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The Political Graveyard: A Database of American History
American Academy of Arts and Sciences Politicians

Very incomplete list!

  Morris Berthold Abram (1918-2000) — also known as Morris Abram — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born in Fitzgerald, Ben Hill County, Ga., June 19, 1918. Democrat. Rhodes scholar; lawyer; served in the U.S. Army Air Force in World War II; served on prosecution staff at Nuremburg war crimes trials; U.S. Representative to United Nations European office; worked on Marshall Plan for postwar reconstruction of Europe; candidate in primary for U.S. Representative from Georgia 5th District, 1952; candidate for nomination for U.S. Senator from New York, 1968; president of Brandeis University, 1968-70; member, U.S. Civil Rights Commission, 1984-86. Jewish. Member, Phi Beta Kappa; Omicron Delta Kappa; Phi Kappa Phi; American Bar Association; American Academy of Arts and Sciences; American Jewish Committee; Urban League; Council on Foreign Relations. Died, from a viral infection, in a hospital at Geneva, Switzerland, March 16, 2000 (age 81 years, 271 days). Interment at Woodside Cemetery, Yarmouth Port, Yarmouth, Mass.
  Relatives: Son of Samuel Abram (1883-1957) and Irene (Cohen) Abram (1897-1979); married, December 23, 1944, to Jane Isabella Maguire (1920-2009; divorced 1974); married, January 25, 1975, to Carlyn (Feldman) Fisher (divorced 1987); married, August 26, 1990, to Bruna Molina.
  Epitaph: He established "one man, one vote" as a principle of American law.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
Dean Acheson Dean Gooderham Acheson (1893-1971) — also known as Dean Acheson — of Washington, D.C. Born in Middletown, Middlesex County, Conn., April 11, 1893. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Navy during World War I; lawyer; private secretary to U.S. Supreme Court Justice Louis D. Brandeis, 1919-21; undersecretary of treasury, 1933; U.S. Secretary of State, 1949-53. Episcopalian. English ancestry. Member, American Bar Association; American Academy of Arts and Sciences; Delta Kappa Epsilon; Council on Foreign Relations. Received the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1964; received a Pulitzer Prize in History, 1970, for his book Present At The Creation: My Years In The State Department. Died, probably from a heart attack, over his desk in his study, Sandy Spring, Montgomery County, Md., October 12, 1971 (age 78 years, 184 days). Interment at Oak Hill Cemetery, Washington, D.C.
  Relatives: Son of Edward Campion Acheson (1858-1934; Episcopal bishop of Connecticut) and Eleanor Gertrude (Gooderham) Acheson (1870-1958); married, May 5, 1917, to Alice Caroline Stanley (1895-1996; artist); father of David Campion Acheson (1921-?).
  Cross-reference: Lucius D. Battle — Francis E. Meloy, Jr.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Books by Dean Acheson: Present at the Creation : My Years in the State Department (1969)
  Books about Dean Acheson: Walter Isaacson, The Wise Men : Six Friends and the World They Made — Robert L. Beisner, Dean Acheson : A Life in the Cold War
  Image source: Christian Science Monitor, September 25, 2010
  Hugh Gardner Ackley (1915-1998) — also known as H. Gardner Ackley — of Ann Arbor, Washtenaw County, Mich. Born in Indianapolis, Marion County, Ind., June 30, 1915. University professor; economist; chair, U.S. Council of Economic Advisors, 1964-68; U.S. Ambassador to Italy, 1968-69. Scottish ancestry. Member, Kappa Delta Pi; Tau Kappa Alpha; Phi Kappa Phi; Trilateral Commission; American Economic Association; American Philosophical Society; American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Died, from complications of Alzheimer's disease, in Huron Woods nursing home, Superior Township, Washtenaw County, Mich., February 12, 1998 (age 82 years, 227 days). Cremated.
  Relatives: Son of Hugh M. Ackley and Margaret (McKenzie) Ackley; married, September 18, 1937, to Bonnie A. Lowry.
  See also Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier
John Adams John Adams (1735-1826) — also known as "His Rotundity"; "The Duke of Braintree"; "American Cato"; "Old Sink and Swim"; "The Colossus of Independence"; "Father of the American Navy" — of Quincy, Norfolk County, Mass. Born in Braintree (part now in Quincy), Norfolk County, Mass., October 30, 1735. Lawyer; Delegate to Continental Congress from Massachusetts, 1774-78; signer, Declaration of Independence, 1776; U.S. Minister to Netherlands, 1781-88; Great Britain, 1785-88; Vice President of the United States, 1789-97; President of the United States, 1797-1801; defeated (Federalist), 1800; delegate to Massachusetts state constitutional convention, 1820. Unitarian. English ancestry. Member, American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Elected to the Hall of Fame for Great Americans in 1900. Died in Quincy, Norfolk County, Mass., July 4, 1826 (age 90 years, 247 days). Original interment at Hancock Cemetery, Quincy, Mass.; reinterment at United First Parish Church, Quincy, Mass.
  Relatives: Son of John Adams (1691-1761) and Susanna (Boylston) Adams (1699-1797); married, October 25, 1764, to Abigail Smith (1744-1818; aunt of William Cranch); father of Abigail Amelia Adams (1765-1813; who married William Stephens Smith) and John Quincy Adams (1767-1848); grandfather of George Washington Adams and Charles Francis Adams (1807-1886); great-grandfather of John Quincy Adams (1833-1894) and Brooks Adams; second great-grandfather of Charles Francis Adams (1866-1954); third great-grandfather of Thomas Boylston Adams; first cousin thrice removed of Edward M. Chapin; first cousin four times removed of Arthur Chapin; first cousin six times removed of Denwood Lynn Chapin; second cousin of Samuel Adams; second cousin once removed of Joseph Allen; second cousin twice removed of John Milton Thayer; second cousin thrice removed of William Vincent Wells; second cousin four times removed of Lyman Kidder Bass, Daniel T. Hayden, Arthur Laban Bates and Almur Stiles Whiting; second cousin five times removed of Charles Grenfill Washburn, Lyman Metcalfe Bass and Emerson Richard Boyles; third cousin once removed of Jeremiah Mason and George Bailey Loring; third cousin twice removed of Asahel Otis, Erastus Fairbanks, Charles Stetson, Henry Brewster Stanton, Charles Adams, Jr., Isaiah Stetson, Joshua Perkins, Eli Thayer and Bailey Frye Adams; third cousin thrice removed of Day Otis Kellogg, Dwight Kellogg, Caleb Stetson (1801-1885), Oakes Ames, Oliver Ames, Jr., Benjamin W. Waite, Alfred Elisha Ames, George Otis Fairbanks, Austin Wells Holden, Horace Fairbanks, Ebenezer Oliver Grosvenor, Joseph Washburn Yates, Augustus Brown Reed Sprague, Franklin Fairbanks, Erskine Mason Phelps, Arthur Newton Holden, John Alden Thayer, Irving Hall Chase, Isaiah Kidder Stetson and Giles Russell Taggart.
  Political families: Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York; Kidder family of Connecticut (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Adams counties in Idaho, Iowa, Miss., Neb., Ohio, Pa., Wash. and Wis. are named for him.
