, Jr.; third cousin twice removed of Martin Van Buren; fourth cousin once removed of Franklin Delano Roosevelt (1882-1945).
  Political families: Roosevelt family of New York City, New York; Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York; Monroe family of Virginia and Washington (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Cross-reference: Gifford Pinchot — David J. Leahy — William Barnes, Jr. — Oliver D. Burden — William J. Youngs — George B. Cortelyou — Mason Mitchell — Frederic MacMaster — John Goodnow — William Loeb, Jr.
  Roosevelt counties in Mont. and N.M. are named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: Theodore BassettTheodore R. McKeldinTheodore R. KupfermanTheodore Roosevelt Britton, Jr.
  Personal motto: "Speak softly and carry a big stick."
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about Theodore Roosevelt: James MacGregor Burns & Susan Dunn, The Three Roosevelts: Patrician Leaders Who Transformed America — H. W. Brands, T.R : The Last Romantic — Edmund Morris, Theodore Rex — Edmund Morris, The Rise of Theodore Roosevelt — John Morton Blum, The Republican Roosevelt — Richard D. White, Jr., Roosevelt the Reformer : Theodore Roosevelt as Civil Service Commissioner, 1889-1895 — Frederick W. Marks III, Velvet on Iron : The Diplomacy of Theodore Roosevelt — James Chace, 1912 : Wilson, Roosevelt, Taft and Debs : The Election that Changed the Country — Patricia O'Toole, When Trumpets Call : Theodore Roosevelt After the White House — Candice Millard, The River of Doubt : Theodore Roosevelt's Darkest Journey — Lewis Einstein, Roosevelt : His Mind in Action — Rick Marshall, Bully!: The Life and Times of Theodore Roosevelt: Illustrated with More Than 250 Vintage Political Cartoons
  Image source: American Monthly Review of Reviews, October 1901
Elihu Root Elihu Root (1845-1937) — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born in Clinton, Oneida County, N.Y., February 15, 1845. Republican. Lawyer; U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York, 1883-85; delegate to New York state constitutional convention at-large, 1894; U.S. Secretary of War, 1899-1904; delegate to Republican National Convention from New York, 1904 (Temporary Chair), 1912; U.S. Secretary of State, 1905-09; U.S. Senator from New York, 1909-15; delegate to New York state constitutional convention at-large, 1915; candidate for Republican nomination for President, 1916; delegate to New York convention to ratify 21st amendment, 1933. Member, Union League; American Society for International Law; American Bar Association; American Philosophical Society; American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize in 1912. Died, of pneumonia, in Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., February 7, 1937 (age 91 years, 358 days). Interment at Hamilton College Cemetery, Clinton, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Prof. Oren Root and Nancy Whitney (Buttrick) Root; married, January 8, 1878, to Clara Wales (died 1928).
  Cross-reference: Willard Bartlett — Thomas Burke
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Books about Elihu Root: Richard William Leopold, Elihu Root and the Conservative Tradition
  Image source: American Monthly Review of Reviews, June 1902
Woodrow Wilson Woodrow Wilson (1856-1924) — also known as Thomas Woodrow Wilson; "Schoolmaster in Politics" — of New Jersey. Born in Staunton, Va., December 28, 1856. Democrat. University professor; president of Princeton University, 1902-10; Governor of New Jersey, 1911-13; President of the United States, 1913-21. Presbyterian. Member, Phi Kappa Psi; Phi Alpha Delta. Recipient of Nobel Peace Prize in 1919; elected to the Hall of Fame for Great Americans in 1950. Died in Washington, D.C., February 3, 1924 (age 67 years, 37 days). Interment at Washington National Cathedral, Washington, D.C.
  Relatives: Son of Rev. Joseph Ruggles Wilson (1822-1903) and Janet 'Jessie' (Woodrow) Wilson (1826-1888); married, June 24, 1885, to Ellen Louise Axson (1860-1914); married, December 18, 1915, to Edith (Bolling) Galt (1872-1961); father of Eleanor Randolph Wilson (1889-1967; who married William Gibbs McAdoo (1863-1941)).
