PoliticalGraveyard.com
The Political Graveyard: A Database of American History
The Internet's Most Comprehensive Source of U.S. Political Biography
(or, The Web Site that Tells Where the Dead Politicians are Buried)
Created and maintained by Lawrence Kestenbaum

Namesake Politicians: Counties, States, Provinces

in alphabetical order

  John Adair (1757-1840) — of Harrodsburg, Mercer County, Ky. Born in Chester District (now Chester County), S.C., January 9, 1757. Democrat. General in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; delegate to Kentucky state constitutional convention, 1792; member of Kentucky state house of representatives, 1793-95, 1798, 1800-03, 1817; Speaker of the Kentucky State House of Representatives, 1802-03; U.S. Senator from Kentucky, 1805-06; general in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812; Governor of Kentucky, 1820-24; U.S. Representative from Kentucky 7th District, 1831-33. Slaveowner. Died in Harrodsburg, Mercer County, Ky., May 19, 1840 (age 83 years, 131 days). Original interment in unknown location; reinterment in 1872 at Frankfort Cemetery, Frankfort, Ky.
  Relatives: Son of William Adair (1719-1812) and Mary (Moore) Adair (1729-1819); married to Catherine Palmer (1768-1854); father of Eliza Palmer Adair (1790-1871; who married Thomas Bell Monroe (1791-1865)) and Eleanor Katherine 'Ellen' Adair (1801-1884; who married Joseph Mills White); grandfather of Victor Monroe.
  Political families: Harrison-Randolph-Marshall-Cabell family of Virginia; Roosevelt family of New York; Monroe-Grayson-Roosevelt-Breckinridge family of Virginia and Kentucky (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Adair counties in Iowa, Ky. and Mo. are named for him.
  The city of Adairville, Kentucky, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Alva Adams (1850-1922) — of Pueblo, Pueblo County, Colo. Born in a log cabin in Iowa County, Wis., May 14, 1850. Democrat. Hardware merchant; member of Colorado state legislature, 1876; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Colorado, 1880 (Convention Vice-President), 1904 (member, Credentials Committee); Governor of Colorado, 1887-89, 1897-99, 1905; member of Democratic National Committee from Colorado, 1908-. Member, Freemasons. Died at a sanitarium in Battle Creek, Calhoun County, Mich., November 1, 1922 (age 72 years, 171 days). Interment at Roselawn Cemetery, Pueblo, Colo.
  Relatives: Son of John Adams and Eliza (Blanchard) Adams (1832-1911); brother of William Herbert Adams (1861-1954); married to Ella Charlotte Nye (1851-1931); father of Alva Blanchard Adams; uncle of Harry Wilfred Adams; grandfather of Alva Blanchard Adams Jr..
  Political family: Adams family of Pueblo, Colorado.
  Adams County, Colo. is named for him.
  See also National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
John Adams John Adams (1735-1826) — also known as "His Rotundity"; "The Duke of Braintree"; "American Cato"; "Old Sink and Swim"; "The Colossus of Independence"; "Father of the American Navy" — of Quincy, Norfolk County, Mass. Born in Braintree (part now in Quincy), Norfolk County, Mass., October 30, 1735. Lawyer; Delegate to Continental Congress from Massachusetts, 1774-78; signer, Declaration of Independence, 1776; U.S. Minister to Netherlands, 1781-88; Great Britain, 1785-88; Vice President of the United States, 1789-97; President of the United States, 1797-1801; defeated (Federalist), 1800; delegate to Massachusetts state constitutional convention, 1820. Unitarian. English ancestry. Member, American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Elected to the Hall of Fame for Great Americans in 1900. Died in Quincy, Norfolk County, Mass., July 4, 1826 (age 90 years, 247 days). Original interment at Hancock Cemetery, Quincy, Mass.; reinterment in 1828 at United First Parish Church, Quincy, Mass.; memorial monument at Constitution Gardens, Washington, D.C.
  Relatives: Son of John Adams (1691-1761) and Susanna (Boylston) Adams (1699-1797); married, October 25, 1764, to Abigail Quincy Smith (aunt of William Cranch); father of Abigail Amelia Adams (1765-1813; who married William Stephens Smith) and John Quincy Adams (1767-1848) (who married Louisa Catherine Johnson); grandfather of George Washington Adams and Charles Francis Adams (1807-1886); great-grandfather of John Quincy Adams (1833-1894) and Brooks Adams; second great-grandfather of Charles Francis Adams (1866-1954); third great-grandfather of Thomas Boylston Adams; first cousin thrice removed of Edward M. Chapin; first cousin four times removed of Arthur Chapin; first cousin six times removed of Denwood Lynn Chapin; second cousin of Samuel Adams; second cousin once removed of Joseph Allen; second cousin twice removed of John Milton Thayer; second cousin thrice removed of William Vincent Wells; second cousin four times removed of Lyman Kidder Bass, Daniel T. Hayden, Arthur Laban Bates and Almur Stiles Whiting; second cousin five times removed of Charles Grenfill Washburn, Lyman Metcalfe Bass and Emerson Richard Boyles; third cousin once removed of Jeremiah Mason and George Bailey Loring; third cousin twice removed of Asahel Otis, Erastus Fairbanks, Charles Stetson, Henry Brewster Stanton, Charles Adams Jr., Isaiah Stetson, Joshua Perkins, Eli Thayer and Bailey Frye Adams; third cousin thrice removed of Day Otis Kellogg, Dwight Kellogg, Caleb Stetson (1801-1885), Oakes Ames, Oliver Ames Jr., Benjamin W. Waite, Alfred Elisha Ames, George Otis Fairbanks, Austin Wells Holden, Horace Fairbanks, Ebenezer Oliver Grosvenor, Joseph Washburn Yates, Augustus Brown Reed Sprague, Franklin Fairbanks, Erskine Mason Phelps, Arthur Newton Holden, John Alden Thayer, Irving Hall Chase, Isaiah Kidder Stetson and Giles Russell Taggart.
  Political family: Kellogg-Adams-Seymour-Chapin family of Connecticut and New York (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Adams counties in Idaho, Iowa, Miss., Neb., Ohio, Pa., Wash. and Wis. are named for him.
  Mount Adams (second highest peak in the Northeast), in the White Mountains, Coos County, New Hampshire, is named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS John Adams (built 1941-42 at Richmond, California; torpedoed and lost in the Coral Sea, 1942) was named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: John Adams HarperJohn A. CameronJohn A. DixJohn Adams FisherJohn A. TaintorJohn A. GilmerJohn A. PerkinsJohn Adams HymanJohn A. DamonJohn A. LeeJohn A. SandersJohn Adams Hurson
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Books about John Adams: John Ferling, John Adams: A Life — Joseph J. Ellis, The Passionate Sage: The Character and Legacy of John Adams — David McCullough, John Adams — Gore Vidal, Inventing A Nation: Washington, Adams, Jefferson — John Ferling, Adams vs. Jefferson: The Tumultuous Election of 1800 — James Grant, John Adams : Party of One
  Image source: Portrait & Biographical Album of Washtenaw County (1891)
John Quincy Adams John Quincy Adams (1767-1848) — also known as "Old Man Eloquent"; "The Accidental President"; "The Massachusetts Madman" — of Boston, Suffolk County, Mass.; Quincy, Norfolk County, Mass. Born in Braintree (part now in Quincy), Norfolk County, Mass., July 11, 1767. Lawyer; U.S. Minister to Netherlands, 1794-97; Prussia, 1797-1801; Russia, 1809-14; Great Britain, 1815-17; member of Massachusetts state senate, 1802; U.S. Senator from Massachusetts, 1803-08; resigned 1808; U.S. Secretary of State, 1817-25; President of the United States, 1825-29; U.S. Representative from Massachusetts, 1831-48 (11th District 1831-33, 12th District 1833-43, 8th District 1843-48); died in office 1848; candidate for Governor of Massachusetts, 1834. Unitarian. English ancestry. Member, American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Elected to the Hall of Fame for Great Americans in 1905. Suffered a stroke while speaking on the floor of the U.S. House of Representatives, February 21, 1848, and died two days later in the Speaker's office, U.S. Capitol Building, Washington, D.C., February 23, 1848 (age 80 years, 227 days). Original interment at Hancock Cemetery, Quincy, Mass.; reinterment at United First Parish Church, Quincy, Mass.; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery, Washington, D.C.
  Relatives: Son of John Adams and Abigail Adams; brother of Abigail Amelia Adams (1765-1813; who married William Stephens Smith); married, July 26, 1797, to Louisa Catherine Johnson (daughter of Joshua Johnson; sister-in-law of John Pope; niece of Thomas Johnson); father of George Washington Adams and Charles Francis Adams (1807-1886); grandfather of John Quincy Adams and Brooks Adams; great-grandfather of Charles Francis Adams (1866-1954); second great-grandfather of Thomas Boylston Adams; first cousin of William Cranch; second cousin once removed of Samuel Adams; second cousin twice removed of Edward M. Chapin; second cousin thrice removed of Arthur Chapin; second cousin five times removed of Denwood Lynn Chapin; third cousin of Joseph Allen; third cousin once removed of Samuel Sewall, Josiah Quincy and John Milton Thayer; third cousin twice removed of William Vincent Wells; third cousin thrice removed of Lyman Kidder Bass, Daniel T. Hayden, Arthur Laban Bates and Almur Stiles Whiting; fourth cousin of Jeremiah Mason, Josiah Quincy Jr. and George Bailey Loring; fourth cousin once removed of Asahel Otis, Erastus Fairbanks, Charles Stetson, Henry Brewster Stanton, Charles Adams Jr., Isaiah Stetson (1812-1880), Joshua Perkins, Eli Thayer, Bailey Frye Adams and Samuel Miller Quincy.
  Political families: Greene-Lippitt family of Providence, Rhode Island; DuPont family of Wilmington, Delaware; Thayer-Capron-Aldrich-Stetson family; Kellogg-Adams-Seymour-Chapin family of Connecticut and New York (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Cross-reference: John Smith — Thurlow Weed
  Adams counties in Ill. and Ind. are named for him.
  Mount Quincy Adams, in the White Mountains, Coos County, New Hampshire, is named for him.  — Mount Quincy Adams, on the border between British Columbia, Canada, and Hoonah-Angoon Census Area, Alaska, is named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: John Q. A. BrackettJohn Q. A. SheldenJ. Q. A. Reber
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Books about John Quincy Adams: Paul C. Nagel, John Quincy Adams : A Public Life, a Private Life — Lynn Hudson Parsons, John Quincy Adams — Robert V. Remini, John Quincy Adams — Joseph Wheelan, Mr. Adams's Last Crusade: John Quincy Adams's Extraordinary Post-Presidential Life in Congress
  Image source: Portrait & Biographical Album of Washtenaw County (1891)
  William Aiken Jr. (1806-1887) — of Charleston, Charleston County, S.C. Born in Charleston, Charleston District (now Charleston County), S.C., January 28, 1806. Democrat. Member of South Carolina state house of representatives, 1838-42; member of South Carolina state senate, 1842-44; Governor of South Carolina, 1844-46; U.S. Representative from South Carolina, 1851-57 (6th District 1851-53, 2nd District 1853-57); delegate to Democratic National Convention from South Carolina, 1872. Slaveowner. Died in Flat Rock, Henderson County, N.C., September 6, 1887 (age 81 years, 221 days). Interment at Magnolia Cemetery, Charleston, S.C.
  Relatives: Son of William Aiken (1778-1831) and Henrietta (Wyatt) Aiken; married, February 3, 1831, to Harriett Lowndes (1812-1892; daughter of Thomas Lowndes); great-grandfather of Burnet Rhett Maybank (1899-1954); second great-grandfather of Burnet Rhett Maybank Jr.; first cousin of David Wyatt Aiken.
  Political families: VanRensselaer family of Albany, New York; DeSaussure-Lowndes-Aiken-Rhett family of Charleston, South Carolina (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Aiken County, S.C. is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  James Lusk Alcorn (1816-1894) — also known as James L. Alcorn — of Livingston County, Ky.; Friars Point, Coahoma County, Miss. Born near Golconda, Pope County, Ill., November 4, 1816. Republican. Lawyer; member of Kentucky state house of representatives, 1843; member of Mississippi state house of representatives, 1846, 1856-57; member of Mississippi state senate, 1848-54; candidate for U.S. Representative from Mississippi, 1856; general in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; Governor of Mississippi, 1870-71; defeated, 1873; U.S. Senator from Mississippi, 1871-77. Slaveowner. Died in Friars Point, Coahoma County, Miss., December 20, 1894 (age 78 years, 46 days). Interment at Alcorn Cemetery, Friars Point, Miss.
  Relatives: Son of James Alcorn (1788-1859) and Louisa (Lusk) Alcorn (1794-1858); married 1839 to Mary Catherine Stewart (died 1849); married 1850 to Amelia Walton Glover.
  Alcorn County, Miss. is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  William Julius Alexander (1797-1857) — of North Carolina. Born in Salisbury, Rowan County, N.C., March, 1797. Lawyer; member of North Carolina house of commons, 1826-31, 1833-35; superintendent of the U.S. Mint at Charlotte, N.C., 1846-51. Died in Lincolnton, Lincoln County, N.C., February 15, 1857 (age 59 years, 0 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of William Alexander; married to Catharine Wilson.
  Alexander County, N.C. is named for him.
  William M. Alexander — of Illinois. Member of Illinois state house of representatives, 1822; Speaker of the Illinois State House of Representatives, 1822. Burial location unknown.
  Alexander County, Ill. is named for him.
Russell A. Alger Russell Alexander Alger (1836-1907) — also known as Russell A. Alger — of Detroit, Wayne County, Mich. Born in a log cabin, Lafayette Township, Medina County, Ohio, February 27, 1836. Republican. Lawyer; general in the Union Army during the Civil War; lumber business; delegate to Republican National Convention from Michigan, 1884, 1896; Governor of Michigan, 1885-86; candidate for Republican nomination for President, 1888; Presidential Elector for Michigan, 1888; U.S. Secretary of War, 1897-99; U.S. Senator from Michigan, 1902-07; appointed 1902; died in office 1907. Member, Freemasons; Grand Army of the Republic; Sons of the American Revolution; Loyal Legion. Died in Washington, D.C., January 24, 1907 (age 70 years, 331 days). Entombed at Elmwood Cemetery, Detroit, Mich.
  Relatives: Son of Russell Alger (died 1849) and Caroline (Moulton) Alger (1809-1848); brother of Charles Moulton Alger; married, April 2, 1861, to Annette H. Henry (1840-1919); father of Frederick Moulton Alger (1876-1933) (who married Mary Eldridge Swift); grandfather of Frederick Moulton Alger Jr..
  Political family: Alger family of Detroit, Michigan.
  Alger County, Mich. is named for him.
  The village of Alger, Ohio, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: Portrait & Biographical Album of Washtenaw County (1891)
  Henry Watkins Allen (1820-1866) — of Texas; Louisiana. Born in Prince Edward County, Va., April 29, 1820. Member of Texas state house of representatives, 1853; general in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; Governor of Louisiana, 1864-65. Presbyterian. Died in Mexico City (Ciudad de México), Distrito Federal, April 22, 1866 (age 45 years, 358 days). Interment at Old State Capitol, Baton Rouge, La.
  Relatives: Son of Dr. Thomas Allen and Ann (Watkins) Allen; married to Salome Crane.
  Allen Parish, La. is named for him.
  The city of Port Allen, Louisiana, is named for him.
  See also National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article
  William Allen (1803-1879) — also known as "Earthquake Allen"; "Petticoat Allen"; "The Fog Horn"; "The Ohio Gong"; "Rise Up William Allen" — of Ohio. Born in Edenton, Chowan County, N.C., December 27, 1803. Democrat. Lawyer; U.S. Representative from Ohio 7th District, 1833-35; U.S. Senator from Ohio, 1837-49; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Ohio, 1864; Governor of Ohio, 1874-76. Died near Chillicothe, Ross County, Ohio, July 11, 1879 (age 75 years, 196 days). Interment at Grandview Cemetery, Chillicothe, Ohio.
  Relatives: Son of Nathaniel Allen and Sarah (Colburn) Allen; married 1842 to Effie Coons; uncle of Allen Granberry Thurman (1813-1895).
  Political family: Allen-McCormick-Thurman-Dun family of Chillicothe, Ohio.
  Allen County, Kan. is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Joseph Campbell Anderson (1830-1891) — also known as Joseph C. Anderson — of Kansas. Born in Jessamine County, Ky., 1830. Lawyer; member of Kansas territorial legislature, 1855; arrested and imprisoned during the Civil War for refusing to sign an oath of allegiance to the Union. Died in 1891 (age about 61 years). Interment at Lexington Cemetery, Lexington, Ky.
  Relatives: Son of Oliver Anderson (1794-1873) and Mary (Campbell) Anderson (1797-1842); married to Dovey Blythe (1846-1914).
  Anderson County, Kan. is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Joseph Inslee Anderson (1757-1837) — also known as Joseph Anderson — of Tennessee. Born in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., November 5, 1757. Major in Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; lawyer; justice of Southwest Territory supreme court, 1791; delegate to Tennessee state constitutional convention, 1796; U.S. Senator from Tennessee, 1797-1815; Comptroller of the U.S. Treasury, 1815-36. Member, Society of the Cincinnati. Died in Washington, D.C., April 17, 1837 (age 79 years, 163 days). Interment at Congressional Cemetery, Washington, D.C.
  Relatives: Son of William Anderson and Elizabeth (Inslee) Anderson; married 1797 to Only Patience Outlaw; father of Alexander Outlaw Anderson (1794-1869).
  Anderson County, Tenn. is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Kenneth Lewis Anderson (1805-1845) — of Texas. Born in North Carolina, September 11, 1805. Member of Texas Republic House of Representatives, 1841-42; Vice President of the Texas Republic, 1844-45; died in office 1845. Died at the Fanthorp Inn, in Fanthorp (now Anderson), Grimes County, Tex., July 3, 1845 (age 39 years, 295 days). Interment at Fanthorp Cemetery, Anderson, Tex.
  Anderson County, Tex. is named for him.
  Richard Clough Anderson Jr. (1788-1826) — also known as Richard C. Anderson, Jr. — of Kentucky. Born near Louisville, Jefferson County, Ky., August 4, 1788. Lawyer; member of Kentucky state house of representatives, 1814-15, 1821-22; Speaker of the Kentucky State House of Representatives, 1822; U.S. Representative from Kentucky 8th District, 1817-21; U.S. Minister to Gran Colombia, 1823-26, died in office 1826. Slaveowner. Died, of yellow fever, near Cartagena, Colombia, July 24, 1826 (age 37 years, 354 days). Interment a private or family graveyard, Jefferson County, Ky.
  Relatives: Son of Richard Anderson and Elizabeth (Clark) Anderson.
  Anderson County, Ky. is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Branch Tanner Archer (1790-1856) — Born in Fauquier County, Va., December 13, 1790. Physician; member of Virginia House of Burgesses, 1819-20; delegate to Texas Convention of 1833 from District of Columbia, 1833; delegate to Texas Consultation of 1835 from District of Columbia, 1835; served in the Texas Army during the Texas War of Independence; member of Texas Republic House of Representatives, 1836; Texas Republic Secretary of War, 1840-41. Member, Freemasons. Died in Brazoria, Brazoria County, Tex., September 22, 1856 (age 65 years, 284 days). Interment at Restwood Memorial Park, Clute, Tex.
  Relatives: First cousin once removed of William Segar Archer (1789-1855).
  Political families: Archer-Eggleston-Jefferson family of Virginia; Harrison-Randolph-Marshall-Cabell family of Virginia (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Archer County, Tex. is named for him.
  Antonio D. Archuleta (born c.1845) — of Colorado. Born about 1845. Member of Colorado state senate, 1885. Burial location unknown.
  Archuleta County, Colo. is named for him.
  John Armstrong (1717-1795) — also known as "Hero of Kittanny" — of Pennsylvania. Born in Brookeborough, County Fermanagh, Ireland (now Northern Ireland), October 13, 1717. Civil engineer; surveyor; general in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; Delegate to Continental Congress from Pennsylvania, 1778-80. Died in Carlisle, Cumberland County, Pa., March 9, 1795 (age 77 years, 147 days). Interment at Old Carlisle Cemetery, Carlisle, Pa.
  Relatives: Son of James Armstrong ; married to Rebecca Lyon; father of James Armstrong (1748-1828) and John Armstrong Jr.; great-grandfather of John Jacob Astor III; second great-grandfather of William Waldorf Astor; third great-grandfather of William Astor Chanler and Lewis Stuyvesant Chanler (1869-1942).
  Political family: Livingston-Schuyler family of New York (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Armstrong County, Pa. is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Moses Kimball Armstrong (1832-1906) — also known as Moses K. Armstrong — of Yankton, Yankton County, Dakota Territory (now S.Dak.). Born in Milan, Erie County, Ohio, September 19, 1832. Member of Dakota territorial House of Representatives, 1862-63; member Dakota territorial council, 1865-67, 1870-71; President of the Dakota Territorial Council, 1866-67; treasurer of Dakota Territory, 1865-68; Delegate to U.S. Congress from Dakota Territory, 1871. Died in Albert Lea, Freeborn County, Minn., January 11, 1906 (age 73 years, 114 days). Interment at Lakewood Cemetery, Minneapolis, Minn.
  Armstrong County, S.Dak. is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
Chester A. Arthur Chester Alan Arthur (1829-1886) — also known as Chester A. Arthur; Chester Abell Arthur; "The Gentleman Boss"; "His Accidency"; "Elegant Arthur"; "Our Chet"; "Dude President" — of New York. Born in Fairfield, Franklin County, Vt., October 5, 1829. Republican. Lawyer; U.S. Collector of Customs, 1870-78; New York Republican state chair, 1879-81; delegate to Republican National Convention from New York, 1880; Vice President of the United States, 1881; President of the United States, 1881-85; candidate for Republican nomination for President, 1884. Episcopalian. Member, Loyal Legion; Psi Upsilon; Union League. Died, of Bright's disease and a cerebral hemorrhage, in New York, New York County, N.Y., November 18, 1886 (age 57 years, 44 days). Interment at Albany Rural Cemetery, Menands, N.Y.; statue at Madison Square Park, Manhattan, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Rev. William Arthur (1796-1875) and Malvina (Stone) Arthur (1802-1869); married, October 25, 1859, to Ellen Lewis "Nell" Herndon (1837-1880); fourth cousin once removed of Benjamin Franklin Flanders (1816-1896) and Cassius Montgomery Clay Twitchell.
  Political families: Eastman family; Flanders family of Vermont; Sargent-Davis-Pike-Flanders family of New Hampshire; Fairbanks-Adams family of Massachusetts (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Arthur County, Neb. is named for him.
  The village of Arthur, Nebraska, is named for him.  — The village of Chester, Nebraska, is named for him.  — Lake Arthur, in Polk County, Minnesota, is named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: Chester A. HeitmanChester Arthur PikeChester A. Johnson
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Books about Chester A. Arthur: Thomas C. Reeves, Gentleman Boss : The Life of Chester Alan Arthur — Justus D. Doenecke, The Presidencies of James A. Garfield and Chester A. Arthur — George Frederick Howe, Chester A. Arthur, A Quarter-Century of Machine Politics — Zachary Karabell, Chester Alan Arthur — Paul Joseph, Chester Arthur (for young readers)
  Image source: Portrait & Biographical Album of Washtenaw County (1891)
  Samuel Ashe (1725-1813) — of New Hanover County, N.C. Born in Bath, Beaufort County, N.C., March 24, 1725. Lawyer; delegate to North Carolina state constitutional convention, 1776; justice of North Carolina state supreme court, 1777; Governor of North Carolina, 1795-98; Presidential Elector for North Carolina, 1804. Died in Rocky Point, Pender County, N.C., February 3, 1813 (age 87 years, 316 days). Interment at Ashe Family Cemetery, Rocky Point, N.C.; memorial monument at Pack Square Park, Asheville, N.C.
  Relatives: Son of John Baptista Ashe (1695-1734) and Elizabeth (Swann) Ashe (1699-1729); married to Mary Porter (1732-1767) and Elizabeth Merrick (1735-1815); father of John Baptista Ashe (1748-1802); uncle and cousin by marriage of William Henry Hill; grandfather of John Baptista Ashe (1810-1857), Thomas Samuel Ashe and William Shepperd Ashe; great-granduncle of George Davis (1820-1896) and Horatio Davis; cousin by marriage of Alfred Moore Waddell.
  Political families: Polk family; Ashe-Polk family of North Carolina (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Ashe County, N.C. is named for him.
  The city of Asheville, North Carolina, is named for him.  — The city of Asheboro, North Carolina, is named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS Samuel Ashe (built 1942 at Wilmington, North Carolina; scrapped 1970) was named for him.
  See also National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Chester Ashley (1790-1848) — of Little Rock, Pulaski County, Ark. Born in Westfield, Hampden County, Mass., June 1, 1790. Democrat. U.S. Senator from Arkansas, 1844-48; died in office 1848. Slaveowner. Died in Washington, D.C., April 29, 1848 (age 57 years, 333 days). Interment at Mt. Holly Cemetery, Little Rock, Ark.; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery, Washington, D.C.
  Relatives: Son of Nancy (Pomeroy) Ashley (1761-1792) and William Ashley (1763-1847); married, July 4, 1821, to Mary Worthington Watkins Elliot (1798-1865); first cousin five times removed of Boyd Kenneth Benedict; second cousin once removed of Samuel Clesson Allen; second cousin twice removed of Aaron Kellogg; third cousin of Elisha Hunt Allen; third cousin once removed of Jason Kellogg, Charles Kellogg (1773-1842), Orsamus Cook Merrill, Timothy Merrill, Daniel Fiske Kellogg, William Fessenden Allen and Frederick Hobbes Allen; fourth cousin of Luther Walter Badger, Silas Dewey Kellogg, Greene Carrier Bronson, Daniel Kellogg (1791-1875), Alvan Kellogg, Alvah Nash, John Russell Kellogg, Day Otis Kellogg, Dwight Kellogg, Laman Ingersoll, George Smith Catlin, Albert Gallatin Kellogg, Francis William Kellogg, Ensign Hosmer Kellogg, Farrand Fassett Merrill (1814-1859) and Charles Kellogg (1839-1903); fourth cousin once removed of Amaziah Brainard, Orlando Kellogg, William Dean Kellogg, Stephen Wright Kellogg, George Bradley Kellogg, William Pitt Kellogg, Daniel Kellogg (1835-1918), Arthur Tappan Kellogg, Selah Merrill, Edwin W. Kellogg and Samuel Herbert Kellogg.
  Political families: Kellogg-Adams-Seymour-Chapin family of Connecticut and New York; Murphy-Merrill family of Harbor Beach, Michigan (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Ashley County, Ark. is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  David Rice Atchison (1807-1886) — also known as David R. Atchison — of Plattsburg, Clinton County, Mo.; Platte City, Platte County, Mo. Born in Frogtown, Fayette County, Ky., August 11, 1807. Lawyer; member of Missouri state house of representatives, 1834, 1838; circuit judge in Missouri, 1841; U.S. Senator from Missouri, 1843-48, 1849-55. Presbyterian. Member, Freemasons. An organizer of the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railroad. Thought by some to have been president for one day in 1849, because President Zachary Taylor refused to be inaugurated on a Sunday. Slaveowner. Died near Gower, Clinton County, Mo., January 26, 1886 (age 78 years, 168 days). Interment at Greenlawn Cemetery, Plattsburg, Mo.; statue at Clinton County Courthouse Grounds, Plattsburg, Mo.
  Relatives: Son of William Atchison and Catherine (Allen) Atchison.
  Atchison counties in Kan. and Mo. are named for him.
  The city of Atchison, Kansas, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  William Yates Atkinson (1854-1899) — of Newnan, Coweta County, Ga. Born in Oakland, Meriwether County, Ga., November 11, 1854. Democrat. Lawyer; member of Georgia state house of representatives, 1886-94; Speaker of the Georgia State House of Representatives, 1892-94; Georgia Democratic state chair, 1890-92; Governor of Georgia, 1894-98. Presbyterian. Died in Newnan, Coweta County, Ga., August 8, 1899 (age 44 years, 270 days). Interment at Oak Hill Cemetery, Newnan, Ga.
  Relatives: Married 1880 to Susie Cobb Milton (granddaughter of John Milton); father of William Yates Atkinson Jr. (1887-1953).
  Political family: Milton family of Georgia.
  Atkinson County, Ga. is named for him.
  See also National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  James H. Audrain (1782-1831) — of Missouri. Born in 1782. Member of Missouri state legislature, 1820. Died in 1831 (age about 49 years). Burial location unknown.
  Audrain County, Mo. is named for him.
  Stephen Fuller Austin (1793-1836) — also known as Stephen F. Austin; "Father of Texas" — Born in Wythe County, Va., November 3, 1793. Member of Missouri territorial legislature, 1814-19; delegate to Texas Convention of 1832 from District of San Felipe de Austin, 1832; took petition to Mexico City for the establishment of Texas as a separate Mexican state, 1832; charged with attempting revolution, and imprisoned until 1835; delegate to Texas Convention of 1833 from District of Austin, 1833; delegate to Texas Consultation of 1835 from District of San Felipe de Austin, 1835; candidate for President of the Texas Republic, 1836; Texas Republic Secretary of State, 1836; died in office 1836. Member, Freemasons. Died of pneumonia, in Brazoria County, Tex., December 27, 1836 (age 43 years, 54 days). Original interment at Peach Point Cemetery, Gulf Prairie, Tex.; reinterment in 1910 at Texas State Cemetery, Austin, Tex.
  Relatives: Son of Moses Austin (1761-1821) and Maria (Brown) Austin (1768-1824).
  Austin County, Tex. is named for him.
  The city of Austin, Texas, is named for him.  — Stephen F. Austin State University, Nacogdoches, Texas, is named for him.  — Austin College, Sherman, Texas, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Handbook of Texas Online
  Books about Stephen F. Austin: Gregg Cantrell, Stephen F. Austin : Empresario of Texas
  Waightstill Avery (1741-1821) — of Burke County, N.C. Born in Groton, New London County, Conn., May 10, 1741. Lawyer; colonel in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; member of North Carolina house of commons, 1776, 1782-83, 1793; North Carolina state attorney general, 1777-79; member of North Carolina state senate, 1796. Fought a pistol duel with Andrew Jackson in 1788; neither man was injured. Died in the judge's chambers at the Burke County Courthouse, Morganton, Burke County, N.C., March 13, 1821 (age 79 years, 307 days). Interment at Swan Ponds Plantation Cemetery, Morganton, N.C.
  Relatives: Son of Jerusha (Morgan) Avery (1704-1763) and Humphrey Avery; married, October 3, 1778, to Leah Probart Franks (1775-1832); father of Elizabeth Avery (who married William Ballard Lenoir); grandfather of Isaac Thomas Lenoir and William Waigstill Avery; granduncle of Lorenzo Burrows; first cousin four times removed of Horace Billings Packer; second cousin once removed of Noyes Barber; second cousin twice removed of Daniel Packer, Asa Packer, Edwin Barber Morgan, Christopher Morgan, Edwin Denison Morgan and Alfred Avery Burnham; second cousin thrice removed of Judson B. Phelps, Morgan Gardner Bulkeley, William Henry Bulkeley, Robert Asa Packer and William Frederick Morgan Rowland; second cousin four times removed of Henry Brewster Stanton, Jonathan R. Herrick, Erskine Mason Phelps and Spencer Gale Frink; second cousin five times removed of D-Cady Herrick, Herman Arod Gager, Walter Richmond Herrick and Burdette Burt Bliss; third cousin twice removed of Nathan Belcher, Samuel Townsend Douglass (1814-1898), Silas Hamilton Douglas and Joshua Perkins; third cousin thrice removed of Charles Phelps Huntington, George Mortimer Beakes, George Douglas Perkins, Chauncey C. Pendleton, Daniel Parrish Witter, Albert Lemando Bingham, Cornelia Cole Fairbanks, Llewellyn James Barden and Henry Woolsey Douglas.
  Political family: Kellogg-Adams-Seymour-Chapin family of Connecticut and New York (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Avery County, N.C. is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Augustus Octavius Bacon (1839-1914) — also known as Augustus O. Bacon — of Macon, Bibb County, Ga. Born in Bryan County, Ga., October 20, 1839. Democrat. Served in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; candidate for Presidential Elector for Georgia, 1868; member of Georgia state house of representatives, 1871-83, 1892-93; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Georgia, 1884; U.S. Senator from Georgia, 1895-1914; died in office 1914. Died in Washington, D.C., February 14, 1914 (age 74 years, 117 days). Interment at Rose Hill Cemetery, Macon, Ga.
  Relatives: Son of Rev. Augustus Octavius Bacon and Mary Louisa (Jones) Bacon; married, April 19, 1864, to Virginia Lamar.
  Bacon County, Ga. is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  Edward Dickinson Baker (1811-1861) — also known as Edward D. Baker — of Springfield, Sangamon County, Ill.; Galena, Jo Daviess County, Ill.; San Francisco, Calif.; Oregon City, Clackamas County, Ore. Born in London, England, February 24, 1811. Lawyer; member of Illinois state house of representatives, 1837-40; member of Illinois state senate, 1841-45; U.S. Representative from Illinois, 1845-46, 1849-51 (7th District 1845-46, 6th District 1849-51); resigned 1846; colonel in the U.S. Army during the Mexican War; U.S. Senator from Oregon, 1860-61; died in office 1861; general in the Union Army during the Civil War. Killed in battle at Balls Bluff, Loudoun County, Va., October 21, 1861 (age 50 years, 239 days). Interment at San Francisco National Cemetery, San Francisco, Calif.
  Relatives: Married, April 27, 1831, to Mary A. Lee.
  Baker County, Ore. is named for him.
  The city of Baker City, Oregon, is named for him.  — Fort Baker (previously, Lime Point Military Reservation; renamed Fort Baker in 1897; now part of Golden Gate National Recreation Area), in Marin County, California, is named for him.  — Baker Street, in San Francisco, California, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  James McNair Baker (1821-1892) — of Florida. Born in Robeson County, N.C., July 20, 1821. Candidate for U.S. Representative from Florida, 1856; state court judge in Florida, 1859-62, 1881-90; Senator from Florida in the Confederate Congress, 1862-65; justice of Florida state supreme court, 1865-68. Died in Jacksonville, Duval County, Fla., June 20, 1892 (age 70 years, 336 days). Interment at Evergreen Cemetery, Jacksonville, Fla.
  Baker County, Fla. is named for him.
  Abraham Baldwin (1754-1807) — of Augusta, Richmond County, Ga. Born in North Guilford, Guilford, New Haven County, Conn., November 22, 1754. Served in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; lawyer; member of Georgia state house of representatives, 1785; Delegate to Continental Congress from Georgia, 1785, 1787-89; member, U.S. Constitutional Convention, 1787; U.S. Representative from Georgia at-large, 1789-99; U.S. Senator from Georgia, 1799-1807; died in office 1807. Congregationalist. Member, Society of the Cincinnati. One of the founders, and first president, of Franklin College, which later became the University of Georgia. Died in Washington, D.C., March 4, 1807 (age 52 years, 102 days). Interment at Rock Creek Cemetery, Washington, D.C.; cenotaph at Greenfield Hill Cemetery, Fairfield, Conn.
  Relatives: Son of Michael Baldwin and Lucy (Dudley) Baldwin; half-brother of Henry Baldwin (1780-1844); brother of Ruth Baldwin (who married Joel Barlow).