  Mount Adams (second highest peak in the Northeast), in the White Mountains, Coos County, New Hampshire, is named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: John Adams HarperJohn A. CameronJohn A. DixJohn Adams FisherJohn A. TaintorJohn A. GilmerJohn A. PerkinsJohn Adams HymanJohn A. DamonJohn A. LeeJohn A. SandersJohn Adams Hurson
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Books about John Adams: John Ferling, John Adams: A Life — Joseph J. Ellis, The Passionate Sage: The Character and Legacy of John Adams — David McCullough, John Adams — Gore Vidal, Inventing A Nation: Washington, Adams, Jefferson — John Ferling, Adams vs. Jefferson: The Tumultuous Election of 1800 — James Grant, John Adams : Party of One
  Image source: Portrait & Biographical Album of Washtenaw County (1891)
John Quincy Adams John Quincy Adams (1767-1848) — also known as "Old Man Eloquent"; "The Accidental President"; "The Massachusetts Madman" — of Boston, Suffolk County, Mass.; Quincy, Norfolk County, Mass. Born in Braintree (part now in Quincy), Norfolk County, Mass., July 11, 1767. Lawyer; U.S. Minister to Netherlands, 1794-97; Prussia, 1797-1801; Russia, 1809-14; Great Britain, 1815-17; member of Massachusetts state senate, 1802; U.S. Senator from Massachusetts, 1803-08; resigned 1808; U.S. Secretary of State, 1817-25; President of the United States, 1825-29; U.S. Representative from Massachusetts, 1831-48 (11th District 1831-33, 12th District 1833-43, 8th District 1843-48); died in office 1848; candidate for Governor of Massachusetts, 1834. Unitarian. English ancestry. Member, American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Elected to the Hall of Fame for Great Americans in 1905. Suffered a stroke while speaking on the floor of the U.S. House of Representatives, February 21, 1848, and died two days later in the Speaker's office, U.S. Capitol Building, Washington, D.C., February 23, 1848 (age 80 years, 227 days). Original interment at Hancock Cemetery, Quincy, Mass.; reinterment at United First Parish Church, Quincy, Mass.; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery, Washington, D.C.
  Relatives: Son of John Adams and Abigail (Smith) Adams (1744-1818); brother of Abigail Amelia Adams (1765-1813; who married William Stephens Smith); married, July 26, 1797, to Louisa Catherine Johnson (1775-1852; daughter of Joshua Johnson; sister-in-law of John Pope; niece of Thomas Johnson); father of George Washington Adams and Charles Francis Adams (1807-1886); grandfather of John Quincy Adams and Brooks Adams; great-grandfather of Charles Francis Adams (1866-1954); second great-grandfather of Thomas Boylston Adams; first cousin of William Cranch; second cousin once removed of Samuel Adams; second cousin twice removed of Edward M. Chapin; second cousin thrice removed of Arthur Chapin; second cousin five times removed of Denwood Lynn Chapin; third cousin of Joseph Allen; third cousin once removed of Samuel Sewall, Josiah Quincy and John Milton Thayer; third cousin twice removed of William Vincent Wells; third cousin thrice removed of Lyman Kidder Bass, Daniel T. Hayden, Arthur Laban Bates and Almur Stiles Whiting; fourth cousin of Jeremiah Mason, Josiah Quincy, Jr. and George Bailey Loring; fourth cousin once removed of Asahel Otis, Erastus Fairbanks, Charles Stetson, Henry Brewster Stanton, Charles Adams, Jr., Isaiah Stetson (1812-1880), Joshua Perkins, Eli Thayer, Bailey Frye Adams and Samuel Miller Quincy.
  Political families: Kidder family of Connecticut; Greene family of Providence, Rhode Island; DuPont family of Wilmington, Delaware; Thayer-Capron-Aldrich-Stetson family; Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York; Stetson family of New York and Massachusetts (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Cross-reference: John Smith — Thurlow Weed
  Adams counties in Ill. and Ind. are named for him.
  Mount Quincy Adams, in the White Mountains, Coos County, New Hampshire, is named for him.  — Mount Quincy Adams, on the border between British Columbia, Canada, and Hoonah-Angoon Census Area, Alaska, is named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: John Q. A. BrackettJohn Q. A. SheldenJ. Q. A. Reber
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Books about John Quincy Adams: Paul C. Nagel, John Quincy Adams : A Public Life, a Private Life — Lynn Hudson Parsons, John Quincy Adams — Robert V. Remini, John Quincy Adams — Joseph Wheelan, Mr. Adams's Last Crusade: John Quincy Adams's Extraordinary Post-Presidential Life in Congress
  Image source: Portrait & Biographical Album of Washtenaw County (1891)
  Thomas Boylston Adams (1910-1997) — also known as Thomas B. Adams — of Lincoln, Middlesex County, Mass. Born in Kansas City, Jackson County, Mo., July 25, 1910. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army Air Force in World War II; hotel executive; candidate in primary for U.S. Senator from Massachusetts, 1966; candidate for U.S. Representative from Massachusetts, 1968; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Massachusetts, 1972. Member, American Academy of Arts and Sciences; Phi Beta Kappa. Died in Lincoln, Middlesex County, Mass., June 4, 1997 (age 86 years, 314 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of John Adams (1875-1964) and Marian (Morse) Adams (1878-1959); married, January 5, 1940, to Ramelle Frost Cochrane (1916-2004); grandnephew of John Quincy Adams (1833-1894) and Brooks Adams; great-grandson of Charles Francis Adams (1807-1886); great-grandnephew of George Washington Adams; second great-grandson of John Quincy Adams (1767-1848); second great-grandnephew of Benjamin Gorham; third great-grandson of John Adams (1735-1826), Nathaniel Gorham and Joshua Johnson; third great-grandnephew of Thomas Johnson; first cousin once removed of Charles Francis Adams (1866-1954); first cousin twice removed of William Everett; first cousin four times removed of William Cranch (1769-1855); second cousin thrice removed of Bradley Tyler Johnson; second cousin five times removed of Samuel Adams; third cousin of Leverett Saltonstall and Richard Saltonstall; third cousin once removed of William Lawrence Saltonstall.
  Political families: Sewall-Adams-Cony family of Maine; Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Willard Bartlett (1846-1925) — of Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y. Born in Uxbridge, Worcester County, Mass., October 14, 1846. Democrat. Lawyer; law partner of Elihu Root, 1869-83 and 1917-24; drama critic; Justice of New York Supreme Court 2nd District, 1884-1907; Justice of the Appellate Division of the New York Supreme Court 2nd Department, 1896-1906; judge of New York Court of Appeals, 1906-16; chief judge of New York Court of Appeals, 1914-16. Member, American Bar Association; Sons of the Revolution; Society of Colonial Wars; American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Died, from heart disease, in Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y., January 17, 1925 (age 78 years, 95 days). Interment at Green-Wood Cemetery, Brooklyn, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of William Osborne Bartlett (prominent lawyer) and Agnes E. H. (Willard) Bartlett; brother of Franklin Bartlett (1847-1909); married, October 26, 1870, to Mary Fairbanks Buffum.
  David Lionel Bazelon (1909-1993) — also known as David L. Bazelon — of Chicago, Cook County, Ill.; Washington, D.C. Born in Superior, Douglas County, Wis., September 3, 1909. Democrat. Lawyer; alternate delegate to Democratic National Convention from Illinois, 1948; Judge of U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit, 1949-79; took senior status 1979. Jewish. Member, American Bar Association; Federal Bar Association; American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Died in Washington, D.C., February 19, 1993 (age 83 years, 169 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Israel Bazelon and Lena (Krasnovsky) Bazelon; married, June 7, 1936, to Miriam M. Kellner.
  See also federal judicial profile
  Adolf Augustus Berle, Jr. (1895-1971) — also known as Adolf A. Berle; A. A. Berle — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born in Boston, Suffolk County, Mass., January 29, 1895. Served in the U.S. Army during World War I; lawyer; economist; law professor; member of the "Brain Trust" which advised President Franklin D. Roosevelt; American Labor candidate for delegate to New York state constitutional convention at-large, 1937; U.S. Ambassador to Brazil, 1945-46. Congregationalist. Member, American Academy of Arts and Sciences; Council on Foreign Relations; American Philosophical Society; Phi Beta Kappa. Died, from a stroke, in Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., February 17, 1971 (age 76 years, 19 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Adolf Augustus Berle (born 1866; clergyman) and Augusta (Wright) Berle; married, December 17, 1927, to Beatrice Bend Bishop; father of Peter A. A. Berle (1929?-).