  Political family: Wilson-Floyd-McAdoo family.
  Cross-reference: William C. Bullitt — Bainbridge Colby — Joseph E. Davies — Joseph P. Tumulty — Thomas H. Birch — Byron R. Newton
  Mount Woodrow Wilson, in Fremont County and Sublette County, Wyoming, is named for him.  — The Woodrow Wilson Plaza, in the Federal Triangle, Washington, D.C., is named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: Woodrow W. BeanWoodrow W. JonesWoodrow W. ScottTom Woodrow PayneW. W. DumasWoodrow Wilson MannWoodrow W. BairdWoodrow W. MathnaWoodrow W. HulmeWoodrow W. KlineWoodrow W. McDonaldWoodrow W. HollanWoodrow W. CarterWoodrow W. FergusonW. Wilson GoodeWoodrow Wilson StoreyWoodrow W. Bean III
  Coins and currency: His portrait appeared on the U.S. $100,000 gold certificate, which was issued in 1934-45 for cash transactions between banks.
  Campaign slogan (1916): "He kept us out of war."
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about Woodrow Wilson: Louis Auchincloss, Woodrow Wilson — Herbert Hoover, The Ordeal of Woodrow Wilson — James Chace, 1912 : Wilson, Roosevelt, Taft and Debs : The Election that Changed the Country — John Milton Cooper, Reconsidering Woodrow Wilson: Progressivism, Internationalism, War, and Peace — A. Scott Berg, Wilson — Anne Schraff, Woodrow Wilson (for young readers)
  Critical books about Woodrow Wilson: Jim Powell, Wilson's War : How Woodrow Wilson's Great Blunder Led to Hitler, Lenin, Stalin, and World War II
  Image source: American Monthly Review of Reviews, July 1902
  Charles Gates Dawes (1865-1951) — also known as Charles G. Dawes; "Charging Charlie" — of Lincoln, Lancaster County, Neb.; Evanston, Cook County, Ill. Born in Marietta, Washington County, Ohio, August 27, 1865. Republican. Engineer; lawyer; banker; U.S. Comptroller of the Currency, 1898-1901; colonel in the U.S. Army during World War I; Vice President of the United States, 1925-29; candidate for Republican nomination for President, 1928; U.S. Ambassador to Great Britain, 1929-31; delegate to Republican National Convention from Illinois, 1932, 1936. Awarded Nobel Peace Prize in 1925. Died in Evanston, Cook County, Ill., April 23, 1951 (age 85 years, 239 days). Interment at Rosehill Cemetery, Chicago, Ill.
  Relatives: Son of Rufus R. Dawes and Mary Beman (Gates) Dawes (1842-1921); brother of Rufus Cutler Dawes and Beman Gates Dawes (1870-1953); married, January 24, 1889, to Cora D. Blymyer; great-grandson of Ephraim Cutler; second great-grandson of Manasseh Cutler; second cousin four times removed of Amaziah Brainard; second cousin five times removed of Henry Champion and Epaphroditus Champion; third cousin thrice removed of Leveret Brainard; fourth cousin once removed of Tewksbury Loring Swett.
  Political families: Upson-Dawes family of Connecticut; Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Cross-reference: Addison L. Green
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — Find-A-Grave memorial — Comptrollers of the Currency
Frank B. Kellogg Frank Billings Kellogg (1856-1937) — also known as Frank B. Kellogg — of Rochester, Olmsted County, Minn.; St. Paul, Ramsey County, Minn. Born in Potsdam, St. Lawrence County, N.Y., December 22, 1856. Republican. Lawyer; law partner of Cushman K. Davis; delegate to Republican National Convention from Minnesota, 1904, 1908; member of Republican National Committee from Minnesota, 1904-12; U.S. Senator from Minnesota, 1917-23; defeated, 1922; U.S. Ambassador to Great Britain, 1923-25; U.S. Secretary of State, 1925-29; received the Nobel Peace Prize in 1929. Member, American Bar Association. Died in St. Paul, Ramsey County, Minn., December 21, 1937 (age 80 years, 364 days). Cremated; ashes interred at Washington National Cathedral, Washington, D.C.