  Political family: Baldwin family of Connecticut.
  Baldwin counties in Ala. and Ga. are named for him.
  The World War II Liberty ship SS Abraham Baldwin (built 1941 at New Orleans, Louisiana; scuttled 1976 as an artificial reef in the Gulf of Mexico) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Bland Ballard (1761-1853) — of Shelby County, Ky. Born in Fredericksburg, Va., October 16, 1761. Member of Kentucky state legislature, 1800-05; served in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812. Died September 5, 1853 (age 91 years, 324 days). Original interment somewhere in Shelbyville, Ky.; reinterment in 1854 at Frankfort Cemetery, Frankfort, Ky.
  Relatives: Grandfather of Bland Ballard (1819-1879).
  Ballard County, Ky. is named for him.
  The city (now inactive) of Blandville, Kentucky, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article
  James Barbour (1775-1842) — of Barboursville, Orange County, Va. Born near Gordonsville, Orange County, Va., June 10, 1775. Whig. Lawyer; member of Virginia state house of delegates, 1798-1812; Speaker of the Virginia State House of Delegates, 1809; Governor of Virginia, 1812-14; U.S. Senator from Virginia, 1815-25; U.S. Secretary of War, 1825-28; U.S. Minister to Great Britain, 1828-29; delegate to Whig National Convention from Virginia, 1839 (Convention President; speaker). Presbyterian. Member, Freemasons. Slaveowner. Died in Barboursville, Orange County, Va., June 7, 1842 (age 66 years, 362 days). Interment at Barboursville Vineyards and Winery, Barboursville, Va.
  Relatives: Son of Col. Thomas Barbour and Mary (Thomas) Barbour; brother of Philip Pendleton Barbour (1783-1841); married 1792 to Lucy Johnson; cousin *** of John Strode Barbour.
  Political family: Barbour family of Virginia.
  Barbour County, Ala. is named for him.
  The World War II Liberty ship SS James Barbour (built 1942-43 at Houston, Texas; scrapped 1970) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
Philip Pendleton Barbour Philip Pendleton Barbour (1783-1841) — of Luckettsville, Orange County, Va. Born near Gordonsville, Orange County, Va., May 25, 1783. Democrat. Lawyer; member of Virginia state house of delegates, 1812-14; U.S. Representative from Virginia, 1814-25, 1827-30 (10th District 1814-15, 11th District 1815-25, 1827-30); Speaker of the U.S. House, 1821-23; state court judge in Virginia, 1825-27; delegate to Virginia state constitutional convention, 1829-30; U.S. District Judge for the Eastern District of Virginia, 1830-36; candidate for Democratic nomination for Vice President, 1832; Associate Justice of U.S. Supreme Court, 1836-41; died in office 1841. Episcopalian. Slaveowner. Died in Washington, D.C., February 25, 1841 (age 57 years, 276 days). Interment at Congressional Cemetery, Washington, D.C.
  Relatives: Son of Col. Thomas Barbour and Mary (Thomas) Barbour; brother of James Barbour; married 1804 to Frances Johnson; cousin *** of John Strode Barbour (1790-1855).
  Political family: Barbour family of Virginia.
  Barbour County, W.Va. is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — federal judicial profile — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: The South in the Building of the Nation (1909)
  Alanson Hamilton Barnes (1817-1890) — also known as A. H. Barnes — Born in Turin, Lewis County, N.Y., April 15, 1817. Justice of Dakota territorial supreme court, 1873-81. Died May 10, 1890 (age 73 years, 25 days). Burial location unknown.
  Barnes County, N.Dak. is named for him.
  Henry D. Barron (1833-1882) — of Waukesha, Waukesha County, Wis.; St. Croix Falls, Polk County, Wis. Born January 1, 1833. Postmaster at Waukesha, Wis., 1853-55, 1856-57; circuit judge in Wisconsin, 1860, 1877-82 (8th Circuit 1860, 11th Circuit 1877-82); member of Wisconsin state assembly, 1863-64, 1866-69, 1872-73; Presidential Elector for Wisconsin, 1868, 1872; member of Wisconsin state senate, 1874-76. Died January 22, 1882 (age 49 years, 21 days). Interment at Prairie Home Cemetery, Waukesha, Wis.
  Barron County, Wis. is named for him.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  William Taylor Barry (1784-1835) — also known as William T. Barry — of Kentucky. Born near Lunenburg, Lunenburg County, Va., February 5, 1784. Democrat. Member of Kentucky state house of representatives, 1807, 1814; U.S. Representative from Kentucky 5th District, 1810-11; U.S. Senator from Kentucky, 1814-16; state court judge in Kentucky, 1816-17; member of Kentucky state senate, 1817-21; Lieutenant Governor of Kentucky, 1820-24; secretary of state of Kentucky, 1824-25; justice of Kentucky state supreme court, 1825; candidate for Governor of Kentucky, 1828; U.S. Postmaster General, 1829-35. Slaveowner. Appointed Minister to Spain, but died en route to post, in Liverpool, England, August 30, 1835 (age 51 years, 206 days). Original interment and cenotaph at St. James's Cemetery, Liverpool, England; reinterment in 1854 at Frankfort Cemetery, Frankfort, Ky.
  Relatives: Son of John Barry and Susannah (Dozier) Barry; married 1805 to Lucy Waller Overton; married 1812 to Catherine Armistead Mason (sister of Armistead Thomson Mason and John Thomson Mason (1787-1850)).
  Political family: Mason family of Virginia (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Barry counties in Mich. and Mo. are named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  David Barton (1783-1837) — also known as "Little Red" — of St. Louis, Mo. Born near Greeneville, Greene County, Tenn., December 14, 1783. Missouri territory attorney general, 1813; circuit judge in Missouri, 1815-17; member of Missouri territorial House of Representatives, 1818; delegate to Missouri state constitutional convention from St. Louis County, 1820; U.S. Senator from Missouri, 1821-31; member of Missouri state senate 7th District, 1834-35. Died in Boonville, Cooper County, Mo., September 28, 1837 (age 53 years, 288 days). Original interment at City Cemetery, Boonville, Mo.; reinterment in 1858 at Walnut Grove Cemetery, Boonville, Mo.
  Relatives: Son of Isaac Barton and Keziah (Murphy) Barton.
  Barton County, Mo. is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Francis Stebbins Bartow (1816-1861) — also known as Francis S. Bartow — of Georgia. Born in Savannah, Chatham County, Ga., September 6, 1816. Lawyer; candidate for U.S. Representative from Georgia 1st District, 1856; delegate to Georgia secession convention, 1861; Delegate from Georgia to the Confederate Provisional Congress, 1861; died in office 1861; colonel in the Confederate Army during the Civil War. Slaveowner. Killed by rifle shot, while rallying his men on the Henry House Hill, during the first battle of Manassas, Va., July 21, 1861 (age 44 years, 318 days). Interment at Laurel Grove North Cemetery, Savannah, Ga.
  Relatives: Son of Theodosius Bartow (1775-1856) and Frances Louisa (Stebbins) Bartow (1792-1873); married, April 18, 1844, to Louisa Green Berrien (1827-1913; daughter of John Macpherson Berrien); first cousin twice removed of Theodosia Bartow (1746-1794; who married Aaron Burr (1756-1836)).
  Political families: Kellogg-Adams-Seymour-Chapin family of Connecticut and New York; Sherman family of Connecticut; Tallmadge-Floyd family of New York; Burr-Alston-Wilson-Ballard family of Charleston, South Carolina; Edwards-Davenport-Thompson-Kittell family of Connecticut; Cornell-Schilplin-Washburn-Burr family of New York; Berrien-Burr-Bartow-Biddle family of Pennsylvania; Hamlin-Bemis family of Bangor, Maine (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Bartow County, Ga. is named for him.
  The city of Bartow, Florida, is named for him.  — The town of Bartow, Georgia, is named for him.  — The community of Bartow, West Virginia, is named for him.  — Bartow Elementary School (now Otis J. Brock Elementary School), in Savannah, Georgia, was formerly named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS Francis S. Bartow (built 1944 at Savannah, Georgia; scrapped 1971) was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Frederick Bates (1777-1825) — of Detroit, Wayne County, Mich.; St. Louis, Mo. Born in Belmont, Goochland County, Va., June 23, 1777. Lawyer; postmaster at Detroit, Mich., 1802-05; justice of Michigan territorial supreme court, 1805; secretary of Missouri Territory, 1806; delegate to Missouri state constitutional convention, 1820; Governor of Missouri, 1824-25; died in office 1825. Died in Chesterfield, St. Louis County, Mo., August 4, 1825 (age 48 years, 42 days). Interment at Thornhill Cemetery in Faust Park, Near St. Louis, St. Louis County, Mo.
  Relatives: Son of Thomas Fleming Bates (1742-1803) and Caroline Matilda (Woodson) Bates (born 1751); brother of James Woodson Bates and Edward Bates; married 1819 to Nancy Opie Ball; third cousin once removed of Samuel Hughes Woodson, Silas Woodson (1819-1896), Daniel Woodson and John Archibald Woodson; third cousin twice removed of Urey Woodson.
  Political family: Woodson family of Jessamine County, Kentucky.
  Bates County, Mo. is named for him.
  See also National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — Michigan Supreme Court Historical Society
  Elisha Baxter (1827-1899) — of Batesville, Independence County, Ark. Born in Rutherford County, N.C., September 1, 1827. Republican. Mayor of Batesville, Ark., 1853; member of Arkansas state legislature, 1854; colonel in the Union Army during the Civil War; justice of Arkansas state supreme court, 1864; district judge in Arkansas 3rd District, 1868-73; delegate to Republican National Convention from Arkansas, 1872; Governor of Arkansas, 1873-74. Died in Batesville, Independence County, Ark., May 31, 1899 (age 71 years, 272 days). Interment at Oaklawn Cemetery, Batesville, Ark.
  Cross-reference: Enoch H. Vance
  Baxter County, Ark. is named for him.
  See also National Governors Association biography — Find-A-Grave memorial
  William Henry Harrison Beadle (1838-1915) — also known as William H. H. Beadle — of Madison, Lake County, S.Dak. Born, in a log cabin at Howard, Parke County, Ind., January 1, 1838. Republican. Colonel in the Union Army during the Civil War; lawyer; member of Republican National Committee from Dakota Territory, 1872-; member of Dakota territorial House of Representatives, 1877-79; Dakota Territory superintendent of public instruction, 1879-86; president, Madison State Normal School (now Dakota State University), 1889-1906. Member, Freemasons. Died in San Francisco, Calif., November 15, 1915 (age 77 years, 318 days). Interment at Riverside Cemetery, Albion, Mich.
  Presumably named for: William Henry Harrison
  Relatives: Son of James Ward Beadle and Elizabeth (Bright) Beadle; married, May 18, 1863, to Ellen S. (Rich) Chapman.
  Beadle County, S.Dak. is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article
  George Loomis Becker (1829-1904) — also known as George L. Becker — of St. Paul, Ramsey County, Minn. Born in Locke, Cayuga County, N.Y., February 4, 1829. Democrat. Lawyer; mayor of St. Paul, Minn., 1856-57; delegate to Minnesota state constitutional convention 2nd District, 1857; candidate for Governor of Minnesota, 1859, 1894; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Minnesota, 1860; member of Minnesota state senate 1st District, 1868-71; member of Minnesota railroad and warehouse commission, 1885; appointed 1885. Dutch ancestry. Died in St. Paul, Ramsey County, Minn., January 6, 1904 (age 74 years, 336 days). Interment at Oakland Cemetery, St. Paul, Minn.
  Becker County, Minn. is named for him.
  See also Minnesota Legislator record
  John Crepps Wickliffe Beckham (1869-1940) — also known as J. C. W. Beckham — of Frankfort, Franklin County, Ky.; Louisville, Jefferson County, Ky. Born in Bardstown, Nelson County, Ky., August 5, 1869. Democrat. School principal; lawyer; member of Kentucky state house of representatives, 1894-98; Speaker of the Kentucky State House of Representatives, 1898; Lieutenant Governor of Kentucky, 1900; Governor of Kentucky, 1900-07; defeated, 1927; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Kentucky, 1900, 1904 (member, Platform and Resolutions Committee), 1908, 1912 (member, Platform and Resolutions Committee), 1916, 1920, 1936; U.S. Senator from Kentucky, 1915-21; defeated, 1920, 1936. Presbyterian. Died in Louisville, Jefferson County, Ky., January 9, 1940 (age 70 years, 157 days). Interment at Frankfort Cemetery, Frankfort, Ky.
  Relatives: Son of William Netherton Beckham (1833-1882) and Julia Tevis (Wickliffe) Beckham (1835-1913); married, November 21, 1900, to Jean Raphael Fuqua (1879-1962); nephew of Robert Charles Wickliffe (1819-1895) and John Crepps Wickliffe (1830-1913); grandson of Charles Anderson Wickliffe; first cousin of Robert Charles Wickliffe (1874-1912); second cousin once removed of Robert Wickliffe Woolley.
  Political family: Wickliffe-Holt family of Bardstown, Kentucky.
  Beckham County, Okla. is named for him.
  The World War II Liberty ship SS J. C. W. Beckham (built 1943 at New Orleans, Louisiana; scrapped 1968) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Barnard Elliott Bee (1787-1853) — also known as Barnard E. Bee — of Texas. Born in Charleston, Charleston District (now Charleston County), S.C., 1787. Served in the Texas Army during the Texas War of Independence; Texas Republic Secretary of the Treasury, 1836; Texas Republic Secretary of War, 1837-38; Texas Republic Secretary of State, 1838-39; Texas Republic Minister to the United States, 1838-41. Died in 1853 (age about 66 years). Interment at St. Paul's Episcopal Churchyard, Pendleton, S.C.
  Relatives: Son of Thomas Bee; brother-in-law of James Hamilton Jr.; father of Bernard Elliott Bee (Confederate general; gave Thomas J. 'Stonewall' Jackson his nickname) and Hamilton Prioleau Bee; grandfather of Carlos Bee (1867-1932).
  Political family: Bee family of Charleston, South Carolina.
  Bee County, Tex. is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article
  Joshua Fry Bell (1811-1870) — also known as Joshua F. Bell — of Danville, Boyle County, Ky. Born in Danville, Boyle County, Ky., November 26, 1811. U.S. Representative from Kentucky 4th District, 1845-47; member of Kentucky state house of representatives, 1862-67. Slaveowner. Died in Danville, Boyle County, Ky., August 17, 1870 (age 58 years, 264 days). Interment at Bellevue Cemetery, Danville, Ky.
  Bell County, Ky. is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Peter Hansborough Bell (1812-1898) — also known as Peter H. Bell — of Austin, Travis County, Tex. Born in Spotsylvania County, Va., May 12, 1812. Democrat. Served in the Texas Army during the Texas War of Independence; colonel in the U.S. Army during the Mexican War; Governor of Texas, 1849-53; U.S. Representative from Texas 2nd District, 1853-57; colonel in the Confederate Army during the Civil War. Slaveowner. Died in Littleton, Halifax County, N.C., March 8, 1898 (age 85 years, 300 days). Original interment at City Cemetery, Littleton, N.C.; reinterment in 1930 at Texas State Cemetery, Austin, Tex.; memorial monument at Courthouse Grounds, Belton, Tex.
  Bell County, Tex. is named for him.
  The city of Belton, Texas, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — National Governors Association biography
  Granville Gaylord Bennett (1833-1910) — also known as G. G. Bennett — of Deadwood, Lawrence County, S.Dak. Born near Bloomingburg, Fayette County, Ohio, October 9, 1833. Republican. Lawyer; served in the Union Army during the Civil War; member of Iowa state house of representatives, 1865-67; member of Iowa state senate, 1867-71; justice of Dakota territorial supreme court, 1875-78; Delegate to U.S. Congress from Dakota Territory, 1879-81; delegate to Republican National Convention from South Dakota, 1900. Died in Hot Springs, Fall River County, S.Dak., June 28, 1910 (age 76 years, 262 days). Interment at Mt. Moriah Cemetery, Deadwood, S.Dak.
  Bennett County, S.Dak. may have been named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
  John Emory Bennett (1833-1893) — also known as John E. Bennett — of Morrison, Whiteside County, Ill.; Helena (now part of Helena-West Helena), Phillips County, Ark.; Clark, Clark County, S.Dak. Born in East Bethany, Genesee County, N.Y., March 18, 1833. Republican. General in the Union Army during the Civil War; circuit judge in Arkansas, 1868; justice of Arkansas state supreme court, 1871-74; judge of South Dakota state supreme court 3rd District, 1889-93; died in office 1893. Died in Pierre, Hughes County, S.Dak., December 31, 1893 (age 60 years, 288 days). Interment at Rose Hill Cemetery, Near Clark, Clark County, S.Dak.
  Bennett County, S.Dak. may have been named for him.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  B. W. Benson — of Valley City, Barnes County, Dakota Territory (now N.Dak.). Member of Dakota territorial House of Representatives, 1883-84. Burial location unknown.
  Benson County, N.Dak. is named for him.
Thomas Hart Benton Thomas Hart Benton (1782-1858) — also known as "Old Bullion" — of Franklin, Williamson County, Tenn.; St. Louis, Mo. Born near Hillsborough, Orange County, N.C., March 14, 1782. Lawyer; newspaper editor; member of Tennessee state senate, 1809; U.S. Senator from Missouri, 1821-51; U.S. Representative from Missouri 1st District, 1853-55; Benton Democrat candidate for Governor of Missouri, 1856. Fought a duel with Andrew Jackson, who later became a political ally. In April, 1850, he caused a scandal with his attempt to assault Sen. Henry Stuart Foote, of Mississippi, during debate on the Senate floor; he was restrained by other senators. Foote had a cocked pistol in his hand and undoubtedly would have shot him. Slaveowner. Died in Washington, D.C., April 10, 1858 (age 76 years, 27 days). Interment at Bellefontaine Cemetery, St. Louis, Mo.
  Relatives: Son of Jesse Benton and Ann (Gooch) Benton; married 1821 to Elizabeth McDowell (1794-1854; sister of James McDowell); father of Jessie Benton (who married John Charles Frémont); uncle of Thomas Hart Benton Jr. (1816-1879); granduncle of Maecenas Eason Benton.
  Political family: Benton family (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Benton counties in Ark., Ind., Iowa, Minn., Ore. and Wash. are named for him.
  Coins and currency: His portrait appeared on the U.S. $100 gold certificate in the 1880s to 1920s.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Image source: The South in the Building of the Nation (1909)
  John Macpherson Berrien (1781-1856) — also known as John M. Berrien — of Savannah, Chatham County, Ga. Born in Rocky Hill, Somerset County, N.J., August 23, 1781. Democrat. Lawyer; state court judge in Georgia, 1810; member of Georgia state senate, 1822-23; U.S. Senator from Georgia, 1825-29, 1841-45, 1845-52; U.S. Attorney General, 1829-31. Slaveowner. Died in Savannah, Chatham County, Ga., January 1, 1856 (age 74 years, 131 days). Interment at Laurel Grove North Cemetery, Savannah, Ga.
  Relatives: Son of John Berrien (1760-1815) and Margaret (MacPherson) Berrien (1763-1785); married, December 1, 1803, to Elisa Lydia Anciaux (1786-1828); married, July 8, 1833, to Elizabeth Cecil Hunter (1810-1852); father of Louisa Green Berrien (1827-1913; who married Francis Stebbins Bartow (1816-1861)); first cousin twice removed of Edward MacFunn Biddle Jr..
  Political families: Berrien-Burr-Bartow-Biddle family of Pennsylvania; Kellogg-Adams-Seymour-Chapin family of Connecticut and New York (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Berrien counties in Ga. and Mich. are named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  William Wyatt Bibb (1781-1820) — also known as William W. Bibb — of Petersburg, Elbert County, Ga. Born in Amelia County, Va., October 2, 1781. Democrat. Physician; member of Georgia state house of representatives, 1803-05; U.S. Representative from Georgia, 1807-13 (4th District 1807, at-large 1807-09, 1st District 1809-11, at-large 1811-13); U.S. Senator from Georgia, 1813-16; Governor of Alabama Territory, 1817-19; Governor of Alabama, 1819-20; died in office 1820. Fell from his horse during a thunderstorm, sustained internal injuries, and died in Autauga County (part now in Elmore County), Ala., July 10, 1820 (age 38 years, 282 days). Interment a private or family graveyard, Elmore County, Ala.
  Relatives: Son of William Bibb (1735-1796) and Sally (Wyatt) Bibb (1759-1826; who later married William Barnett); brother of Thomas Bibb (1782-1839); married 1803 to Mary Ann Freeman (1788-1856); granduncle of Albert Taylor Goodwyn; cousin *** of David Bibb Graves.
  Political family: Bibb-Graves family of Alabama.
  Cross-reference: Willis Roberts
  Bibb counties in Ala. and Ga. are named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Frederick H. Billings (1823-1890) — Born in Royalton, Windsor County, Vt., September 27, 1823. Republican. Vermont secretary of civil and military affairs, 1846-48; lawyer; went to California for the 1849 Gold Rush; president, Northern Pacific Railway, 1879-81; delegate to Republican National Convention from Vermont, 1880. Died in Woodstock, Windsor County, Vt., September 30, 1890 (age 67 years, 3 days). Interment at River Street Cemetery, Woodstock, Vt.
  Relatives: Son of Oel Billings (1788-1871) and Sophie (Wetherbe) Billings (1796-1870); married to Julia Parmly (1835-1914); uncle of Franklin Swift Billings (1862-1935); granduncle of Franklin Swift Billings Jr..
  Political family: Billings family of Woodstock, Vermont.
  Billings County, N.Dak. is named for him.
  The city of Billings, Montana, is named for him.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Henry Harrison Bingham (1841-1912) — also known as Henry H. Bingham — of Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa. Born in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., December 4, 1841. Republican. Colonel in the Union Army during the Civil War; postmaster at Philadelphia, Pa., 1867-72; delegate to Republican National Convention from Pennsylvania, 1872, 1876, 1884, 1888, 1892, 1896 (alternate; chair, Committee on Rules and Order of Business; speaker), 1900, 1904; U.S. Representative from Pennsylvania 1st District, 1879-1912; died in office 1912. Member, Phi Kappa Psi. Received the Medal of Honor in 1893 for action at Wilderness, Va., May 6, 1864. Died in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., March 22, 1912 (age 70 years, 109 days). Interment at Laurel Hill Cemetery, Philadelphia, Pa.
  Bingham County, Idaho is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Isaac Newton Blackford (1786-1859) — of Indiana. Born in Bound Brook, Somerset County, N.J., November 6, 1786. Territorial court judge in Indiana, 1814-15; member of Indiana state house of representatives, 1816-17; justice of Indiana state supreme court, 1817-53; candidate for Presidential Elector for Indiana, 1824; candidate for Governor of Indiana, 1825; Judge of U.S. Court of Claims, 1855-59. Died in Washington, D.C., December 31, 1859 (age 73 years, 55 days). Interment at Crown Hill Cemetery, Indianapolis, Ind.
  Presumably named for: Isaac Newton
  Blackford County, Ind. is named for him.
James G. Blaine James Gillespie Blaine (1830-1893) — also known as James G. Blaine; "The Plumed Knight"; "Belshazzar Blaine"; "Magnetic Man" — of Augusta, Kennebec County, Maine. Born in West Brownsville, Washington County, Pa., January 31, 1830. Republican. Delegate to Republican National Convention from Maine, 1856 (Honorary Secretary); member of Maine state house of representatives, 1859-62; Speaker of the Maine State House of Representatives, 1861-62; U.S. Representative from Maine 3rd District, 1863-76; Speaker of the U.S. House, 1869-75; candidate for Republican nomination for President, 1876, 1880; U.S. Senator from Maine, 1876-81; U.S. Secretary of State, 1881, 1889-92; candidate for President of the United States, 1884. Congregationalist. Scotch-Irish ancestry. Died in Washington, D.C., January 27, 1893 (age 62 years, 362 days). Original interment at Oak Hill Cemetery, Washington, D.C.; reinterment in 1920 at Blaine Memorial Park, Augusta, Maine.
  Relatives: Son of Ephraim Lyon Blaine (1796-1850) and Maria Louise (Gillespie) Blaine (1801-1871); married, June 30, 1850, to Harriet Stanwood (1827-1903); father of Harriet Blaine (1871-1958; who married Truxtun Beale); nephew of Ellen Blaine (who married John Hoge Ewing (1796-1887)); grandfather of James Gillespie Blaine III.
  Political family: Dewey-Blaine-Coit-Huntington family of Connecticut (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Cross-reference: Robert G. Ingersoll
  Blaine counties in Idaho, Mont., Neb. and Okla. are named for him.
  Mount Blaine, in Park County, Colorado, is named for him.  — The city of Blaine, Washington, is named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS James G. Blaine (built 1942 at South Portland, Maine; scrapped 1969) was named for him.
  Politician named for him: J. B. McLaughlin
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about James G. Blaine: Mark Wahlgren Summers, Rum, Romanism, & Rebellion : The Making of a President, 1884 — Edward P. Crapol, James G. Blaine : Architect of Empire — Richard B. Cheney & Lynne V. Cheney, Kings Of The Hill : How Nine Powerful Men Changed The Course of American History
  Image source: William C. Roberts, Leading Orators (1884)
  John Blair (born c.1786) — of Pennsylvania. Born about 1786. Member of Pennsylvania state legislature, 1820. Burial location unknown.
  Blair County, Pa. is named for him.
  Richard Bland (1710-1776) — of Virginia. Born in Orange County, Va., May 6, 1710. Delegate to Continental Congress from Virginia, 1774. Died in Williamsburg, Va., October 26, 1776 (age 66 years, 173 days). Interment in private or family graveyard.
  Relatives: Son of Richard Bland (1665-1720) and Elizabeth (Randolph) Bland (1680-1720); married to Martha Macon; nephew of Richard Randolph; uncle of Theodorick Bland (1742-1790); granduncle of Henry Lee, Charles Lee, Richard Bland Lee, Edmund Jennings Lee, John Randolph of Roanoke and Henry St. George Tucker; great-granduncle of Nathaniel Beverly Tucker; second great-granduncle of Fitzhugh Lee and William Henry Fitzhugh Lee; fourth great-granduncle of William Welby Beverley (1889-1969); first cousin of Peyton Randolph (1721-1775); first cousin once removed of Thomas Jefferson, Edmund Jenings Randolph and Beverley Randolph; first cousin twice removed of John Marshall, James Markham Marshall, Thomas Mann Randolph Jr., Alexander Keith Marshall, Martha Jefferson Randolph, Dabney Carr, Theodorick Bland (1776-1846) and Peyton Randolph (1779-1828); first cousin thrice removed of Thomas Marshall, James Keith Marshall, Francis Wayles Eppes, Dabney Smith Carr, Benjamin Franklin Randolph, Meriwether Lewis Randolph, George Wythe Randolph, Edmund Randolph and Carter Henry Harrison; first cousin four times removed of Thomas Jefferson Coolidge, John Augustine Marshall, Carter Henry Harrison II and Frederick Madison Roberts; first cousin five times removed of John Gardner Coolidge, Edith Wilson, William Marshall Bullitt, Alexander Scott Bullitt and Francis Beverley Biddle; second cousin twice removed of John Wayles Eppes; second cousin four times removed of William Henry Robertson.
  Political families: Pendleton-Lee family of Maryland; Lee-Randolph family; Harrison-Randolph-Marshall-Cabell family of Virginia; Blackburn-Slaughter-Buckner-Madison family of Kentucky (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Bland County, Va. is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Logan Edwin Bleckley (1827-1907) — also known as Logan E. Bleckley — of Clarkesville, Habersham County, Ga. Born in Rabun County, Ga., July 3, 1827. Lawyer; served in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; justice of Georgia state supreme court, 1875-80; chief justice of Georgia Supreme Court, 1887-94. Methodist. Died in Clarkesville, Habersham County, Ga., March 6, 1907 (age 79 years, 246 days). Interment at Oakland Cemetery, Atlanta, Ga.
  Relatives: Son of James Bleckley and Catharine Bleckley; married 1857 to Clara Caroline Haralson; married 1893 to Chloe Herring.
  Bleckley County, Ga. is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article
  William Blount (1749-1800) — Born in Windsor, Bertie County, N.C., April 6, 1749. Served in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; member of North Carolina house of commons, 1781, 1783; Delegate to Continental Congress from North Carolina, 1782-83, 1786-87; member, U.S. Constitutional Convention, 1787; member of North Carolina state senate, 1788; Governor of Southwest Territory, 1790-96; delegate to Tennessee state constitutional convention, 1796; U.S. Senator from Tennessee, 1796-97; member of Tennessee state senate, 1798-1800; died in office 1800; Speaker of the Tennessee State Senate, 1798-99. Presbyterian. Became involved in a conspiracy to turn Florida over to British control; when this plot was uncovered in 1797, was expelled from the U.S. Senate; afterwards, on July 7, 1797, he was impeached, but the Senate dropped the matter for lack of jurisdiction. Slaveowner. Died in Knoxville, Knox County, Tenn., March 21, 1800 (age 50 years, 349 days). Interment at First Presbyterian Church Cemetery, Knoxville, Tenn.
  Relatives: Son of Barbara (Gray) Blount and Jacob Blount (1726-1789); half-brother of William Blount; brother of Thomas Blount (1759-1812); married, February 12, 1778, to Mary Moseley Grainger (1761-1802); father of William Grainger Blount.
  Political family: Blount family of North Carolina.
  Blount County, Tenn. is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  William Blount (1768-1835) — also known as Willie Blount — of Tennessee. Born in Bertie County, N.C., April 18, 1768. Superior court judge in Tennessee, 1796; member of Tennessee state house of representatives, 1807-09; Governor of Tennessee, 1809-15; defeated, 1827; delegate to Tennessee state constitutional convention, 1834. Died near Nashville, Davidson County, Tenn., September 10, 1835 (age 67 years, 145 days). Original interment at a private or family graveyard, Montgomery County, Tenn.; reinterment at Greenwood Cemetery, Clarksville, Tenn.
  Relatives: Son of Jacob Blount and Hannah (Baker) Blount; half-brother of William Blount (1749-1800); married 1809 to Lucinda Baker; second great-grandfather of Harry Hill McAlister.
  Political family: Blount family of North Carolina.
  Blount County, Ala. is named for him.
  See also National Governors Association biography
Shadrach Bond Shadrach Bond (1773-1832) — also known as Shadrack Bond — of Indiana; Illinois. Born in Frederick, Frederick County, Md., November 24, 1773. Member Indiana territorial council, 1805-08; Delegate to U.S. Congress from Illinois Territory, 1812-13; Governor of Illinois, 1818-22; candidate for U.S. Representative from Illinois, 1824. Slaveowner. Died in Kaskaskia, Randolph County, Ill., April 12, 1832 (age 58 years, 140 days). Original interment somewhere in Kaskaskia, Ill.; reinterment at Evergreen Cemetery, Chester, Ill.
  Bond County, Ill. is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — National Governors Association biography
  Image source: Collections of the Illinois State Historical Library (1909)
  Daniel Boone (1734-1820) — Born in Berks County, Pa., November 2, 1734. Explorer and frontiersman; member of Virginia state house of delegates, 1781, 1787. English and Welsh ancestry. Died in St. Charles County, Mo., September 26, 1820 (age 85 years, 329 days). Original interment at a private or family graveyard, St. Charles County, Mo.; reinterment at Frankfort Cemetery, Frankfort, Ky.
  Relatives: Married to Rebecca Ann Bryan (1739-1813); father of Jessie Bryan Boone and Nathan Boone; grandfather of Harriett Morgan Boone (1794-1861; who married Hiram Howell Baber); granduncle of Levi Day Boone (1808-1882); second great-grandfather of Elmer Charless Henderson.
  Political families: Thomas-Smith-Irwin family of Pennsylvania; Boone family of St. Charles County, Missouri (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Boone counties in Ark., Ill., Ind., Ky., Mo., Neb. and W.Va. are named for him.
  The Daniel Boone National Forest (established 1937 as Cumberland National Forest; renamed 1966), in Bath, Clay, Estill, Harlan, Jackson, Knox, Laurel, Lee, Leslie, McCreary, Menifee, Morgan, Owsley, Perry, Powell, Pulaski, Rockcastle, Rowan, Wayne, Whitley, and Wolfe counties, Kentucky, is named for him.  — Boone Dam (built 1950-52), on the South Fork Holston River, in Sullivan and Washington counties, Tennessee, and the Boone Lake reservoir behind the dam, are named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Nathan Boone (1781-1857) — of St. Charles County, Mo. Born in Fayette County, Ky., March 2, 1781. Served in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812; delegate to Missouri state constitutional convention from St. Charles County, 1820; served in the U.S. Army during the Black Hawk War. Died in 1857 (age about 76 years). Interment a private or family graveyard, Greene County, Mo.
  Relatives: Son of Daniel Boone and Rebecca Ann (Bryan) Boone (1739-1813); brother of Jessie Bryan Boone; great-granduncle of Elmer Charless Henderson (1873-1956).
  Political family: Boone family of St. Charles County, Missouri (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Boone County, Iowa is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Gail Borden Jr. (1801-1874) — Born in Norwich, Chenango County, N.Y., November 9, 1801. School teacher; surveyor; delegate to Texas Convention of 1833 from District of Austin, 1833; newspaper publisher; Collector of Customs at Galveston for the Texas Republic, 1837-38 and 1841-43; in 1849, he invented a dehydrated beef product called a "meat biscuit", but it failed commercially; in 1853, he invented a process to make sweetened condensed milk, which could be transported without refrigeration, and developed sanitation practices to to prevent contamination. Died in Borden, Colorado County, Tex., January 11, 1874 (age 72 years, 63 days). Interment at Woodlawn Cemetery, Bronx, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Gail Borden (1777-1863) and Philadelphia (Wheeler) Borden (1780-1828).
  Borden County, Tex. is named for him.
  The community of Borden, Texas, is named for him.  — The community of Gail, Texas, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article
  Pierre Evariste Jean Baptiste Bossier (1797-1844) — also known as Pierre E. J. B. Bossier — of Louisiana. Born in Natchitoches, Natchitoches Parish, La., March 22, 1797. Planter; member of Louisiana state senate, 1833-43; U.S. Representative from Louisiana 4th District, 1843-44; died in office 1844. Slaveowner. Died in Washington, D.C., April 24, 1844 (age 47 years, 33 days). Original interment and cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery, Washington, D.C.; reinterment at Catholic Cemetery, Natchitoches, La.
  Presumably named for: John the Baptist
  Bossier Parish, La. is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  E. M. Bowman — Member of Dakota territorial House of Representatives, 1883-84. Burial location unknown.
  Bowman County, N.Dak. is named for him.
  James E. Boyd (1834-1906) — of Omaha, Douglas County, Neb. Born in County Tyrone, Ireland (now Northern Ireland), September 9, 1834. Democrat. Grain commission merchant; member of Nebraska state house of representatives, 1866; delegate to Nebraska state constitutional convention, 1871; delegate to Nebraska state constitutional convention, 1875; mayor of Omaha, Neb., 1881-83, 1885-87; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Nebraska, 1888, 1892; member of Democratic National Committee from Nebraska, 1888; Governor of Nebraska, 1891, 1892-93. Died April 30, 1906 (age 71 years, 233 days). Interment at Forest Lawn Memorial Park, Omaha, Neb.
  Boyd County, Neb. is named for him.