  See also Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — Internet Movie Database profile
  Books by Adolf A. Berle: Latin America : Diplomacy and Reality (1962) — American Economic Republic (1963) — Power Without Property : A New Development in American Political Economy (1959) — Navigating the Rapids, 1918-1971 (1973) — Power (1969) — Tides of Crisis : A Primer of Foreign Relations (1957) — The Twentieth-Century Capitalist Revolution (1954) — The Modern Corporation and Private Property (1933)
  Books about Adolf A. Berle: Jordan A. Schwarz, Liberal : Adolf A. Berle and the Vision of an American Era
  James Bowdoin (1726-1790) — of Massachusetts. Born in Boston, Suffolk County, Mass., August 7, 1726. Delegate to Massachusetts state constitutional convention, 1779-80; Governor of Massachusetts, 1785-87; delegate to Massachusetts convention to ratify U.S. constitution, 1788. French ancestry. Member, American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Died, of consumption (tuberculosis), in Boston, Suffolk County, Mass., November 6, 1790 (age 64 years, 91 days). Interment at Old Granary Burying Ground, Boston, Mass.
  Relatives: Son of James Bowdoin (1676-1747) and Hannah (Portage) Bowdoin (1686-1726); married to Elizabeth Erving (1731-1809); father of James Bowdoin III; great-grandfather of Robert Charles Winthrop; fifth great-grandfather of William Amory Gardner Minot and John Forbes Kerry; second cousin thrice removed of George Griswold Sill (1829-1907).
  Political family: Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Bowdoin College, in Brunswick, Maine, is named for him.  — The towns of Bowdoin & Bowdoinham, Maine, are named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  James Bowdoin III (1752-1811) — also known as Jemmy Bowdoin — of Massachusetts. Born in Boston, Suffolk County, Mass., September 22, 1752. Member of Massachusetts state legislature, 1776-77; delegate to Massachusetts state constitutional convention, 1779-80. Member, American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Died in Naushon Island, Dukes County, Mass., October 11, 1811 (age 59 years, 19 days). Interment at Old Granary Burying Ground, Boston, Mass.
  Relatives: Son of James Bowdoin (1726-1790).
  Political families: Winthrop-Hamlin family of Massachusetts and Connecticut; Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York; Saltonstall-Davis-Frelinghuysen-Appleton family of Massachusetts (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Edward William Brooke III (1919-2015) — also known as Edward W. Brooke — of Newton Center, Newton, Middlesex County, Mass. Born in Washington, D.C., October 26, 1919. Republican. Served in the U.S. Army during World War II; lawyer; candidate for secretary of state of Massachusetts, 1960; Massachusetts state attorney general, 1963-67; U.S. Senator from Massachusetts, 1967-79; defeated, 1978. Episcopalian. African ancestry. Member, American Bar Association; American Academy of Arts and Sciences; Amvets; Alpha Phi Alpha. First Black U.S. Senator in the 20th century; recipient of the Spingarn Medal in 1967. Died in Coral Gables, Miami-Dade County, Fla., January 3, 2015 (age 95 years, 69 days). Interment at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Va.
  Relatives: Son of Edward W. Brooke and Helen (Seldon) Brooke; married, June 7, 1947, to Remigia Ferrari Scacco.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Ellsworth Bunker (1894-1984) — also known as "The Refrigerator"; "The Sly Fox" — of New York; Dummerston, Windham County, Vt. Born in Yonkers, Westchester County, N.Y., May 11, 1894. Director and officer, National Sugar Refining Company; director, American-Hawaiian Steamship Company; U.S. Ambassador to Argentina, 1951-52; Italy, 1952-53; India, 1956-61; Nepal, 1956-59; , 1966-67, 1973-78; Vietnam, 1967-73. Member, Council on Foreign Relations; American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Recipient of two Presidential Medals of Freedom, in 1963 and in 1967. Died, in Brattleboro Memorial Hospital, Brattleboro, Windham County, Vt., September 27, 1984 (age 90 years, 139 days). Interment somewhere in Dummerston, Vt.
  Relatives: Son of George R. Bunker and Jean Polhemus (Cobb) Bunker; married, April 24, 1920, to Harriet Allen Butler (died 1964); married, January 3, 1967, to Caroline Clendening Laise (1917-?).
  See also U.S. State Dept career summary
  Books about Ellsworth Bunker: Howard B. Schaffer, Ellsworth Bunker : Global Troubleshooter, Vietnam Hawk
  Edward Capps (1866-1950) — of Princeton, Mercer County, N.J. Born in Jacksonville, Morgan County, Ill., December 21, 1866. University professor; U.S. Minister to Greece, 1920. Member, American Association of University Professors; American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Died in 1950 (age about 83 years). Interment at Diamond Grove Cemetery, Jacksonville, Ill.
  Relatives: Son of Stephen Reid Capps and Rhoda S. (Tomlin) Capps; married, July 20, 1892, to Grace Alexander.
  See also U.S. State Dept career summary
  William Richards Castle, Jr. (1878-1963) — of Washington, D.C. Born in Honolulu, Island of Oahu, Honolulu County, Hawaii, June 19, 1878. Republican. College instructor; U.S. Ambassador to Japan, 1929-30. Episcopalian. Member, American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Died in 1963 (age about 85 years). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of William Richards Castle and Ida Beatrice (Lowrey) Castle; married, June 3, 1902, to Margaret Farlow (born 1880); second cousin thrice removed of Asa Tenney (1759-1831); third cousin twice removed of Abner Bailey White Tenney and Horace Addison Tenney; fourth cousin once removed of Asa Wentworth Tenney.
  Political family: Tenney family.
  See also U.S. State Dept career summary
  Charles Woolsey Cole (1906-1978) — also known as Charles W. Cole — of Amherst, Hampshire County, Mass.; New York. Born in Montclair, Essex County, N.J., February 8, 1906. University professor; President of Amherst College, 1946-60; U.S. Ambassador to Chile, 1961-64. Presbyterian. Member, American Academy of Arts and Sciences; American Association of University Professors; Council on Foreign Relations; Phi Beta Kappa; Delta Kappa Epsilon; Delta Sigma Rho; American Historical Association; American Economic Association. Died in 1978 (age about 72 years). Burial location unknown.
  See also Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary
  James Bryant Conant (1893-1978) — also known as James B. Conant — Born in Dorchester, Boston, Suffolk County, Mass., March 26, 1893. Major in the U.S. Army during World War I; chemist; university professor; President of Harvard University, 1933-53; U.S. Ambassador to Germany, 1955-57. Member, American Academy of Arts and Sciences; Phi Beta Kappa; Sigma Xi; Alpha Chi Sigma; American Philosophical Society; Council on Foreign Relations. Died in Hanover, Grafton County, N.H., February 11, 1978 (age 84 years, 322 days). Interment at Mt. Auburn Cemetery, Cambridge, Mass.
  Relatives: Son of James Scott Conant and Jennett Orr (Bryant) Conant; married to Patty Thayer Reynolds and Grace Richards.
  See also U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Fred Tarbell Field (1876-1950) — of Newton, Middlesex County, Mass. Born in Springfield, Windsor County, Vt., December 24, 1876. Lawyer; justice of Massachusetts state supreme court, 1929-47; chief justice of Massachusetts supreme judicial court, 1938-47. Baptist. Member, American Academy of Arts and Sciences; American Bar Association; American Historical Association; Phi Beta Kappa. Died, in Newton-Wellesley Hospital, Newton, Middlesex County, Mass., July 23, 1950 (age 73 years, 211 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Frederic Griswold Field and Anna Melanie (Tarbell) Field; married, October 11, 1922, to Gertrude Alice Montague; nephew of Walbridge Abner Field (1833-1899).