  Relatives: Son of Asa Farnsworth Kellogg (1823-1893) and Abigail (Billings) Kellogg (1826-1909); married, June 16, 1886, to Clara M. Cook (1861-1942); second cousin once removed of Orlando Kellogg; second cousin twice removed of William Dean Kellogg; second cousin thrice removed of Charles Kellogg; second cousin four times removed of Aaron Kellogg; third cousin of Rowland Case Kellogg; third cousin twice removed of Alvan Kellogg, Day Otis Kellogg, Dwight Kellogg and Ensign Hosmer Kellogg; third cousin thrice removed of Jason Kellogg, Orsamus Cook Merrill, Elijah Hunt Mills, Timothy Merrill (1781-1836) and Daniel Fiske Kellogg; fourth cousin of Alphonso Alva Hopkins.
  Political families: Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York; Woodruff-Hornblower-Seymour-Wadsworth family of Connecticut; Hoar-Sherman family of Massachusetts; Murphy-Merrill family of Harbor Beach, Michigan (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: Minnesota Legislative Manual 1917
  Jane Addams (1860-1935) — of Chicago, Cook County, Ill. Born in Cedarville, Stephenson County, Ill., September 6, 1860. Progressive. Social worker; sociologist; lecturer; suffragette; pacifist; delegate to Progressive National Convention from Illinois, 1912; candidate for Presidential Elector for Illinois, 1924; received the Nobel Peace Prize in 1931. Female. Presbyterian or Unitarian. English ancestry. Lesbian. Member, Phi Beta Kappa; American Civil Liberties Union; Women's International League for Peace and Freedom; NAACP. Died, from cancer, in Chicago, Cook County, Ill., May 21, 1935 (age 74 years, 257 days). Interment at Cedarville Cemetery, Cedarville, Ill.
  Relatives: Daughter of Sarah (Weber) Addams (1817-1863) and John Huy Addams; aunt of Anna Marcet Haldeman (1887-1941; who married Emanuel Julius (1889-1951)); grandniece of William Addams.
  The World War II Liberty ship SS Jane Addams (built 1942, sold 1947) was named for her.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
Nicholas Murray Butler Nicholas Murray Butler (1862-1947) — of Paterson, Passaic County, N.J.; Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born in Elizabeth, Union County, N.J., April 2, 1862. Republican. University professor; alternate delegate to Republican National Convention from New Jersey, 1888; President of Columbia University, 1901-45; delegate to Republican National Convention from New York, 1904, 1912, 1916, 1920, 1924, 1928 (speaker), 1932; candidate for Vice President of the United States, 1912; candidate for Republican nomination for President, 1920, 1928; co-recipient of Nobel Peace Prize in 1931; elected (Wet) delegate to New York convention to ratify 21st amendment 1933, but did not serve; blind in his later years. Episcopalian. Member, American Philosophical Society; American Historical Association; Psi Upsilon; Phi Beta Kappa. Died, of bronchio-pneumonia, in St. Luke's Hospital, Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., December 7, 1947 (age 85 years, 249 days). Interment at Cedar Lawn Cemetery, Paterson, N.J.
  Relatives: Son of Henry L. Butler and Mary J. (Murray) Butler; married 1887 to Susanna Edwards Schuyler (died 1903); married, March 5, 1907, to Kate La Montagne (sister-in-law of Francis Key Pendleton (1850-1930)).
  Political families: Pendleton-Lee family; Key family of Maryland (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Cross-reference: Thomas Burke
  Campaign slogan (1920): "Pick Nick as President for a Picnic in November."