  See also National Governors Association biography
  Linn Boyd (1800-1859) — of Cadiz, Trigg County, Ky.; Paducah, McCracken County, Ky. Born in Nashville, Davidson County, Tenn., November 22, 1800. Democrat. Member of Kentucky state house of representatives, 1827-32; U.S. Representative from Kentucky 1st District, 1835-37, 1839-55; Speaker of the U.S. House, 1851-55; Lieutenant Governor of Kentucky, 1859; died in office 1859. Slaveowner. Died in Paducah, McCracken County, Ky., December 17, 1859 (age 59 years, 25 days). Interment at Oak Grove Cemetery, Paducah, Ky.
  Relatives: Son of Abraham Boyd; married 1832 to Alice Bennett; married 1850 to Anna L. Dixon.
  Boyd County, Ky. is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  John Boyle (1774-1834) — of Lancaster, Garrard County, Ky. Born in Botetourt County, Va., October 28, 1774. Democrat. Lawyer; member of Kentucky state house of representatives, 1800; U.S. Representative from Kentucky 2nd District, 1803-09; Judge, Kentucky Court of Appeals, 1809-26; U.S. District Judge for Kentucky, 1827-34; died in office 1834. Slaveowner. Died near Danville, Boyle County, Ky., January 28, 1834 (age 59 years, 92 days). Interment at Bellevue Cemetery, Danville, Ky.
  Boyle County, Ky. is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — federal judicial profile
  William Bradford (1755-1795) — of Pennsylvania. Born in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., September 14, 1755. Colonel in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; lawyer; Pennsylvania state attorney general, 1780-91; justice of Pennsylvania state supreme court, 1791-94; U.S. Attorney General, 1794-95; died in office 1795. Presbyterian. Died August 23, 1795 (age 39 years, 343 days). Interment at St. Mary's Churchyard, Burlington, N.J.
  Relatives: Son of William Bradford and Rachel (Budd) Bradford; married to Susan Vergereau Boudinot (1764-1854; daughter of Elias Boudinot; niece of Richard Stockton (1730-1781)).
  Political family: Stockton family of Princeton, New Jersey (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Bradford County, Pa. is named for him.
  The city of Bradford, Pennsylvania, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  John Branch Jr. (1782-1863) — of Enfield, Halifax County, N.C. Born in Halifax, Halifax County, N.C., November 4, 1782. Democrat. Lawyer; member of North Carolina state senate, 1811, 1813-17, 1834; Governor of North Carolina, 1817-20; federal judge, 1822; U.S. Senator from North Carolina, 1823-29; U.S. Secretary of the Navy, 1829-31; U.S. Representative from North Carolina 5th District, 1831-33; delegate to North Carolina state constitutional convention, 1835; Governor of Florida Territory, 1844-45. Episcopalian. Slaveowner. Died of pneumonia, in Enfield, Halifax County, N.C., January 4, 1863 (age 80 years, 61 days). Interment at Elmwood Cemetery, Enfield, N.C.
  Relatives: Son of Col. John Branch and Mary (Bradford) Branch; married to Elizabeth Fort and Eliza Jordan; uncle of Lawrence O'Bryan Branch; granduncle of William Augustus Blount Branch (1847-1910).
  Political family: Branch family of Enfield, North Carolina.
  Branch County, Mich. is named for him.
  The World War II Liberty ship SS John Branch (built 1943 at Wilmington, North Carolina; sold 1947, scrapped 1962) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Carter Braxton (1736-1797) — of Virginia. Born in King and Queen County, Va., September 16, 1736. Member of Virginia House of Burgesses, 1761-75; Delegate to Continental Congress from Virginia, 1775-76; signer, Declaration of Independence, 1776. Died in Richmond, Va., October 10, 1797 (age 61 years, 24 days). Interment a private or family graveyard, King William County, Va.; memorial monument at Constitution Gardens, Washington, D.C.
  Relatives: Son of George Braxton and Mary (Carter) Braxton; married 1755 to Judith Robinson; married 1761 to Elizabeth Corbin; grandfather-in-law of William Brockenbrough; grandfather of Mary Page White (who married Andrew Stevenson); great-grandfather of John White Brockenbrough, John White Stevenson and Elliott Muse Braxton; ancestor *** of William Tyler Page (born1868).
  Political families: Tyler family of Virginia; Brockenbrough-Stevenson-Braxton-Tyler family of Virginia (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Braxton County, W.Va. is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  John Breathitt (1786-1834) — of Kentucky. Born in Loudoun County, Va., September 9, 1786. Member of Kentucky state house of representatives, 1811; Lieutenant Governor of Kentucky, 1828-32; Governor of Kentucky, 1832-34; died in office 1834. Presbyterian. Died of tuberculosis in Frankfort, Franklin County, Ky., February 21, 1834 (age 47 years, 165 days). Original interment at Breathitt Cemetery, Near Russellville, Logan County, Ky.; reinterment at Maple Grove Cemetery, Russellville, Ky.
  Relatives: Son of William Breathitt (1757-1817) and Elizabeth Dawson (Whitsett) Breathitt (1765-1834); married, March 26, 1812, to Caroline Matilda Whitaker (1795-1821); uncle of Lavinia Sappington (1807-1885; who married Meredith Miles Marmaduke) and Jane Breathitt Sappington (1813-1831; who married Claiborne Fox Jackson); granduncle of John Sappington Marmaduke and James Breathitt (1852-1934); great-granduncle of Erasmus L. Pearson and James Breathitt Jr.; second great-granduncle of Edward Thompson Breathitt Jr.; first cousin once removed of Isaac Breathed Snodgrass.
  Political families: Jackson-Lee family; Henshaw-Breathitt-Snodgrass-Sappington family of West Virginia (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Breathitt County, Ky. is named for him.
  See also National Governors Association biography
  John Breckinridge (1760-1806) — of Kentucky. Born near Staunton, Augusta County, Va., December 2, 1760. Democrat. Served in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; lawyer; U.S. Attorney for Kentucky, 1793-94; Kentucky state attorney general, 1793-97; member of Kentucky state house of representatives, 1798-1801; Speaker of the Kentucky State House of Representatives, 1799-1801; delegate to Kentucky state constitutional convention, 1799; U.S. Senator from Kentucky, 1801-05; U.S. Attorney General, 1805-06; died in office 1806. Presbyterian. Slaveowner. Died, from a stomach infection, in near Lexington, Fayette County, Ky., December 14, 1806 (age 46 years, 12 days). Original interment at a private or family graveyard, Fayette County, Ky.; reinterment at Lexington Cemetery, Lexington, Ky.
  Relatives: Son of Robert Breckenridge (1712-1772) and Letitia 'Lettice' (Preston) Breckenridge (1729-1798); half-brother of Robert Breckinridge; brother of James Breckinridge; married, June 28, 1785, to Mary Hopkins Cabell (1769-1858); father of Letitia Preston Breckinridge (1786-1831; who married Peter Buell Porter and Alfred William Grayson), Joseph Cabell Breckinridge and Robert Jefferson Breckinridge (1800-1871); nephew of William Preston; uncle of James Douglas Breckinridge; grandfather of John Cabell Breckinridge (who married Mary Cyrene Burch), Mary Cabell Breckinridge (1826-1854; who married Peter Augustus Porter (1827-1864)), Robert Jefferson Breckinridge Jr. and William Campbell Preston Breckinridge; great-grandfather of Clifton Rodes Breckinridge, Peter Augustus Porter (1853-1925), Levin Irving Handy, Desha Breckinridge and Henry Skillman Breckinridge; second great-grandfather of John Bayne Breckinridge; cousin *** of John Brown and James Brown; first cousin of Francis Smith Preston and James Patton Preston; first cousin once removed of William Campbell Preston, James McDowell, John Buchanan Floyd, John Smith Preston and George Rogers Clark Floyd.
  Political families: Harrison-Randolph-Marshall-Cabell family of Virginia; Breckinridge-Preston-Cabell family of Virginia; Kellogg-Adams-Seymour-Chapin family of Connecticut and New York; Monroe-Grayson-Roosevelt-Breckinridge family of Virginia and Kentucky (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Breckinridge County, Ky. is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Henry Percy Brewster (1816-1884) — of Texas. Born in Laurens District (now Laurens County), S.C., November 22, 1816. Served in the Texas Army during the Texas War of Independence; Texas Republic Secretary of War, 1836; Texas state attorney general, 1849-50; colonel in the Confederate Army during the Civil War. Died November 27, 1884 (age 68 years, 5 days). Buried at sea in Gulf of Mexico.
  Brewster County, Tex. is named for him.
  Andrew Briscoe (1810-1849) — of Texas. Born in Claiborne County, Miss., November 25, 1810. Served in the Texas Army during the Texas War of Independence; delegate to Texas Republic Republic constitutional convention from District of Harrisburg, 1836; signer, Texas Declaration of Independence, 1836. Died October 4, 1849 (age 38 years, 313 days). Interment at Texas State Cemetery, Austin, Tex.
  Briscoe County, Tex. is named for him.
  Robert Brooke (c.1760-1800) — of Spotsylvania County, Va. Born in Spotsylvania County, Va., about 1760. Lawyer; member of Virginia state house of delegates, 1791-94; Governor of Virginia, 1794-96; Virginia state attorney general, 1796-1800; died in office 1800. Member, Freemasons. Died in Virginia, February 27, 1800 (age about 40 years). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Anne Hay (Taliaferro) Brooke (1731-1782) and Richard Brooke (1732-1792); married 1786 to Mary Ritchie Hopper; first cousin once removed of Francis Taliaferro Helm; first cousin twice removed of Charles John Helm and Hubbard Dozier Helm; second cousin once removed of John Walker and Francis Walker; third cousin of George Madison, Meriwether Lewis (1774-1809) and Richard Aylett Buckner; third cousin once removed of Zachary Taylor, Thomas Walker Gilmer, Aylette Buckner and David Shelby Walker; third cousin twice removed of John Strother Pendleton, Albert Gallatin Pendleton, Aylett Hawes Buckner, James David Walker and David Shelby Walker Jr.; third cousin thrice removed of James Francis Buckner, Hubbard T. Smith, Key Pittman and Vail Montgomery Pittman.
  Political families: Walker-Meriwether-Kellogg family of Virginia; Jackson-Lee family; Demarest-Meriwether-Lewis family of New Jersey; Harrison-Randolph-Marshall-Cabell family of Virginia; Lee-Randolph family; Walker-Helm-Lincoln-Brown family of Kentucky; Washington-Walker family of Virginia; Pendleton-Lee family of Maryland; Clay family of Kentucky; Lewis-Pollard family of Texas (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Brooke County, W.Va. is named for him.
  See also National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article
  Wilmot W. Brookings (1830-1905) — of Sioux Falls, Minnehaha County, Dakota Territory (now S.Dak.). Born in Woolwich, Sagadahoc County, Maine, October 23, 1830. Lawyer; in February 1858, he was out in a blizzard and lost both feet; member Dakota territorial council, 1862-63, 1867-69; President of the Dakota Territorial Council, 1868; member of Dakota territorial House of Representatives, 1863-66; Speaker of the Dakota Territory House of Representatives, 1864-65; justice of Dakota territorial supreme court, 1869-73; delegate to South Dakota state constitutional convention, 1883, 1885. Died in Boston, Suffolk County, Mass., 1905 (age about 74 years). Burial location unknown.
  Brookings County, S.Dak. is named for him.
  James Abijah Brooks (1855-1944) — of Falfurrias, Brooks County, Tex. Born in Bourbon County, Ky., November 20, 1855. Texas Ranger; member of Texas state house of representatives, 1909-11; Brooks County Judge, 1911-39. Died in Falfurrias, Brooks County, Tex., January 15, 1944 (age 88 years, 56 days). Interment at Falfurrias Burial Park, Falfurrias, Tex.
  Relatives: Son of John Strode Brooks and Mary Jane (Kerr) Brooks; married to Virginia Wilborn.
  Brooks County, Tex. is named for him.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Preston Smith Brooks (1819-1857) — also known as Preston S. Brooks — of Ninety Six, Edgefield District (now Greenwood County), S.C. Born in Edgefield, Edgefield District (now Edgefield County), S.C., August 5, 1819. Lawyer; member of South Carolina state house of representatives, 1844; U.S. Representative from South Carolina 4th District, 1853-56, 1856-57; died in office 1857. Suffered a hip wound in a duel with Louis T. Wigfall, 1839, and could walk only with a cane for the rest of his life. In May, 1856, furious over an anti-slavery speech, he went to the Senate and beat Senator Charles Sumner with a cane, causing severe injuries; an attempt to expel him from Congress failed for lack of the necessary two-thirds vote, but he resigned; re-elected to his own vacancy. Slaveowner. Died in Washington, D.C., January 27, 1857 (age 37 years, 175 days). Interment at Willow Brook Cemetery, Edgefield, S.C.; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery, Washington, D.C.
  Relatives: Son of Whitefield Brooks and Mary P. (Carroll) Brooks; married 1841 to Caroline Means (1820-1843); married 1843 to Martha Means; cousin *** of Milledge Luke Bonham (1813-1890).
  Political family: Bonham family of Edgefield, South Carolina.
  Cross-reference: L. M. Keitt
  Brooks County, Ga. is named for him.
  The city of Brooksville, Florida, is named for him.
  Politician named for him: Preston Brooks Carwile
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  John Broome (1738-1810) — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in Staten Island, Richmond County, N.Y., July 19, 1738. Importer and exporter; delegate to New York state constitutional convention, 1777; colonel in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; member of New York state assembly from New York County, 1800-02; member of New York state senate Southern District, 1803-04; Lieutenant Governor of New York, 1804-10; died in office 1810. Died in New York, New York County, N.Y., August 8, 1810 (age 72 years, 20 days). Interment at First Presbyterian Churchyard, Manhattan, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Samuel Broome and Marie (LaTourette) Broome; married, October 19, 1769, to Rebecca Lloyd (1746-1800); married 1806 to Ruth Hunter (1755-1840).
  Broome County, N.Y. is named for him.
  The town of Broome, New York, is named for him.  — Broome Street, in Manhattan, New York, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Napoleon Bonaparte Broward (1857-1910) — also known as Napoleon B. Broward — of Jacksonville, Duval County, Fla. Born in Duval County, Fla., April 19, 1857. Democrat. Steamboat business; phosphate mining business; member of Florida state house of representatives, 1900; Governor of Florida, 1905-09; alternate delegate to Democratic National Convention from Florida, 1908. Died October 1, 1910 (age 53 years, 165 days). Interment at Evergreen Cemetery, Jacksonville, Fla.
  Presumably named for: Napoleon Bonaparte
  Relatives: Son of Napoleon Bonaparte Broward and Mary Dorcas (Parsons) Broward; married 1883 to Caroline Georgia Kemps (died 1883); married 1887 to Annie I. Douglas.
  Broward County, Fla. is named for him.
  See also National Governors Association biography — NNDB dossier
  Albert Gallatin Brown (1813-1880) — also known as Albert G. Brown — of Terry, Hinds County, Miss. Born in Chester District (now Chester County), S.C., May 31, 1813. Democrat. Lawyer; member of Mississippi state house of representatives, 1835-39; U.S. Representative from Mississippi, 1839-41, 1847-53 (at-large 1839-41, 4th District 1847-53); circuit judge in Mississippi, 1842-43; Governor of Mississippi, 1844-48; U.S. Senator from Mississippi, 1854-61; served in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; Senator from Mississippi in the Confederate Congress, 1862-65. Member, Freemasons. Slaveowner. Died near Terry, Hinds County, Miss., June 12, 1880 (age 67 years, 12 days). Interment at Greenwood Cemetery, Jackson, Miss.
  Presumably named for: Albert Gallatin
  Relatives: Son of Joseph Brown (1778-1844) and Elizabeth (Rice) Brown (1787-1855); married 1835 to Elizabeth Taliaferro (1817-1836); married, January 12, 1841, to Roberta Eugenia Young (1817-1886).
  Brown County, Kan. is named for him.
  The World War II Liberty ship SS Albert G. Brown (built 1943 at New Orleans, Louisiana; scrapped 1960) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Alfred Brown (1836-1919) — also known as "Consolidation Brown" — of Scotland, Bon Homme County, Dakota Territory (now S.Dak.). Born near Ottawa, Ontario, January 1, 1836. Member of Dakota territorial House of Representatives, 1879-80. Died in 1919 (age about 83 years). Burial location unknown.
  Brown County, S.Dak. is named for him.
  Joseph Renshaw Brown (1805-1870) — also known as Joseph R. Brown — of Wisconsin; Minnesota. Born January 11, 1805. Member of Wisconsin territorial legislature, 1840-42; member Minnesota territorial council 6th District, 1854-55; member of Minnesota territorial House of Representatives 10th District, 1857; delegate to Minnesota state constitutional convention 10th District, 1857. Died in New York, 1870 (age about 65 years). Interment at Brown Cemetery, Henderson, Minn.
  Brown County, Minn. is named for him.
  See also Minnesota Legislator record
William J. Bryan William Jennings Bryan (1860-1925) — also known as William J. Bryan; "The Great Commoner"; "The Peerless Leader"; "The Silver-Tongued Orator"; "The Boy Orator of the Platte"; "The Niagaric Nebraskan" — of Jacksonville, Morgan County, Ill.; Lincoln, Lancaster County, Neb.; Miami, Dade County (now Miami-Dade County), Fla. Born in Salem, Marion County, Ill., March 19, 1860. Democrat. Lawyer; newspaper editor; U.S. Representative from Nebraska 1st District, 1891-95; candidate for President of the United States, 1896, 1900, 1908; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Nebraska, 1904 (member, Platform and Resolutions Committee), 1912 (member, Platform and Resolutions Committee; speaker), 1920; U.S. Secretary of State, 1913-15; candidate for Democratic nomination for President, 1920; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Florida, 1924 (member, Platform and Resolutions Committee). Presbyterian. Member, Freemasons; Sigma Pi; Knights of Pythias. Died in Dayton, Rhea County, Tenn., July 26, 1925 (age 65 years, 129 days). Interment at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Va.; statue at Rhea County Courthouse Grounds, Dayton, Tenn.
  Relatives: Son of Silas Lillard Bryan (1822-1880) and Mariah Elizabeth (Jennings) Bryan (1834-1896); brother of Charles Wayland Bryan and Mary Elizabeth Bryan (1873-1962; who married Thomas Stinson Allen); married, October 1, 1884, to Mary Elizabeth Baird (1860-1930); father of Ruth Bryan Owen; grandfather of Helen Rudd Brown; cousin *** of William Sherman Jennings.
  Political family: Bryan-Jennings family of Illinois.
  Cross-reference: Clarence S. Darrow — Willis J. Abbot
  Bryan County, Okla. is named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: William J. Bryan JarvisW. J. Bryan Dorn
  Campaign slogan (1896): "Sixteen to one."
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Books about William Jennings Bryan: Robert W. Cherny, A Righteous Cause : The Life of William Jennings Bryan — Paolo E. Coletta, William Jennings Bryan, Vol. 1: Political Evangelist, 1860-1908 — Paolo E. Coletta, William Jennings Bryan, Vol. 2: Progressive Politician and Moral Statesman, 1909-1915 — Paolo E. Coletta, William Jennings Bryan, Vol. 3: Political Puritan, 1915-1925 — Michael Kazin, A Godly Hero: The Life of William Jennings Bryan — Scott Farris, Almost President: The Men Who Lost the Race but Changed the Nation — Gerard N. Magliocca, The Tragedy of William Jennings Bryan: Constitutional Law and the Politics of Backlash
  Image source: Munsey's Magazine, October 1903
James Buchanan James Buchanan (1791-1868) — also known as "The Sage of Wheatland"; "Buck"; "Old Buck" — of Lancaster, Lancaster County, Pa. Born in a log cabin near Mercersburg, Franklin County, Pa., April 23, 1791. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812; lawyer; member of Pennsylvania state house of representatives, 1814; U.S. Representative from Pennsylvania, 1821-31 (3rd District 1821-23, 4th District 1823-31); U.S. Minister to Russia, 1832-33; Great Britain, 1853-56; U.S. Senator from Pennsylvania, 1834-45; resigned 1845; candidate for Democratic nomination for President, 1844, 1848, 1852; U.S. Secretary of State, 1845-49; President of the United States, 1857-61. Presbyterian. Member, Freemasons. Died near Lancaster, Lancaster County, Pa., June 1, 1868 (age 77 years, 39 days). Interment at Woodward Hill Cemetery, Lancaster, Pa.; memorial monument at Meridian Hill Park, Washington, D.C.
  Relatives: Son of James Buchanan (c.1761-1821) and Elizabeth (Speer) Buchanan (1767-1833).
  Cross-reference: David Fullerton Robison — John A. Quitman — John Gallagher Montgomery
  Buchanan counties in Iowa, Mo. and Va. are named for him.
  The city of Buchanan, Michigan, is named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS James Buchanan (built 1942 at Terminal Island, California; scrapped 1969) was named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: James B. DukeJames B. CullisonJames Buchanan SigginsJ. B. MarcumJames B. Searcy
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Books about James Buchanan: Philip S. Klein, President James Buchanan: A Biography — Jean H. Baker, James Buchanan — R. G. Horton, The Life And Public Services Of James Buchanan: Late Minister To England And Formerly Minister To Russia, Senator And Representative In Congress, And Sec. Of State
  Critical books about James Buchanan: Nathan Miller, Star-Spangled Men : America's Ten Worst Presidents
  Image source: Portrait & Biographical Album of Washtenaw County (1891)
  Alexander Scott Bullitt (1761-1816) — of Kentucky. Born near Dumfries, Prince William County, Va., 1761. Delegate to Kentucky state constitutional convention, 1792, 1799; member of Kentucky state senate, 1792-99; Lieutenant Governor of Kentucky, 1800-04. Died in Jefferson County, Ky., April 13, 1816 (age about 54 years). Interment at Oxmoor-Bullitt Family Cemetery, Louisville, Ky.
  Relatives: Son of Helen (Scott) Bullitt (1739-1795) and Cuthbert Bullitt; married 1786 to Priscilla Christian (niece of Patrick Henry); great-grandfather of William Christian Bullitt (1856-1914), William Marshall Bullitt and Alexander Scott Bullitt (1877-1932); second great-grandfather of William Christian Bullitt (1891-1967); first cousin thrice removed of Hugh Kennedy Bullitt.
  Political families: Lee-Randolph family; Harrison-Randolph-Marshall-Cabell family of Virginia; Bullitt-Fry-Henry family of Virginia (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Bullitt County, Ky. is named for him.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Archibald Bulloch (c.1730-1777) — of Georgia. Born in Charleston, Charleston District (now Charleston County), S.C., about 1730. Lawyer; Delegate to Continental Congress from Georgia, 1775; served in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; President of Georgia, 1776-77; died in office 1777. Died in Savannah, Chatham County, Ga., February 22, 1777 (age about 47 years). Interment at Colonial Park Cemetery, Savannah, Ga.
  Relatives: Son of James Bulloch and Jean (Stobo) Bulloch; married to Mary de Veaux; father of William Bellinger Bulloch; second great-grandfather of Corinne Roosevelt Robinson and Theodore Roosevelt; third great-grandfather of Theodore Douglas Robinson, Alice Roosevelt Longworth, Eleanor Roosevelt, Corinne Robinson Alsop, Theodore Roosevelt Jr. (1887-1944) and William Sheffield Cowles; fourth great-grandfather of James Roosevelt, Elliott Roosevelt, Corinne A. Chubb, Franklin Delano Roosevelt Jr. and John deKoven Alsop.
  Political families: Roosevelt family of New York; Kellogg-Adams-Seymour-Chapin family of Connecticut and New York (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Bulloch County, Ga. is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article
  John Burke (1859-1937) — of Devils Lake, Ramsey County, N.Dak.; Fargo, Cass County, N.Dak.; Bismarck, Burleigh County, N.Dak. Born in Sigourney, Keokuk County, Iowa, February 25, 1859. Democrat. Lawyer; member of North Dakota state house of representatives, 1891; member of North Dakota state senate, 1893-97; Governor of North Dakota, 1907-13; candidate for Democratic nomination for Vice President, 1912; Treasurer of the United States, 1913-21; candidate for U.S. Senator from North Dakota, 1916; delegate to Democratic National Convention from North Dakota, 1924; justice of North Dakota state supreme court, 1925-37; chief justice of North Dakota state supreme court, 1935-36. Catholic. Irish ancestry. Died May 14, 1937 (age 78 years, 78 days). Interment at St. Mary's Cemetery, Bismarck, N.Dak.; statue at State Capitol Grounds, Bismarck, N.Dak.
  Relatives: Son of John Burke and Mary (Ryan) Burke; married, August 22, 1891, to Mary E. Kane.
  Cross-reference: Usher L. Burdick
  Burke County, N.Dak. is named for him.
  The World War II Liberty ship SS John Burke (built 1942 at Portland, Oregon; bombed by kamikazi and sank in the Sulu Sea, 1944) was named for him.
  See also National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Thomas Burke (c.1747-1783) — of Orange County, N.C. Born in Galway, Ireland, about 1747. Physician; lawyer; delegate to North Carolina state constitutional convention, 1776; Delegate to Continental Congress from North Carolina, 1776; member of North Carolina state legislature, 1777; Governor of North Carolina, 1781-82. Died near Hillsborough, Orange County, N.C., December 2, 1783 (age about 36 years). Interment a private or family graveyard, Orange County, N.C.
  Burke County, N.C. is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — National Governors Association biography
  Edward Burleson (1798-1851) — of Texas. Born in Buncombe County, N.C., December 15, 1798. Served in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812; delegate to Texas Convention of 1833 from District of Mina, 1833; delegate to Texas Consultation of 1835 from District of Mina, 1835; general in the Texas Army during the Texas War of Independence; member of Texas Republic House of Representatives, 1837-38; member of Texas Republic Senate from District of Bastrop, Gonzales and Fayette, 1838-39; Vice President of the Texas Republic, 1841-44; candidate for President of the Texas Republic, 1844; member of Texas state senate, 1846-51; died in office 1851. Methodist. Member, Freemasons. Died of pneumonia, in Austin, Travis County, Tex., December 26, 1851 (age 53 years, 11 days). Interment at Texas State Cemetery, Austin, Tex.
  Relatives: Father of Edward Burleson Jr.; grandfather of Albert Sidney Burleson (1863-1937).
  Political family: Burleson family of Austin, Texas.
  Burleson County, Tex. is named for him.
  David Gouverneur Burnet (1788-1870) — also known as David G. Burnet — of Texas. Born in Newark, Essex County, N.J., April 14, 1788. U.S. Consul in Galveston, 1832-35; delegate to Texas Convention of 1833 from District of Liberty, 1833; delegate to Texas Consultation of 1835 from District of Liberty, 1835; President of the Texas Republic, 1836; Vice President of the Texas Republic, 1838-41; Texas Republic Secretary of State, 1839, 1839-40. Member, Freemasons. Died December 5, 1870 (age 82 years, 235 days). Original interment and cenotaph at Lakeview Cemetery, Galveston, Tex.; reinterment to unknown location.
  Relatives: Son of William Burnet; half-brother of Jacob Burnet (1770-1853).
  Political family: Burnet family of Newark, New Jersey.
  Burnet County, Tex. is named for him.
  Thomas P. Burnett (1800-1845) — of Mt. Hope Township, Grant County, Wis. Born in Pittsylvania County, Va., September 3, 1800. Lawyer; walked with a limp due to a leg injury during a fire; present for the surrender of Black Hawk (Indian chief), August 2, 1832; member Wisconsin territorial council, 1836. Methodist. Member, Freemasons. Died, of typhoid, in Mt. Hope Township, Grant County, Wis., November 7, 1845 (age 45 years, 65 days). Interment at Hermitage Cemetery, Mt. Hope Township, Grant County, Wis.
  Relatives: Son of John Burnett and Judith Burnett; married, December 29, 1836, to Lucia Maria Brunson.
  Burnett County, Wis. is named for him.
  Francis Burt (1807-1854) — Born in Pendleton, Pendleton District (now Anderson County), S.C., January 13, 1807. Member of South Carolina state legislature, 1832-44; South Carolina state treasurer, 1844; delegate to South Carolina state constitutional convention, 1852; Governor of Nebraska Territory, 1854; died in office 1854. Died in Bellevue, Sarpy County, Neb., October 18, 1854 (age 47 years, 278 days). Interment at St. Paul's Episcopal Churchyard, Pendleton, S.C.
  Relatives: Son of Francis Burt (1759-1837) and Catherine (Miles) Burt (1774-1855); brother of Armistead Burt (1802-1883); married to George Ann Hall (1807-1870).
  Political family: Calhoun-Pickens family of South Carolina (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Burt County, Neb. is named for him.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Andrew Pickens Butler (1796-1857) — also known as Andrew P. Butler — of Edgefield, Edgefield District (now Edgefield County), S.C. Born in Edgefield, Edgefield District (now Edgefield County), S.C., November 18, 1796. Lawyer; member of South Carolina state house of representatives from Edgefield, 1824-31; member of South Carolina state senate from Edgefield, 1832-33; resigned 1833; common pleas court judge in South Carolina, 1834-46; U.S. Senator from South Carolina, 1846-57; died in office 1857. Slaveowner. Died near Edgefield, Edgefield District (now Edgefield County), S.C., May 25, 1857 (age 60 years, 188 days). Interment at Butler United Methodist Church Cemetery, Saluda, S.C.; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery, Washington, D.C.
  Relatives: Son of William Butler and Behethland Foote (Moore) Butler (1764-1853); brother of William Butler Jr. and Pierce Mason Butler (1798-1847); married, December 5, 1829, to Susan Ann Simkins (1811-1830; daughter of Eldred Simkins); married 1831 to Rebecca Harriet Hayne (1811-1834); uncle of Matthew Calbraith Butler.
  Political family: Butler-Perry-Belmont-Slidell family of Edgefield, South Carolina (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Butler County, Kan. is named for him.
  Epitaph: "He was of very noble nature, of high endowments, of lofty moral qualities. As a judge, the Judicial Records of the State sho whis abilities. In the Senate of the United States, that illustrious body was illustrated by his creer. In all that he said and did, there was a dash of genius and heroism. His fire seemed to be passed on a high stage of Public Dalies, but his heart was always amidst tender and gentle affections. He was prompt to weep with those who wept, he was equally ready to rejoice with those who were in joy. His death, elicited lamentations made of Public Expression to the circle of his intimacies. It spread the deepest of affections."
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  David Christy Butler (1829-1891) — also known as David C. Butler — of Nebraska. Born December 15, 1829. Republican. Member of Nebraska territorial House of Representatives, 1861; member Nebraska territorial council, 1864; Governor of Nebraska, 1867-71; removed 1871; member of University of Nebraska board of regents, 1869-71; impeached on March 4, 1871, and removed from office as Governor on June 2, 1871. Member, Freemasons. Died May 25, 1891 (age 61 years, 161 days). Interment at Pawnee City Cemetery, Pawnee City, Neb.
  Butler County, Neb. is named for him.
  See also National Governors Association biography
  Richard Butler (1743-1791) — of Pennsylvania. Born April 1, 1743. Served in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; state court judge in Pennsylvania, 1788; member of Pennsylvania state senate, 1790. Killed on an expedition against Indian tribes, November 4, 1791 (age 48 years, 217 days). Original interment in unknown location; reinterment at Soldiers Monument, Fort Recovery, Ohio.
  Butler counties in Ohio and Pa. are named for him.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  William Butler (d. 1818) — of Georgia. Member of Georgia state legislature, 1800. Killed by Indians at Butler Springs, Butler County, Ala., March 20, 1818. Burial location unknown.
  Butler County, Ala. is named for him.
  William Orlando Butler (1791-1880) — also known as William O. Butler — of Carrollton, Carroll County, Ky. Born in Jessamine County, Ky., April 19, 1791. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812; member of Kentucky state house of representatives, 1817-18; U.S. Representative from Kentucky 13th District, 1839-43; general in the U.S. Army during the Mexican War; candidate for Vice President of the United States, 1848. Slaveowner. Died in Carrollton, Carroll County, Ky., August 6, 1880 (age 89 years, 109 days). Interment in private or family graveyard.
  Relatives: Son of Percival Butler and Mildred (Hawkins) Butler.
  Butler counties in Iowa and Mo. are named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Stephen Cabarrus (1754-1808) — of North Carolina. Born in 1754. Member of North Carolina house of commons, 1790. Died in 1808 (age about 54 years). Interment at St. Paul's Churchyard, Edenton, N.C.
  Cabarrus County, N.C. is named for him.
William H. Cabell William Henry Cabell (1772-1853) — also known as William H. Cabell — of Virginia. Born in Cumberland County, Va., December 16, 1772. Lawyer; member of Virginia state house of delegates, 1796-1805; Presidential Elector for Virginia, 1800, 1804; Governor of Virginia, 1805-08; state court judge in Virginia, 1808-11; Judge, Virginia Court of Appeals, 1830-51. Died in Richmond, Va., January 12, 1853 (age 80 years, 27 days). Interment at Shockoe Hill Cemetery, Richmond, Va.
  Relatives: Son of Col. Nicholas Cabell (1750-1803) and Hannah (Carrington) Cabell (1751-1817); married 1795 to Elizabeth Cabell (1774-1801; his first cousin); married 1805 to Agnes Sarah Bell Gamble (1783-1863; sister-in-law of William Wirt); father of Edward Carrington Cabell; nephew of William Cabell and Paul Carrington; first cousin of William Cabell Jr.; first cousin once removed of Joseph Cabell Breckinridge, Benjamin William Sheridan Cabell (1793-1862) and Robert Jefferson Breckinridge; first cousin twice removed of John Cabell Breckinridge, Carter Henry Harrison, Peter Augustus Porter (1827-1864), William Lewis Cabell, Robert Jefferson Breckinridge Jr., George Craighead Cabell and William Campbell Preston Breckinridge; first cousin thrice removed of Clifton Rodes Breckinridge, Peter Augustus Porter (1853-1925), Benjamin Earl Cabell, Carter Henry Harrison II, Levin Irving Handy, Desha Breckinridge and Henry Skillman Breckinridge; first cousin four times removed of Earle Cabell; second cousin once removed of Cameron Erskine Thom; second cousin twice removed of Erskine Mayo Ross.
  Political families: Harrison-Randolph-Marshall-Cabell family of Virginia; Breckinridge-Preston-Cabell family of Virginia; Kellogg-Adams-Seymour-Chapin family of Connecticut and New York; Walker-Bolling family of Huntsville, Alabama (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Cabell County, W.Va. is named for him.
  See also National Governors Association biography — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: Huntington Through Seventy-Five Years (1947)
  Ezequiel Cabeza de Baca (1864-1917) — also known as Ezequiel C. de Baca — of New Mexico. Born November 1, 1864. Democrat. Lieutenant Governor of New Mexico, 1911; delegate to Democratic National Convention from New Mexico, 1916; Governor of New Mexico, 1917; died in office 1917. Died February 18, 1917 (age 52 years, 109 days). Interment at Mt. Calvary Cemetery, Las Vegas, N.M.
  DeBaca County, N.M. is named for him.
  See also National Governors Association biography
  John Caldwell (1757-1804) — of Kentucky. Born in Prince Edward County, Va., 1757. Member of Kentucky state senate, 1792; Lieutenant Governor of Kentucky, 1804; died in office 1804. Died, of an "inflammation of the brain" (probably a stroke), while presiding over the Kentucky State Senate, at the then state capitol building, Frankfort, Franklin County, Ky., 1804 (age about 47 years). Interment at Frankfort Cemetery, Frankfort, Ky.