  Marion Bayard Folsom (1893-1976) — also known as Marion B. Folsom — of Rochester, Monroe County, N.Y. Born in McRae, Telfair County, Ga., November 23, 1893. Republican. Served in the U.S. Army during World War I; member, Commission on Intergovernmental Relations, 1953-55; U.S. Secretary of Health, Education and Welfare, 1955-58. Presbyterian. Member, American Academy of Arts and Sciences; American Economic Association. Treasurer of Eastman Kodak Company, 1935-53. Died September 27, 1976 (age 82 years, 309 days). Interment at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Va.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
Benjamin Franklin Benjamin Franklin (1706-1790) — also known as "Silence Dogood"; "Anthony Afterwit"; "Poor Richard"; "Alice Addertongue"; "Polly Baker"; "Harry Meanwell"; "Timothy Turnstone"; "Martha Careful"; "Benevolus"; "Caelia Shortface" — of Pennsylvania. Born in Boston, Suffolk County, Mass., January 17, 1706. Delegate to Continental Congress from Pennsylvania, 1775; U.S. Postmaster General, 1775-76; signer, Declaration of Independence, 1776; delegate to Pennsylvania state constitutional convention, 1776; U.S. Minister to France, 1778-85; Sweden, 1782-83; President of Pennsylvania, 1785-88; member, U.S. Constitutional Convention, 1787. Deist. Member, Freemasons; American Philosophical Society; American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Famed for his experiments with electricity; invented bifocal glasses and the harmonica. Elected to the Hall of Fame for Great Americans in 1900. Died in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., April 17, 1790 (age 84 years, 90 days). Interment at Christ Church Burial Ground, Philadelphia, Pa.; statue erected 1856 at Old City Hall Grounds, Boston, Mass.; statue at La Arcata Court, Santa Barbara, Calif.
  Relatives: Son of Josiah Franklin (1657-1745) and Abiah Lee (Folger) Franklin (1667-1752); married, September 1, 1730, to Deborah Read; father of Sarah 'Sally' Franklin (1743-1808; who married Richard Bache); uncle of Franklin Davenport; grandfather of Richard Bache, Jr. and Deborah Franklin Bache (1891-1863; who married William John Duane); great-grandfather of Alexander Dallas Bache (1806-1867; physicist), Mary Blechenden Bache (1808-1873; who married Robert John Walker) and Sophia Arabella Bache (1815-1904; who married William Wallace Irwin); second great-grandfather of Robert Walker Irwin; fifth great-grandfather of Daniel Baugh Brewster and Elise du Pont; first cousin four times removed of Charles James Folger, Benjamin Dexter Sprague and Wharton Barker (1846-1921); first cousin six times removed of Thomas Mott Osborne; first cousin seven times removed of Charles Devens Osborne and Lithgow Osborne; second cousin five times removed of George Hammond Parshall.
  Political families: Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York; Bache-Dallas family of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Franklin counties in Ala., Ark., Fla., Ga., Ill., Ind., Iowa, Kan., Ky., La., Maine, Mass., Miss., Mo., Neb., N.Y., N.C., Ohio, Pa., Tenn., Vt., Va. and Wash. are named for him.
  Mount Franklin, in the White Mountains, Coos County, New Hampshire, is named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: Benjamin F. ButlerBenjamin F. WadeBenjamin Franklin WallaceBenjamin Cromwell FranklinBenjamin Franklin PerryBenjamin Franklin RobinsonBenjamin F. RandolphBenjamin Franklin MasseyBenjamin F. RawlsBenjamin Franklin LeiterBenjamin Franklin ThomasBenjamin F. HallBenjamin F. AngelBenjamin Franklin RossBenjamin F. FlandersBenjamin F. BomarBenjamin F. MudgeBenjamin F. ButlerBenjamin F. LoanBenjamin F. SimpsonBenjamin Franklin TerryBenjamin Franklin JunkinBenjamin F. PartridgeB. F. LangworthyBenjamin F. HardingBenjamin MebaneB. F. WhittemoreBenjamin Franklin BradleyBenjamin Franklin ClaypoolBenjamin F. CoatesB. Franklin MartinBenjamin Franklin HoweyBenjamin F. MartinBenjamin Franklin RiceBenjamin F. RandolphBenjamin F. HopkinsBenjamin F. TracyBenjamin F. GradyBenjamin F. FarnhamBenjamin F. MeyersBenjamin Franklin WhiteBenjamin Franklin PrescottBenjamin F. JonasB. Franklin FisherBenjamin Franklin PottsBenjamin F. FunkBenjamin F. MarshFrank B. ArnoldBenjamin F. HeckertBenjamin F. BradleyBenjamin F. HowellBenjamin F. MahanBen Franklin CaldwellBenjamin Franklin TilleyBenjamin F. HackneyB. F. McMillanBenjamin F. ShivelyB. Frank HiresB. Frank MebaneB. Frank MurphyBenjamin F. StarrBenjamin Franklin Jones, Jr.Benjamin F. WeltyBenjamin F. JonesBenjamin Franklin BoleyBen Franklin LooneyBenjamin F. BledsoeBenjamin Franklin WilliamsBenjamin Franklin KelleyBenjamin Franklin ButlerBenjamin F. JamesFrank B. HeintzlemanBenjamin F. FeinbergB. Franklin BunnBen F. CameronBen F. BlackmonB. Frank WhelchelB. F. Merritt, Jr.Ben F. HornsbyBen Dillingham II
  Coins and currency: His portrait appears on the U.S. $100 bill, and formerly on the U.S. half dollar coin (1948-63).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial — Early American Foreign Service Database
  Books by Benjamin Franklin: The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin — An Account of the Newly Invented Pennsylvanian Fire-Place (1744)
  Books about Benjamin Franklin: H. W. Brands, The First American: The Life and Times of Benjamin Franklin — Edmund S. Morgan, Benjamin Franklin — Stacy Schiff, A Great Improvisation : Franklin, France, and the Birth of America — Gordon S. Wood, The Americanization of Benjamin Franklin — Walter Isaacson, Benjamin Franklin : An American Life — Carl Van Doren, Benjamin Franklin — Philip Dray, Stealing God's Thunder : Benjamin Franklin's Lightning Rod and the Invention of America
  Image source: Library of Congress
  John Kenneth Galbraith (1908-2006) — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y.; Cambridge, Middlesex County, Mass. Born in Iona Station, Ontario, October 15, 1908. Democrat. Naturalized U.S. citizen; economist; university professor; U.S. Ambassador to India, 1961-63; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Massachusetts, 1972. Scottish ancestry. Member, Americans for Democratic Action; American Economic Association; American Academy of Arts and Sciences; American Philosophical Society. Received the Medal of Freedom in 1946, and again in 2000. Died, of pneumonia, in Mt. Auburn Hospital, Cambridge, Middlesex County, Mass., April 29, 2006 (age 97 years, 196 days). Interment at Indian Hill Cemetery, Middletown, Conn.
  Relatives: Son of William Archibald 'Archie' Galbraith and Catherine (Kendall) Galbraith; married, September 17, 1937, to Catherine 'Kitty' Atwater; father of Peter Woodard Galbraith (1950-) and James Kenneth Galbraith.
  Political family: Galbraith family of Massachusetts and Vermont.