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: American Monthly Review of Reviews, February 1902
Cordell Hull Cordell Hull (1871-1955) — also known as "Father of the United Nations" — of Carthage, Smith County, Tenn. Born in a log cabin at Olympus, Overton County (now Pickett County), Tenn., October 2, 1871. Democrat. Lawyer; member of Tennessee state house of representatives, 1893-97; served in the U.S. Army during the Spanish-American War; circuit judge in Tennessee, 1903-07; U.S. Representative from Tennessee 4th District, 1907-21, 1923-31; defeated, 1920; member of Democratic National Committee from Tennessee, 1914-24; Chairman of Democratic National Committee, 1921-24; candidate for Democratic nomination for President, 1928, 1940, 1944; U.S. Senator from Tennessee, 1931-33; U.S. Secretary of State, 1933-44; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Tennessee, 1936. Baptist; later Episcopalian. Received the Nobel Peace Prize in 1945. Died, of heart disease and tuberculosis, at Bethesda Naval Hospital, Bethesda, Montgomery County, Md., July 23, 1955 (age 83 years, 294 days). Entombed at Washington National Cathedral, Washington, D.C.
  Relatives: Son of William Hull and Elizabeth (Riley) Hull.
  Cross-reference: Thomas K. Finletter
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books by Cordell Hull: The Memoirs of Cordell Hull
  Books about Cordell Hull: Julius William Pratt, Cordell Hull, 1933-44
  Image source: U.S. postage stamp (1963)
  Glenn Theodore Seaborg (1912-1999) — also known as Glenn T. Seaborg; Glenn Teodor Sjöberg — Born in Ishpeming, Marquette County, Mich., April 19, 1912. Democrat. Physical chemist; university professor; received the Nobel Prize in Chemistry, 1951; chair, U.S. Atomic Energy Commission, 1961-71. Swedish ancestry. Member, Alpha Chi Sigma; American Chemical Society. Died in Lafayette, Contra Costa County, Calif., February 25, 1999 (age 86 years, 312 days). Cremated.
  Relatives: Son of Herman Theodore 'Ted' Seaborg and Selma Olivia (Erickson) Seaborg; married 1942 to Helen L. Griggs (1917-2006).
  The element Seaborgium is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  George Catlett Marshall (1880-1959) — also known as George C. Marshall — of Leesburg, Loudoun County, Va. Born in Uniontown, Fayette County, Pa., December 31, 1880. Served in the U.S. Army during World War I; general in the U.S. Army during World War II; U.S. Secretary of State, 1947-49; U.S. Secretary of Defense, 1950-51. Episcopalian. Member, Freemasons; Kappa Alpha Order; Society of the Cincinnati. Awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1953. Died at Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Washington, D.C., October 16, 1959 (age 78 years, 289 days). Interment at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Va.
  Relatives: Son of George Catlett Marshall and Laura (Bradford) Marshall; married, February 11, 1902, to Elizabeth Carter Coles (died 1927); married, October 15, 1930, to Katherine Boyce Tupper Brown.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile
  Books about George C. Marshall: Larry I. Bland & James B. Barber, George C. Marshall, Soldier of Peace
  Linus Carl Pauling (1901-1994) — also known as Linus Pauling — of California. Born in Portland, Multnomah County, Ore., February 28, 1901. Chemist; university professor; candidate for U.S. Senator from California, 1962; received the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1954, the Nobel Peace Prize in 1962, and the Lenin Peace Prize in 1968-69. Unitarian; later Atheist. Died, from prostate cancer, in Big Sur, Monterey County, Calif., August 19, 1994 (age 93 years, 172 days). Cremated; ashes interred at Oswego Pioneer Cemetery, Lake Oswego, Ore.
  Relatives: Son of Herman Pauling (1876-1910) and Lucy Isabelle (Darling) Pauling (1881-1926); married, June 17, 1923, to Ava Helen Miller.