  Caldwell County, Ky. is named for him.
John C. Calhoun John Caldwell Calhoun (1782-1850) — also known as John C. Calhoun — of Pickens District (now Pickens County), S.C. Born in Abbeville District (part now in McCormick County), S.C., March 18, 1782. Member of South Carolina state house of representatives, 1808; U.S. Representative from South Carolina 6th District, 1811-17; U.S. Secretary of War, 1817-25; Vice President of the United States, 1825-32; resigned 1832; U.S. Senator from South Carolina, 1832-43, 1845-50; died in office 1850; U.S. Secretary of State, 1844-45. Scotch-Irish ancestry. Slaveowner. Died in Washington, D.C., March 31, 1850 (age 68 years, 13 days). Interment at St. Philip's Churchyard, Charleston, S.C.; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery, Washington, D.C.; memorial monument at Marion Park, Charleston, S.C.
  Relatives: Son of James Patrick Calhoun (1727-1795) and Martha (Caldwell) Calhoun (1750-1802); married, December 27, 1809, to Floride Bonneau (1792-1866) and Floride Calhoun (daughter of John Ewing Colhoun (c.1749-1802)); father of Anna Maria Calhoun (1817-1875; who married Thomas Green Clemson (1807-1888)); uncle of John Alfred Calhoun and Martha Catherine Calhoun (1809-1869; who married Armistead Burt); great-granduncle of John Temple Graves; first cousin of John Ewing Colhoun (c.1749-1802) and Joseph Calhoun; first cousin once removed of Andrew Pickens; first cousin twice removed of Francis Wilkinson Pickens; second cousin once removed of Sarah Ann Calhoun (1811-1892; who married Alexander Henry Brown); second cousin twice removed of William Francis Calhoun.
  Political family: Calhoun-Pickens family of South Carolina (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Calhoun counties in Ala., Ark., Fla., Ga., Ill., Iowa, Mich., Miss., S.C., Tex. and W.Va. are named for him.
  The John C. Calhoun State Office Building (opened 1926), in Columbia, South Carolina, is named for him.  — Lake Calhoun (now known by its Dakota name, Bde Maka Ska), in Minneapolis, Minnesota, was named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS John C. Calhoun (built 1941-42 at Wilmington, North Carolina; destroyed in cargo explosion at Finchhafen, Papua New Guinea, 1944) was named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: John C. JohnsonJohn Calhoun NichollsJohn Calhoun CookJohn C. SheppardJohn C. BellJohn C. C. MayoJohn C. Phillips
  Coins and currency: His portrait appeared on Confederate States $1,000 notes (1861) and $100 notes (1862).
  Campaign slogan: "Liberty dearer than union."
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about John C. Calhoun: Margaret L. Coit, John C. Calhoun : American Portrait — Clyde N. Wilson, John C. Calhoun — Merrill D. Peterson, The Great Triumvirate: Webster, Clay, and Calhoun — Warren Brown, John C. Calhoun (for young readers)
  Image source: James Smith Noel Collection, Louisiana State University in Shreveport
  Simon Cameron (1799-1889) — also known as "The Czar of Pennsylvania" — of Harrisburg, Dauphin County, Pa. Born in Maytown, Lancaster County, Pa., March 8, 1799. Adjutant General of Pennsylvania, 1829-30; U.S. Senator from Pennsylvania, 1845-49, 1857-61, 1867-77; resigned 1861, 1877; candidate for Republican nomination for President, 1860; U.S. Secretary of War, 1861-62; U.S. Minister to Russia, 1862. Member, Freemasons. Died near Maytown, Lancaster County, Pa., June 26, 1889 (age 90 years, 110 days). Interment at Harrisburg Cemetery, Harrisburg, Pa.
  Relatives: Son of Charles Cameron and Martha (Pfoutz) Cameron; brother of William Cameron; married to Margaret Brua; father of Virginia Rolette Cameron (who married Isaac Wayne MacVeagh) and James Donald Cameron (1833-1918); grandfather of Joseph Gardner Bradley.
  Political families: Sherman family of Connecticut; Cameron family of Pennsylvania (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Cameron counties in La. and Pa. are named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier
  John Lafayette Camp (1828-1891) — of Gilmer, Upshur County, Tex. Born in Jefferson County, Ala., February 20, 1828. Democrat. Planter; lawyer; colonel in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Texas, 1872; member of Texas state senate, 1875-78; district judge in Texas, 1878-84. Died in San Antonio, Bexar County, Tex., July 16, 1891 (age 63 years, 146 days). Interment at Dignowitty Cemetery, San Antonio, Tex.
  Relatives: Father of John Lafayette Camp Jr. (1855-1918).
  Camp County, Tex. is named for him.
  George Washington Campbell (1769-1848) — also known as George W. Campbell — of Nashville, Davidson County, Tenn. Born in Scotland, February 9, 1769. Democrat. U.S. Representative from Tennessee at-large, 1803-09; state court judge in Tennessee, 1809; U.S. Senator from Tennessee, 1811-14, 1815-18; U.S. Secretary of the Treasury, 1814; U.S. Minister to Russia, 1818-20. Scottish ancestry. Died in Nashville, Davidson County, Tenn., February 17, 1848 (age 79 years, 8 days). Interment at Nashville City Cemetery, Nashville, Tenn.
  Campbell County, Tenn. is named for him.
  The World War II Liberty ship SS George W. Campbell (built 1942-43 at Portland, Oregon; scrapped 1967) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  John Allen Campbell (1835-1880) — of Wyoming. Born in Salem, Columbiana County, Ohio, October 8, 1835. General in the Union Army during the Civil War; Governor of Wyoming Territory, 1869-75. Presbyterian. Member, Freemasons. Died in Washington, D.C., July 14, 1880 (age 44 years, 280 days). Burial location unknown.
  Campbell County, Wyo. is named for him.
  Norman B. Campbell — of Bon Homme, Bon Homme County, Dakota Territory (now S.Dak.). Member of Dakota territorial House of Representatives, 1872-73. Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Charles T. Campbell (Civil War general).
  Campbell County, S.Dak. is named for him.
  Allen Daniel Candler (1834-1910) — also known as Allen D. Candler; "The One-Eyed Ploughboy from Pigeon Roost" — of Jonesboro, Clayton County, Ga.; Gainesville, Hall County, Ga. Born in Auraria, Lumpkin County, Ga., November 4, 1834. Democrat. Colonel in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; in the battle of Jonesboro, 1864, he was wounded, and lost an eye; railroad president; mayor of Gainesville, Ga., 1872; member of Georgia state house of representatives, 1873-77; member of Georgia state senate, 1878-79; U.S. Representative from Georgia 9th District, 1883-91; secretary of state of Georgia, 1894-98; Governor of Georgia, 1898-1902. Presbyterian. Member, Freemasons. Died in Atlanta, Fulton County, Ga., October 26, 1910 (age 75 years, 356 days). Interment at Alta Vista Cemetery, Gainesville, Ga.
  Relatives: Son of Daniel Gill Candler (1812-1887) and Nancy Caroline (Matthews) Candler (1815-1869); married, January 12, 1864, to Eugenia Williams; nephew of Samuel Charles Candler and Ezekiel Slaughter Candler; great-grandson of William Candler; first cousin of Milton Anthony Candler, Asa Griggs Candler, William Ezekiel Candler and John Slaughter Candler; first cousin once removed of Charles Murphey Candler, Ezekiel Samuel Candler Jr. and Thomas Slaughter Candler; first cousin twice removed of George Scott Candler; second cousin once removed of Mark Anthony Cooper; third cousin once removed of Joseph Meriwether Terrell.
  Political family: Candler family of Georgia.
  Candler County, Ga. is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Newton Cannon (1781-1841) — of Tennessee. Born in Guilford County, N.C., May 22, 1781. Democrat. Member of Tennessee state senate, 1811-13, 1829-31; U.S. Representative from Tennessee at-large, 1814-17, 1819-23; Governor of Tennessee, 1835-39; defeated, 1827, 1839. Slaveowner. Died in Nashville, Davidson County, Tenn., September 16, 1841 (age 60 years, 117 days). Interment a private or family graveyard, Williamson County, Tenn.
  Relatives: Brother of Robert Cannon (c.1790-1863).
  Cannon County, Tenn. is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — National Governors Association biography
John G. Carlisle John Griffin Carlisle (1835-1910) — also known as John G. Carlisle — of Covington, Kenton County, Ky. Born in Campbell County (part now in Kenton County), Ky., September 5, 1835. Democrat. Lawyer; law partner of Charles D. Foote; member of Kentucky state house of representatives, 1859-61; member of Kentucky state senate, 1866-71; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Kentucky, 1868; Lieutenant Governor of Kentucky, 1871-75; U.S. Representative from Kentucky 6th District, 1877-90; resigned 1890; Speaker of the U.S. House, 1883-89; candidate for Democratic nomination for President, 1884; U.S. Senator from Kentucky, 1890-93; U.S. Secretary of the Treasury, 1893-97. Died, reportedly from intestinal trouble and heart disease, in the Hotel Wolcott, Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., July 31, 1910 (age 74 years, 329 days). Interment at Linden Grove Cemetery, Covington, Ky.
  Relatives: Son-in-law of John A. Goodson; son of Lilborn Hardin Carlisle (1811-1852) and Mary A. (Reynolds) Carlisle (1813-1881); brother of Napoleon H. Carlisle (born1840); married, January 15, 1857, to Mary Jane Goodson (1834-1905).
  Political family: Carlisle-Goodson family of Covington, Kentucky.
  Carlisle County, Ky. is named for him.
  The World War II Liberty ship SS John G. Carlisle (built 1942-43 at Richmond, California; scrapped 1965) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about John G. Carlisle: James A. Barnes, John Carlisle : Financial Statesman
  Image source: The Parties and The Men (1896)
  Reuben B. Carlton (1812-1863) — of Minnesota. Born in 1812. Member of Minnesota state senate 26th District, 1857-58. Died in 1863 (age about 51 years). Burial location unknown.
  Carlton County, Minn. is named for him.
  See also Minnesota Legislator record
  Charles Carroll of Carrollton (1737-1832) — of Maryland. Born in Annapolis, Anne Arundel County, Md., September 19, 1737. Delegate to Continental Congress from Maryland, 1776-81; signer, Declaration of Independence, 1776; member of Maryland state senate, 1777-1800; U.S. Senator from Maryland, 1789-92. Catholic. Slaveowner. Died in Baltimore, Md., November 14, 1832 (age 95 years, 56 days). Interment at Doughoregan Manor Chapel, Ellicott City, Md.; memorial monument at Constitution Gardens, Washington, D.C.
  Relatives: Son of Charles Carroll (1702-1783) and Elizabeth (Brooke) Carroll (1709-1761); married, June 5, 1768, to Mary Darnell (1749-1782); father of Catharine 'Kitty' Carroll (1778-1861; who married Robert Goodloe Harper); grandfather of Louisa Carroll (1797-1870; who married Isaac Rand Jackson), Mary Sophia Carroll (1804-1886; who married Richard Henry Bayard) and Harriet Julianna Carroll (1808-1881; who married John Lee); great-grandfather of John Lee Carroll and Helen Sophia Carroll (1841-1886; who married Charles Oliver O'Donnell); second great-grandfather of John Howell Carroll; third great-grandfather of Suzanne Howell Carroll (who married John Boynton Philip Clayton Hill); third great-granduncle of John Duffy Alderson (1896-1975); first cousin of Daniel Carroll; second cousin of Charles Carroll, Barrister; second cousin once removed of Thomas Sim Lee, Alexander Contee Hanson and Alexander Contee Magruder; second cousin thrice removed of John Read Magruder; third cousin twice removed of Reuben Handy Meriwether; third cousin thrice removed of Carter Henry Harrison and Levin Irving Handy.
  Political families: Lee-Randolph family; Carroll family of Maryland; Eisenhower-Nixon family (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Carroll counties in Ark., Ga., Ill., Ind., Iowa, Ky., Md., Miss., Mo., N.H., Ohio and Va., East Carroll Parish, La. and West Carroll Parish, La., are named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: Charles C. WalcuttCharles C. FitchCharles C. FrickCharles Carroll Glover, Jr.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  William Carroll (1788-1844) — of Tennessee. Born near Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, Pa., March 3, 1788. General in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812; Governor of Tennessee, 1821-27, 1829-35. Died in Nashville, Davidson County, Tenn., March 22, 1844 (age 56 years, 19 days). Interment at Nashville City Cemetery, Nashville, Tenn.
  Relatives: Son of Thomas Carroll; father of William Henry Carroll (1810-1868); uncle of Mary Catherine Carroll (1816-1842; who married Caleb Cushing Norvell); grandfather of William Henry Carroll (1842-1915).
  Political family: Conway-Norvell-Johnson-Carroll family.
  Carroll County, Tenn. is named for him.
  See also National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Samuel Price Carson (1798-1838) — also known as Samuel P. Carson — of Pleasant Garden, Guilford County, N.C. Born in Pleasant Garden, Guilford County, N.C., January 22, 1798. Democrat. Member of North Carolina state senate, 1822-24, 1834; U.S. Representative from North Carolina 12th District, 1825-33; delegate to North Carolina state constitutional convention, 1835; delegate to Texas Republic Republic constitutional convention from District of Red River, 1836; signer, Texas Declaration of Independence, 1836; Texas Republic Secretary of State, 1836. Slaveowner. Died in Hot Springs, Garland County, Ark., November 2, 1838 (age 40 years, 284 days). Interment at Government Cemetery, Hot Springs, Ark.
  Cross-reference: Robert Brank Vance
  Carson County, Tex. is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Benjamin Wisnor Carter (born c.1830) — of Oklahoma. Born about 1830. Served in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; territorial court judge in Oklahoma, 1870. Burial location unknown.
  Carter County, Okla. is named for him.
  Thomas Henry Carter (1854-1911) — also known as Thomas H. Carter — of Helena, Lewis and Clark County, Mont. Born near Portsmouth, Scioto County, Ohio, October 30, 1854. Republican. Delegate to U.S. Congress from Montana Territory, 1889; U.S. Representative from Montana at-large, 1889-91; defeated, 1890; Chairman of Republican National Committee, 1892-96; U.S. Senator from Montana, 1895-1901, 1905-11; delegate to Republican National Convention from Montana, 1900, 1904; speaker, 1896. Died in Washington, D.C., September 17, 1911 (age 56 years, 322 days). Interment at Mt. Olivet Cemetery, Washington, D.C.
  Relatives: Married to Ellen L. Galen.
  Carter County, Mont. is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  William Grayson Carter (d. 1849) — Lawyer; member of Kentucky state senate, 1834-38. Died, of cholera, in Lexington, Fayette County, Ky., July 11, 1849. Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of John Carter and Hebe (Grayson) Carter; grandson of William Grayson (1736-1790).
  Political families: Harrison-Randolph-Marshall-Cabell family of Virginia; Roosevelt family of New York; Monroe-Grayson-Roosevelt-Breckinridge family of Virginia and Kentucky; Kellogg-Adams-Seymour-Chapin family of Connecticut and New York; Pendleton-Lee family of Maryland (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Carter County, Ky. is named for him.
Lewis Cass Lewis Cass (1782-1866) — of Detroit, Wayne County, Mich. Born in Exeter, Rockingham County, N.H., October 9, 1782. Democrat. Member of Ohio state house of representatives, 1806; general in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812; Governor of Michigan Territory, 1813-31; U.S. Secretary of War, 1831-36; U.S. Minister to France, 1836-42; member of University of Michigan board of regents, 1843-44; appointed 1843; candidate for Democratic nomination for President, 1844, 1852; U.S. Senator from Michigan, 1845-48, 1849-57; resigned 1848; candidate for President of the United States, 1848; U.S. Secretary of State, 1857-60. Member, Freemasons. Died in Detroit, Wayne County, Mich., June 17, 1866 (age 83 years, 251 days). Interment at Elmwood Cemetery, Detroit, Mich.
  Relatives: Second great-grandfather of Thomas Cass Ballenger (1926-2015).
  Cass counties in Ill., Ind., Iowa, Mich., Minn., Mo., Neb. and Tex. are named for him.
  The town and village of Cassville, Wisconsin, is named for him.  — The village of Cass City, Michigan, is named for him.  — The village of Cassopolis, Michigan, is named for him.  — The city of Cassville, Missouri, is named for him.  — Cass Lake, and the adjoining city of Cass Lake, Minnesota, are named for him.  — Cass Lake, in Oakland County, Michigan, is named for him.  — The Cass River, in Tuscola and Saginaw counties, Michigan, is named for him.  — The Lewis Cass Building (opened 1921 as the State Office Building; damaged in a fire in 1951; rebuilt and named for Lewis Cass; changed to Elliott-Larsen Building in 2020), in Lansing, Michigan, was named for him.  — Cass Avenue, Cass Park, and Cass Technical High School, in Detroit, Michigan, are named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: Lewis Cass WilmarthLewis C. CarpenterLewis C. VandergriftLewis C. TidballLewis Cass WickLewis Cass Tidball IILewis C. Gabbert
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Books about Lewis Cass: Willard Carl Klunder, Lewis Cass and the Politics of Moderation — Frank Bury Woodford, Lewis Cass, the Last Jeffersonian
  Image source: Library of Congress
  Richard Caswell (1729-1789) — of Dobbs County (part now in Lenoir County), N.C. Born in Harford County (part now in Baltimore County), Md., August 3, 1729. Lawyer; surveyor; Delegate to Continental Congress from North Carolina, 1774; Governor of North Carolina, 1776-80, 1785-87; delegate to North Carolina state constitutional convention, 1776; member of North Carolina state senate from Dobbs County, 1780-84, 1788-89; died in office 1789. Died in Fayetteville, Cumberland County, N.C., November 10, 1789 (age 60 years, 99 days). Interment at Caswell Memorial Cemetery, Kinston, N.C.
  Caswell County, N.C. is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — National Governors Association biography
  Thomas Benton Catron (1840-1921) — also known as Thomas B. Catron — of Santa Fe, Santa Fe County, N.M. Born near Lexington, Lafayette County, Mo., October 6, 1840. Republican. Served in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; lawyer; New Mexico territory attorney general, 1869-72; U.S. Attorney for New Mexico, 1872-78; member New Mexico territorial council, 1884; Delegate to U.S. Congress from New Mexico Territory, 1895-97; mayor of Santa Fe, N.M., 1906-08; U.S. Senator from New Mexico, 1912-17; delegate to Republican National Convention from New Mexico, 1916. Died in Santa Fe, Santa Fe County, N.M., May 15, 1921 (age 80 years, 221 days). Interment at Fairview Cemetery, Santa Fe, N.M.
  Relatives: Married, April 28, 1877, to Julia Anna Walz (1857-1909); father of Charles Christopher Catron (1879-1951).
  Catron County, N.M. is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Jerome Bunty Chaffee (1825-1886) — also known as Jerome B. Chaffee — of Denver, Colo. Born in Niagara County, N.Y., April 17, 1825. Republican. Member of Colorado territorial House of Representatives, 1861-63; Speaker of Colorado Territory House of Representatives, 1863; member of Republican National Committee from Colorado Territory, 1866-68, 1870-72; delegate to Republican National Convention from Colorado Territory, 1868; Delegate to U.S. Congress from Colorado Territory, 1871-75; delegate to Republican National Convention from Colorado, 1876; U.S. Senator from Colorado, 1876-79; Colorado Republican state chair, 1884. One of the founders of the city of Denver. Died in Salem Center, Westchester County, N.Y., March 9, 1886 (age 60 years, 326 days). Interment at Oakwood Cemetery, Adrian, Mich.
  Relatives: Married to Miriam B. Comstock (1829-1857); father of Frances Josephine Chaffee (1857-1909; who married Ulysses Simpson Grant Jr. (1852-1929)).
  Political family: Kellogg-Adams-Seymour-Chapin family of Connecticut and New York (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Chaffee County, Colo. is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Henry H. Chambers (1790-1826) — of Huntsville, Madison County, Ala. Born near Kenbridge, Lunenburg County, Va., October 1, 1790. Democrat. Physician; delegate to Alabama state constitutional convention, 1819; member of Alabama state house of representatives, 1820; candidate for Governor of Alabama, 1821, 1823; U.S. Senator from Alabama, 1825-26; died in office 1826. Died near Kenbridge, Lunenburg County, Va., January 24, 1826 (age 35 years, 115 days). Interment a private or family graveyard, Lunenburg County, Va.
  Relatives: Father of Henry Cousins Chambers (1823-1871).
  Chambers County, Ala. is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  Robert Milledge Charlton (1807-1854) — also known as Robert M. Charlton — of Georgia. Born in Savannah, Chatham County, Ga., January 19, 1807. Member of Georgia state house of representatives, 1830; U.S. Attorney for Georgia, 1835-36, 1839-40; mayor of Savannah, Ga., 1839-41; U.S. Senator from Georgia, 1852-53. Slaveowner. Died in Savannah, Chatham County, Ga., January 18, 1854 (age 46 years, 364 days). Interment at Laurel Grove North Cemetery, Savannah, Ga.
  Relatives: Son of Thomas Usher Pulaski Charlton (1779-1835); father of Mary Marshall Charlton (1835-1904; who married Julian Hartridge).
  Political family: Charlton family of Savannah, Georgia.
  Charlton County, Ga. is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Champion S. Chase (d. 1898) — of Omaha, Douglas County, Neb. Born in Cornish, Sullivan County, N.H. Nebraska state attorney general, 1867-69; member of University of Nebraska board of regents, 1869-75; mayor of Omaha, Neb., 1874-77, 1879-81, 1883-84. Died November 3, 1898. Burial location unknown.
  Chase County, Neb. is named for him.
Salmon P. Chase Salmon Portland Chase (1808-1873) — also known as Salmon P. Chase; "Old Mr. Greenbacks" — of Cincinnati, Hamilton County, Ohio. Born in Cornish, Sullivan County, N.H., January 13, 1808. Republican. Liberty candidate for U.S. Representative from Ohio 1st District, 1846; U.S. Senator from Ohio, 1849-55, 1861; Governor of Ohio, 1856-60; candidate for Republican nomination for President, 1856, 1860; U.S. Secretary of the Treasury, 1861-64; Chief Justice of U.S. Supreme Court, 1864-73; died in office 1873. Episcopalian. Died in New York, New York County, N.Y., May 7, 1873 (age 65 years, 114 days). Original interment at Oak Hill Cemetery, Washington, D.C.; reinterment at Spring Grove Cemetery, Cincinnati, Ohio.
  Relatives: Son of Ithamar Chase (1762-1817) and Janette Chase (1777-1832); married to Eliza Ann Smith (1821-1845); father of Katherine Jane 'Kate' Chase (1840-1899; who married William Sprague (1830-1915)); nephew of Dudley Chase; cousin *** of Dudley Chase Denison.
  Political families: Sprague family; Chase family of Vermont (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Chase County, Kan. is named for him.
  Chase Hall (dormitory, built 1926), at Harvard University Business School, Boston, Massachusetts, is named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS Salmon P. Chase (built 1942 at Portland, Oregon; scrapped 1960) was named for him.
  Politician named for him: Chase S. Osborn
  Coins and currency: His portrait appeared on various U.S. currency, including $1 and $10 notes in the 1860s, and the $10,000 bill from 1918 to 1946.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Books about Salmon P. Chase: Frederick J. Blue, Salmon P. Chase : A Life in Politics — John Niven, Salmon P. Chase : A Biography — Albert B. Hart, Salmon P. Chase — Doris Kearns Goodwin, Team of Rivals : The Political Genius of Abraham Lincoln
  Image source: Life and Work of James G. Blaine (1893)
  Edward Saunders Cheatham (1818-1878) — also known as Edward S. Cheatham — of Springfield, Robertson County, Tenn. Born in Springfield, Robertson County, Tenn., July 31, 1818. Democrat. Member of Tennessee state house of representatives, 1853-55; member of Tennessee state senate, 1855-57, 1861-63; Speaker of the Tennessee State Senate, 1855-57, 1861-62; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Tennessee, 1872. Died in Horn Lake, DeSoto County, Miss., December 21, 1878 (age 60 years, 143 days). Interment at Mt. Olivet Cemetery, Nashville, Tenn.
  Relatives: Son-in-law of Ephraim Hubbard Foster (1794-1854); son of Richard Cheatham; brother of Richard Boone Cheatham and Boyd M. Cheatham; nephew of Anderson Cheatham.
  Political family: Cheatham-Foster family of Nashville, Tennessee.
  Cheatham County, Tenn. is named for him.
  George Campbell Childress (1804-1841) — also known as George C. Childress — of Texas. Born in Nashville, Davidson County, Tenn., January 8, 1804. Lawyer; delegate to Texas Republic Republic constitutional convention from District of Milam, 1836; signer, Texas Declaration of Independence, 1836. Killed himself with a Bowie knife, in Galveston, Galveston County, Tex., October 6, 1841 (age 37 years, 271 days). Interment at Trinity Episcopal Cemetery, Galveston, Tex.; statue at Washington-on-the-Brazos State Park, Washington, Tex.
  Childress County, Tex. is named for him.
  The World War II Liberty ship SS George C. Childress (built 1943 at Houston, Texas; sold and renamed SS K. Hadjipateras; sunk during a storm in the Bay of Bengal, 1967) was originally named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  William Parish Chilton (1810-1871) — also known as William P. Chilton — of Alabama. Born near Elizabethtown, Hardin County, Ky., August 10, 1810. Member of Alabama state legislature, 1839; candidate for U.S. Representative from Alabama 7th District, 1843; associate justice of Alabama state supreme court, 1852-56; member of Alabama state senate, 1859; Delegate from Alabama to the Confederate Provisional Congress, 1861-62; Representative from Alabama in the Confederate Congress 6th District, 1862-65. Died in Montgomery, Montgomery County, Ala., January 20, 1871 (age 60 years, 163 days). Interment at Oakwood Cemetery, Montgomery, Ala.
  Relatives: Son of Margaret (Bledsoe) Chilton (1766-1831) and Thomas John Chilton (1769-1840); brother of Thomas Chilton; married 1829 to Mary Catherine Morgan (1814-1845; sister of John Tyler Morgan); married to Elvira Frances Morgan (1826-1891; sister of first wife); grandfather of Arthur Bounds Chilton; granduncle of Horace George Chilton; first cousin twice removed of John Smith; second cousin of Joshua Chilton; second cousin once removed of Commodore Perry Chilton and Shadrach Chilton; third cousin once removed of Howell Cobb, Henry Rootes Jackson (1820-1898) and Thomas Reade Rootes Cobb.
  Political families: Pendleton-Lee family of Maryland; Jackson-Lee family; King family of Savannah, Georgia; Walker-Meriwether-Kellogg family of Virginia; Washington-Walker family of Virginia (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Chilton County, Ala. is named for him.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
Thomas Chittenden Thomas Chittenden (1730-1797) — of Williston, Chittenden County, Vt. Born in Guilford, New Haven County, Conn., January 6, 1730. Governor of Vermont, 1778-89, 1790-97; died in office 1797. Died in Williston, Chittenden County, Vt., August 25, 1797 (age 67 years, 231 days). Interment at Thomas Chittenden Cemetery, Williston, Vt.; statue at State House Grounds, Montpelier, Vt.; statue at Town Green, Williston, Vt.
  Relatives: Son of Ebenezer Chittenden (1699-1756) and Mary (Johnson) Chittenden (1699-1779); married 1749 to Elizabeth Meigs (1732-1817); father of Mary Chittenden (1758-1794; who married Jonas Galusha), Beulah Chittenden (1763-1824; who married Matthew Lyon) and Martin Chittenden; grandfather of Chittenden Lyon; first cousin twice removed of Josiah C. Chittenden and Abel Madison Scranton; first cousin thrice removed of Roger Calvin Leete; second cousin twice removed of Jeduthun Wilcox, Clark S. Chittenden and Russell Sage; second cousin thrice removed of Leonard Wilcox and Edgar Jared Doolittle; second cousin four times removed of Charles H. Chittenden; third cousin once removed of Chauncey Goodrich, Oliver Wolcott Jr., Elizur Goodrich and Frederick Wolcott; third cousin twice removed of Ensign Hosmer Kellogg and Eli Coe Birdsey; third cousin thrice removed of Frederick Walker Pitkin and Roger Wolcott (1847-1900); fourth cousin of Return Jonathan Meigs, Sr. and Josiah Meigs; fourth cousin once removed of Return Jonathan Meigs Jr., Elijah Hunt Mills, Henry Meigs and Zina Hyde Jr..
  Political families: Kellogg-Adams-Seymour-Chapin family of Connecticut and New York; Roosevelt family of New York; Wolcott-Wadsworth family of Connecticut (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Chittenden County, Vt. is named for him.
  The town of Chittenden, Vermont, is named for him.
  See also National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: Men of Vermont (1894)
  Pierre Chouteau Jr. (1789-1865) — also known as Pierre Cadet Chouteau — of St. Louis County, Mo. Born in St. Louis, Mo., January 19, 1789. Merchant; lead mining business; fur trader; delegate to Missouri state constitutional convention from St. Louis County, 1820. Died September 6, 1865 (age 76 years, 230 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Jean-Pierre Chouteau (1758-1849) and Pelagie (Kiersereau) Chouteau (1767-1793).
  Chouteau County, Mont. is named for him.
  The city of Choteau, Montana, is named for him.  — The city of Fort Pierre, South Dakota, is named for him.  — The city of Pierre, South Dakota, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article
  William Christian (c.1743-1786) — Born in Staunton, Va., about 1743. Lawyer; member of Virginia House of Burgesses, 1773-75; colonel in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War. Manx ancestry. Killed while fighting Indians in what is now Clark County, Ind., April 9, 1786 (age about 43 years). Interment at Bullitt Family Cemetery, Louisville, Ky.
  Relatives: Son of Israel Christian and Elizabeth (Starke) Christian (1720-1789); brother of Anne Christian (who married William Fleming); married to Anne Henry (1738-1790; sister of Patrick Henry); second great-granduncle of William Marshall Bullitt and Alexander Scott Bullitt (1877-1932).
  Political families: Lee-Randolph family; Harrison-Randolph-Marshall-Cabell family of Virginia; Bullitt-Fry-Henry family of Virginia (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Christian counties in Ill., Ky. and Mo. are named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  William Charles Cole Claiborne (1775-1817) — also known as William C. C. Claiborne — of New Orleans, Orleans Parish, La. Born in Sussex County, Va., 1775. Lawyer; delegate to Tennessee state constitutional convention, 1796; state court judge in Tennessee, 1796; U.S. Representative from Tennessee at-large, 1797-1801; Governor of Mississippi Territory, 1801-04; Governor of Orleans Territory, 1804-12; Governor of Louisiana, 1812-16; U.S. Senator from Louisiana, 1817; died in office 1817. Episcopalian. Member, Freemasons. Fought a duel with Daniel Clark on June 8, 1807; he was wounded in the thigh. Died of a liver ailment, in New Orleans, Orleans Parish, La., November 23, 1817 (age about 42 years). Originally entombed at St. Louis Cemetery No. 1, New Orleans, La.; re-entombed in 1872 at Metairie Cemetery, New Orleans, La.
  Relatives: Son of William Charles Cole Claiborne (1748-1809) and Mary (Leigh) Claiborne (1750-1782); brother of Ferdinand Leigh Claiborne and Nathaniel Herbert Claiborne; married to Clarissa Duralde (1776-1809), Suzette Bosque and Elizabeth Lewis; uncle of John Francis Hamtramck Claiborne; second great-granduncle of Herbert Claiborne Pell Jr. (1884-1961) and Corinne Claiborne Boggs; third great-granduncle of Claiborne de Borda Pell, Barbara Boggs Sigmund and Thomas Hale Boggs Jr.; first cousin once removed of Thomas Claiborne (1749-1812); second cousin of John Claiborne and Thomas Claiborne (1780-1856); third cousin thrice removed of Andrew Fuller Fox.
  Political family: Claiborne-Dallas family of Virginia and Louisiana (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Claiborne counties in La., Miss. and Tenn. are named for him.
  Epitaph: "Cara patria, carior libertas; ubi est libertas, ibi mea patria." [Dear my country, dearer liberty; where liberty is, there is my country.]
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — National Governors Association biography
  Newton Clark — of Sioux Falls, Minnehaha County, Dakota Territory (now S.Dak.). Member of Dakota territorial House of Representatives, 1872-73. Burial location unknown.
  Clark County, S.Dak. is named for him.
  William Clark (1770-1838) — of Missouri. Born in Caroline County, Va., August 1, 1770. Governor of Missouri Territory, 1813-20; candidate for Governor of Missouri, 1820. Episcopalian. Member, Freemasons. Commanded expedition with Meriwether Lewis to Oregon, 1803-04. Died in St. Louis, Mo., September 1, 1838 (age 68 years, 31 days). Interment at Bellefontaine Cemetery, St. Louis, Mo.
  Relatives: Grandfather-in-law of Edgar Parks Rucker (1861-1908).
  Cross-reference: George F. Shannon
  Clark counties in Ark., Mo. and Wash. are named for him; Lewis and Clark County, Mont. is named partly for him.
  Coins and currency: His portrait appeared (along with Lewis's) on the U.S. $10 note (1898-1927).
  See also NNDB dossier
  Books about William Clark: Jay H. Buckley, William Clark: Indian Diplomat — Donald Barr Chidsey, Lewis and Clark: The Great Adventure
  William Andrews Clark (1839-1925) — also known as William A. Clark — of Butte, Silver Bow County, Mont. Born near Connellsville, Fayette County, Pa., January 8, 1839. Democrat. Banker; mine owner; delegate to Montana state constitutional convention, 1884, 1889; candidate for Delegate to U.S. Congress from Montana Territory, 1888; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Montana, 1892, 1904; U.S. Senator from Montana, 1899-1900, 1901-07; resigned 1900. Member, Freemasons. Died, of pneumonia, in Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., March 2, 1925 (age 86 years, 53 days). Interment at Woodlawn Cemetery, Bronx, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of John Clark and Mary (Andrews) Clark; married 1869 to Kate L. Stauffer (died 1893); married, May 25, 1901, to Anna E. La Chapelle.
  Clark County, Nev. is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  James Clarke (1812-1850) — of Burlington, Des Moines County, Iowa. Born in Greensburg, Westmoreland County, Pa., July 5, 1812. Secretary of Iowa Territory, 1839-41; mayor of Burlington, Iowa, 1844-45; delegate to Iowa state constitutional convention from Des Moines County, 1844; Governor of Iowa Territory, 1845-46. Died in a cholera epidemic, in Burlington, Des Moines County, Iowa, July 28, 1850 (age 38 years, 23 days). Interment at Aspen Grove Cemetery, Burlington, Iowa.
  Relatives: Son-in-law of Henry Dodge (1782-1867).
  Political families: Polk family; Kellogg-Adams-Seymour-Chapin family of Connecticut and New York (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Clarke County, Iowa is named for him.
  Green Clay (1757-1826) — Born in Powhatan County, Va., August 14, 1757. Served in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; surveyor; member of Virginia state house of delegates, 1788-89; member of Kentucky state house of representatives, 1793-94; member of Kentucky state senate, 1795-98, 1807; delegate to Kentucky state constitutional convention, 1799; general in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812. Member, Freemasons. Died in White Hall, Madison County, Ky., October 31, 1826 (age 69 years, 78 days). Interment at White Hall Family Cemetery, Richmond, Ky.