  See also Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books by John Kenneth Galbraith: Ambassador's Journal : A Personal Account of the Kennedy Years (1969) — The Affluent Society (1958) — The Great Crash : 1929 (1954) — A Short History of Financial Euphoria — Money : Whence it Came, Where it Went (1975) — A Tenured Professor (1990) — Name-Dropping : From FDR On (1999) — A Life In Our Times (1981) — The New Industrial State (1967)
  Books about John Kenneth Galbraith: Richard Parker, John Kenneth Galbraith : His Life, His Politics, His Economics
  Ruth Bader Ginsburg (1933-2020) — of Washington, D.C. Born in Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y., March 15, 1933. Judge of U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit, 1980-93; Associate Justice of U.S. Supreme Court, 1993-. Female. Jewish. Member, American Bar Association; Council on Foreign Relations; American Academy of Arts and Sciences; American Civil Liberties Union; American Jewish Congress; Phi Alpha Delta. Inducted, National Women's Hall of Fame, 2002. Died in Washington, D.C., September 18, 2020 (age 87 years, 187 days). Burial location unknown.
  See also NNDB dossier — National Women's Hall of Fame
  Francis Calley Gray (b. 1890) — also known as Francis C. Gray — of Boston, Suffolk County, Mass. Born in Chestnut Hill, Newton, Middlesex County, Mass., January 22, 1890. Republican. Served in the U.S. Army during World War I; lawyer; banker; director, U.S. Smelting, Refining & Mining Co.; director, Massachusetts Fire and Marine Insurance Co.; chairman, Massachusetts General Hospital; alternate delegate to Republican National Convention from Massachusetts, 1944. Member, American Academy of Arts and Sciences; Humane Society. Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Morris Gray and Flora (Grant) Gray; married, September 16, 1916, to Helen Rotch Bullard.
  John Wilkes Hammond (1837-1922) — of Cambridge, Middlesex County, Mass. Born in Rochester (part now in Mattapoisett), Plymouth County, Mass., December 16, 1837. Lawyer; member of Massachusetts state house of representatives, 1872-73; superior court judge in Massachusetts, 1886-98; justice of Massachusetts state supreme court, 1898-1914. Member, American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Died in 1922 (age about 84 years). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of John Wilkes Hammond and Maria Louisa (Southworth) Hammond; married, August 15, 1866, to Clara E. Tweed.
  John Hancock (1737-1793) — of Massachusetts. Born in Braintree (part now in Quincy), Norfolk County, Mass., January 23, 1737. Delegate to Continental Congress from Massachusetts, 1775-78; signer, Declaration of Independence, 1776; Governor of Massachusetts, 1780-85, 1787-93; died in office 1793; received 4 electoral votes, 1789. Congregationalist. Irish ancestry. Member, Freemasons; American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Died in Quincy, Norfolk County, Mass., October 8, 1793 (age 56 years, 258 days). Interment at Old Granary Burying Ground, Boston, Mass.
  Relatives: Son of Rev. John Hancock (1702-1744) and Mary (Hawke) Hancock; married, August 28, 1775, to Dorothy 'Dolly'(Quincy) Scott (1747-1830).
  Hancock counties in Ga., Ill., Ind., Iowa, Ky., Maine, Miss., Ohio, Tenn. and W.Va. are named for him.
  The town of Hancock, Massachusetts, is named for him.  — Mount Hancock, in the White Mountains, Grafton County, New Hampshire, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about John Hancock: Harlow Giles Unger, John Hancock : Merchant King and American Patriot — Harlow Giles Unger, John Hancock: Merchant King & American Patriot
Thomas Jefferson Thomas Jefferson (1743-1826) — also known as "Apostle of Liberty"; "Sage of Monticello"; "Friend of the People"; "Father of the University of Virginia" — of Albemarle County, Va. Born in Albemarle County, Va., April 13, 1743. Lawyer; Delegate to Continental Congress from Virginia, 1775-76, 1783-84; signer, Declaration of Independence, 1776; Governor of Virginia, 1779-81; member of Virginia state legislature, 1782; U.S. Minister to France, 1785-89; U.S. Secretary of State, 1790-93; Vice President of the United States, 1797-1801; President of the United States, 1801-09; defeated (Democratic-Republican), 1796. Deist. English ancestry. Member, American Philosophical Society; American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He was elected to the Hall of Fame for Great Americans in 1900. Died near Charlottesville, Albemarle County, Va., July 4, 1826 (age 83 years, 82 days). Interment at Monticello Graveyard, Near Charlottesville, Albemarle County, Va.; cenotaph at University of Missouri Quadrangle, Columbia, Mo.; memorial monument at West Potomac Park, Washington, D.C.
  Relatives: Son of Peter Jefferson (1707-1757) and Jane (Randolph) Jefferson (1720-1776); married, January 1, 1772, to Martha Wayles Skelton (1748-1782); father of Martha Jefferson (1772-1836; who married Thomas Mann Randolph, Jr.) and Maria Jefferson (1778-1804; who married John Wayles Eppes); uncle of Dabney Carr; grandfather of Francis Wayles Eppes, Virginia Jefferson Randolph (who married Nicholas Philip Trist), Benjamin Franklin Randolph, Meriwether Lewis Randolph and George Wythe Randolph; grandnephew of Richard Randolph; granduncle of Dabney Smith Carr (1802-1854); great-grandfather of Thomas Jefferson Coolidge and Frederick Madison Roberts; second great-grandfather of John Gardner Coolidge; first cousin once removed of Richard Bland and Peyton Randolph (1721-1775); first cousin twice removed of John Jordan Crittenden, Thomas Turpin Crittenden, Robert Crittenden and Carter Henry Harrison; first cousin thrice removed of Alexander Parker Crittenden, Thomas Leonidas Crittenden, Thomas Theodore Crittenden and Carter Henry Harrison II; first cousin four times removed of Thomas Theodore Crittenden, Jr.; second cousin of Theodorick Bland, Edmund Jenings Randolph, Beverley Randolph and John Randolph of Roanoke; second cousin once removed of John Marshall, Henry Lee, Charles Lee, James Markham Marshall, Alexander Keith Marshall, Edmund Jennings Lee, Peyton Randolph (1779-1828), Henry St. George Tucker and William Segar Archer; second cousin twice removed of Thomas Marshall, James Keith Marshall, Nathaniel Beverly Tucker and Edmund Randolph; second cousin thrice removed of Fitzhugh Lee and John Augustine Marshall; second cousin four times removed of William Marshall Bullitt, Alexander Scott Bullitt and Francis Beverley Biddle; second cousin five times removed of William Welby Beverley; third cousin thrice removed of William Henry Robertson.
  Political families: Lee-Randolph family of Maryland and Virginia; Marshall-Harrison-Randolph-Cabell family of Virginia (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Cross-reference: Jefferson M. Levy — Joshua Fry
  Jefferson counties in Ala., Ark., Colo., Fla., Ga., Idaho, Ill., Ind., Iowa, Kan., Ky., La., Miss., Mo., Mont., Neb., N.Y., Ohio, Okla., Ore., Pa., Tenn., Tex., Wash., W.Va. and Wis. are named for him.