  See also Wikipedia article
Willard Libby Willard Frank Libby (1908-1980) — also known as Willard Libby — Born in Grand Valley, Garfield County, Colo., December 17, 1908. Physical chemist; university professor; member, U.S. Atomic Energy Commission, 1954; received the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1960, for leading the team that developed Carbon-14 dating. Member, Alpha Chi Sigma. Died in Santa Monica, Los Angeles County, Calif., September 8, 1980 (age 71 years, 266 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Ora Edward Libby (1879-1945) and Eva May (Rivers) Libby (1890-1945); married 1966 to Leona (Woods) Marshall (1919-1986; physicist).
  See also NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: FamousScientists.org
  Henry Alfred Kissinger (b. 1923) — also known as Henry A. Kissinger; Heinz Alfred Kissinger — Born in Fürth, Germany, May 27, 1923. Served in the U.S. Army during World War II; university professor; U.S. Secretary of State, 1973-77. Jewish. Member, Council on Foreign Relations; Trilateral Commission. Received the Nobel Peace Prize in 1973; received the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1977. Still living as of 2020.
  Relatives: Married, February 6, 1949, to Anne Fleischer (divorced 1964); married, March 30, 1974, to Nancy Maginnes.
  Cross-reference: John H. Holdridge
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile
  Books by Henry Kissinger: Years of Renewal (1999) — Years of Upheaval (1982) — American Foreign Policy (1974) — Diplomacy (1994) — Nuclear Weapons and Foreign Policy (1957) — The White House Years (1979) — A World Restored: Metternich, Castlereagh and the Problems of Peace, 1812-22 (1957)
  Books about Henry Kissinger: Walter Isaacson, Kissinger: A Biography — Phyllis Schlafly, Kissinger on the Couch — Robert D. Sulzinger, Henry Kissinger : Doctor of Diplomacy — Alistair Horne, Kissinger: 1973, the Crucial Year
  Critical books about Henry Kissinger: Christopher Hitchens, The Trial of Henry Kissinger
  James Earl Carter, Jr. (b. 1924) — also known as Jimmy Carter; "The Peanut"; "Dasher"; "Deacon" — of Plains, Sumter County, Ga. Born in a hospital, at Plains, Sumter County, Ga., October 1, 1924. Democrat. Member of Georgia state senate, 1963-66; Governor of Georgia, 1971-75; defeated in primary, 1966; President of the United States, 1977-81; defeated, 1980; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Georgia, 1996, 2000, 2004, 2008; speaker, 1984, 1988. Baptist. Member, American Legion; Council on Foreign Relations; Phi Alpha Delta; Lions. Received the Nobel Peace Prize in 2002. Still living as of 2020.
  Relatives: Son of James Earl Carter, Sr. and Lillian (Gordy) Carter (1898-1983); married, July 7, 1946, to Eleanor Rosalynn Smith; father of John William Carter; first cousin of Hugh Alton Carter, Sr. (1920-1999).
  Political family: Carter family of Plains, Georgia.
  Cross-reference: Clennon King — Thomas A. Hutto — Griffin Smith — Jane F. Harman — Philip H. Alston, Jr.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile
  Books by Jimmy Carter: Turning Point : A Candidate, a State, and a Nation Come of Age (1992) — An Hour Before Daylight : Memories of a Rural Boyhood (2001) — Keeping Faith : Memoirs of a President (1982) — Always a Reckoning and Other Poems (1995) — The Blood of Abraham: Insights into the Middle East (1993) — Everything to Gain : Making the Most of the Rest of Your Life (1987) — A Government As Good As Its People (1977) — Living Faith (1996) — Negotiation: The Alternative to Hostility (1984) — An Outdoor Journal: Adventures and Reflections (1994) — Sources of Strength : Meditations on Scripture for a Living Faith (1997) — The Virtues of Aging (1998) — Why Not The Best? (1975) — White House Diary (2010) — Talking Peace : A Vision for the Next Generation (1993, for young readers)
  Books about Jimmy Carter: Douglas Brinkley, The Unfinished Presidency : Jimmy Carter's Journey to the Nobel Peace Prize — Rod Troester, Jimmy Carter as Peacemaker : A Post-Presidential Biography
  Critical books about Jimmy Carter: Nathan Miller, Star-Spangled Men : America's Ten Worst Presidents — Steven F. Hayward, The Real Jimmy Carter : How Our Worst Ex-President Undermines American Foreign Policy, Coddles Dictators, and Created the Party of Clinton and Kerry — Bernard Goldberg, 100 People Who Are Screwing Up America (And Al Franken Is #37)
  Albert Arnold Gore, Jr. (b. 1948) — also known as Al Gore; "Ozone Man"; "Sundance" — of Carthage, Smith County, Tenn. Born in Washington, D.C., March 31, 1948. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army during the Vietnam war; U.S. Representative from Tennessee, 1977-85 (4th District 1977-83, 6th District 1983-85); U.S. Senator from Tennessee, 1985-93; candidate for Democratic nomination for President, 1988; Vice President of the United States, 1993-2001; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Tennessee, 1996, 2000, 2004, 2008; candidate for President of the United States, 2000. Baptist. Member, Jaycees; American Legion; Veterans of Foreign Wars; Farm Bureau. Received the Nobel Peace Prize in 2007 for his work on global warming. Still living as of 2020.