  Relatives: Son of Charles Clay (1716-1789) and Martha 'Patsy' (Green) Clay (1719-1793); brother of Matthew Clay (1754-1815); married, March 14, 1795, to Sally Lewis (1776-1867); father of Brutus Junius Clay (1808-1878) and Cassius Marcellus Clay; uncle of Matthew Clay (c.1795-1827); grandfather of Green Clay Smith and Brutus Junius Clay (1847-1932); granduncle of Thomas Clay McCreery; first cousin once removed of Henry Clay (1777-1852) and Porter Clay; first cousin twice removed of Thomas Hart Clay, Henry Clay Jr. and James Brown Clay; first cousin thrice removed of Henry Clay (1849-1884); first cousin four times removed of Oliver Carroll Clay; first cousin five times removed of Archer Woodford; second cousin once removed of Clement Comer Clay; second cousin twice removed of Clement Claiborne Clay Jr..
  Political family: Clay family of Kentucky (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Clay County, Ky. is named for him.
Henry Clay Henry Clay (1777-1852) — also known as "The Sage of Ashland"; "The Great Compromiser" — of Lexington, Fayette County, Ky. Born in Hanover County, Va., April 12, 1777. Member of Kentucky state house of representatives, 1803; U.S. Senator from Kentucky, 1806-07, 1810-11, 1831-42, 1849-52; died in office 1852; U.S. Representative from Kentucky, 1811-14, 1815-21, 1823-25 (5th District 1811-13, at-large 1813-14, 2nd District 1815-21, 3rd District 1823-25); Speaker of the U.S. House, 1811-14, 1815-20, 1823-25; candidate for President of the United States, 1824, 1832 (National Republican), 1844 (Whig); U.S. Secretary of State, 1825-29; candidate for Whig nomination for President, 1839. Member, Freemasons. In 1809, he fought a duel with Humphrey Marshall, in which both men were wounded. Elected to the Hall of Fame for Great Americans in 1900. Slaveowner. Died in Washington, D.C., June 29, 1852 (age 75 years, 78 days). Interment at Lexington Cemetery, Lexington, Ky.; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery, Washington, D.C.
  Relatives: Son of John Clay and Elizabeth (Hudson) Clay (1750-1829); brother of Porter Clay; married, April 11, 1799, to Lucretia (Hart) Erwin (1781-1864); father of Thomas Hart Clay, Henry Clay Jr. and James Brown Clay; grandfather of Henry Clay; granduncle of Ellen Hart Ross (who married James Reily (1811-1863)); first cousin once removed of Matthew Clay (1754-1815) and Green Clay; second cousin of Matthew Clay (c.1795-1827), Brutus Junius Clay (1808-1878) and Cassius Marcellus Clay; second cousin once removed of Brutus Junius Clay (1847-1932); second cousin thrice removed of Oliver Carroll Clay; second cousin four times removed of Archer Woodford; third cousin of Clement Comer Clay; third cousin once removed of Clement Claiborne Clay Jr..
  Political family: Clay family of Kentucky (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Clay counties in Ala., Fla., Ga., Ill., Ind., Kan., Minn., Miss., Mo., Neb., N.C., S.Dak., Tenn., Tex. and W.Va. are named for him.
  Mount Clay (also called Mount Reagan), in the White Mountains, Coos County, New Hampshire, is named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS Henry Clay (built 1941-42 at Mobile, Alabama; scrapped 1967) was named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: Henry Clay LongneckerHenry Clay DeanH. Clay DickinsonHenry C. BrockmeyerH. Clay CockerillHenry Clay EwingHenry Clay CaldwellHenry Clay HallHenry Clay GoodingHenry Clay NaillHenry C. MyersHenry C. ColeH. Clay HarrisHenry C. MinerHenry C. WarmothHenry Clay ClevelandH. Clay EvansHenry C. PayneHenry C. BatesH. Clay FosterHenry C. McCormickHenry C. IdeHenry Clay WilliamsHenry C. SimmsHenry Clay FergusonHenry C. GloverH. Clay ParkHenry C. HansbroughHenry C. SnodgrassH. Clay MaydwellHenry C. GleasonHenry C. LoudenslagerH. Clay Van VoorhisHenry C. ClippingerH. Clay CrawfordH. Clay BascomH. Clay MichieH. Clay ChisolmH. Clay HowardHenry C. HallHenry Clay McDowellH. Clay JonesH. Clay DayHenry Clay HinesH. Clay HeatherHenry Clay MeachamHenry Clay CallowayH. Clay SuterH. Clay WarthHenry Clay ElwoodH. Clay KennedyH. Clay DavisH. Clay NeedhamHenry Clay EthertonH. Clay MaceH. Clay ArmstrongH. Clay BaldwinH. Clay HaynesH. Clay BurkholderMrs. H. Clay KauffmanH. Clay BentleyHenry C. GreenbergH. Clay Gardenhire, Jr.Henry Clay CoxH. Clay Myers, Jr.H. Clay Johnson
  Coins and currency: His portrait appeared on some U.S. currency issued in the 19th and early 20th centuries.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about Henry Clay: Robert Vincent Remini, Henry Clay: Statesman for the Union — Maurice G. Baxter, Henry Clay the Lawyer — Richard B. Cheney & Lynne V. Cheney, Kings Of The Hill : How Nine Powerful Men Changed The Course of American History — Merrill D. Peterson, The Great Triumvirate: Webster, Clay, and Calhoun — Scott Farris, Almost President: The Men Who Lost the Race but Changed the Nation — David S. Heidler & Jeanne T. Heidler, Henry Clay: The Essential American — Fergus M. Bordewich, America's Great Debate: Henry Clay, Stephen A. Douglas, and the Compromise That Preserved the Union
  Image source: James Smith Noel Collection, Louisiana State University in Shreveport
  Henry Clay Jr. (1811-1847) — of Kentucky. Born in Lexington, Fayette County, Ky., April 10, 1811. Lawyer; member of Kentucky state house of representatives, 1835-37; colonel in the U.S. Army during the Mexican War. Episcopalian. Killed in action at the Battle of Buena Vista, Buena Vista, Coahuila, February 23, 1847 (age 35 years, 319 days). Interment at Frankfort Cemetery, Frankfort, Ky.
  Relatives: Son of Henry Clay (1777-1852) and Lucretia (Hart) Clay (1781-1864); brother of Thomas Hart Clay and James Brown Clay; married 1832 to Julia Prather (1814-1840); nephew of Porter Clay; uncle of Henry Clay (1849-1884); first cousin twice removed of Matthew Clay and Green Clay; second cousin once removed of Cassius Marcellus Clay; third cousin twice removed of Oliver Carroll Clay; third cousin thrice removed of Archer Woodford (1899-1955).
  Political families: Clay family of Kentucky; Walker-Meriwether-Kellogg family of Virginia; Washington-Walker family of Virginia (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Clay County, Iowa is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Augustin Smith Clayton (1783-1839) — also known as Augustin S. Clayton — of Athens, Clarke County, Ga. Born in Fredericksburg, Va., November 27, 1783. Member of Georgia state house of representatives, 1810; state court judge in Georgia, 1819; member of Georgia state senate, 1826; U.S. Representative from Georgia at-large, 1832-35. Slaveowner. Died in Athens, Clarke County, Ga., June 21, 1839 (age 55 years, 206 days). Interment at Oconee Hill Cemetery, Athens, Ga.
  Clayton County, Ga. is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  John M. Clayton — of Pine Bluff, Jefferson County, Ark. Republican. Member of Arkansas state senate, 1873; candidate for U.S. Representative from Arkansas 2nd District, 1874, 1888; delegate to Republican National Convention from Arkansas, 1888. Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Brother of Powell Clayton (1833-1914).
  Clay County, Ark. may have been named for him.
  John Middleton Clayton (1796-1856) — also known as John M. Clayton — of Dover, Kent County, Del.; New Castle, New Castle County, Del. Born in Dagsboro, Sussex County, Del., July 24, 1796. Lawyer; member of Delaware state house of representatives from Kent County, 1824; secretary of state of Delaware, 1826-28; U.S. Senator from Delaware, 1829-36, 1845-49, 1853-56; resigned 1836, 1849; died in office 1856; justice of Delaware state supreme court, 1837-39; U.S. Secretary of State, 1849-50. Slaveowner. Died in Dover, Kent County, Del., November 9, 1856 (age 60 years, 108 days). Interment at Old Presbyterian Cemetery, Dover, Del.
  Relatives: Son of James George Clayton (1761-1820) and Sarah (Middleton) Clayton (1774-1829); married, September 13, 1822, to Sally Ann Fisher (1799-1825); nephew of Joshua Clayton; great-granduncle of Clayton Douglass Buck (1890-1965); first cousin of Thomas Clayton.
  Political families: DuPont family of Wilmington, Delaware; Livingston-Schuyler family of New York (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Clayton County, Iowa is named for him.
  The World War II Liberty ship SS John M. Clayton (built 1942 at Terminal Island, California; bombed 1945; repaired; renamed USS Harcourt; scrapped 1962) was originally named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
Powell Clayton Powell Clayton (1833-1914) — of Little Rock, Pulaski County, Ark.; Eureka Springs, Carroll County, Ark. Born in Bethel, Delaware County, Pa., August 7, 1833. Republican. Engineer; surveyor; general in the Union Army during the Civil War; planter; president and general manager, Eureka Springs Railway; Governor of Arkansas, 1868-71; U.S. Senator from Arkansas, 1871-77; delegate to Republican National Convention from Arkansas, 1872 (delegation chair), 1876, 1880, 1884, 1888, 1892, 1896 (speaker), 1908, 1912; member of Republican National Committee from Arkansas, 1872-74, 1896-1912; U.S. Minister to Mexico, 1897-98; U.S. Ambassador to Mexico, 1898-1905. Died in Washington, D.C., August 25, 1914 (age 81 years, 18 days). Interment at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Va.
  Relatives: Son of John Clayton and Ann (Clark) Clayton; brother of John M. Clayton (born c.1833); married, December 14, 1865, to Adaline McGraw.
  Clay County, Ark. may have been named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary
  Image source: New York Public Library
Grover Cleveland Grover Cleveland (1837-1908) — also known as Stephen Grover Cleveland; "Uncle Jumbo"; "The Veto Mayor"; "Grover The Good"; "The Sage of Princeton"; "Dumb Prophet"; "Buffalo Hangman"; "The Veto President"; "Beast of Buffalo"; "Big Steve" — of Buffalo, Erie County, N.Y.; Princeton, Mercer County, N.J.; Tamworth, Carroll County, N.H. Born in Caldwell, Essex County, N.J., March 18, 1837. Democrat. Lawyer; Erie County Sheriff, 1870-73; mayor of Buffalo, N.Y., 1882; Governor of New York, 1883-85; President of the United States, 1885-89, 1893-97; defeated, 1888. Presbyterian. Member, Sigma Chi. Elected to the Hall of Fame for Great Americans in 1935. Died in Princeton, Mercer County, N.J., June 24, 1908 (age 71 years, 98 days). Interment at Princeton Cemetery, Princeton, N.J.; statue at City Hall Grounds, Buffalo, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Rev. Richard Falley Cleveland (1804-1853) and Anne (Neal) Cleveland (1806-1882); married, June 2, 1886, to Frances Folsom (1864-1947) and Frances Clara Folsom; father of Richard Folsom Cleveland (1897-1974) (son-in-law of Thomas Frank Gailor; brother-in-law of Frank Hoyt Gailor); first cousin once removed of Francis Landon Cleveland; second cousin of James Harlan Cleveland; second cousin once removed of James Harlan Cleveland Jr.; second cousin twice removed of Jonathan Usher and Joseph Wheeler Bloodgood; third cousin once removed of John Palmer Usher and Robert Cleveland Usher; third cousin thrice removed of Ephraim Safford and Isaiah Kidder; fourth cousin once removed of Samuel Lord and Rollin Usher Tyler.
  Political family: Kellogg-Adams-Seymour-Chapin family of Connecticut and New York (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Cross-reference: Henry T. Ellett — Wilson S. Bissell — David King Udall — Edward S. Bragg — Thomas F. Grady — Lyman K. Bass — George B. Cortelyou
  Cleveland counties in Ark. and Okla. are named for him.
  Mount Cleveland, a volcano on Chuginadak Island, Alaska, is named for him.  — The town of Grover, North Carolina, is named for him.  — The Cleveland National Forest (established 1908), in San Diego, Riverside, Orange counties, California, is named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: Grover C. CookGrover C. MeyrsGrover C. TalbotGrover C. HelmGrover C. RobertsonG. C. CooleyGrover A. WhalenGrover C. TaylorGrover C. WinnGrover C. LukeGrover C. AlbrightGrover Cleveland WelshGrover C. BelknapGrover C. WorrellGrover B. HillGrover C. DillmanGrover C. BrennemanGrover C. GeorgeGrover C. MitchellGrover C. LadnerGrover C. HallGrover C. TyeGrover C. CiselGrover C. HedrickGrover C. HunterGrover C. MontgomeryGrover C. FarwellGrover C. GillinghamGrover C. StudivanGrover C. LayneGrover C. HudsonGrover C. CombsGrover C. SnyderGrover C. GuernseyGrover C. HendersonGrover C. SmithGrover C. JacksonGrover C. HunterGrover C. BowerGrover C. LandGrover C. MoritzGrover C. GreggGrover C. Richman, Jr.Grover C. AndersonGrover C. ChrissGrover C. CriswellGrover C. BrownGrover C. Robinson III
  Coins and currency: His portrait appeared on the U.S. $20 bill (1914-28), and on the $1,000 bill (1928-46).
  Campaign slogan (1884): "We love him for the enemies he has made."
  Opposition slogan (1884): "Ma, Ma, Where's My Pa?"
  See also National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Books about Grover Cleveland: Alyn Brodsky, Grover Cleveland : A Study in Character — H. Paul Jeffers, An Honest President: The Life and Presidencies of Grover Cleveland — Mark Wahlgren Summers, Rum, Romanism, & Rebellion : The Making of a President, 1884 — Henry F. Graff, Grover Cleveland — Jeff C. Young, Grover Cleveland (for young readers)
  Critical books about Grover Cleveland: Matthew Algeo, The President Is a Sick Man: the Supposedly Virtuous Grover Cleveland Survives a Secret Surgery at Sea and Vilifies the Courageous Newspaperman Who Dared Expose the Truth — Charles Lachman, A Secret Life : The Lies and Scandals of President Grover Cleveland
  Image source: New York Red Book 1896
  Duncan Lamont Clinch (1787-1849) — also known as Duncan L. Clinch — of St. Marys, Camden County, Ga. Born in Edgecombe County, N.C., April 6, 1787. U.S. Representative from Georgia at-large, 1844-45. Slaveowner. Died in Macon, Bibb County, Ga., November 27, 1849 (age 62 years, 235 days). Interment at Bonaventure Cemetery, Savannah, Ga.
  Relatives: Son-in-law of William Houstoun (1755-1813); married to Elizabeth Houstown.
  Clinch County, Ga. is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
De_Witt Clinton De Witt Clinton (1769-1828) — also known as "Father of the Erie Canal" — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in Napanoch, Ulster County, N.Y., March 2, 1769. Democrat. Lawyer; member of New York state assembly from New York County, 1797-98; member of New York state senate Southern District, 1798-1802, 1805-11; delegate to New York state constitutional convention, 1801; member of New York council of appointment, 1801; U.S. Senator from New York, 1802-03; mayor of New York City, N.Y., 1803-07, 1808-10, 1811-15; Lieutenant Governor of New York, 1811-13; candidate for President of the United States, 1812; Governor of New York, 1817-23, 1825-28; died in office 1828. Member, Freemasons. Chief advocate for the Erie Canal, completed 1825. Slaveowner. Died, from heart failure, in Albany, Albany County, N.Y., February 11, 1828 (age 58 years, 346 days). Original interment at Clinton Cemetery, Little Britain, N.Y.; reinterment at Green-Wood Cemetery, Brooklyn, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of James Clinton and Mary (De Witt) Clinton (1737-1795); half-brother of James Graham Clinton; brother of Charles Clinton, George Clinton Jr., Mary Clinton (1773-1808; who married Ambrose Spencer (1765-1848)) and Katherine Clinton (1778-1837; who married Ambrose Spencer (1765-1848)); married, February 13, 1796, to Maria Franklin (1775-1818); married, May 8, 1819, to Catherine Livingston Jones (1775-1870); father of George William Clinton (1807-1885); nephew of George Clinton; first cousin of Jacob Hasbrouck DeWitt; first cousin once removed of Charles De Witt; first cousin five times removed of Abraham Owen Smoot III and Isaac Albert Smoot; second cousin once removed of Charles D. Bruyn and Charles Gerrit De Witt; second cousin twice removed of David Miller De Witt.
  Political families: Clinton-DeWitt family of New York; DeWitt-Bruyn-Hasbrouck-Kellogg family of New York (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Cross-reference: Peter Gansevoort
  Clinton counties in Ill., Ind., Iowa, Ky., Mich., Mo. and Pa., and DeWitt County, Ill., are named for him.
  The township and city of DeWitt, Michigan, are named for him.  — The city of De Witt, Iowa, is named for him.  — The village of DeWitt, Illinois, is named for him.  — The city of De Witt, Missouri, is named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: De Witt C. StevensDeWitt C. WalkerDe Witt C. StanfordDe Witt C. LittlejohnDe Witt C. GageDeWitt C. ClarkDe Witt C. LeachDewitt C. WestJohn DeWitt Clinton AtkinsDeWitt C. WilsonDe Witt C. MorrisD. C. GiddingsDeWitt C. HoughDeWitt C. JonesDe Witt C. TowerD. C. CoolmanDeWitt Clinton CregierDeWitt C. HoytDeWitt Clinton SenterDe Witt C. RuggDeWitt C. AllenDeWitt C. PeckDeWitt C. RichmanDewitt C. AldenDeWitt C. CramDe Witt C. BoltonDeWitt C. HuntingtonDeWitt C. JonesDeWitt C. PondDe Witt C. CarrDeWitt C. PierceDe Witt C. BadgerDeWitt C. DominickDeWitt C. BeckerDe Witt C. TitusDe Witt C. WinchellDewitt C. TurnerDewitt C. RuscoeDeWitt C. BrownDeWitt C. FrenchDe Witt C. FlanaganDeWitt C. ColeDeWitt C. TalmageDewitt Clinton ChaseDe Witt C. Poole, Jr.DeWitt C. CunninghamDewitt C. Chastain
  Coins and currency: His portrait appeared on the U.S. $1,000 note in 1898-1905.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Books about De Witt Clinton: Evan Cornog, The Birth of Empire : DeWitt Clinton and the American Experience, 1769-1828
  Image source: New York Public Library
George Clinton George Clinton (1739-1812) — of Ulster County, N.Y.; New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in Little Britain, Orange County, N.Y., July 26, 1739. Delegate to Continental Congress from New York, 1775-76; Governor of New York, 1777-95, 1801-04; delegate to New York convention to ratify U.S. constitution from Ulster County, 1788; member of New York state assembly from New York County, 1800-01; Vice President of the United States, 1805-12; died in office 1812. Christian Reformed. Scotch-Irish ancestry. Member, Freemasons. Died in Washington, D.C., April 20, 1812 (age 72 years, 269 days). Original interment at Congressional Cemetery, Washington, D.C.; reinterment in 1908 at Old Dutch Churchyard, Kingston, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Charles Clinton (1690-1773) and Elizabeth (Denniston) Clinton (1701-1779); brother of James Clinton; married, February 7, 1770, to Cornelia Tappen (1744-1800); father of Catherine Clinton (1770-1811; who married Pierre Van Cortlandt Jr.) and Elizabeth Denniston Clinton (1780-1825; who married Matthias Burnett Tallmadge); uncle of Charles Clinton (1767-1829), De Witt Clinton, George Clinton Jr. (1771-1809), Mary Clinton (1773-1808; who married Ambrose Spencer (1765-1848)), Katherine Clinton (1778-1837; who married Ambrose Spencer (1765-1848)) and James Graham Clinton; granduncle of George William Clinton.
  Political families: Clinton-DeWitt family of New York; DeWitt-Bruyn-Hasbrouck-Kellogg family of New York (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Clinton counties in N.Y. and Ohio are named for him.
  See also congressional biography — National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about George Clinton: John P. Kaminski, George Clinton : Yeoman Politician of the New Republic
  Image source: New York Public Library
  Thomas Willis Cobb (1784-1830) — also known as Thomas W. Cobb — of Lexington, Oglethorpe County, Ga.; Greensboro, Greene County, Ga. Born in Columbia County, Ga., 1784. Lawyer; U.S. Representative from Georgia at-large, 1817-21, 1823-24; U.S. Senator from Georgia, 1824-28; superior court judge in Georgia, 1828-30. Slaveowner. Died in Greensboro, Greene County, Ga., February 1, 1830 (age about 45 years). Interment at Greensboro Cemetery, Greensboro, Ga.
  Cobb County, Ga. is named for him.
  Epitaph: In his domestic circle he was fond and affectionate. "As a friend he was ardent and devoted. As a man, honorable, generous, and sincere. As a statesman, independent, and inflexible. As a judge, pure, and incorruptible. Amiable in private and useful in public life, his death was a deep affliction to his children, his friends, and his country"; "An honest man's the noblest work of God."
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  William Cocke (1747-1828) — Born in Amelia County, Va., September 6, 1747. Member of Virginia House of Burgesses, 1774; general in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; delegate to Tennessee state constitutional convention, 1796; U.S. Senator from Tennessee, 1796-97, 1797, 1799-1805; circuit judge in Tennessee, 1809-12; general in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812; member of Mississippi state legislature, 1822. Died in Columbus, Lowndes County, Miss., August 22, 1828 (age 80 years, 351 days). Interment at Friendship Cemetery, Columbus, Miss.
  Relatives: Son of Abraham Cocke (1690-1760) and Mary Polly Anne (Batte) Cocke (1710-1780); father of John Alexander Cocke; grandfather of Frederick Bird Smith Cocke and William Michael Cocke; second great-grandfather of William Alexander Cocke (1873-1959); third great-grandfather of Luke Lea.
  Political family: Lea-Cocke family of Tennessee.
  Cocke County, Tenn. is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  George S. S. Codington — also known as G. S. S. Codington — of Medary, Brookings County, Dakota Territory (now S.Dak.). Minister; member of Dakota territorial House of Representatives, 1877-78. Congregationalist or Presbyterian. Died of tuberculosis in Wisconsin. Burial location unknown.
  Codington County, S.Dak. is named for him.
  John Coffee (1782-1836) — of Georgia. Born in Prince Edward County, Va., December 3, 1782. Democrat. Member of Georgia state legislature, 1820; U.S. Representative from Georgia at-large, 1833-36; died in office 1836. Slaveowner. Died near Jacksonville, Telfair County, Ga., September 25, 1836 (age 53 years, 297 days). Original interment at a private or family graveyard, Telfair County, Ga.; reinterment in 1921 at McRae City Cemetery, McRae, Ga.; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery, Washington, D.C.
  Coffee County, Ga. is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  A. M. Coffey (born c.1805) — of Kansas. Born about 1805. Member of Kansas territorial legislature, 1840. Burial location unknown.
  Coffey County, Kan. is named for him.
Richard Coke Richard Coke (1829-1897) — of Waco, McLennan County, Tex. Born in Williamsburg, Va., March 13, 1829. Democrat. Served in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; state court judge in Texas, 1865; justice of Texas state supreme court, 1866; Governor of Texas, 1874-76; U.S. Senator from Texas, 1877-95. Slaveowner. Died in Waco, McLennan County, Tex., May 14, 1897 (age 68 years, 62 days). Interment at Oakwood Cemetery, Waco, Tex.
  Relatives: Nephew of Richard Coke Jr. (1790-1851).
  Coke County, Tex. is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — National Governors Association biography
  Image source: Library of Congress
  Robert M. Coleman (1799-1837) — also known as R. M. Coleman — of Texas. Born in Kentucky, 1799. Delegate to Texas Consultation of 1835 from District of Mina, 1835; delegate to Texas Republic Republic constitutional convention from District of Mina, 1836; signer, Texas Declaration of Independence, 1836. Drowned in the Brazos River at Velasco, Brazoria County, Tex., July 1, 1837 (age about 38 years). Burial location unknown.
  Coleman County, Tex. is named for him.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Edward Coles (1786-1868) — of Madison County, Ill. Born in Albemarle County, Va., December 15, 1786. Governor of Illinois, 1822-26. Slaveowner. Died in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., July 7, 1868 (age 81 years, 205 days). Cenotaph at Valley View Cemetery, Edwardsville, Ill.
  Relatives: Brother-in-law of John Rutherford (1792-1866).
  Coles County, Ill. is named for him.
  See also National Governors Association biography
  Books about Edward Coles: David Ress, Governor Edward Coles and the Vote to Forbid Slavery in Illinois, 1823-1824 — Suzanne Cooper Guasco, Confronting Slavery: Edward Coles and the Rise of Antislavery Politics in Nineteenth-Century America
Schuyler Colfax Schuyler Colfax Jr. (1823-1885) — also known as "The Christian Statesman"; "Smiler" — of South Bend, St. Joseph County, Ind. Born in New York, New York County, N.Y., March 23, 1823. Delegate to Indiana state constitutional convention, 1850-51; delegate to Whig National Convention from Indiana, 1852; U.S. Representative from Indiana 9th District, 1855-69; Speaker of the U.S. House, 1863-69; Vice President of the United States, 1869-73; candidate for Republican nomination for Vice President, 1872. Member, Odd Fellows; Freemasons. Died in Mankato, Blue Earth County, Minn., January 13, 1885 (age 61 years, 296 days). Interment at South Bend City Cemetery, South Bend, Ind.
  Relatives: Son of Schuyler Washington Colfax (1792-1822) and Hannah (Stryker) Colfax (1805-1872); married 1844 to Evelyn Clark (1823-1863); married, November 18, 1868, to Ellen Maria Wade (niece of Benjamin Franklin Wade (1800-1878) and Edward Wade); father of Schuyler Colfax III.
  Political family: Colfax-Wade family.
  Colfax counties in Neb. and N.M. are named for him.
  The city of Schuyler, Nebraska, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about Schuyler Colfax: Willard H. Smith, Schuyler Colfax : The changing fortunes of a political idol — James S. Brisbin, The campaign lives of Ulysses S. Grant and Schuyler Colfax — Willard H. Smith, Schuyler Colfax and the political upheaval of 1854-1855 — Willard H. Smith, Schuyler Colfax: a reappraisal
  Image source: James G. Blaine, Twenty Years of Congress, vol. 2 (1886)
  James Collinsworth (1806-1838) — Born in Tennessee, 1806. U.S. Attorney for the Western District of Tennessee, 1829-35; served in the Texas Army during the Texas War of Independence; delegate to Texas Republic Republic constitutional convention from District of Brazoria, 1836; signer, Texas Declaration of Independence, 1836; Texas Republic Secretary of State, 1836; Attorney General of the Texas Republic, 1836; member of Texas Republic Senate from District of Brazoria, 1836; justice of Texas Republic supreme court, 1837. Member, Freemasons. While a candidate for the presidency of the Texas Republic, jumped off a boat and drowned in Galveston Bay, 1838 (age about 32 years). Interment at Founders Memorial Park, Houston, Tex.
  Collingsworth County, Tex. is named for him.
  Walter Terry Colquitt (1799-1855) — also known as Walter T. Colquitt — of Columbus, Muscogee County, Ga. Born in Halifax County, Va., December 27, 1799. Member of Georgia state legislature, 1830; U.S. Representative from Georgia at-large, 1839-40, 1842-43; U.S. Senator from Georgia, 1843-48. Slaveowner. Died in Macon, Bibb County, Ga., May 7, 1855 (age 55 years, 131 days). Interment at Linwood Cemetery, Columbus, Ga.
  Relatives: Father of Alfred Holt Colquitt (1824-1894); first cousin by marriage of Joseph Lane.
  Political family: Lane-Colquitt family of North Carolina.
  Colquitt County, Ga. is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  Henry Wharton Conway (1793-1827) — also known as Henry W. Conway — of Little Rock, Pulaski County, Ark. Born near Greeneville, Greene County, Tenn., March 18, 1793. Served in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812; postmaster at Little Rock, Ark., 1821-23; Delegate to U.S. Congress from Arkansas Territory, 1823-27; died in office 1827. Mortally wounded in a duel with Robert Crittenden on October 29, 1827, and died at Arkansas Post, Arkansas County, Ark., November 9, 1827 (age 34 years, 236 days). Interment at Scull Cemetery, Arkansas Post, Ark.
  Relatives: Son of Thomas C. Conway (1771-1835) and Nancy Ann Elizabeth (Rector) Conway (1771-1845); brother of James Sevier Conway, William Conway and Elias Nelson Conway; first cousin of Ambrose Hundley Sevier and Henry Massey Rector (1816-1899); second cousin twice removed of George Taylor Conway and Walter B. Conway; second cousin thrice removed of Charles Mitchell Conway; third cousin of James Lawson Kemper.
  Political family: Conway-Norvell-Johnson-Carroll family.
  Conway County, Ark. is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Daniel Pope Cook (1794-1827) — of Edwardsville, Madison County, Ill. Born in Scott County, Ky., October 16, 1794. Lawyer; Illinois state attorney general, 1819; U.S. Representative from Illinois at-large, 1819-27; U.S. Commercial Agent (Consul) in Havana, 1827. Died in Scott County, Ky., October 16, 1827 (age 33 years, 0 days). Original interment at Hutchinson Cemetery, Springfield, Ill.; reinterment in 1866 at Oak Ridge Cemetery, Springfield, Ill.
  Relatives: Son of Mary Jane (Mothershead) Cook (1748-1840) and John Dillard Cook (1753-1828); brother of Nathaniel Cook and John Dillard Cook (1789-1852); married, May 6, 1821, to Julia Catherine Edwards (1801-1830; daughter of Ninian Edwards; niece of Cyrus Edwards); father of John Pope Cook.
  Political family: Edwards-Cook family (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Cook County, Ill. is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Philip Cook (1817-1894) — of Americus, Sumter County, Ga. Born in Twiggs County, Ga., July 31, 1817. Democrat. Member of Georgia state senate, 1850; general in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; delegate to Georgia state constitutional convention, 1865; U.S. Representative from Georgia 3rd District, 1873-83; secretary of state of Georgia, 1890-94; died in office 1894. Slaveowner. Died in Atlanta, Fulton County, Ga., May 21, 1894 (age 76 years, 294 days). Interment at Rose Hill Cemetery, Macon, Ga.
  Cook County, Ga. is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  William Gordon Cooke (1808-1847) — of Texas. Born in Fredericksburg, Va., March 26, 1808. Served in the Texas Army during the Texas War of Independence; member of Texas Republic House of Representatives, 1844-45; Texas Republic Secretary of War and Marine, 1845-46; candidate for U.S. Representative from Texas, 1846; Adjutant General of Texas, 1846-47; died in office 1847. Member, Freemasons. Died of tuberculosis, at Seguin, Guadalupe County, Tex., December 24, 1847 (age 39 years, 273 days). Original interment somewhere in Geronimo, Tex.; reinterment in 1937 at Texas State Cemetery, Austin, Tex.
  Relatives: Nephew by marriage of José Antonio Navarro (1795-1871).
  Political family: Navarro family of San Antonio, Texas.
  Cooke County, Tex. is named for him.
  Cooke Avenue, in San Antonio, Texas, is named for him.
Dighton Corson Dighton Corson (1827-1915) — of Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, Wis.; Virginia City, Storey County, Nev.; Deadwood, Lawrence County, Dakota Territory (now S.Dak.); Pierre, Hughes County, S.Dak. Born in Canaan, Somerset County, Maine, October 21, 1827. Lawyer; member of Wisconsin state assembly, 1858; Milwaukee County District Attorney, 1859; District Attorney, 1st Judicial District of Nevada; delegate to South Dakota state constitutional convention, 1885, 1889; judge of South Dakota state supreme court 1st District, 1889-1913. Died in Pierre, Hughes County, S.Dak., May 7, 1915 (age 87 years, 198 days). Interment at Mt. Muncie Cemetery, Lansing, Kan.
  Relatives: Son of Nancy (Tuttle) Corson (1787-1863) and Isaac Corson; married, May 22, 1882, to Elizabeth Hoffman.
  Corson County, S.Dak. is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: South Dakota Legislative Manual, 1903
  Leonard Covington (1768-1813) — of Maryland. Born in Aquasco, Prince George's County, Md., October 30, 1768. Democrat. U.S. Representative from Maryland at-large, 1805-07; member of Maryland state senate, 1807-09; general in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812. Slaveowner. Mortally wounded in the Battle of Chrysler's Field, and died in Frenchs Mills (now Fort Covington), Franklin County, N.Y., November 14, 1813 (age 45 years, 15 days). Original interment somewhere in Fort Covington, N.Y.; reinterment in 1820 at Mt. Covington, Sackets Harbor, N.Y.; cenotaph at Military Post Cemetery, Sackets Harbor, N.Y.
  Covington counties in Ala. and Miss. are named for him.
  The city of Covington, Kentucky, is named for him.  — The city of Covington, Georgia, is named for him.  — The town of Covington, New York, is named for him.  — Fort Covington (early 19th century blockhouse) and the town of Fort Covington, New York, were named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Robert Craig (1792-1852) — of Virginia. Born near Christiansburg, Montgomery County, Va., 1792. Democrat. Member of Virginia state legislature, 1820; U.S. Representative from Virginia, 1829-33, 1835-41 (20th District 1829-33, 5th District 1835-37, 4th District 1837-39, 5th District 1839-41). Slaveowner. Died in Roanoke County, Va., November 25, 1852 (age about 60 years). Interment a private or family graveyard, Roanoke County, Va.
  Craig County, Va. is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Thomas B. Craighead (b. 1800) — of Mississippi. Born in 1800. Member of Mississippi state senate, 1840. Burial location unknown.
  Craighead County, Ark. is named for him.
  Samuel Johnson Crawford (1835-1913) — of Garnett, Anderson County, Kan. Born near Bedford, Lawrence County, Ind., April 10, 1835. Republican. Member of Kansas state house of representatives, 1861; general in the Union Army during the Civil War; Governor of Kansas, 1865-68; resigned 1868; member of Republican National Committee from Kansas, 1866-68. Died in Topeka, Shawnee County, Kan., October 21, 1913 (age 78 years, 194 days). Interment at Topeka Cemetery, Topeka, Kan.
  Relatives: Father of Florence Crawford (who married Arthur Capper (1865-1951)).
  Crawford County, Kan. is named for him.
  See also National Governors Association biography
  William Harris Crawford (1772-1834) — also known as William H. Crawford — of Lexington, Oglethorpe County, Ga. Born in Nelson County, Va., February 24, 1772. Democrat. Member of Georgia state house of representatives, 1803; U.S. Senator from Georgia, 1807-13; U.S. Minister to France, 1813-15; U.S. Secretary of War, 1815-16; U.S. Secretary of the Treasury, 1816-25; candidate for President of the United States, 1824; state court judge in Georgia, 1827. Slaveowner. Died in Oglethorpe County, Ga., September 15, 1834 (age 62 years, 203 days). Interment a private or family graveyard, Oglethorpe County, Ga.
  Relatives: Uncle of Nathan Crawford Barnett (c.1801-1890).
  Crawford counties in Ark., Ga., Ill., Ind., Iowa, Mo. and Wis. are named for him.