  Mount Jefferson (third highest peak in the Northeast), in Coos County, New Hampshire, is named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: Thomas Jefferson KennardThomas Jefferson CampbellThomas J. GazleyThomas Jefferson WordThomas J. DrakeThomas Jefferson HeardThomas Jefferson GreenThomas J. RuskThomas Jefferson WithersThomas J. ParsonsThomas J. DryerThomas J. FosterThomas J. HenleyThomas J. BarrThomas Jefferson JenningsThomas J. HendersonThomas J. Van AlstyneThomas Jefferson CasonThomas Jefferson BufordT. Jefferson CoolidgeThomas J. MegibbenThomas J. BunnThomas J. HardinThomas J. McLain, Jr.Thomas J. BrownThomas Jefferson SpeerThomas J. BoyntonThomas J. HudsonThomas J. BradyThomas J. SelbyThomas Jefferson DeavittThomas Jefferson MajorsThomas Jefferson WoodT. J. JarrattThomas Jefferson NunnThomas J. StraitThomas J. HumesT. J. AppleyardThomas J. ClunieThomas J. SteeleThomas J. BoyntonThomas J. O'DonnellThomas J. HalseyThomas J. GrahamT. J. MartinThomas Jefferson LillyThomas J. RandolphTom J. TerralT. Jeff BusbyThomas Jefferson MurphyThomas J. HamiltonTom ManganThomas J. RyanTom J. MurrayTom SteedThomas Jefferson Edmonds, Jr.Thomas J. AndersonThomas Jefferson RobertsThomas J. Barlow III
  Coins and currency: His portrait has appeared on the U.S. nickel (five cent coin) since 1938, and on the $2 bill since the 1860s.
  Personal motto: "Rebellion to tyrants is obedience to God."
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about Thomas Jefferson: Joseph J. Ellis, American Sphinx: The Character of Thomas Jefferson — Willard Sterne Randall, Thomas Jefferson : A Life — R. B. Bernstein, Thomas Jefferson — Joyce Appleby, Thomas Jefferson — Gore Vidal, Inventing A Nation: Washington, Adams, Jefferson — John Ferling, Adams vs. Jefferson: The Tumultuous Election of 1800 — Susan Dunn, Jefferson's Second Revolution : The Election Crisis of 1800 — Andrew Burstein, Jefferson's Secret: Death and Desire at Monticello — Christopher Hitchens, Thomas Jefferson : Author of America — David Barton, The Jefferson Lies: Exposing the myths you've always believed about Thomas Jefferson — David Barton, The Jefferson Lies: Exposing the Myths You've Always Believed About Thomas Jefferson — Donald Barr Chidsey, Mr. Hamilton and Mr. Jefferson
  Critical books about Thomas Jefferson: Joseph Wheelan, Jefferson's Vendetta : The Pursuit of Aaron Burr and the Judiciary
  Image source: Portrait & Biographical Album of Washtenaw County (1891)
Henry Cabot Lodge Henry Cabot Lodge (1850-1924) — of Nahant, Essex County, Mass. Born in Boston, Suffolk County, Mass., May 12, 1850. Republican. Lawyer; member of Massachusetts state house of representatives, 1880-81; Massachusetts Republican state chair, 1883; U.S. Representative from Massachusetts 6th District, 1887-93; resigned 1893; U.S. Senator from Massachusetts, 1893-1924; died in office 1924; delegate to Republican National Convention from Massachusetts, 1896 (speaker), 1900, 1904, 1908, 1916, 1920 (Temporary Chair; Permanent Chair; speaker), 1924. Member, American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Died, after a severe stroke, at Charlesgate Hospital, Cambridge, Middlesex County, Mass., November 9, 1924 (age 74 years, 181 days). Interment at Mt. Auburn Cemetery, Cambridge, Mass.
  Relatives: Son of John Ellerton Lodge (1820-1901) and Anna Sophie (Cabot) Lodge (1821-1900); married, June 29, 1871, to Anna Cabot Mills 'Nannie' Davis (1850-1915; daughter of Admiral Charles Henry Davis (1807-1877); sister-in-law of Brooks Adams; granddaughter of Elijah Hunt Mills); father of Constance Lodge (1872-1941; who married Augustus Peabody Gardner) and George 'Bay' Lodge (1873-1909; grandson-in-law of Frederick Theodore Frelinghuysen); grandfather of Henry Cabot Lodge, Jr. and John Davis Lodge; great-grandson of George Cabot; great-grandfather of William Amory Gardner Minot and George Cabot Lodge (1927-); third cousin once removed of John Lee Saltonstall; third cousin twice removed of Leverett Saltonstall, Richard Saltonstall, William Gurdon Saltonstall and John Lee Saltonstall, Jr.; third cousin thrice removed of William Lawrence Saltonstall and John Forbes Kerry.
  Political families: Winthrop-Hamlin family of Massachusetts and Connecticut; Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York; Davis family; Saltonstall-Davis-Frelinghuysen-Appleton family of Massachusetts (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Cross-reference: Louis A. Coolidge — Albert Henry Washburn
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: American Monthly Review of Reviews, July 1908
  Calvert Magruder (1893-1968) — of Cambridge, Middlesex County, Mass. Born in Annapolis, Anne Arundel County, Md., December 26, 1893. Democrat. Secretary to U.S. Supreme Court Justice Louis Brandeis, 1916-17; served in the U.S. Army during World War I; law professor; Judge of U.S. Court of Appeals for the 1st Circuit, 1939-59; took senior status 1959. Episcopalian. Member, American Bar Association; American Judicature Society; American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Died May 22, 1968 (age 74 years, 148 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Daniel Randall Magruder and Rosalie Eugenia Stuart (Webster) Magruder; married, October 8, 1925, to Anna Saltonstall Ward.
  See also federal judicial profile
  Harold Raymond Medina (1888-1990) — also known as Harold R. Medina — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born in Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y., February 16, 1888. Lawyer; law professor; U.S. District Judge for the Southern District of New York, 1947-51; Judge of U.S. Court of Appeals for the 2nd Circuit, 1951-58; took senior status 1958. Episcopalian. Member, American Bar Association; American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Died in Westwood, Bergen County, N.J., March 14, 1990 (age 102 years, 26 days). Interment at Westhampton Cemetery, Westhampton Beach, Long Island, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Joaquin A. Medina and Elizabeth (Fash) Medina; married, June 6, 1911, to Ethel Forde Hillyer (1888-1971).
  See also federal judicial profile — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Henry Parkman, Jr. (1894-1958) — of Boston, Suffolk County, Mass. Born in Boston, Suffolk County, Mass., April 26, 1894. Republican. Served in the U.S. Army during World War I; lawyer; delegate to Republican National Convention from Massachusetts, 1928, 1936; member of Massachusetts state senate Third Suffolk District, 1929-36; candidate for mayor of Boston, Mass., 1933; candidate for U.S. Senator from Massachusetts, 1940; colonel in the U.S. Army during World War II. Episcopalian. Member, American Bar Association; American Academy of Arts and Sciences; Phi Beta Kappa; Freemasons; American Legion; Veterans of Foreign Wars. Died in 1958 (age about 64 years). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Henry Parkman and Mary Frances (Parker) Parkman; married, June 26, 1936, to Doris Montague Leamy; uncle of William P. Homans, Jr. (1922?-1997).
  Political family: Peabody-Parkman family of Massachusetts.
  Robert Porter Patterson (1891-1952) — of Cold Spring, Putnam County, N.Y. Born in Glens Falls, Warren County, N.Y., February 12, 1891. Lawyer; served in the U.S. Army during World War I; U.S. District Judge for the Southern District of New York, 1930-39; Judge of U.S. Court of Appeals for the 2nd Circuit, 1939-40; U.S. Secretary of War, 1945-47. Member, American Bar Association; American Academy of Arts and Sciences; Phi Beta Kappa; Phi Delta Theta; American Legion. Died in Elizabeth, Union County, N.J., January 22, 1952 (age 60 years, 344 days). Interment at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Va.
  Relatives: Son of Charles R. Patterson and Lodice E. (Porter) Patterson; married, January 3, 1920, to Margaret T. Winchester.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Christopher Hallowell Phillips (b. 1920) — also known as Christopher H. Phillips — of Beverly, Essex County, Mass.; Washington, D.C. Born in The Hague (Den Haag), Netherlands, December 6, 1920. Republican. Served in the U.S. Army Air Force in World War II; member of Massachusetts state senate, 1948-53; delegate to Republican National Convention from Massachusetts, 1952, 1960; U.S. Ambassador to Brunei, 1989-91. Episcopalian. Member, American Academy of Arts and Sciences; Council on Foreign Relations. Presumed deceased. Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of William Phillips (1878-1968) and Caroline Astor (Drayton) Phillips; married, May 11, 1943, to Mabel B. Olsen (died 1995); married 1997 to Sydney Watkins Osborne.