  Relatives: Son of Albert Arnold Gore (1907-1998) and Pauline (LaFon) Gore (1912-2004); married, May 19, 1970, to Tipper Aitcheson; second cousin of Mary Benton Gore (who married Gordon Evans Dean); second cousin once removed of Louise Gore.
  Political family: Gore family of Carthage, Tennessee.
  Cross-reference: Gore Vidal
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — votes in Congress from the Washington Post — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Books by Al Gore: Earth in the Balance : Ecology and the Human Spirit (1993)
  Books about Al Gore: David Maraniss & Ellen Nakashima, The Prince of Tennessee : The Rise of Al Gore — Bill Turque, Inventing Al Gore: A Biography — Bob Zelnick, Gore : A Political Life — Joseph Kaufman, The World According to Al Gore : An A-to-Z Compilation of His Opinions, Positions, and Public Statements — Alexander Cockburn & Jeffrey St. Clair, Al Gore : A User's Manual — Roger Simon, Divided We Stand : How Al Gore Beat George Bush and Lost the Presidency — Scott Farris, Almost President: The Men Who Lost the Race but Changed the Nation — Rebecca Stefoff, Al Gore : Vice President (for young readers)
  Critical books about Al Gore: Bill Sammon, At Any Cost : How Al Gore Tried to Steal the Election — Bernard Goldberg, 100 People Who Are Screwing Up America (And Al Franken Is #37)
  Barack Hussein Obama, Jr. (b. 1961) — also known as Barack Obama; "The Messiah"; "Renegade"; "The Loin King" — of Chicago, Cook County, Ill. Born in Honolulu, Island of Oahu, Honolulu County, Hawaii, August 4, 1961. Democrat. Lawyer; member of Illinois state senate 13th District, 1997-2004; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Illinois, 2004 (speaker), 2008; U.S. Senator from Illinois, 2005-08; resigned 2008; President of the United States, 2009-17; received the Nobel Peace Prize in 2009. United Church of Christ. Kenyan ancestry. Still living as of 2020.
  Relatives: Son of Barack Hussein Obama, Sr. (1936-1982) and Stanley Ann (Dunham) Obama (1942-1995); married, October 18, 1992, to Michelle LaVaughn Robinson (1964-).
  Cross-reference: Joe Wilson — Philip J. Berg — Rod Blagojevich
  Barack Obama Elementary School (formerly J.E.B. Stuart Elementary School; renamed 2018), in Richmond, Virginia, is named for him.
  Campaign slogan (2008): "Yes We Can!"
  Campaign slogan (2008): "Change We Can Believe In."