  Politician named for him: Crawford Wheatley
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier
  Books about William Harris Crawford: Philip Jackson Green, The life of William Harris Crawford — Philip Jackson Green, The public life of William Harris Crawford, 1807-1825 — Everette Wayne Cutler, William H. Crawford: A contextual biography — Robert Coleman Lorish, William H. Crawford and the presidential election of 1824
Charles F. Crisp Charles Frederick Crisp (1845-1896) — also known as Charles F. Crisp — of Ellaville, Schley County, Ga.; Americus, Sumter County, Ga. Born in Sheffield, Yorkshire, England, of American parents, January 29, 1845. Democrat. Served in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; lawyer; superior court judge in Georgia, 1876-82; U.S. Representative from Georgia 3rd District, 1883-96; died in office 1896; Speaker of the U.S. House, 1891-95. Died in Atlanta, Fulton County, Ga., October 23, 1896 (age 51 years, 268 days). Interment at Oak Grove Cemetery, Americus, Ga.
  Relatives: Father of Charles Robert Crisp (1870-1937).
  Crisp County, Ga. is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  Image source: The Parties and The Men (1896)
  John Jordan Crittenden (1787-1863) — also known as John J. Crittenden — of Illinois; Russellville, Logan County, Ky.; Frankfort, Franklin County, Ky. Born near Versailles, Woodford County, Ky., September 10, 1787. Lawyer; Illinois territory attorney general, 1809-10; member of Kentucky state house of representatives, 1811-17, 1825-29; served in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812; U.S. Senator from Kentucky, 1817-19, 1835-41, 1842-48, 1855-61; Presidential Elector for Kentucky, 1824; U.S. Attorney for Kentucky, 1827-29; secretary of state of Kentucky, 1834-35; U.S. Attorney General, 1841, 1850-53; Governor of Kentucky, 1848-50; U.S. Representative from Kentucky 8th District, 1861-63. Two of his sons were generals on opposite sides in the Civil War; a grandson of his was killed in Gen. Custer's expedition against the Sioux in 1876. Slaveowner. Died in Frankfort, Franklin County, Ky., July 26, 1863 (age 75 years, 319 days). Interment at Frankfort Cemetery, Frankfort, Ky.
  Relatives: Son of John Crittenden and Judith Turpin (Harris) Crittenden (1760-1800); brother of Thomas Turpin Crittenden and Robert Crittenden; married 1811 to Sarah O. Lee (1787-1824); married 1826 to Maria Knox Innes (1796-1851); married 1853 to Elizabeth Moss (1804-1873); father of Thomas Leonidas Crittenden; uncle of Alexander Parker Crittenden and Thomas Theodore Crittenden; granduncle of Thomas Theodore Crittenden Jr. (1863-1938); first cousin twice removed of Thomas Jefferson; second cousin once removed of Martha Jefferson Randolph and Dabney Carr; third cousin of Francis Wayles Eppes, Dabney Smith Carr, Benjamin Franklin Randolph, Meriwether Lewis Randolph and George Wythe Randolph; third cousin once removed of Thomas Jefferson Coolidge and Frederick Madison Roberts; third cousin twice removed of John Gardner Coolidge and Edith Wilson.
  Political families: Harrison-Randolph-Marshall-Cabell family of Virginia; Lee-Randolph family (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Crittenden County, Ky. is named for him.
  The World War II Liberty ship SS John J. Crittenden (built 1942-43 at Jacksonville, Florida; scrapped 1968) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Robert Crittenden (1797-1834) — of Arkansas. Born near Versailles, Woodford County, Ky., January 1, 1797. Secretary of Arkansas Territory, 1819-29. Mortally wounded Henry Wharton Conway in a duel on October 29, 1827. Died in Vicksburg, Warren County, Miss., December 18, 1834 (age 37 years, 351 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of John Crittenden and Judith Turpin (Harris) Crittenden (1760-1800); brother of John Jordan Crittenden and Thomas Turpin Crittenden; uncle of Alexander Parker Crittenden (1816-1870), Thomas Leonidas Crittenden and Thomas Theodore Crittenden; granduncle of Thomas Theodore Crittenden Jr.; first cousin twice removed of Thomas Jefferson; second cousin once removed of Martha Jefferson Randolph and Dabney Carr; third cousin of Francis Wayles Eppes, Dabney Smith Carr, Benjamin Franklin Randolph, Meriwether Lewis Randolph and George Wythe Randolph; third cousin once removed of Thomas Jefferson Coolidge and Frederick Madison Roberts; third cousin twice removed of John Gardner Coolidge and Edith Wilson.
  Political families: Harrison-Randolph-Marshall-Cabell family of Virginia; Lee-Randolph family (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Crittenden County, Ark. is named for him.
  David Crockett (1786-1836) — also known as Davy Crockett; "King of the Wild Frontier" — of Tennessee. Born in Greene County, Tenn., August 17, 1786. Democrat. Member of Tennessee state house of representatives, 1821; U.S. Representative from Tennessee, 1827-31, 1833-35 (9th District 1827-31, 12th District 1833-35); served in the Texas Army during the Texas War of Independence. Member, Freemasons. Slaveowner. Killed while defending the Alamo, in San Antonio, Bexar County, Tex., March 6, 1836 (age 49 years, 202 days). Cremated; ashes interred at San Fernando Cathedral, San Antonio, Tex.
  Relatives: Son of John Crockett and Rebecca (Hawkins) Crockett; married, August 16, 1806, to Mary 'Polly' Finley; married 1815 to Elizabeth Patton; father of John Wesley Crockett; first cousin twice removed of Charles Carroll Walcutt (1838-1898).
  Political family: Crockett-Walcutt family of Tennessee.
  Crockett counties in Tenn. and Tex. are named for him.
  The Davy Crockett National Forest (established 1936), in Houston and Trinity counties, Texas, is named for him.
  Personal motto: "Be sure you're right, then go ahead."
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books by David Crockett: A Narrative of the Life of David Crockett of the State of Tennessee
  Books about David Crockett: William C. Davis, Three Roads to the Alamo: The Lives and Fortunes of David Crockett, James Bowie, and William Barret Travis — Constance Rourke, Davy Crockett — Elaine Alphin, Davy Crockett (for young readers)
  Edward Cross (1798-1887) — of Washington, Hempstead County, Ark. Born in Hawkins City (unknown county), Tenn., November 11, 1798. Democrat. U.S. Representative from Arkansas at-large, 1839-45. Slaveowner. Died near Washington, Hempstead County, Ark., April 6, 1887 (age 88 years, 146 days). Interment a private or family graveyard, Hempstead County, Ark.
  Cross County, Ark. is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  John H. Crowley (born c.1851) — of Colorado. Born about 1851. Member of Colorado state senate, 1890. Burial location unknown.
  Crowley County, Colo. is named for him.
  David Browning Culberson (1830-1900) — also known as David B. Culberson — of Jefferson, Marion County, Tex. Born in Troup County, Ga., September 29, 1830. Democrat. Member of Texas state house of representatives, 1859; colonel in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; member of Texas state senate, 1873; U.S. Representative from Texas, 1875-97 (2nd District 1875-83, 4th District 1883-97). Died in Jefferson, Marion County, Tex., May 7, 1900 (age 69 years, 220 days). Interment at Oakwood Cemetery, Jefferson, Tex.
  Relatives: Father of Charles Allen Culberson (1855-1925).
  Culberson County, Tex. is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Thomas B. Cuming (d. 1858) — of Nebraska. Secretary of Nebraska Territory, 1854-58; died in office 1858; Governor of Nebraska Territory, 1854-55, 1857-58. Died March 23, 1858. Original interment at a private or family graveyard, Douglas County, Neb.; subsequent interment at Prospect Hill Cemetery, Omaha, Neb.; reinterment at Holy Sepulchre Cemetery, Omaha, Neb.
  Cuming County, Neb. is named for him.
  George Curry (1861-1947) — of Kingston, Sierra County, N.M. Born in Bayou Sara, West Feliciana Parish, La., April 3, 1861. Republican. Lincoln County Clerk, 1888-90; Lincoln County Assessor, 1890-92; Lincoln County Sheriff, 1892-94; member of New Mexico territorial senate, 1894-96; served in the U.S. Army during the Spanish-American War; Otero County Sheriff, 1899; governor, Ambos Camarine, Philippine Islands, 1901; chief of police, Manila, P.I., 1902; governor, Isabella, P.I., 1904-05; governor, Samar, P.I., 1905-07; Governor of New Mexico Territory, 1907-10; U.S. Representative from New Mexico at-large, 1911-13. Catholic. Member, Knights of Pythias; Elks. Died in Albuquerque, Bernalillo County, N.M., November 24, 1947 (age 86 years, 235 days). Interment at Santa Fe National Cemetery, Santa Fe, N.M.
  Relatives: Son of George Curry and Clara Curry.
  Curry County, N.M. is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
  George Law Curry (1820-1878) — also known as George L. Curry — of Oregon. Born in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., July 2, 1820. Democrat. Newspaper publisher; jeweler; member of Oregon territorial legislature, 1848-49, 1851-52; secretary of Oregon Territory, 1853-55; Governor of Oregon Territory, 1853, 1854, 1854-59; candidate for U.S. Senator from Oregon, 1860. Died in Portland, Multnomah County, Ore., July 28, 1878 (age 58 years, 26 days). Interment at Lone Fir Cemetery, Portland, Ore.
  Curry County, Ore. is named for him.
  The World War II Liberty ship SS George L. Curry (built 1943 at Portland, Oregon; scrapped 1968) was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Samuel Sam Dale (1772-1841) — also known as Sam Dale — of Alabama; Mississippi. Born in Rockbridge County, Va., 1772. Served in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812; member of Alabama state house of representatives, 1819; member of Mississippi state house of representatives, 1836. Scotch-Irish ancestry. Died near Daleville, Lauderdale County, Miss., May 24, 1841 (age about 68 years). Original interment at a private or family graveyard, Lauderdale County, Miss.; reinterment at Oakwood Cemetery, Montgomery, Ala.
  Dale County, Ala. is named for him.
  The community of Daleville, Mississippi, is named for him.  — Sam Dale State Park, on Highway 39, near Daleville, Mississippi, is named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS Sam Dale (built 1944 at New Orleans, Louisiana; scrapped 1973) was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Alexander James Dallas (1759-1817) — also known as Alexander J. Dallas — of Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa. Born in Kingston, Jamaica, June 21, 1759. Lawyer; newspaper editor; secretary of the commonwealth of Pennsylvania, 1791-1801; resigned 1801; U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania, 1801-14; U.S. Secretary of the Treasury, 1814-16. Scottish ancestry. Died in Trenton, Mercer County, N.J., January 16, 1817 (age 57 years, 209 days). Interment at St. Peter's Episcopal Churchyard, Philadelphia, Pa.
  Relatives: Son of Dr. Robert Charles Dallas and Sarah Elizabeth (Cormack) Dallas; married to Arabella Maria Smith (1761-1837); father of Sophia Burrell Dallas (1784-1860; who married Richard Bache Jr.) and George Mifflin Dallas (1792-1864) (who married Sophia Chew Nicklin); grandfather of Mary Blechenden Bache (1808-1873; who married Robert John Walker), Sophia Arabella Bache (1815-1904; who married William Wallace Irwin) and George Mifflin Dallas (1839-1917); great-grandfather of Robert Walker Irwin; third great-grandfather of Claiborne de Borda Pell; fourth great-grandfather of Daniel Baugh Brewster.
  Political families: Bache-Dallas family of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Claiborne-Dallas family of Virginia and Louisiana (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Cross-reference: James G. Birney
  Dallas County, Ala. is named for him.
  The World War II Liberty ship SS Alexander J. Dallas (built 1942 at Portland, Oregon; scrapped 1966) was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  George Mifflin Dallas (1792-1864) — also known as George M. Dallas — of Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa. Born in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., July 10, 1792. Democrat. Lawyer; mayor of Philadelphia, Pa., 1828-29; U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania, 1829-31; U.S. Senator from Pennsylvania, 1831-33; Pennsylvania state attorney general, 1833-35; U.S. Minister to Russia, 1837-39; Great Britain, 1856-61; Vice President of the United States, 1845-49. Scottish ancestry. Member, Freemasons. Died in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., December 31, 1864 (age 72 years, 174 days). Interment at St. Peter's Episcopal Churchyard, Philadelphia, Pa.
  Relatives: Son of Alexander James Dallas and Arabella Maria (Smith) Dallas; brother of Sophia Burrell Dallas (1784-1860; who married Richard Bache Jr.); married, May 23, 1816, to Sophia Chew Nicklin (granddaughter of Benjamin Chew); uncle of Alexander Dallas Bache (1806-1867; physicist), Mary Blechenden Bache (1808-1873; who married Robert John Walker), Sophia Arabella Bache (1815-1904; who married William Wallace Irwin) and George Mifflin Dallas (1839-1917); granduncle of Robert Walker Irwin; second great-granduncle of Claiborne de Borda Pell; third great-granduncle of Daniel Baugh Brewster.
  Political families: Bache-Dallas family of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Claiborne-Dallas family of Virginia and Louisiana (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Dallas counties in Ark., Iowa, Mo. and Tex. are named for him.
  The city of Dallas, Texas, is named for him.
  Politician named for him: George M. Condon
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about George Mifflin Dallas: John M. Belohlavek, George Mifflin Dallas : Jacksonian Patrician
  Nathan Dane (1752-1835) — of Massachusetts. Born in Ipswich, Essex County, Mass., December 29, 1752. School teacher; lawyer; member of Massachusetts state house of representatives, 1782-85; Delegate to Continental Congress from Massachusetts, 1785-88; member of Massachusetts state senate, 1790-91, 1793-97; Presidential Elector for Massachusetts, 1812. Died in Beverly, Essex County, Mass., February 15, 1835 (age 82 years, 48 days). Interment at Beverly Central Cemetery, Beverly, Mass.
  Dane County, Wis. is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  William Darke (1736-1801) — of Berkeley County, Va. (now W.Va.). Born in Bucks County, Pa., May 6, 1736. Colonel in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; delegate to Virginia convention to ratify U.S. constitution from Berkeley County, 1788. Died in Jefferson County, Va (now W.Va.), November 26, 1801 (age 65 years, 204 days). Interment at Darke-Engle-Ronemous Cemetery, Shenandoah Junction, W.Va.
  Darke County, Ohio is named for him.
  The community of Darkesville, West Virginia, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  William Richardson Davie (1756-1820) — also known as "Father of the University of North Carolina" — of Halifax, Halifax County, N.C. Born in Egremont, England, June 22, 1756. Served in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; member, U.S. Constitutional Convention, 1787; Governor of North Carolina, 1798-99. Presbyterian. Member, Freemasons. Died in Land's Ford, Chester County, S.C., November 5, 1820 (age 64 years, 136 days). Interment at Old Waxhaw Presbyterian Church, The Waxhaws, S.C.
  Relatives: Ancestor of Preston Davie (who married May Preston Davie (1895-1975)).
  Political families: Breckinridge-Preston-Cabell family of Virginia; Davie family of Maryland (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Davie County, N.C. is named for him.
  See also National Governors Association biography
  Joseph Hamilton Daviess (1774-1811) — also known as Joe Daviess — of Danville, Boyle County, Ky.; Lexington, Fayette County, Ky. Born in Bedford County, Va., March 4, 1774. Lawyer; U.S. Attorney for Kentucky, 1800-06; major in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812. Welsh ancestry. Member, Freemasons. Around 1801, he served as a second to John Rowan in his duel with James Chambers; after Chambers was killed, he fled to avoid prosecution as accomplice to murder, and became a fugitive, but when Rowan was arrested, he returned to act as Rowan's legal counsel. Shot and killed in the Battle of Tippecanoe, in what is now Tippecanoe County, Ind., November 7, 1811 (age 37 years, 248 days). Interment at Tippecanoe Battlefield Park, Battle Ground, Ind.
  Relatives: Brother-in-law of John Marshall (1755-1835).
  Political families: Harrison-Randolph-Marshall-Cabell family of Virginia; Lee-Randolph family; Biddle-Randolph family of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Anderson-Marshall family of Ohio and West Virginia; Pendleton-Lee family of Maryland (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Daviess counties in Ind., Ky. and Mo., and Jo Daviess County, Ill., are named for him.
  Garrett Davis (1801-1872) — of Paris, Bourbon County, Ky. Born in Mt. Sterling, Montgomery County, Ky., September 10, 1801. Member of Kentucky state legislature, 1830; U.S. Representative from Kentucky, 1839-47 (12th District 1839-43, 8th District 1843-47); U.S. Senator from Kentucky, 1861-72; died in office 1872. Slaveowner. Died in Paris, Bourbon County, Ky., September 22, 1872 (age 71 years, 12 days). Interment at Paris Cemetery, Paris, Ky.
  Relatives: Brother of Amos Davis (1794-1835).
  Davis County, Iowa is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
Jefferson Davis Jefferson Finis Davis (1808-1889) — also known as Jefferson Davis — of Warrenton, Warren County, Miss.; Warren County, Miss. Born in a log cabin, Fairview, Christian County (now Todd County), Ky., June 3, 1808. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army during the Black Hawk War; candidate for Mississippi state house of representatives, 1843; Presidential Elector for Mississippi, 1844; U.S. Representative from Mississippi at-large, 1845-46; served in the U.S. Army during the Mexican War; U.S. Senator from Mississippi, 1847-51, 1857-61; candidate for Governor of Mississippi, 1851; U.S. Secretary of War, 1853-57; President of the Confederacy, 1861-65. Captured by Union forces in May 1865 and imprisoned without trial for about two years. Slaveowner. Died of bronchitis and malaria in New Orleans, Orleans Parish, La., December 6, 1889 (age 81 years, 186 days). Original interment at Metairie Cemetery, New Orleans, La.; reinterment in 1893 at Hollywood Cemetery, Richmond, Va.; memorial monument at Memorial Avenue, Richmond, Va.
  Relatives: Son of Samuel Emory Davis and Jane (Cook) Davis; married, June 17, 1835, to Sarah Knox Taylor (1814-1835; daughter of Zachary Taylor and Margaret Taylor); married, February 25, 1845, to Varina Howell (1826-1906; granddaughter of Richard Howell (1754-1802)); uncle of Mary Bradford (who married Richard Brodhead); granduncle of Jefferson Davis Brodhead and Frances Eileen Hutt (who married Thomas Edmund Dewey).
  Political families: Taylor-Brodhead family of Easton, Pennsylvania; Davis-Howell-Morgan-Agnew family of New Orleans and Shreveport, Louisiana (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Cross-reference: Jesse D. Bright — John H. Reagan — Horace Greeley — Solomon Cohen — George W. Jones — Samuel A. Roberts — William T. Sutherlin — Victor Vifquain — Charles O'Conor
  Jeff Davis County, Ga., Jefferson Davis Parish, La., Jefferson Davis County, Miss. and Jeff Davis County, Tex. are named for him.
  The World War II Liberty ship SS Jefferson Davis (built 1942 at Mobile, Alabama; scrapped 1961) was named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: J. Davis BrodheadJefferson D. HostetterJefferson D. BlountJefferson Davis CarwileJeff DavisJefferson D. HelmsJefferson Davis WigginsJefferson Davis Parris
  Coins and currency: His portrait appeared on Confederate States 50 cent notes in 1861-64.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books by Jefferson Davis: The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government (1881)
  Books about Jefferson Davis: William J. Cooper, Jr., Jefferson Davis, American : A Biography — Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis : Ex-President of the Confederate States of America : A Memoir by His Wife — William C. Davis, An Honorable Defeat: The Last Days of the Confederate Government — James Ronald Kennedy & Walter Donald Kennedy, Was Jefferson Davis Right? — Robert Penn Warren, Jefferson Davis Gets His Citizenship Back — Herman Hattaway & Richard E. Beringer, Jefferson Davis, Confederate President — Felicity Allen, Jefferson Davis: Unconquerable Heart — Clint Johnson, Pursuit: The Chase, Capture, Persecution, and Surprising Release of Confederate President Jefferson Davis
  Image source: Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper, March 9, 1861
  James William Dawes (1845-1918) — also known as James W. Dawes — of Crete, Saline County, Neb. Born in McConnelsville, Morgan County, Ohio, January 8, 1845. Republican. Lawyer; delegate to Nebraska state constitutional convention, 1875; Nebraska Republican state chair, 1876-82; member of Nebraska state senate, 1877; delegate to Republican National Convention from Nebraska, 1880; Governor of Nebraska, 1883-87. Died in Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, Wis., October 8, 1918 (age 73 years, 273 days). Interment at Forest Home Cemetery, Milwaukee, Wis.
  Relatives: Son of Dr. Edward M. Dawes (1807-1865) and Caroline (Dana) Dawes (1813-1897).
  Dawes County, Neb. is named for him.
  See also National Governors Association biography — Find-A-Grave memorial
  William Crosby Dawson (1798-1856) — also known as William C. Dawson — of Greensboro, Greene County, Ga. Born in Greensboro, Greene County, Ga., January 4, 1798. Lawyer; member of Georgia state house of representatives, 1830; U.S. Representative from Georgia at-large, 1836-41; candidate for Governor of Georgia, 1841; circuit judge in Georgia, 1845; U.S. Senator from Georgia, 1849-55. Member, Freemasons. Slaveowner. Died in Greensboro, Greene County, Ga., May 5, 1856 (age 58 years, 122 days). Interment at Greensboro Cemetery, Greensboro, Ga.
  Dawson County, Ga. is named for him.
  The city of Dawson, Georgia, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  Merritt H. Day (1844-1900) — of Scotland, Bon Homme County, Dakota Territory (now S.Dak.); Rapid City, Pennington County, S.Dak. Born in 1844. Served in the Union Army during the Civil War; member Dakota territorial council, 1879-82. Died in Rapid City, Pennington County, S.Dak., 1900 (age about 56 years). Burial location unknown.
  Day County, S.Dak. is named for him.
  Henry Dearborn (1751-1829) — of Massachusetts. Born in North Hampton, Rockingham County, N.H., February 23, 1751. Democrat. U.S. Representative from Massachusetts, 1793-97 (4th District 1793-95, 1st District 1795-97); U.S. Secretary of War, 1801-09; U.S. Minister to Portugal, 1822-24. Member, Freemasons. Died in Roxbury, Norfolk County (now part of Boston, Suffolk County), Mass., June 6, 1829 (age 78 years, 103 days). Original interment in unknown location; subsequent interment in 1834 at Mt. Auburn Cemetery, Cambridge, Mass.; reinterment in 1848 at Forest Hills Cemetery, Jamaica Plain, Boston, Mass.
  Relatives: Father of Henry Alexander Scammell Dearborn (1783-1851).
  Dearborn County, Ind. is named for him.
  The city of Dearborn, Michigan, is named for him.  — The Dearborn River, in Lewis & Clark and Cascade counties, Montana, is named for him.  — Mount Dearborn, a former military arsenal on an island in the Catawba River, Chester County, South Carolina, is named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS Henry Dearborn (built 1942 at Portland, Oregon; scrapped 1959) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary
  James William Denver (1817-1892) — also known as James W. Denver — Born near Winchester, Frederick County, Va., October 23, 1817. Served in the U.S. Army during the Mexican War; member of California state senate, 1852-53; killed newspaper editor Edward Gilbert in a duel on August 2, 1852; secretary of state of California, 1853-55; U.S. Representative from California at-large, 1855-57; secretary of Kansas Territory, 1857-58; Governor of Kansas Territory, 1857-58, 1858, 1858; general in the Union Army during the Civil War; candidate for U.S. Representative from Ohio, 1866. Died in Washington, D.C., August 9, 1892 (age 74 years, 291 days). Interment at Sugar Grove Cemetery, Wilmington, Ohio.
  Relatives: Father of Matthew Rombach Denver (1870-1954).
  Denver County, Colo. is named for him.
  The city and county of Denver, Colorado, are named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS James W. Denver (built 1943 at Baltimore, Maryland; torpedoed and lost 1943 in the Atlantic Ocean) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Jacob S. Deuel (b. 1830) — of Vermillion, Clay County, Dakota Territory (now S.Dak.). Born in Dutchess County, N.Y., 1830. Sawmill owner; member Dakota territorial council, 1862-63. German ancestry. Died in Dutchess County, N.Y. Burial location unknown.
  Deuel County, S.Dak. is named for him.
  William Pitt Dewey (d. 1900) — also known as William P. Dewey — of Yankton, Yankton County, Dakota Territory (now S.Dak.). Member Dakota territorial council, 1883-84. Died in 1900. Burial location unknown.
  Presumably named for: William Pitt
  Dewey County, S.Dak. is named for him.
  Green DeWitt (1787-1835) — of Ralls County, Mo.; Gonzales, Gonzales County, Tex. Born in Lincoln County, Ky., February 12, 1787. Served in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812; Ralls County Sheriff; delegate to Texas Convention of 1833 from District of Gonzales, 1833. Died in Monclova, Coahuila, May 18, 1835 (age 48 years, 95 days). Interment somewhere in Mexico.
  DeWitt County, Tex. is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article
  Lorenzo de Zavala (1788-1836) — also known as Manuel Lorenzo Justiniano de Zavala y Sáenz — of Mérida, Yucatan; La Porte, Harris County, Tex. Born in Tecoh, Yucatan, October 3, 1788. Active in politics in Mexico, 1812-34; imprisoned in 1814-17 by Mexican authorities over his advocacy of democratic reforms; delegate to Texas Consultation of 1835 from District of Harrisburg, 1835; delegate to Texas Republic Republic constitutional convention from District of Harrisburg, 1836; signer, Texas Declaration of Independence, 1836; Vice President of the Texas Republic, 1836. Died, of pneumonia, November 15, 1836 (age 48 years, 43 days). Interment at de Zavala Family Cemetery, La Porte, Tex.
  Relatives: Son of Anastasio de Zavala y Velázquez and Maria Bárbara Sáenz y Castro; married 1807 to Teresa Correa y Correa (died 1831); married, November 12, 1831, to Emily West.
  Zavala County, Tex. is named for him.
  William J. Dickenson — Member of Virginia state house of delegates, 1859-61, 1865-67, 1877-82. Burial location unknown.
  Dickenson County, Va. is named for him.
  Alfred M. Dickey — of North Dakota. Republican. Lieutenant Governor of North Dakota, 1889-90. Burial location unknown.
  Dickey County, N.Dak. is named for him.
Daniel S. Dickinson Daniel Stevens Dickinson (1800-1866) — also known as Daniel S. Dickinson; "Bray" — of Binghamton, Broome County, N.Y. Born in Goshen, Litchfield County, Conn., September 11, 1800. Member of New York state senate 6th District, 1837-40; Lieutenant Governor of New York, 1843-44; U.S. Senator from New York, 1844-51; New York state attorney general, 1862-63; candidate for Republican nomination for Vice President, 1864; U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York, 1865-66; died in office 1866. Died in New York, New York County, N.Y., April 12, 1866 (age 65 years, 213 days). Interment at Spring Forest Cemetery, Binghamton, N.Y.
  Dickinson counties in Iowa and Kan. are named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Image source: William C. Roberts, Leading Orators (1884)
Don M. Dickinson Donald McDonald Dickinson (1846-1917) — also known as Donald M. Dickinson; Don M. Dickinson — of Detroit, Wayne County, Mich.; Trenton, Wayne County, Mich. Born in Port Ontario, Oswego County, N.Y., January 17, 1846. Democrat. Lawyer; Michigan Democratic state chair, 1876; member of Democratic National Committee from Michigan, 1880-85; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Michigan, 1880, 1892; U.S. Postmaster General, 1888-89. Member, American Bar Association; American Historical Association. Died October 15, 1917 (age 71 years, 271 days). Interment at Elmwood Cemetery, Detroit, Mich.
  Relatives: Son of Col. Asa C. Dickinson and Minerva (Holmes) Dickinson; married, June 15, 1869, to Frances L. Platt.
  Dickinson County, Mich. is named for him.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: The Parties and The Men (1896)
  William Dickson (1770-1816) — of Tennessee. Born in Duplin County, N.C., May 5, 1770. Member of Tennessee state house of representatives, 1799-1803; Speaker of the Tennessee State House of Representatives, 1799-1803; U.S. Representative from Tennessee at-large, 1801-07. Member, Freemasons. Died in Nashville, Davidson County, Tenn., February 21, 1816 (age 45 years, 292 days). Interment somewhere in Davidson County, Tenn.
  Relatives: Cousin *** of Molton Dickson (c.1775-1835).
  Dickson County, Tenn. is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Philip Doddridge (1773-1832) — of Virginia. Born in Bedford County, Va., May 17, 1773. Member of Virginia state legislature, 1810; U.S. Representative from Virginia 18th District, 1829-32; died in office 1832. Slaveowner. Died in Washington, D.C., November 19, 1832 (age 59 years, 186 days). Interment at Congressional Cemetery, Washington, D.C.
  Relatives: Son of John Doddridge (1745-1791) and Mary (Wells) Doddridge (1748-1776); married to Juliana Parr Musser.
  Doddridge County, W.Va. is named for him.
  The World War II Liberty ship SS Philip Doddridge (built 1943 at Wilmington, North Carolina; scrapped 1969) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Augustus Caesar Dodge (1812-1883) — also known as Augustus C. Dodge — of Burlington, Des Moines County, Iowa. Born in Ste. Genevieve, Ste. Genevieve County, Mo., January 2, 1812. Democrat. Delegate to U.S. Congress from Iowa Territory, 1840; U.S. Senator from Iowa, 1848-55; U.S. Minister to Spain, 1855-59; candidate for Governor of Iowa, 1859; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Iowa, 1860; mayor of Burlington, Iowa, 1874. Scottish ancestry. Died in Burlington, Des Moines County, Iowa, November 20, 1883 (age 71 years, 322 days). Interment at Aspen Grove Cemetery, Burlington, Iowa.
  Presumably named for: Augustus Caesar
  Relatives: Son of Henry Dodge and Christiana (McDonald) Dodge (1785-1865); nephew of Lewis Fields Linn; third cousin once removed of James Knox Polk and William Hawkins Polk; third cousin twice removed of Charles Polk; fourth cousin of Augustus Sabin Chase, Marshall Tate Polk, Tasker Polk, Richard Tyler Polk and Edwin Fitzhugh Polk; fourth cousin once removed of Trusten Polk (1811-1876), Irving Hall Chase, Rufus King Polk and Frank Lyon Polk.
  Political families: Polk family; Maull family of Lewes, Delaware (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Dodge County, Neb. is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary
  Henry Dodge (1782-1867) — of Ste. Genevieve County, Mo.; Michigan; Dodgeville, Iowa County, Wis. Born near Vincennes, Knox County, Ind., October 12, 1782. Democrat. General in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812; delegate to Missouri state constitutional convention from Ste. Genevieve County, 1820; member Michigan territorial council 7th District, 1832-33; Governor of Wisconsin Territory, 1836-41, 1845-48; Delegate to U.S. Congress from Wisconsin Territory, 1841-45; U.S. Senator from Wisconsin, 1848-57. Slaveowner. Died in Burlington, Des Moines County, Iowa, June 19, 1867 (age 84 years, 250 days). Interment at Aspen Grove Cemetery, Burlington, Iowa.
  Relatives: Son of Nancy Ann (Hunter) Dodge and Israel Dodge (1760-1806); half-brother of Lewis Fields Linn; married 1800 to Christiana McDonald; father-in-law of James Clarke (1812-1850); father of Augustus Caesar Dodge; third cousin once removed of Augustus Sabin Chase (1828-1896); third cousin twice removed of Irving Hall Chase; third cousin thrice removed of Augustus Sabin Chase (1897-1970); fourth cousin once removed of David Lane Dodge.
  Political family: Polk family (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Dodge counties in Minn. and Wis., and Henry County, Iowa, are named for him.
  Fort Dodge (military installation, 1850-53), and the city of Fort Dodge, Iowa, were named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS Henry Dodge (built 1943 at Richmond, California; sold and renamed SS Alheli; sank during a storm in the North Atlantic Ocean, 1968) was originally named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  William Earle Dodge (1805-1883) — also known as William E. Dodge — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in Hartford, Hartford County, Conn., September 4, 1805. Republican. U.S. Representative from New York 8th District, 1865-67; delegate to Republican National Convention from New York, 1872. Died in New York, New York County, N.Y., February 9, 1883 (age 77 years, 158 days). Interment at Woodlawn Cemetery, Bronx, N.Y.
  Dodge County, Ga. is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Alexander William Doniphan (1808-1887) — of Liberty, Clay County, Mo.; Richmond, Ray County, Mo. Born in Maysville, Mason County, Ky., July 9, 1808. Lawyer; member of Missouri state house of representatives, 1836, 1840, 1854; in 1838, he refused to obey an order to execute Joseph Smith and other Mormon leaders, calling it "cold-blooded murder"; colonel in the U.S. Army during the Mexican War; led Doniphan's Expedition into Mexico, 1846-47; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Missouri, 1876. Died in Richmond, Ray County, Mo., August 8, 1887 (age 79 years, 30 days). Interment at Fairview Cemetery, Liberty, Mo.; statue at County Courthouse Grounds, Richmond, Mo.
  Relatives: Son-in-law of John Thorton (1786-1847); married, December 21, 1837, to Elizabeth Jane Thornton (1820-1873).
  Political family: Trigg family of Virginia.
  Doniphan County, Kan. is named for him.
  The city of Doniphan, Missouri, is named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS Alexander W. Doniphan (built 1944 at New Orleans, Louisiana; scrapped 1964) was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about Alexander William Doniphan: Roger D. Launius, Alexander William Doniphan: Portrait of a Missouri Moderate
  Stockton P. Donley (1831-1871) — of Texas. Born in Missouri, May 27, 1831. Served in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; justice of Texas state supreme court, 1866. Died February 17, 1871 (age 39 years, 266 days). Interment at Oakwood Cemetery, Tyler, Tex.
  Donley County, Tex. is named for him.
  Charles Dougherty (1801-1853) — of Georgia. Born in 1801. State court judge in Georgia, 1840. Died November 26, 1853 (age about 52 years). Interment at Old Athens Cemetery, Athens, Ga.
  Dougherty County, Ga. is named for him.
Stephen A. Douglas Stephen Arnold Douglas (1813-1861) — also known as Stephen A. Douglas; "The Little Giant" — of Quincy, Adams County, Ill.; Chicago, Cook County, Ill. Born in Brandon, Rutland County, Vt., April 23, 1813. Democrat. Member of Illinois state house of representatives, 1837-39; secretary of state of Illinois, 1840-41; justice of Illinois state supreme court, 1841-43; U.S. Representative from Illinois 5th District, 1843-47; U.S. Senator from Illinois, 1847-61; died in office 1861; candidate for Democratic nomination for President, 1852, 1856; candidate for President of the United States, 1860. Slaveowner. Died, of typhoid fever, in Chicago, Cook County, Ill., June 3, 1861 (age 48 years, 41 days). Interment at Douglas Monument Park, Chicago, Ill.
  Relatives: Father of Robert Martin Douglas; grandfather of Robert Dick Douglas (born1875).
  Political family: Douglas-Dick family of Greensboro, North Carolina.