  Political family: Roosevelt family of New York City, New York (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also U.S. State Dept career summary
  John Phillips (1770-1823) — of Boston, Suffolk County, Mass. Born in Boston, Suffolk County, Mass., November 26, 1770. Member of Massachusetts state house of representatives, 1803; member of Massachusetts state senate, 1804; mayor of Boston, Mass., 1822-23. English ancestry. Member, American Academy of Arts and Sciences; American Antiquarian Society. Died May 29, 1823 (age 52 years, 184 days). Interment at Old Granary Burying Ground, Boston, Mass.
  Relatives: Married to Sally Walley (1772-1845); father of Wendell Phillips (1811-1884).
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Gifford Pinchot (1865-1946) — of Milford, Pike County, Pa. Born in Simsbury, Hartford County, Conn., August 11, 1865. Chief Forester of the U.S.; close confidant of President Theodore Roosevelt; candidate for U.S. Senator from Pennsylvania, 1914 (Roosevelt Progressive), 1926 (Republican primary); Governor of Pennsylvania, 1923-27, 1931-35; defeated in Republican primary, 1938. French ancestry. Member, American Academy of Arts and Sciences; American Forestry Association; American Academy of Political and Social Science. Died, from leukemia, at the Harkness Pavilion, Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center, Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., October 4, 1946 (age 81 years, 54 days). Interment at Milford Cemetery, Milford, Pa.
  Relatives: Son of James W. Pinchot and Mary (Eno) Pinchot; married 1914 to Cornelia Elizabeth Bryce (daughter of Lloyd Stephens Bryce (1851-1917)).
  Political family: Cooper-Ashley family of New York City, New York.
  The Gifford Pinchot National Forest (established 1908 as the Columbia National Forest; renamed 1949), in Skamania, Lewis, Yakima, Cowlitz, and Klickitat counties, Washington, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article
  Books about Gifford Pinchot: Char Miller, Gifford Pinchot and the Making of Modern Environmentalism
  John Dyneley Prince (1868-1945) — also known as John D. Prince — of Passaic County, N.J.; Ringwood Manor, Passaic County, N.J. Born in New York, New York County, N.Y., April 17, 1868. University professor; member of New Jersey state house of assembly from Passaic County, 1906, 1908-09; Speaker of the New Jersey State House of Assembly, 1909; member of New Jersey state senate from Passaic County, 1910-12; U.S. Minister to Denmark, 1921-26; Serbs, Croats and Slovenes, 1926-29; Yugoslavia, 1929-33. Member, American Philosophical Society; American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Died in 1945 (age about 77 years). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of John Dyneley Prince and Anne Maria (Morris) Prince; married, October 5, 1889, to Adeline Loomis.
  See also U.S. State Dept career summary
Elihu Root Elihu Root (1845-1937) — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born in Clinton, Oneida County, N.Y., February 15, 1845. Republican. Lawyer; U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York, 1883-85; delegate to New York state constitutional convention at-large, 1894; U.S. Secretary of War, 1899-1904; delegate to Republican National Convention from New York, 1904 (Temporary Chair), 1912; U.S. Secretary of State, 1905-09; U.S. Senator from New York, 1909-15; delegate to New York state constitutional convention at-large, 1915; candidate for Republican nomination for President, 1916; delegate to New York convention to ratify 21st amendment, 1933. Member, Union League; American Society for International Law; American Bar Association; American Philosophical Society; American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize in 1912. Died, of pneumonia, in Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., February 7, 1937 (age 91 years, 358 days). Interment at Hamilton College Cemetery, Clinton, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Prof. Oren Root and Nancy Whitney (Buttrick) Root; married, January 8, 1878, to Clara Wales (died 1928).
  Cross-reference: Willard Bartlett — Thomas Burke
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Books about Elihu Root: Richard William Leopold, Elihu Root and the Conservative Tradition
  Image source: American Monthly Review of Reviews, June 1902
  Walter V. Schaefer (1904-1986) — of Lake Bluff, Lake County, Ill. Born in Grand Rapids, Kent County, Mich., December 10, 1904. Lawyer; justice of Illinois state supreme court, 1951-76 (7th District 1951-63, 1st District 1964-76); appointed 1951. Member, American Bar Association; American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Died June 15, 1986 (age 81 years, 187 days). Burial location unknown.
  Caleb Strong (1745-1819) — of Massachusetts. Born in Northampton, Hampshire County, Mass., January 9, 1745. Member of Massachusetts state house of representatives, 1776; member of Massachusetts state senate, 1780; Delegate to Continental Congress from Massachusetts, 1780; member, U.S. Constitutional Convention, 1787; U.S. Senator from Massachusetts, 1789-96; Governor of Massachusetts, 1800-07, 1812-16. Congregationalist. Member, American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Died November 7, 1819 (age 74 years, 302 days). Interment at Bridge Street Cemetery, Northampton, Mass.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  John Sullivan (1740-1795) — of Durham, Strafford County, N.H. Born in Somersworth, Strafford County, N.H., February 17, 1740. Delegate to Continental Congress from New Hampshire, 1774, 1780-81; served in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; New Hampshire state attorney general, 1782-86; delegate to New Hampshire state constitutional convention, 1782-83; member of New Hampshire Governor's Council, 1785-86; President of New Hampshire, 1786-88, 1789-90; federal judge, 1789; U.S. District Judge for New Hampshire, 1789-95; died in office 1795. Member, American Academy of Arts and Sciences; Freemasons. Died in Durham, Strafford County, N.H., January 23, 1795 (age 54 years, 340 days). Interment in private or family graveyard.
  Relatives: Brother of James Sullivan (1744-1808); father of George Sullivan.
  Political families: Saltonstall-Davis-Frelinghuysen-Appleton family of Massachusetts; Sullivan-Saltonstall family of Durham, New Hampshire (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — federal judicial profile — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  William Cushing Wait (1860-1935) — also known as William C. Wait — of Medford, Middlesex County, Mass. Born in Charlestown, Middlesex County (now part of Boston, Suffolk County), Mass., December 18, 1860. Democrat. Lawyer; superior court judge in Massachusetts, 1902-23; justice of Massachusetts state supreme court, 1923-34. Unitarian. Member, American Bar Association; American Academy of Arts and Sciences; American Geographic Society; Phi Beta Kappa. Died in Medford, Middlesex County, Mass., January 28, 1935 (age 74 years, 41 days). Interment at Oak Grove Cemetery, Medford, Mass.
  Relatives: Son of Elijah Smith Wait (1831-1894) and Eliza Ann (Hadley) Wait (1832-1907); married, January 1, 1889, to Edith Foote Wright (1866-1948).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Earl Warren (1891-1974) — also known as "Superchief" — of Oakland, Alameda County, Calif. Born in Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, Calif., March 19, 1891. Republican. Lawyer; served in the U.S. Army during World War I; Alameda County District Attorney, 1925-39; delegate to Republican National Convention from California, 1928 (alternate), 1932; Temporary Chair, 1944; California Republican state chair, 1934-36; member of Republican National Committee from California, 1936-38; California state attorney general, 1939-43; Governor of California, 1943-53; candidate for Presidential Elector for California, 1944; candidate for Vice President of the United States, 1948; Chief Justice of U.S. Supreme Court, 1953-69; chair, President's Commission on the Assassination of President KNDY, 1963-64. Norwegian ancestry. Member, American Bar Association; Freemasons; Shriners; Elks; American Academy of Arts and Sciences; American Philosophical Society; Phi Delta Phi; Sigma Phi; Exchange Club. Awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom posthumously in 1981. Died in Washington, D.C., July 9, 1974 (age 83 years, 112 days). Interment at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Va.