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — votes in Congress from the Washington Post — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Books by Barack Obama: Dreams from My Father : A Story of Race and Inheritance (2004) — The Audacity of Hope : Thoughts on Reclaimig the American Dream (2006)
  Books about Barack Obama: Steve Dougherty, Hopes and Dreams: The Story of Barack Obama — David Mendell, Obama: From Promise to Power — John K. Wilson, Barack Obama: This Improbable Quest — Shelby Steele, A Bound Man: Why We Are Excited About Obama and Why He Can't Win — Joseph Vogel, The Obama Movement: Why Barack Obama Speaks to America's Youth — Jodi Kantor, The Obamas — David Maraniss, Barack Obama: The Making of the Man — Jonathan Alter, The Promise: President Obama, Year One — Pete Souza, The Rise of Barack Obama — Jonathan Alter, The Center Holds: Obama and His Enemies — Chuck Todd, The Stranger: Barack Obama in the White House
  Critical books about Barack Obama: Webster Griffin Tarpley, Obama - The Postmodern Coup: Making of a Manchurian Candidate — Gordon Heslop, The Hope of Audacity: Barack Obama, A Bad Choice — Edward Klein, The Amateur: Barack Obama in the White House — Michelle Malkin, Culture of Corruption: Obama and His Team of Tax Cheats, Crooks, and Cronies — David Limbaugh, The Great Destroyer: Barack Obama's War on the Republic — David Limbaugh, Crimes Against Liberty: An Indictment of President Barack Obama — Dinesh D'Souza, The Roots of Obama's Rage — David Freddoso, Gangster Government: Barack Obama and the New Washington Thugocracy — Stanley Kurtz, Radical-in-Chief: Barack Obama and the Untold Story of American Socialism — Jerome R. Corsi, The Obama Nation: Leftist Politics and the Cult of Personality — Jack Cashill, Deconstructing Obama: The Life, Loves, and Letters of America's First Postmodern President — Kate Obenshain, Divider-in-Chief: The Fraud of Hope and Change — Dinesh D'Souza, Obama's America: Unmaking the American Dream — Dinesh D'Souza, The Roots of Obama's Rage — Phyllis Schlafly & George Neumayr, No Higher Power: Obama's War on Religious Freedom
"Enjoy the hospitable entertainment of a political graveyard."
Henry L. Clinton, Apollo Hall, New York City, February 3, 1872
The Political Graveyard

The Political Graveyard is a web site about U.S. political history and cemeteries. Founded in 1996, it is the Internet's most comprehensive free source for American political biography, listing 312,576 politicians, living and dead.
  The listings are incomplete; development of the database is a continually ongoing project.  
  Information on this page — and on all other pages of this site — is believed to be accurate, but is not guaranteed. Users are advised to check with other sources before relying on any information here.  
  The official URL for this page is: https://politicalgraveyard.com/special/nobel-prize.html.  
  Links to this or any other Political Graveyard page are welcome, but specific page addresses may sometimes change as the site develops.  
  If you are searching for a specific named individual, try the alphabetical index of politicians.  
  More information: FAQ; privacy policy; cemetery links.  
  If you find any error or omission in The Political Graveyard, or if you have information to share, please see the biographical checklist and submission guidelines.  
Copyright notices: (1) Facts are not subject to copyright; see Feist v. Rural Telephone. (2) Politician portraits displayed on this site are 70-pixel-wide monochrome thumbnail images, which I believe to constitute fair use under applicable copyright law. Where possible, each image is linked to its online source. However, requests from owners of copyrighted images to delete them from this site are honored. (3) Original material, programming, selection and arrangement are © 1996-2019 Lawrence Kestenbaum. (4) This work is also licensed for free non-commercial re-use, with attribution, under a Creative Commons License.
Site information: The Political Graveyard is created and maintained by Lawrence Kestenbaum, who is solely responsible for its structure and content. — The mailing address is The Political Graveyard, P.O. Box 2563, Ann Arbor MI 48106. — This site is hosted by HDL. — The Political Graveyard opened on July 1, 1996; the last full revision was done on March 10, 2021.

Creative 
Commons License Follow polgraveyard on Twitter [Amazon.com]