  Douglas counties in Colo., Ga., Ill., Kan., Minn., Mo., Neb., Nev., Ore., S.Dak., Wash. and Wis. are named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Books about Stephen A. Douglas: Robert W. Johannsen, Stephen A. Douglas — James L. Huston, Stephen A. Douglas and the Dilemmas of Democratic Equality — Roy Morris, Jr., The Long Pursuit: Abraham Lincoln's Thirty-Year Struggle with Stephen Douglas for the Heart and Soul of America — Scott Farris, Almost President: The Men Who Lost the Race but Changed the Nation — Fergus M. Bordewich, America's Great Debate: Henry Clay, Stephen A. Douglas, and the Compromise That Preserved the Union
  Image source: Library of Congress
  Thomas Stevenson Drew (1802-1879) — also known as Thomas S. Drew — of Arkansas. Born in Wilson County, Tenn., August 25, 1802. Democrat. Governor of Arkansas, 1844-49; Independent Democratic candidate for U.S. Representative from Arkansas 2nd District, 1858. Died in Lipan, Hood County, Tex., 1879 (age about 76 years). Original interment somewhere in Lipan, Tex.; reinterment in 1923 at Masonic Cemetery, Pocahontas, Ark.
  Drew County, Ark. is named for him.
  See also National Governors Association biography
  Elmer Scipio Dundy (1830-1896) — also known as Elmer S. Dundy — of Falls City, Richardson County, Neb. Born in Trumbull County, Ohio, March 5, 1830. Lawyer; member Nebraska territorial council, 1858-62; justice of Nebraska territorial supreme court, 1863-67; U.S. District Judge for Nebraska, 1868. Died October 28, 1896 (age 66 years, 237 days). Interment at Moravian Cemetery, New Dorp, Staten Island, N.Y.
  Dundy County, Neb. is named for him.
  Daniel Dunklin (1790-1844) — of Washington County, Mo. Born in Greenville, Greenville County, S.C., January 14, 1790. Democrat. Lieutenant Governor of Missouri, 1828-32; Governor of Missouri, 1832-36. Died of pneumonia, August 25, 1844 (age 54 years, 224 days). Interment at Daniel Dunklin Grave State Historic Site, Herculaneum, Mo.
  Dunklin County, Mo. is named for him.
  See also National Governors Association biography
  Charles Dunn — of Wisconsin. Chief justice of Wisconsin territorial supreme court, 1836-48. Burial location unknown.
  Dunn County, Wis. is named for him.
  John P. Dunn (born c.1823) — of Bismarck, Burleigh County, N.Dak. Born about 1823. Mayor of Bismarck, N.Dak., 1860. Burial location unknown.
  Dunn County, N.Dak. is named for him.
  William Pope Duval (1784-1854) — also known as William P. Duval — of Kentucky; Calhoun County, Fla. Born in Virginia, 1784. Democrat. U.S. Representative from Kentucky at-large, 1813-15; U.S. District Judge for the Eastern District of Florida, 1821-22; Governor of Florida Territory, 1822-34; delegate to Florida state constitutional convention from Calhoun County, 1838-39; member of Florida state senate, 1839-42. He was the model for Washington Irving's character "Ralph Ringwood" and James K. Paulding's character "Nimrod Wildfire". Slaveowner. Died in Washington, D.C., March 19, 1854 (age about 69 years). Interment at Congressional Cemetery, Washington, D.C.
  Relatives: Father of Marcia Duval (who married George Washington Paschal (1812-1878)).
  Duval County, Fla. is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Robert Henry Dyer (1774-1826) — Born in North Carolina, 1774. Served in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812; member of Tennessee state senate, 1820. Died in Madison County, Tenn., May 11, 1826 (age about 51 years). Interment in private or family graveyard.
  Dyer County, Tenn. is named for him.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Peter Early (1773-1817) — of Georgia. Born near Madison, Madison County, Va., June 20, 1773. U.S. Representative from Georgia, 1803-07 (at-large 1803-05, 2nd District 1805-07); superior court judge in Georgia, 1807-13; Governor of Georgia, 1813-15; member of Georgia state senate, 1815-17; died in office 1817. Slaveowner. Died near Scull Shoals, Greene County, Ga., August 15, 1817 (age 44 years, 56 days). Original interment in private or family graveyard; reinterment at City Cemetery, Greensboro, Ga.
  Relatives: Grandfather of Daniella Jones (who married Joseph Wheeler (1836-1906)).
  Early County, Ga. is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — National Governors Association biography
  John Henry Eaton (1790-1856) — also known as John H. Eaton — of Nashville, Davidson County, Tenn. Born near Scotland Neck, Halifax County, N.C., June 18, 1790. Democrat. Lawyer; served in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812; member of Tennessee state house of representatives, 1815-16; U.S. Senator from Tennessee, 1818-21, 1821-29; U.S. Secretary of War, 1829-31; Governor of Florida Territory, 1834-36; U.S. Minister to Spain, 1836-40. Member, Freemasons. Resigned from Cabinet in 1831 during the scandal (called the "Petticoat Affair") over past infedelities of his second wife, Peggy Eaton. Slaveowner. Died in Washington, D.C., November 17, 1856 (age 66 years, 152 days). Interment at Oak Hill Cemetery, Washington, D.C.
  Eaton County, Mich. is named for him.
  The World War II Liberty ship SS John H. Eaton (built 1942-43 at Houston, Texas; sold 1947, scrapped 1968) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary
  Robert Milner Echols (1798-1847) — also known as Robert M. Echols — of Walton County, Ga. Born near Washington, Wilkes County, Ga., 1798. Member of Georgia state house of representatives, 1824-29; member of Georgia state senate, 1830-44; general in the U.S. Army during the Mexican War. Killed in action when he fell from his horse during battle, at National Bridge (Puente Nacional), near Veracruz, Veracruz, December 3, 1847 (age about 49 years). Original interment somewhere in Mexico; reinterment at a private or family graveyard, Walton County, Ga.
  Echols County, Ga. is named for him.
  Matthew Duncan Ector (1822-1879) — Born in Putnam County, Ga., February 28, 1822. Member of Georgia state legislature, 1850; member of Texas state legislature, 1855; general in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; Judge, Texas Court of Appeals, 1866-79; died in office 1879. Wounded during the Civil War, and lost a leg. Died October 29, 1879 (age 57 years, 243 days). Interment at Greenwood Cemetery, Marshall, Tex.
  Ector County, Tex. is named for him.
  John Edgar (c.1750-1832) — of Fort Kaskaskia (now Kaskaskia), Randolph County, Ill. Born in Ireland, about 1750. Member of Northwest Territory House of Representatives, 1799-1801; justice of the peace. Died in 1832 (age about 82 years). Cenotaph at Garrison Hill Cemetery, Kaskaskia, Ill.
  Edgar County, Ill. is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Newton Edmunds (1819-1908) — of Yankton, Yankton County, Dakota Territory (now S.Dak.). Born in Hartland, Niagara County, N.Y., May 31, 1819. Republican. Governor of Dakota Territory, 1863-66; member of Republican National Committee from Dakota Territory, 1866-70; member Dakota territorial council, 1879-80. Died, following a series of paralytic strokes, in Yankton, Yankton County, S.Dak., February 13, 1908 (age 88 years, 258 days). Burial location unknown.
  Edmunds County, S.Dak. is named for him.
  Ninian Edwards (1775-1833) — of Kaskaskia, Randolph County, Ill.; Edwardsville, Madison County, Ill. Born in Montgomery County, Md., March 17, 1775. Democrat. Member of Kentucky state house of representatives, 1796-97; state court judge in Kentucky, 1803; justice of Kentucky state supreme court, 1808; Governor of Illinois Territory, 1809-18; U.S. Senator from Illinois, 1818-24; Governor of Illinois, 1826-30; candidate for U.S. Representative from Illinois, 1832. Baptist. Slaveowner. Died of cholera, in Belleville, St. Clair County, Ill., July 20, 1833 (age 58 years, 125 days). Original interment somewhere in Belleville, Ill.; reinterment in 1855 at Oak Ridge Cemetery, Springfield, Ill.; statue at Ninian Edwards Plaza, Edwardsville, Ill.
  Relatives: Son of Margaret (Beall) Edwards (1750-1826) and Benjamin Edwards; brother of Cyrus Edwards (1793-1877); married, February 20, 1803, to Elvira Lane (1780-1839); father of Julia Catherine Edwards (1801-1830; who married Daniel Pope Cook) and Ninian Wirt Edwards; uncle of Lucy Amanda Gray (1812-1867; who married Finis Ewing McLean); grandfather of John Pope Cook; granduncle of Richard Lee Metcalfe; great-granduncle of Theodore W. Metcalfe.
  Political family: Edwards-Cook family (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Edwards County, Ill. is named for him.
  The city of Edwardsville, Illinois, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article
  Samuel Elbert (1740-1788) — of Georgia. Born in South Carolina, 1740. General in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; Delegate to Continental Congress from Georgia, 1784; Governor of Georgia, 1785-86. Died in Savannah, Chatham County, Ga., November 1, 1788 (age about 48 years). Interment at Colonial Park Cemetery, Savannah, Ga.
  Relatives: Married to Elizabeth Rae.
  Elbert County, Ga. is named for him.
  The city of Elberton, Georgia, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — National Governors Association biography
  Samuel Hitt Elbert (1833-1899) — of Plattsmouth, Cass County, Neb.; Denver, Colo. Born in Logan County, Ohio, April 3, 1833. Republican. Member of Nebraska territorial legislature, 1860; delegate to Republican National Convention from Nebraska Territory, 1860; secretary of Colorado Territory, 1862-66; member of Colorado territorial legislature, 1869; Governor of Colorado Territory, 1873-74; justice of Colorado state supreme court, 1877-88; delegate to Republican National Convention from Colorado, 1884. Methodist. Died in Galveston, Galveston County, Tex., November 27, 1899 (age 66 years, 238 days). Interment at Riverside Cemetery, Denver, Colo.
  Relatives: Son of John Downes Elbert (1806-1865) and Achsa (Hitt) Elbert (1808-1901); married to Josephine Evans (1844-1868; daughter of John Evans (1814-1897)).
  Elbert County, Colo. is named for him.
  Mount Elbert, in Lake County, Colorado, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  John Milton Elliott (1820-1879) — also known as John M. Elliott — of Prestonsburg, Floyd County, Ky. Born in Scott County, Va., May 20, 1820. Democrat. Member of Kentucky state house of representatives, 1847, 1860-61; U.S. Representative from Kentucky 6th District, 1853-59; Delegate from Kentucky to the Confederate Provisional Congress, 1861-62; Representative from Kentucky in the Confederate Congress, 1862-65; circuit judge in Kentucky, 1868-74; Judge, Kentucky Court of Appeals, 1876-79; died in office 1879. Expelled from the Kentucky legislature in 1861 for supporting the Confederacy. Slaveowner. Shot and killed by Col. Thomas Buford, in front of the ladies' entrance to the Capitol Hotel, in Frankfort, Franklin County, Ky., March 26, 1879 (age 58 years, 310 days). Interment at Frankfort Cemetery, Frankfort, Ky.; statue at Boyd County Courthouse Grounds, Catlettsburg, Ky.
  Relatives: Son of John Elliott and Jane Elliott.
  Elliott County, Ky. is named for him.
  Epitaph: "Assassinated, for having done his duty as a Judge."
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Albert H. Ellis (born c.1867) — of Oklahoma. Born about 1867. Delegate to Oklahoma state constitutional convention, 1907. Burial location unknown.
  Ellis County, Okla. is named for him.
  Richard Ellis (1781-1846) — Born in Virginia, February 14, 1781. Delegate to Alabama state constitutional convention, 1819; associate justice of Alabama state supreme court, 1819; delegate to Texas Republic Republic constitutional convention from District of Red River, 1836; signer, Texas Declaration of Independence, 1836; member of Texas Republic Senate from District of Red River, 1836-39. Slaveowner. Reportedly "came to his death suddenly by his clothes taking fire", at his home in Bowie County, Tex., December 20, 1846 (age 65 years, 309 days). Original interment in private or family graveyard; reinterment in 1929 at Texas State Cemetery, Austin, Tex.
  Ellis County, Tex. is named for him.
  John Archer Elmore (1762-1834) — of Laurens District (now Laurens County), S.C.; Autauga County, Ala. Born in Prince Edward County, Va., August 21, 1762. Served in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; member of South Carolina state legislature, 1800; member of Alabama state legislature, 1820. Slaveowner. Died in Autauga County, Ala., April 24, 1834 (age 71 years, 246 days). Interment a private or family graveyard, Elmore County, Ala.
  Relatives: Father-in-law of Dixon Hall Lewis and Benjamin Fitzpatrick (1802-1869); father of Franklin Harper Elmore, Benjamin F. Elmore, Rush Elmore and Albert S. Elmore.
  Political family: Elmore family of South Carolina and Alabama.
  Elmore County, Ala. is named for him.
  David Emanuel (1744-1808) — of Georgia. Born in 1744. Member of Georgia state senate, 1780; Governor of Georgia, 1801. Jewish. Died February 19, 1808 (age about 63 years). Burial location unknown.
  Emanuel County, Ga. is named for him.
  See also National Governors Association biography
  George W. Emery (1830-1909) — of Utah. Born in Corinth, Penobscot County, Maine, August 13, 1830. Governor of Utah Territory, 1875-80. Died in Marshfield, Plymouth County, Mass., July 10, 1909 (age 78 years, 331 days). Burial location unknown.
  Emery County, Utah is named for him.
  George Bernard Erath (1813-1891) — also known as George B. Erath — of Milam County, Tex. Born in Vienna, Austria, January 1, 1813. Member of Texas Republic Congress, 1843; member of Texas state house of representatives, 1846; member of Texas state senate, 1857. Died May 13, 1891 (age 78 years, 132 days). Interment at Oakwood Cemetery, Waco, Tex.
  Erath County, Tex. is named for him.
  Clement Anselm Evans (1833-1911) — also known as Clement A. Evans — of Georgia. Born in Stewart County, Ga., March 25, 1833. State court judge in Georgia, 1854; member of Georgia state senate, 1859; general in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; Methodist minister. Methodist. Member, United Confederate Veterans. Died July 2, 1911 (age 78 years, 99 days). Interment at Oakland Cemetery, Atlanta, Ga.
  Evans County, Ga. is named for him.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Andrew Jackson Faulk (1814-1898) — also known as Andrew J. Faulk — of Yankton, Yankton County, Dakota Territory (now S.Dak.). Born in Milford, Pike County, Pa., November 26, 1814. Newspaper publisher; Governor of Dakota Territory, 1866-69. Methodist. Died in Yankton, Yankton County, S.Dak., September 4, 1898 (age 83 years, 282 days). Burial location unknown.
  Presumably named for: Andrew Jackson
  Relatives: Father-in-law of Walter Atwood Burleigh (1820-1896).
  Faulk County, S.Dak. is named for him.
  James Fentress — of Tennessee. Member of Tennessee state house of representatives, 1814-25; Speaker of the Tennessee State House of Representatives, 1815-17, 1819-25. Burial location unknown.
  Fentress County, Tenn. is named for him.
Elisha P. Ferry Elisha Peyre Ferry (1825-1895) — also known as Elisha P. Ferry — of Waukegan, Lake County, Ill.; Seattle, King County, Wash. Born in Monroe County, Mich., August 9, 1825. Democrat. Lawyer; Presidential Elector for Illinois, 1852; postmaster at Waukegan, Ill., 1853-54; village president of Waukegan, Illinois, 1856-57; mayor of Waukegan, Ill., 1859; delegate to Illinois state constitutional convention from Lake County, 1862; colonel in the Union Army during the Civil War; Governor of Washington Territory, 1872-80; vice-president, Puget Sound National Bank; Governor of Washington, 1889-93. French ancestry. Died of pneumonia and congestive heart failure, in Seattle, King County, Wash., October 14, 1895 (age 70 years, 66 days). Interment at Lake View Cemetery, Seattle, Wash.
  Relatives: Brother of Lucien Peyre Ferry; married to Sarah Brown Kellog (1827-1912); father of Eliza P. Ferry (1851-1935; who married John Leary (1837-1905)); uncle of Clinton Peyre Ferry.
  Political family: Ferry family of Seattle, Washington.
  Ferry County, Wash. is named for him.
  See also National Governors Association biography — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: City of Waukegan
Millard Fillmore Millard Fillmore (1800-1874) — also known as "The Accidental President" — of East Aurora, Erie County, N.Y.; Buffalo, Erie County, N.Y. Born in Cayuga County, N.Y., January 7, 1800. Whig. Lawyer; member of New York state assembly from Erie County, 1829-31; U.S. Representative from New York, 1833-35, 1837-43 (32nd District 1833-35, 1837-41, 38th District 1841-43); candidate for Governor of New York, 1844; in 1846, he was one of the founders of the University of Buffalo, originally a medical school; New York state comptroller, 1848-49; Vice President of the United States, 1849-50; President of the United States, 1850-53; defeated, 1852, 1856. Unitarian. English ancestry. Died, after a series of strokes, in Buffalo, Erie County, N.Y., March 8, 1874 (age 74 years, 60 days). Interment at Forest Lawn Cemetery, Buffalo, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Nathaniel Fillmore (1771-1863) and Phoebe (Millard) Fillmore (1781-1831); married, February 5, 1826, to Abigail Powers (1798-1853) and Abigail Powers (1798-1853); married, February 10, 1858, to Caroline (Carmichael) McIntosh (1813-1881); nephew of Calvin Fillmore; third cousin of John Leslie Russell; third cousin once removed of Jonathan Brace, Bela Edgerton, Heman Ticknor, Leslie Wead Russell, Alonzo Mark Leffingwell, Alphonso Alva Hopkins, Charles Hazen Russell and John Clarence Keeler; third cousin twice removed of John Leffingwell Randolph; third cousin thrice removed of Matthew Griswold (1714-1799); fourth cousin of Thomas Kimberly Brace, Alfred Peck Edgerton, Joseph Ketchum Edgerton, Charles Henry Pendleton, Chauncey C. Pendleton and Eckford Gustavus Pendleton; fourth cousin once removed of James Kilbourne, Elijah Abel, Samuel Clesson Allen, Greene Carrier Bronson, Willard J. Chapin, Russell Sage and Samuel Lount Kilbourne.
  Political families: Kellogg-Adams-Seymour-Chapin family of Connecticut and New York; Waterman-Huntington family of Connecticut; Wolcott-Wadsworth family of Connecticut; Wolcott-Griswold-Packwood-Brandegee family of Connecticut; Hosmer-Griswold-Parsons family of Middletown, Connecticut (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Cross-reference: Edward H. Thompson
  Fillmore counties in Minn. and Neb., and Millard County, Utah, are named for him.
  The city of Fillmore, Utah, is named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: Millard F. RileyMillard F. McCrayMillard F. ParkerMillard F. DunlapMillard F. VoiesMillard F. CottrellMillard F. VoresMillard F. SaundersMillard F. TawesMillard F. Caldwell, Jr.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Books about Millard Fillmore: Robert J. Raybach, Millard Fillmore : Biography of a President — Elbert B. Smith, The Presidencies of Zachary Taylor and Millard Fillmore
  Image source: Portrait & Biographical Album of Washtenaw County (1891)
  David W. Finney — of Neosho Falls, Woodson County, Kan. Republican. Lieutenant Governor of Kansas, 1881-85. Burial location unknown.
  Finney County, Kan. is named for him.
  Samuel Rhoads Fisher (1794-1839) — also known as S. Rhoads Fisher — of Texas. Born in Pennsylvania, December 31, 1794. Delegate to Texas Republic Republic constitutional convention from District of Matagorda, 1836; signer, Texas Declaration of Independence, 1836; Texas Republic Secretary of the Navy, 1836-37. Died March 14, 1839 (age 44 years, 73 days). Interment at Matagorda Cemetery, Matagorda, Tex.
  Fisher County, Tex. is named for him.
  John Floyd (1769-1839) — of Jefferson, Jackson County, Ga. Born in Beaufort, Beaufort County, S.C., October 3, 1769. Planter; shipbuilder; served in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812; member of Georgia state house of representatives, 1820-27; U.S. Representative from Georgia 7th District, 1827-29. Slaveowner. Died near Jefferson, Jackson County, Ga., June 24, 1839 (age 69 years, 264 days). Interment at Floyd Family Cemetery, Woodbine, Ga.
  Relatives: Son of Charles Floyd (1747-1820) and Mary (Fendin) Floyd (1747-1804); married, December 12, 1793, to Isabella Maria Hazzard (1773-1859); great-grandfather of William Gibbs McAdoo (1863-1941).
  Political family: Harrison-Randolph-Marshall-Cabell family of Virginia (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Floyd County, Ga. is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
  John Floyd (1783-1837) — of Newbern, Pulaski County, Va. Born in Jefferson County, Ky., April 24, 1783. Democrat. Member of Virginia state legislature, 1810; U.S. Representative from Virginia, 1817-29 (5th District 1817-21, 20th District 1821-29); Governor of Virginia, 1830-34; received 11 electoral votes for President, 1832. Slaveowner. Died in Sweetsprings, Monroe County, Va (now W.Va.), August 17, 1837 (age 54 years, 115 days). Interment at Lewis Family Cemetery, Sweetsprings, W.Va.
  Relatives: Son of John Floyd (1750-1783) and Sallie Jane (Buchanan) Floyd (1759-1812); half-brother of James Douglas Breckinridge; married 1804 to Letitia Preston (1776-1852; sister of Francis Smith Preston and James Patton Preston); father of John Buchanan Floyd (1806-1863) and George Rogers Clark Floyd; first cousin twice removed of Joseph Weldon Bailey Jr..
  Political families: Breckinridge-Preston-Cabell family of Virginia; Kellogg-Adams-Seymour-Chapin family of Connecticut and New York; Johnston family of Abingdon, Virginia (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Floyd County, Ind. is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Thomas Ford (1800-1850) — of Ogle County, Ill. Born in Uniontown, Fayette County, Pa., December 5, 1800. Democrat. State court judge in Illinois, 1837; justice of Illinois state supreme court, 1841-42; Governor of Illinois, 1842-46. Died in Peoria, Peoria County, Ill., November 3, 1850 (age 49 years, 333 days). Interment at Springdale Cemetery, Peoria, Ill.
  Ford County, Ill. is named for him.
  See also National Governors Association biography
  Nathan Bedford Forrest (1821-1877) — also known as "Wizard of the Saddle" — of Memphis, Shelby County, Tenn. Born near Chapel Hill, Bedford County (now Marshall County), Tenn., July 13, 1821. Democrat. Cotton planter; slave trader; general in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; in April 1864, after the Battle of Fort Pillow, Tennessee, Confederate troops under his command massacred African-American Union soldiers, not accepting them as prisoners, since the Confederacy refused to recognize ex-slaves as legitimate combatants; this event, seen as a war crime, sparked outrage across the North, and a congressional inquiry; in 1867, he became involved in the Ku Klux Klan and was elected Grand Wizard; the organization used violent tactics to intimidate Black voters and suppress their votes; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Tennessee, 1868; in 1869, he had a change of heart, and issued a letter ordering that the Klan be dissolved and its costumes destroyed; he went on to denounce the group and its crimes; in 1875, he gave a "friendly speech" to a meeting of an African-American organization in Memphis, calling for peace, harmony, and economic advancement of former slaves; for this speech, he was vehemently denounced in the Southern press. English ancestry. Member, Ku Klux Klan. After his death, he became a folk hero among white Southerners, particularly during the imposition of Jim Crow segregation laws in the early 20th century, and later, in reaction to the Civil Rights movement in the 1950s and 1960s. Slaveowner. Died, from complications of diabetes, in Memphis, Shelby County, Tenn., October 29, 1877 (age 56 years, 108 days). Original interment at Elmwood Cemetery, Memphis, Tenn.; reinterment in 1904 at Health Sciences Park, Memphis, Tenn.; memorial monument at Myrtle Hill Cemetery, Rome, Ga.; memorial monument at Live Oak Cemetery, Selma, Ala.
  Relatives: Son of William B. Forrest (1801-1837) and Miriam (Beck) Forrest (1802-1867); married 1845 to Mary Ann Montgomery (1826-1893).
  Forrest County, Miss. is named for him.
  The city of Forrest City, Arkansas, is named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS Nathan B. Forrest (built 1943 at Panama City, Florida; scrapped 1973) was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Benjamin Forsyth (c.1775-1814) — of North Carolina. Born about 1775. Member of North Carolina state legislature, 1807. Died in 1814 (age about 39 years). Burial location unknown.
  Forsyth County, N.C. is named for him.
  John Forsyth (1780-1841) — of Augusta, Richmond County, Ga. Born in Fredericksburg, Va., October 22, 1780. Democrat. Lawyer; Georgia state attorney general, 1808; U.S. Representative from Georgia, 1813-18, 1823-27 (at-large 1813-18, 1823-25, 2nd District 1825-27, at-large 1827); resigned 1827; U.S. Senator from Georgia, 1818-19, 1829-34; U.S. Minister to Spain, 1819-23; Governor of Georgia, 1827-29; U.S. Secretary of State, 1834-41. Slaveowner. Died in Washington, D.C., October 21, 1841 (age 60 years, 364 days). Interment at Congressional Cemetery, Washington, D.C.
  Relatives: Son of Robert Moriah Forsythe (1754-1794) and Fanny (Johnston) Forsythe (1757-1805); married, May 12, 1802, to Clara Meigs (1784-1853; daughter of Josiah Meigs); father of John Forsyth Jr. (1812-1877).
  Political families: Kellogg-Adams-Seymour-Chapin family of Connecticut and New York; Livingston-Schuyler family of New York (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Forsyth County, Ga. is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier
Benjamin Franklin Benjamin Franklin (1706-1790) — also known as "Silence Dogood"; "Anthony Afterwit"; "Poor Richard"; "Alice Addertongue"; "Polly Baker"; "Harry Meanwell"; "Timothy Turnstone"; "Martha Careful"; "Benevolus"; "Caelia Shortface" — of Pennsylvania. Born in Boston, Suffolk County, Mass., January 17, 1706. Delegate to Continental Congress from Pennsylvania, 1775; U.S. Postmaster General, 1775-76; signer, Declaration of Independence, 1776; delegate to Pennsylvania state constitutional convention, 1776; U.S. Minister to France, 1778-85; Sweden, 1782-83; President of Pennsylvania, 1785-88; member, U.S. Constitutional Convention, 1787. Deist. Member, Freemasons; American Philosophical Society; American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Famed for his experiments with electricity; invented bifocal glasses and the harmonica. Elected to the Hall of Fame for Great Americans in 1900. Died in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., April 17, 1790 (age 84 years, 90 days). Interment at Christ Church Burial Ground, Philadelphia, Pa.; statue erected 1856 at Old City Hall Grounds, Boston, Mass.; statue at La Arcata Court, Santa Barbara, Calif.; memorial monument at Constitution Gardens, Washington, D.C.
  Relatives: Son of Josiah Franklin (1657-1745) and Abiah Lee (Folger) Franklin (1667-1752); married, September 1, 1730, to Deborah Read; father of Sarah 'Sally' Franklin (1743-1808; who married Richard Bache); uncle of Franklin Davenport; grandfather of Richard Bache Jr. and Deborah Franklin Bache (1891-1863; who married William John Duane); great-grandfather of Alexander Dallas Bache (1806-1867; physicist), Mary Blechenden Bache (1808-1873; who married Robert John Walker) and Sophia Arabella Bache (1815-1904; who married William Wallace Irwin); second great-grandfather of Robert Walker Irwin; fifth great-grandfather of Daniel Baugh Brewster and Elise du Pont; first cousin four times removed of Charles James Folger, Benjamin Dexter Sprague and Wharton Barker (1846-1921); first cousin six times removed of Thomas Mott Osborne; first cousin seven times removed of Charles Devens Osborne and Lithgow Osborne; second cousin five times removed of George Hammond Parshall.
  Political families: Kellogg-Adams-Seymour-Chapin family of Connecticut and New York; Bache-Dallas family of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Cross-reference: Jonathan Williams
  Franklin counties in Ala., Ark., Fla., Ga., Ill., Ind., Iowa, Kan., Ky., La., Maine, Mass., Miss., Mo., Neb., N.Y., N.C., Ohio, Pa., Tenn., Vt., Va. and Wash. are named for him.
  Mount Franklin, in the White Mountains, Coos County, New Hampshire, is named for him.  — The minor planet 5102 Benfranklin (discovered 1986), is named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: Benjamin F. ButlerBenjamin F. WadeBenjamin Franklin WallaceBenjamin Cromwell FranklinBenjamin Franklin PerryBenjamin Franklin RobinsonBenjamin F. RandolphBenjamin Franklin MasseyBenjamin F. RawlsBenjamin Franklin LeiterBenjamin Franklin ThomasBenjamin F. HallBenjamin F. AngelBenjamin Franklin RossBenjamin F. FlandersBenjamin F. BomarBenjamin Franklin HellenBenjamin F. MudgeBenjamin F. ButlerBenjamin F. LoanBenjamin F. SimpsonBenjamin Franklin TerryBenjamin Franklin JunkinBenjamin F. PartridgeB. F. LangworthyBenjamin F. HardingBenjamin MebaneB. F. WhittemoreBenjamin Franklin BradleyBenjamin Franklin ClaypoolBenjamin F. CoatesB. Franklin MartinBenjamin Franklin HoweyBenjamin F. MartinBenjamin Franklin RiceBenjamin F. RandolphBenjamin F. HopkinsBenjamin F. TracyBenjamin Franklin BriggsBenjamin F. GradyBenjamin F. FarnhamBenjamin F. MeyersBenjamin Franklin WhiteBenjamin Franklin PrescottBenjamin F. JonasB. Franklin FisherBenjamin Franklin PottsBenjamin F. FunkBenjamin F. MarshFrank B. ArnoldBenjamin F. HeckertBenjamin F. BradleyBenjamin F. HowellBenjamin Franklin MillerBenjamin F. MahanBen Franklin CaldwellBenjamin Franklin TilleyBenjamin F. HackneyB. F. McMillanBenjamin F. ShivelyB. Frank HiresB. Frank MebaneB. Frank MurphyBenjamin F. StarrBenjamin Franklin Jones, Jr.Benjamin F. WeltyBenjamin F. JonesBenjamin Franklin BoleyBen Franklin LooneyBenjamin F. BledsoeBenjamin Franklin WilliamsB. Frank KelleyBenjamin Franklin ButlerBenjamin F. JamesFrank B. HeintzlemanBenjamin F. FeinbergB. Franklin BunnBen F. CameronBen F. BlackmonB. Frank WhelchelB. F. Merritt, Jr.Ben F. HornsbyBen Dillingham II
  Coins and currency: His portrait appears on the U.S. $100 bill, and formerly on the U.S. half dollar coin (1948-63).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books by Benjamin Franklin: The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin — An Account of the Newly Invented Pennsylvanian Fire-Place (1744)
  Books about Benjamin Franklin: H. W. Brands, The First American: The Life and Times of Benjamin Franklin — Edmund S. Morgan, Benjamin Franklin — Stacy Schiff, A Great Improvisation : Franklin, France, and the Birth of America — Gordon S. Wood, The Americanization of Benjamin Franklin — Walter Isaacson, Benjamin Franklin : An American Life — Carl Van Doren, Benjamin Franklin — Philip Dray, Stealing God's Thunder : Benjamin Franklin's Lightning Rod and the Invention of America
  Image source: Library of Congress
  Benjamin Cromwell Franklin (1805-1873) — of Texas. Born in 1805. State court judge in Texas, 1836; member of Texas state senate, 1845. Died in 1873 (age about 68 years). Burial location unknown.
  Presumably named for: Benjamin Franklin
  Franklin County, Tex. is named for him.
  William S. Freeborn (1816-1900) — of Minnesota. Born in Iowa, 1816. Member Minnesota territorial council 4th District, 1854-57. Died in 1900 (age about 84 years). Interment at San Luis Cemetery, San Luis Obispo, Calif.
  Freeborn County, Minn. is named for him.
  See also Minnesota Legislator record
John C. Fremont John Charles Frémont (1813-1890) — also known as "The Pathfinder"; "The Champion of Freedom" — of San Francisco, Calif. Born in Savannah, Chatham County, Ga., January 21, 1813. Republican. Explorer; Military Governor of California, 1847; arrested for mutiny, 1847; court-martialed; found guilty of mutiny, disobedience, and conduct prejudicial to order; penalty remitted by Pres. James K. Polk; U.S. Senator from California, 1850-51; candidate for President of the United States, 1856; general in the Union Army during the Civil War; Governor of Arizona Territory, 1878-81; speaker, Republican National Convention, 1888. Episcopalian. French ancestry. Died, of peritonitis, in a hotel room at New York, New York County, N.Y., July 13, 1890 (age 77 years, 173 days). Original interment at Trinity Cemetery, Manhattan, N.Y.; reinterment in 1891 at Rockland Cemetery, Nyack, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Jean Charles Frémont and Ann Whiting (Pryor) Frémont; married, October 19, 1841, to Jessie Benton (daughter of Thomas Hart Benton (1782-1858)).
  Political families: Benton family; Breckinridge-Preston-Cabell family of Virginia (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Cross-reference: Selah Hill
  Fremont County, Colo., Fremont County, Idaho, Fremont County, Iowa and Fremont County, Wyo. are named for him.
  Fremont Peak, in Monterey County and San Benito County, California, is named for him.  — Fremont Peak, in Coconino County, Arizona, is named for him.  — The city of Fremont, California, is named for him.  — The city of Fremont, Ohio, is named for him.  — The city of Fremont, Nebraska, is named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS John C. Fremont (built 1941 at Terminal Island, California; mined and wrecked in Manila Bay, Philippines, 1945) was named for him.
  Politician named for him: John F. Hill
  Campaign slogan (1856): "Free Soil, Free Men, Fremont."
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books by John C. Fremont: Memoirs of My Life and Times
  Books about John C. Fremont: Tom Chaffin, Pathfinder: John Charles Fremont and the Course of American Empire — David Roberts, A Newer World : Kit Carson, John C. Fremont and the Claiming of the American West — Andrew Rolle, John Charles Fremont: Character As Destiny
  Image source: Life and Work of James G. Blaine (1893)
  William Savin Fulton (1795-1844) — also known as William S. Fulton — of Little Rock, Pulaski County, Ark. Born in Cecil County, Md., June 2, 1795. Democrat. Secretary of Arkansas Territory, 1829-35; Governor of Arkansas Territory, 1835-36; U.S. Senator from Arkansas, 1836-44; died in office 1844. Slaveowner. Died in Little Rock, Pulaski County, Ark., August 15, 1844 (age 49 years, 74 days). Interment at Mt. Holly Cemetery, Little Rock, Ark.
  Fulton County, Ark. is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  Robert Wilkinson Furnas (1824-1905) — also known as Robert W. Furnas — of Brownville, Nemaha County, Neb. Born in Miami County, Ohio, May 5, 1824. Republican. Printer; farmer; member of Nebraska territorial legislature, 1856; colonel in the Union Army during the Civil War; member of University of Nebraska board of regents, 1869-75; Governor of Nebraska, 1873-75. Presbyterian. Member, Freemasons; Odd Fellows. Died June 1, 1905 (age 81 years, 27 days). Interment at Brownville Cemetery, Brownville, Neb.
  Relatives: Son of William Furnas and Martha (Jenkins) Furnas; married, October 29, 1845, to Mary E. McComas; married to Susannah (Emswiler) Jameson.
  Furnas County, Neb. is named for him.
  See also National Governors Association biography
  James Gadsden (1788-1858) — of South Carolina. Born in Charleston, Charleston County, S.C., May 15, 1788. Served in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812; member of Florida state legislature, 1840; U.S. Minister to Mexico, 1853-56. Negotiated the treaty which led to the Gadsden Purchase, which added 30,000 square miles to the U.S. (parts of southern Arizona and New Mexico). Died in Charleston, Charleston County, S.C., December 25, 1858 (age 70 years, 224 days). Interment at St. Philip's Churchyard, Charleston, S.C.