  Relatives: Son of Methias H. Warren and Chrystal (Hernlund) Warren; married, October 14, 1925, to Nina Palmquist Meyers.
  Cross-reference: William S. Mailliard
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile
  Books about Earl Warren: Ed Cray, Chief Justice: A Biography of Earl Warren — G. Edward White, Earl Warren : A Public Life — Bernard Schwartz, Super Chief, Earl Warren and His Supreme Court — Jim Newton, Justice for All: Earl Warren and the Nation He Made
George Washington George Washington (1732-1799) — also known as "Father of His Country"; "The American Fabius" — of Virginia. Born in Westmoreland County, Va., February 22, 1732. Delegate to Continental Congress from Virginia, 1774-75; general in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; member, U.S. Constitutional Convention, 1787; President of the United States, 1789-97. Episcopalian. English ancestry. Member, Freemasons; Society of the Cincinnati; American Academy of Arts and Sciences. As the leader of the Revolution, he could have been King; instead, he served as the first President and voluntarily stepped down after two terms. Elected to the Hall of Fame for Great Americans in 1900. Died, probably from acute bacterial epiglottitis, at Mt. Vernon, Fairfax County, Va., December 14, 1799 (age 67 years, 295 days). Entombed at Mt. Vernon, Mt. Vernon, Va.; memorial monument at National Mall, Washington, D.C.; statue erected 1860 at Washington Circle, Washington, D.C.; statue erected 1869 at Boston Public Garden, Boston, Mass.
  Relatives: Son of Augustine Washington (1694-1743) and Mary (Ball) Washington (c.1709-1789); married, January 6, 1759, to Martha (Dandridge) Custis (1731-1802; aunt of Burwell Bassett); uncle of Bushrod Washington; granduncle by marriage of Charles Magill Conrad; granduncle of John Thornton Augustine Washington and George Corbin Washington; first cousin six times removed of Archer Woodford; second cousin once removed of Meriwether Lewis (1774-1809); second cousin twice removed of Sulifand Sutherland Ross; second cousin five times removed of Thomas Henry Ball, Jr., William de Bruyn Kops, Horace Lee Washington, Edwin McPherson Holden, Claude C. Ball, Arthur Wesley Holden and Franklin Delano Roosevelt; third cousin thrice removed of Samuel Bullitt Churchill and Thomas Leonidas Crittenden.
  Political families: Pendleton-Lee family; Demarest-Meriwether family of New Jersey; Marshall-Harrison-Randolph-Cabell family of Virginia; Meriwether-Kellogg-Tyler family of Virginia and Connecticut; Washington family; Clay family of Kentucky (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Cross-reference: Henry Lee — Joshua Fry — Alexander Dimitry — Tobias Lear — David Mathews — Rufus Putnam
  Washington counties in Ala., Ark., Colo., Fla., Ga., Idaho, Ill., Ind., Iowa, Kan., Ky., La., Maine, Md., Minn., Miss., Mo., Neb., N.Y., N.C., Ohio, Okla., Ore., Pa., R.I., Tenn., Tex., Utah, Vt., Va. and Wis. are named for him.
  The city of Washington, D.C., is named for him.  — The state of Washington is named for him.  — Mount Washington (highest peak in the Northeast), in the White Mountains, Coos County, New Hampshire, is named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: George Washington Lent MarrGeorge Washington HeardGeorge Washington BarnettGeorge Washington DavisGeorge W. OwenGeorge W. TolandGeorge W. LayGeorge W. PattersonGeorge W. B. TownsGeorge Washington AdamsGeorge Washington HockleyGeorge W. SmythG. W. IngersollGeorge W. HopkinsGeorge Washington MontgomeryGeorge W. KittredgeGeorge W. JonesGeorge W. HarrisonGeorge Washington EwingGeorge Washington SeabrookGeorge W. MorrisonGeorge Washington WoodwardGeorge Washington WrightGeorge Washington TriplettGeorge Washington GlasscockGeorge W. SchuylerGeorge Washington HolmanGeorge W. GreeneGeorge W. WolcottGeorge W. PaschalGeorge Washington DunlapGeorge Washington WarrenGeorge Washington HillGeorge Washington LoganGeorge W. GetchellGeorge Washington WrightGeorge W. JulianGeorge Washington DyalGeorge W. LaddGeorge W. PeckGeorge Washington NesmithGeorge W. MorganGeorge Washington BrooksGeorge Washington CowlesGeorge W. GeddesGeorge Washington WhitmoreGeorge Washington BridgesGeorge W. CateGeorge W. HoukGeorge W. WebberGeorge W. BemisGeorge Washington FairbrotherGeorge Washington GlickGeorge W. JonesGeorge W. BakerGeorge W. ShellGeorge W. AndersonGeorge W. CrouseGeorge W. HulickGeorge W. AllenGeorge W. F. HarperGeorge Washington ClarkGeorge Washington McCraryGeorge W. GordonGeorge W. KingsburyGeorge W. CovingtonGeorge Washington FleegerGeorge W. SteeleGeorge W. WilsonGeorge Washington MartinGeorge W. E. DorseyGeorge W. PlunkittGeorge W. FurbushGeorge W. SuttonGeorge W. CurtinGeorge W. RayGeorge W. RooseveltGeorge W. SmithGeorge W. KippGeorge W. CampbellGeorge W. TaylorGeorge W. StoneGeorge W. BartchGeorge W. ShonkGeorge W. CookGeorge W. MurrayGeorge W. FarisGeorge W. FithianGeorge W. PrinceGeorge W. BucknerGeorge W. CromerGeorge W. DonagheyGeorge W. AldridgeGeorge Washington WagonerGeorge Washington GoethalsGeorge W. ArmstrongGeorge W. LovejoyGeorge W. OakesGeorge W. HaysGeorge W. EdmondsGeorge W. LindsayGeorge Washington JonesT. G. W. TarverGeorge W. DardenGeorge W. MeadGeorge W. GibbonsGeorge W. ListGeorge W. CalkinGeorge W. RauchGeorge W. MichellGeorge Washington JacksonGeorge W. BlanchardGeorge Washington HerzGeorge W. BristowGeorge Washington HardyGeorge W. BallardGeorge W. McKownGeorge Thomas WashingtonGeorge W. CollinsGeorge A. Washington
  Coins and currency: His portrait appears on the U.S. quarter (25 cent coin), and on the $1 bill. His portrait also appeared on various other denominations of U.S. currency, and on the Confederate States $50 note during the Civil War.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Books about George Washington: Richard Brookhiser, Founding Father: Rediscovering George Washington — James Thomas Flexner, Washington: The Indispensable Man — Willard Sterne Randall, George Washington : A Life — Richard Norton Smith, Patriarch : George Washington and the New American Nation — Henry Wiencek, An Imperfect God : George Washington, His Slaves, and the Creation of America — James MacGregor Burns, George Washington — Joseph J. Ellis, His Excellency, George Washington — Gore Vidal, Inventing A Nation: Washington, Adams, Jefferson — David Barton, The Bulletproof George Washington: An Account of God's Providential Care — Wendie C. Old, George Washington (for young readers)
  Image source: Portrait & Biographical Album of Washtenaw County (1891)
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The Political Graveyard

The Political Graveyard is a web site about U.S. political history and cemeteries. Founded in 1996, it is the Internet's most comprehensive free source for American political biography, listing 312,576 politicians, living and dead.
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