  Relatives: Son of Philip Gadsden (1761-1824) and Catherine (Edwards) Gadsden (1766-1816); brother of John Gadsden; grandson of Christopher Gadsden; granduncle of Philip Henry Gadsden (1867-1945); first cousin thrice removed of Oscar Hampton Ballard; first cousin four times removed of Harry R. Pauley.
  Political family: Ballard-Gadsden-Randolph family of West Virginia (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Gadsden County, Fla. is named for him.
  The city of Gadsden, Alabama, was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — Find-A-Grave memorial
  James Taylor Gaines (1776-1856) — also known as James Gaines — of Texas. Born in 1776. Delegate to Texas Republic Republic constitutional convention from District of Sabine, 1836; signer, Texas Declaration of Independence, 1836; member of Texas Republic Senate from District of Shelby, Sabine and Harrison, 1840-42. Died in Quartsburg, Mariposa County, Calif., 1856 (age about 80 years). Burial location unknown.
  Gaines County, Tex. is named for him.
Albert Gallatin Albert Gallatin (1761-1849) — also known as Abraham Albert Alphonse de Gallatin — of Fayette County, Pa.; New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in Geneva, Switzerland, January 29, 1761. Democrat. Delegate to Pennsylvania state constitutional convention, 1790; member of Pennsylvania state house of representatives, 1790-92; U.S. Senator from Pennsylvania, 1793-94; U.S. Representative from Pennsylvania 11th District, 1795-1801; U.S. Secretary of the Treasury, 1801-14; U.S. Minister to France, 1815-23; Great Britain, 1826-27. Swiss ancestry. Died in Astoria, Queens, Queens County, N.Y., August 12, 1849 (age 88 years, 195 days). Entombed at Trinity Churchyard, Manhattan, N.Y.; statue at Treasury Building Grounds, Washington, D.C.
  Relatives: Son of Jean Gallatin and Sophia Albertina Rolaz du Rosey Gallatin; married 1789 to Sophie Allègre (1766-1789); married, November 11, 1793, to Hannah Nicholson (1766-1849); second great-grandfather of May Preston Davie; cousin by marriage of Joseph Hopper Nicholson (1770-1817).
  Political families: Pendleton-Lee family of Maryland; Davie family of Maryland (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Cross-reference: John L. Dawson
  Gallatin counties in Ill., Ky. and Mont. are named for him.
  The city of Gallatin, Tennessee, is named for him.  — The village of Galatia, Illinois, is named for him.  — The Gallatin River, which flows through Gallatin County, Montana, is named for him.  — Gallatin Hall (dormitory, built 1926), at Harvard University Business School, Boston, Massachusetts, is named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS Albert Gallatin (built 1941 at Terminal Island, Los Angeles, California; torpedoed and sunk 1944 in the Arabian Sea) was named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: Albert Galliton HarrisonAlbert G. JewettAlbert G. HawesAlbert G. WakefieldAlbert Gallatin TalbottAlbert G. DowAlbert G. DoleAlbert Gallatin KelloggAlbert Gallatin MarchandAlbert G. BrownAlbert G. Brodhead, Jr.Albert G. AllisonAlbert G. RiddleAlbert Galiton WatkinsAlbert G. PorterAlbert Gallatin EgbertAlbert Gallatin JenkinsAlbert Gallatin CalvertAlbert G. LawrenceAlbert G. FosterAlbert G. Simms
  Coins and currency: His portrait appeared on the U.S. $500 note in 1862-63.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about Albert Gallatin: John Austin Stevens, Albert Gallatin: An American Statesman — L. B. Kuppenheimer, Albert Gallatin's Vision of Democratic Stability — Nicholas Dungan, Gallatin: America's Swiss Founding Father — Raymond Walters, Albert Gallatin: Jeffersonian Financier and Diplomat
  Image source: New York Public Library
James A. Garfield James Abram Garfield (1831-1881) — also known as James A. Garfield — of Hiram, Portage County, Ohio. Born in a log cabin near Orange, Cuyahoga County, Ohio, November 19, 1831. Republican. Lawyer; college professor; president, Eclectic University (now Hiram College); member of Ohio state senate, 1859-61; general in the Union Army during the Civil War; U.S. Representative from Ohio 19th District, 1863-81; President of the United States, 1881; died in office 1881. Disciples of Christ. English ancestry. Member, Freemasons; Delta Upsilon. Shot by the assassin Charles J. Guiteau, in the Baltimore & Potomac Railroad Station, Washington, D.C., July 2, 1881, and died from the effects of the wound and infection, in Elberon, Monmouth County, N.J., September 19, 1881 (age 49 years, 304 days). Entombed at Lake View Cemetery, Cleveland, Ohio; statue erected 1887 at Garfield Circle, Washington, D.C.; statue at Golden Gate Park, San Francisco, Calif.
  Relatives: Son of Abram Garfield (1799-1833) and Elizabeth (Ballou) Garfield (1801-1888); married, November 11, 1858, to Lucretia Rudolph; father of Harry Augustus Garfield and James Rudolph Garfield; fourth cousin of Eli Thayer; fourth cousin once removed of John Alden Thayer (1857-1917).
  Political families: Conger-Hungerford family; Kellogg-Adams-Seymour-Chapin family of Connecticut and New York (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Cross-reference: William S. Maynard
  Garfield counties in Colo., Mont., Neb., Okla., Utah and Wash. are named for him.
  Garfield Mountain, in the Cascade Range, King County, Washington, is named for him.  — The city of Garfield, New Jersey, is named for him.
  Politician named for him: James G. Stewart
  Coins and currency: His portrait appeared on the U.S. $20 gold certificate in 1898-1905.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Books about James A. Garfield: Allan Peskin, Garfield: A Biography — Justus D. Doenecke, The Presidencies of James A. Garfield and Chester A. Arthur
  Image source: James G. Blaine, Twenty Years of Congress, vol. 2 (1886)
Augustus H. Garland Augustus Hill Garland (1832-1899) — also known as Augustus H. Garland — of Little Rock, Pulaski County, Ark. Born in Tipton County, Tenn., June 11, 1832. Democrat. Lawyer; Presidential Elector for Arkansas, 1860; delegate to Arkansas secession convention, 1861; Delegate from Arkansas to the Confederate Provisional Congress, 1861-62; Representative from Arkansas in the Confederate Congress 3rd District, 1862-64; Senator from Arkansas in the Confederate Congress, 1864-65; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Arkansas, 1868; Governor of Arkansas, 1874-77; U.S. Senator from Arkansas, 1877-85; U.S. Attorney General, 1885-89. Slaveowner. Died suddenly while arguing a case before the Supreme Court, in the U.S. Capitol Building, Washington, D.C., January 26, 1899 (age 66 years, 229 days). Interment at Mt. Holly Cemetery, Little Rock, Ark.
  Relatives: Brother of Rufus King Garland (1830-1886).
  Garland County, Ark. is named for him.
  The city of Garland, Texas, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article
  Image source: James G. Blaine, Twenty Years of Congress, vol. 2 (1886)
  James Garrard (1749-1822) — Born in Stafford County, Va., January 14, 1749. Colonel in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; member of Virginia state house of delegates, 1779; delegate to Kentucky state constitutional convention, 1792; Governor of Kentucky, 1796-1804. Baptist. Died in Bourbon County, Ky., January 19, 1822 (age 73 years, 5 days). Interment a private or family graveyard, Bourbon County, Ky.
  Garrard County, Ky. is named for him.
  See also National Governors Association biography
William Gaston William Gaston (1778-1844) — of North Carolina. Born in New Bern, Craven County, N.C., September 19, 1778. Member of North Carolina state legislature, 1810; U.S. Representative from North Carolina, 1813-17 (at-large 1813-15, 4th District 1815-17). Slaveowner. Died in Raleigh, Wake County, N.C., January 23, 1844 (age 65 years, 126 days). Interment at Cedar Grove Cemetery, New Bern, N.C.
  Gaston County, N.C. is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Image source: The South in the Building of the Nation (1909)
  Horatio Gates (1726-1806) — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in 1726. General in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; member of New York state assembly from New York County, 1800-01. Died in 1806 (age about 80 years). Interment at Trinity Churchyard, Manhattan, N.Y.
  Gates County, N.C. is named for him.
  John White Geary (1819-1873) — also known as John W. Geary — of San Francisco, Calif. Born near Mt. Pleasant, Westmoreland County, Pa., December 30, 1819. Civil engineer; colonel in the U.S. Army during the Mexican War; went to California for the 1849 Gold Rush; postmaster at San Francisco, Calif., 1849; candidate for Governor of California, 1849; mayor of San Francisco, Calif., 1850-51; Governor of Kansas Territory, 1856-57; general in the Union Army during the Civil War; Governor of Pennsylvania, 1867-73. Methodist. Died after suffering a heart attack, in Harrisburg, Dauphin County, Pa., February 8, 1873 (age 53 years, 40 days). Interment at Harrisburg Cemetery, Harrisburg, Pa.
  Geary County, Kan. is named for him.
  See also National Governors Association biography — NNDB dossier
  Richard Gentry (1788-1837) — of Columbia, Boone County, Mo. Born in Madison County, Ky., August 25, 1788. Democrat. Member of Missouri state senate, 1826-29; postmaster at Columbia, Mo., 1829-37. One of the founders of Smithton, later Columbia, Mo., 1820. Killed while fighting Indians at the battle of Okeechobee, Okeechobee County, Fla., December 25, 1837 (age 49 years, 122 days). Original interment somewhere in Okeechobee, Fla.; reinterment at Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery, Lemay, Mo.
  Relatives: Son of Richard William Gentry (1763-1843) and Jane (Harris) Gentry (17630-1821); married, February 13, 1810, to Ann Hawkins; grandfather of North Todd Gentry (1866-1944).
  Political family: Gentry family of Columbia, Missouri.
  Gentry County, Mo. is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  James Zachariah George (1826-1897) — also known as James Z. George — of Jackson, Hinds County, Miss.; Carrollton, Carroll County, Miss. Born in Monroe County, Ga., October 20, 1826. Democrat. U.S. Senator from Mississippi, 1881-97; died in office 1897. Slaveowner. Died in Mississippi City, Harrison County, Miss., August 14, 1897 (age 70 years, 298 days). Interment at Evergreen Cemetery, North Carrollton, Miss.
  Relatives: Father of Mary George (who married William Hayne Leavell (1850-1930)).
  George County, Miss. is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Books about James Z. George: Timothy B. Smith, James Z. George: Mississippi's Great Commoner
  Albert Waller Gilchrist (1858-1926) — also known as Albert W. Gilchrist — of Punta Gorda, Charlotte County, Fla. Born in Greenwood, Greenwood County, S.C., January 15, 1858. Democrat. Civil engineer; real estate dealer; orange grower; member of Florida state house of representatives, 1893-96, 1903-06; Speaker of the Florida State House of Representatives, 1905; served in the U.S. Army during the Spanish-American War; Governor of Florida, 1909-13; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Florida, 1912 (speaker), 1924; candidate in primary for U.S. Senator from Florida, 1916. Member, Freemasons. Died, from a tumor of the thigh, in the Hospital for the Ruptured and Crippled, Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., May 15, 1926 (age 68 years, 120 days). Interment at Indian Spring Cemetery, Punta Gorda, Fla.
  Relatives: Son of William E. Gilchrist (born c.1828) and Rhoda Elizabeth (Waller) Gilchrist.
  Gilchrist County, Fla. is named for him.
  Gilchrist Hall (opened 1926), a dormitory at Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida, is named for him.
  See also National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  William Branch Giles (1762-1830) — also known as William B. Giles — of Amelia County, Va. Born in Amelia County, Va., August 12, 1762. Lawyer; U.S. Representative from Virginia, 1790-98, 1801-03 (at-large 1790-91, 9th District 1791-97, at-large 1797-98, 1801-03); member of Virginia state house of delegates, 1798-1800, 1816-17, 1826-27; U.S. Senator from Virginia, 1804, 1805-15; Governor of Virginia, 1827-30; delegate to Virginia state constitutional convention, 1829-30. Slaveowner. Died in Amelia County, Va., December 4, 1830 (age 68 years, 114 days). Interment a private or family graveyard, Amelia County, Va.
  Relatives: Son of William Giles and Ann (Branch) Giles; married 1797 to Martha Peyton Tabb (1777-1808).
  Giles counties in Tenn. and Va. are named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  George Rockingham Gilmer (1790-1859) — also known as George R. Gilmer — of Lexington, Oglethorpe County, Ga. Born near Lexington, Wilkes County (now Oglethorpe County), Ga., April 11, 1790. Lawyer; member of Georgia state house of representatives, 1818-19, 1824; U.S. Representative from Georgia at-large, 1821-23, 1827-29, 1833-35; Governor of Georgia, 1829-31, 1837-39; Presidential Elector for Georgia, 1836; Presidential Elector for Georgia, 1840. Slaveowner. Died in Lexington, Oglethorpe County, Ga., November 16, 1859 (age 69 years, 219 days). Interment at Presbyterian Cemetery, Lexington, Ga.
  Relatives: Son of Thomas Meriwether Gilmer (1763-1817) and Elizabeth (Lewis) Gilmer (1765-1855); first cousin once removed of Meriwether Lewis; first cousin twice removed of David Meriwether (1755-1822) and James Meriwether (1755-1817); second cousin once removed of James Meriwether (1788-1852), David Meriwether (1800-1893) and James Archibald Meriwether; third cousin of Reuben Handy Meriwether; third cousin twice removed of Theodorick Bland; fourth cousin once removed of John Randolph of Roanoke and Henry St. George Tucker.
  Political families: Demarest-Meriwether-Lewis family of New Jersey; Harrison-Randolph-Marshall-Cabell family of Virginia; Walker-Meriwether-Kellogg family of Virginia (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Gilmer County, Ga. is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — National Governors Association biography — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Thomas Walker Gilmer (1802-1844) — of Virginia. Born in Gilmerton, Albemarle County, Va., April 6, 1802. Lawyer; member of Virginia state house of delegates, 1829-36, 1838-39; Speaker of the Virginia State House of Delegates, 1838-39; Governor of Virginia, 1840-41; U.S. Representative from Virginia, 1841-44 (12th District 1841-43, 5th District 1843-44); U.S. Secretary of the Navy, 1844; died in office 1844. Slaveowner. Among those killed in the explosion when a cannon accidentally burst on board the U.S.S. Princeton, on the Potomac River near Fort Washington, Prince George's County, Md., February 28, 1844 (age 41 years, 328 days). Originally entombed at Congressional Cemetery, Washington, D.C.; reinterment at a private or family graveyard, Albemarle County, Va.
  Relatives: Son of George Gilmer (1778-1836) and Elizabeth Anderson (Hudson) Gilmer (1784-1820); married to Anne Elizabeth Baker (1809-1874); nephew of Mildred Gilmer (1772-1799; who married William Wirt); grandnephew of John Walker and Francis Walker; second cousin once removed of Meriwether Lewis (1774-1809); second cousin twice removed of Aylett Hawes; third cousin once removed of Robert Brooke, George Madison, Richard Aylett Buckner, Richard Hawes and Albert Gallatin Hawes; third cousin twice removed of Hubbard T. Smith; third cousin thrice removed of Archer Woodford; fourth cousin of Zachary Taylor, Francis Taliaferro Helm, Aylette Buckner, David Shelby Walker and Aylett Hawes Buckner; fourth cousin once removed of John Strother Pendleton, Albert Gallatin Pendleton, Charles John Helm, Hubbard Dozier Helm, James David Walker, David Shelby Walker Jr. and Harry Bartow Hawes.
  Political families: Walker-Meriwether-Kellogg family of Virginia; Jackson-Lee family; Demarest-Meriwether-Lewis family of New Jersey; Harrison-Randolph-Marshall-Cabell family of Virginia; Lee-Randolph family; Walker-Helm-Lincoln-Brown family of Kentucky; Washington-Walker family of Virginia; Pendleton-Lee family of Maryland; Clay family of Kentucky; Lewis-Pollard family of Texas (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Gilmer County, W.Va. is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — National Governors Association biography — Find-A-Grave memorial
  William Gilpin (1813-1894) — of Colorado. Born in New Castle County, Del., October 4, 1813. Lawyer; newspaper editor; explorer; major in the U.S. Army during the Mexican War; Governor of Colorado Territory, 1861-62; candidate for Delegate to U.S. Congress from Colorado Territory, 1862. Run over by a horse and buggy, and later died as a result, in Denver, Colo., January 20, 1894 (age 80 years, 108 days). Interment at Mt. Olivet Cemetery, Wheat Ridge, Colo.
  Relatives: Son of Joshua Gilpin (1765-1841) and Mary (Dilworth) Gilpin (1777-1864); brother of Henry Dilworth Gilpin (1801-1860); married to Julia Pratte (1836-1912).
  Gilpin County, Colo. is named for him.
  Gilpin Peak, in the Sneffels Range of the Rocky Mountains, in Ouray County and San Miguel County, Colorado, is named for him.  — Gilpin Lake, in the Mount Zirkel Wilderness, Routt County, Colorado, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Thomas Glascock (1790-1841) — of Georgia. Born in Augusta, Richmond County, Ga., October 21, 1790. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812; member of Georgia state house of representatives, 1821-23, 1831-34, 1839; U.S. Representative from Georgia at-large, 1835-39. Slaveowner. Died in Decatur, DeKalb County, Ga., May 19, 1841 (age 50 years, 210 days). Interment at Magnolia Cemetery, Augusta, Ga.
  Glascock County, Ga. is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  George Washington Glasscock (1810-1879) — of Texas. Born in 1810. Member of Texas state legislature, 1850. Died in 1879 (age about 69 years). Burial location unknown.
  Presumably named for: George Washington
  Glasscock County, Tex. is named for him.
  Frank Robert Gooding (1859-1928) — also known as Frank R. Gooding — of Shoshone, Lincoln County, Idaho; Gooding, Gooding County, Idaho. Born in Tiverton, Devon, England, September 16, 1859. Republican. Mining contractor; farmer; member of Idaho state senate, 1900; delegate to Republican National Convention from Idaho, 1904, 1924, 1928; Governor of Idaho, 1905-09; U.S. Senator from Idaho, 1921-28; defeated, 1918; died in office 1928. Methodist. Died in Gooding, Gooding County, Idaho, June 24, 1928 (age 68 years, 282 days). Interment at Elmwood Cemetery, Gooding, Idaho.
  Gooding County, Idaho is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  William Washington Gordon (1796-1842) — of Savannah, Chatham County, Ga. Born in Screven County, Ga., January 17, 1796. Lawyer; mayor of Savannah, Ga., 1834-36; member of Georgia state house of representatives, 1835; member of Georgia state senate, 1838; founder and president of the Central Railroad and Banking Co. Died, from bilious pleurisy, in Savannah, Chatham County, Ga., March 22, 1842 (age 46 years, 64 days). Original interment at Colonial Park Cemetery, Savannah, Ga.; reinterment at Laurel Grove North Cemetery, Savannah, Ga.; memorial monument at Wright Square, Savannah, Ga.
  Relatives: Son of Ambrose Gordon (1751-1804) and Elizabeth (Meade) Gordon (1764-1838); married 1826 to Sarah Anderson 'Addie' Stites (1806-1882; niece of James Moore Wayne (1790-1867)); father of William Washington Gordon; grandfather of Juliette Gordon Low (1860-1927; founder of the Girl Scouts of America in 1912).
  Political family: Gordon-Wayne-Stites family of Savannah, Georgia.
  Gordon County, Ga. is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  John J. Gosper (born c.1843) — of Nebraska. Born about 1843. Secretary of state of Nebraska, 1873-75. Burial location unknown.
  Gosper County, Neb. is named for him.
  William Alexander Graham (1804-1875) — also known as William A. Graham — of Hillsborough, Orange County, N.C. Born near Lincolnton, Lincoln County, N.C., September 5, 1804. Whig. Lawyer; planter; member of North Carolina house of commons, 1833-40; U.S. Senator from North Carolina, 1840-43; Governor of North Carolina, 1845-49; U.S. Secretary of the Navy, 1850-52; candidate for Vice President of the United States, 1852; member of North Carolina state senate, 1854-66; Senator from North Carolina in the Confederate Congress, 1864-65. Scotch-Irish ancestry. Slaveowner. Died in Saratoga Springs, Saratoga County, N.Y., August 11, 1875 (age 70 years, 340 days). Interment at Hillsborough Old Town Cemetery, Hillsborough, N.C.
  Relatives: Son of Joseph Graham (1759-1836) and Isabella (Davidson) Graham (1762-1808); brother of James Graham (1793-1851); married, June 8, 1836, to Susannah Sarah Washington (1816-1890); father of John Washington Graham, William Alexander Graham, Augustus Washington Graham and Sarah Washington Graham (1851-1909; who married Walter Clark).
  Political family: Graham family of Hillsborough, North Carolina.
  Graham County, N.C. is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — NCpedia
  Jedediah Morgan Grant (1816-1856) — also known as Jedediah M. Grant; "Brigham's Sledgehammer" — of Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Utah. Born in Windsor, Broome County, N.Y., February 21, 1816. Mayor of Salt Lake City, Utah, 1851-56; died in office 1856. Mormon. Died, of pneumonia, in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Utah, December 1, 1856 (age 40 years, 284 days). Interment at Salt Lake City Cemetery, Salt Lake City, Utah.
  Relatives: Son of Joshua Grant and Athalia (Howard) Grant; married to Rachel Ridgeway Ivins; father of Heber Jeddy Grant (1856-1945).
  Morgan County, Utah is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article
Ulysses S. Grant Ulysses Simpson Grant (1822-1885) — also known as Ulysses S. Grant; Hiram Ulysses Grant; "Savior of the Union"; "Lion of Vicksburg"; "The Austerlitz of American Politics"; "Unconditional Surrender Grant"; "The Galena Tanner"; "The Silent Soldier"; "The Silent General" — of Galena, Jo Daviess County, Ill. Born in Point Pleasant, Clermont County, Ohio, April 27, 1822. Republican. General in the Union Army during the Civil War; President of the United States, 1869-77; candidate for Republican nomination for President, 1880. Methodist. Scottish ancestry. Member, Loyal Legion. Elected to the Hall of Fame for Great Americans in 1900. Died of throat cancer, at Mt. McGregor, Saratoga County, N.Y., July 23, 1885 (age 63 years, 87 days). Interment at General Grant Memorial, Manhattan, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Jesse Root Grant (1794-1873) and Hannah (Simpson) Grant (1798-1883); married, August 22, 1848, to Julia Boggs Dent (sister-in-law of Alexander Sharp; sister of George Wrenshall Dent and Lewis Dent); father of Frederick Dent Grant (1850-1912) and Ulysses Simpson Grant Jr.; grandfather of Nellie Grant (1881-1972; who married William Pigott Cronan); first cousin twice removed of Augustus Seymour Porter (1769-1849) and Peter Buell Porter; second cousin once removed of Augustus Seymour Porter (1798-1872), Peter Buell Porter Jr. and Peter Augustus Porter (1827-1864); second cousin four times removed of Benjamin Huntington; third cousin of Peter Augustus Porter (1853-1925); third cousin twice removed of John Davenport, Joshua Coit, James Davenport, Henry Huntington, Gurdon Huntington, Samuel Lathrop, Abel Huntington and William Rush Merriam; third cousin thrice removed of Samuel Huntington and Henry Scudder; fourth cousin once removed of Ebenezer Huntington, Theodore Davenport, Benjamin Nicoll Huntington, Jesse Monroe Hatch, Franklin Delano Roosevelt and Warren Delano Robbins.
  Political family: Kellogg-Adams-Seymour-Chapin family of Connecticut and New York (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Cross-reference: Horace Porter — Ayres Phillips Merrill — Robert Martin Douglas — Thomas L. Hamer — James Arkell
  Grant counties in Ark., Kan., La., Minn., Neb., N.M., N.Dak., Okla., Ore., S.Dak., Wash. and W.Va. are named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: Ulysses G. PalmerUlysses S. G. BieberUlysses G. DenmanUlysses G. CrandellUlysses S. G. BlakelyS. U. G. RhodesUlysses G. BordenU. Grant MengelUlysses G. FosterUlysses G. ByersU. S. Grant Leverett
  Coins and currency: His portrait appears on the U.S. $50 bill, and also appeared on $1 and $5 silver certificates in 1887-1927.
  Personal motto: "When in doubt, fight."
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Books about Ulysses S. Grant: Jean Edward Smith, Grant — Frank J. Scaturro, President Grant Reconsidered — William S. McFeely, Grant — Brooks D. Simpson, Ulysses S. Grant: Triumph Over Adversity, 1822-1865 — Brooks D. Simpson, Let Us Have Peace: Ulysses S. Grant and the Politics of War and Reconstruction, 1861-1868 — James S. Brisbin, The campaign lives of Ulysses S. Grant and Schuyler Colfax — Josiah Bunting III, Ulysses S. Grant — Michael Korda, Ulysses S. Grant : The Unlikely Hero — Edward H. Bonekemper, A Victor, Not a Butcher: Ulysses S. Grant's Overlooked Military Genius — Harry J. Maihafer, The General and the Journalists: Ulysses S. Grant, Horace Greeley, and Charles Dana — H. W. Brands, The Man Who Saved the Union: Ulysses Grant in War and Peace — Charles Bracelen Flood, Grant's Final Victory: Ulysses S. Grant's Heroic Last Year — Joan Waugh, U. S. Grant: American Hero, American Myth
  Critical books about Ulysses S. Grant: Nathan Miller, Star-Spangled Men : America's Ten Worst Presidents
  Fiction about Ulysses S. Grant: Newt Gingrich & William R. Forstchen, Grant Comes East — Newt Gingrich & William R. Forstchen, Never Call Retreat : Lee and Grant: The Final Victory
  Image source: Portrait & Biographical Album of Washtenaw County (1891)
  Peter W. Gray (1819-1874) — of Texas. Born in Fredericksburg, Va., December 12, 1819. Member of Texas Republic House of Representatives, 1850; member of Texas state senate, 1851-53; state court judge in Texas, 1854-61; Representative from Texas in the Confederate Congress, 1862-64; justice of Texas state supreme court, 1874. Died of tuberculosis, in Houston, Harris County, Tex., October 3, 1874 (age 54 years, 295 days). Interment at Glenwood Cemetery, Houston, Tex.
  Relatives: Married to Jane Avery (1820-1894).
  Gray County, Tex. is named for him.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Peter William Grayson (1788-1838) — also known as Peter W. Grayson; Peter Wagener Grayson — of Texas. Born in Bardstown, Nelson County, Ky., 1788. Delegate to Texas Consultation of 1835 from District of Goliad, 1835; Attorney General of the Texas Republic, 1836, 1837; candidate for President of the Texas Republic, 1838. Died from self-inflicted gunshot, at Bean Station, Grainger County, Tenn., July 9, 1838 (age about 50 years). Interment at Eastern Cemetery, Louisville, Ky.
  Relatives: Son of Benjamin Grayson (1761-1833) and Caroline Malinda (Taylor) Grayson (1765-1830); brother of Frederick William Spence Grayson and Mary Elizabeth Grayson (1795-1830; who married James Douglas Breckinridge (1781-1849)).
  Political families: Breckinridge-Preston-Cabell family of Virginia; Kellogg-Adams-Seymour-Chapin family of Connecticut and New York; Monroe-Grayson-Roosevelt-Breckinridge family of Virginia and Kentucky (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Grayson County, Tex. is named for him.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  William Grayson (1736-1790) — of Virginia. Born in Prince William County, Va., 1736. Lawyer; colonel in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; member of Virginia state house of delegates, 1784-85, 1788; Delegate to Continental Congress from Virginia, 1785-87; U.S. Senator from Virginia, 1789-90; died in office 1790. Slaveowner. Died in Dumfries, Prince William County, Va., March 12, 1790 (age about 53 years). Interment a private or family graveyard, Prince William County, Va.
  Relatives: Son of Benjamin Grayson (1684-1757) and Susannah (Monroe) Grayson (1695-1752); married to Eleanor Smallwood (1744-1789; sister of William Smallwood); father of Alfred William Grayson; uncle of Alexander Dalrymple Orr and Beverly Robinson Grayson; grandfather of William Grayson Carter; second great-grandfather of Carter Henry Harrison II; second great-granduncle of John Brady Grayson; first cousin once removed of James Monroe (1758-1831); first cousin twice removed of Thomas Bell Monroe and James Monroe (1799-1870); first cousin thrice removed of John Strother Pendleton, Albert Gallatin Pendleton and Victor Monroe; first cousin five times removed of Theodore Douglas Robinson (1883-1934), Sidney Fletcher Taliaferro and Corinne Robinson Alsop; first cousin six times removed of Corinne A. Chubb and John deKoven Alsop.
  Political families: Roosevelt family of New York; Kellogg-Adams-Seymour-Chapin family of Connecticut and New York; Monroe-Grayson-Roosevelt-Breckinridge family of Virginia and Kentucky (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Grayson counties in Ky. and Va. are named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
Horace Greeley Horace Greeley (1811-1872) — also known as "Old Honesty"; "Old White Hat" — of New York, New York County, N.Y.; Chappaqua, Westchester County, N.Y. Born in Amherst, Hillsborough County, N.H., February 3, 1811. Founder and editor of the New York Tribune newspaper; U.S. Representative from New York 6th District, 1848-49; defeated (Republican), 1870; delegate to Republican National Convention from Oregon, 1860; after the Civil War, became advocate of universal amnesty for Confederates; offered bail in May 1867 for Jefferson Davis; member of Republican National Committee from New York, 1866-70; delegate to New York state constitutional convention, 1867; candidate for New York state comptroller, 1869; Democratic candidate for President of the United States, 1872. Died in Pleasantville, Westchester County, N.Y., November 29, 1872 (age 61 years, 300 days). Interment at Green-Wood Cemetery, Brooklyn, N.Y.; statue at City Hall Park, Manhattan, N.Y.; statue at Herald Square, Manhattan, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Zaccheus Greeley (1782-1867) and Mary (Woodburn) Greeley (1788-1855); married, July 5, 1836, to Mary Y. Cheney (1811-1872); second cousin of Wallace M. Greeley (born1838).
  Cross-reference: Josiah B. Grinnell
  Greeley counties in Kan. and Neb. are named for him.
  The city of Greeley, Colorado, is named for him.  — Horace Greeley High School, in Chappaqua, New York, is named for him.  — Mount Horace Greeley, in Keweenaw County, Michigan, is named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS Horace Greeley (built 1942 at Terminal Island, California; scuttled with obsolete ammunition in the North Atlantic Ocean, 1966) was named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: Horace G. SnoverHorace G. KnowlesHorace Greeley Dawson, Jr.
  Personal motto: "Go West, young man."
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Books by Horace Greeley: American conflict: A history of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-1865 (1869) — Recollections Of A Busy Life
  Books about Horace Greeley: Glyndon G. Van Deusen, Horace Greeley, Nineteenth Century Crusader — Harry J. Maihafer, The General and the Journalists: Ulysses S. Grant, Horace Greeley, and Charles Dana — Wilbur J. Granberg, Spread the truth : The life of Horace Greeley — Doris Faber, Horace Greeley: The People's Editor — Coy F. Cross, Go West Young Man! : Horace Greeley's Vision for America — J. Parton, The Life of Horace Greeley, Editor of the New York Tribune
  Image source: Life and Work of James G. Blaine (1893)
  Christopher Greenup (c.1750-1818) — of Frankfort, Franklin County, Ky. Born in Virginia, about 1750. Colonel in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; lawyer; member of Virginia state house of delegates, 1785; U.S. Representative from Kentucky at-large, 1792-97; member of Kentucky state house of representatives, 1798; Clerk of the Kentucky State Senate, 1799-1802; circuit judge in Kentucky, 1802; Governor of Kentucky, 1804-08; Presidential Elector for Kentucky, 1808; justice of the peace. Slaveowner. Died in Blue Licks Spring, Nicholas County, Ky., April 27, 1818 (age about 68 years). Interment at Frankfort Cemetery, Frankfort, Ky.
  Relatives: Son of John Greenup and Elizabeth (Witten) Greenup; married, July 9, 1787, to Mary Catherine 'Cathy' Pope.
  Greenup County, Ky. is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Alfred Burton Greenwood (1811-1889) — also known as Alfred B. Greenwood — of Bentonville, Benton County, Ark. Born in Franklin County, Ga., July 11, 1811. Democrat. Member of Arkansas state house of representatives, 1842-45; circuit judge in Arkansas, 1851-53; U.S. Representative from Arkansas 1st District, 1853-59. Incorrectly credited in some sources as having been a member of the Confederate Congress. Slaveowner. Died in Bentonville, Benton County, Ark., October 4, 1889 (age 78 years, 85 days). Interment at Odd Fellows Cemetery, Bentonville, Ark.
  Greenwood County, Kan. is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  John Alexander Greer (1802-1855) — of Texas. Born in Shelbyville, Bedford County, Tenn., July 18, 1802. Member of Texas Republic Senate from District of San Augustine, 1838-45; Texas Republic Secretary of the Treasury, 1845-46; Lieutenant Governor of Texas, 1847-51. Member, Freemasons. Died while campaigning for the governorship, July 4, 1855 (age 52 years, 351 days). Original interment in private or family graveyard; reinterment in 1929 at Texas State Cemetery, Austin, Tex.
  Greer County, Okla. is named for him.
  John Gregg (1828-1864) — of Texas. Born in Lawrence County, Ala., September 28, 1828. State court judge in Texas, 1856; delegate to Texas secession convention, 1861; Delegate from Texas to the Confederate Provisional Congress, 1861-62; general in the Confederate Army during the Civil War. Killed in action on the Charles City Road near Richmond (unknown county), Va., October 7, 1864 (age 36 years, 9 days). Interment at Odd Fellows Cemetery, Aberdeen, Miss.
  Gregg County, Tex. is named for him.
  John Shaw Gregory (b. 1831) — also known as J. Shaw Gregory — of Fort Randall, Gregory County, Dakota Territory (now S.Dak.). Born in New York, 1831. Member Dakota territorial council, 1862-66. Burial location unknown.
  Gregory County, S.Dak. is named for him.
  Jesse Grimes (1788-1866) — of Texas. Born in Duplin County, N.C., February 6, 1788. Delegate to Texas Convention of 1833 from District of Washington, 1833; delegate to Texas Consultation of 1835 from District of Washington, 1835; delegate to Texas Republic Republic constitutional convention from District of Washington, 1836; signer, Texas Declaration of Independence, 1836; member of Texas Republic Senate, 1836-37, 1844-45; member of Texas Republic House of Representatives, 1841-43. Died March 15, 1866 (age 78 years, 37 days). Original interment at John McGinty Cemetery, Near Navasota, Grimes County, Tex.; reinterment in 1929 at Texas State Cemetery, Austin, Tex.
  Grimes County, Tex. is named for him.
  Felix Grundy (1777-1840) — of Nashville, Davidson County, Tenn. Born in Berkeley County, Va. (now W.Va.), September 11, 1777. Delegate to Kentucky state constitutional convention, 1799; member of Kentucky state house of representatives, 1800; justice of Kentucky state supreme court, 1806; U.S. Representative from Tennessee at-large, 1811-14; member of Tennessee state house of representatives, 1815; U.S. Senator from Tennessee, 1829-38, 1839-40; died in office 1840; U.S. Attorney General, 1838-39. Member, Freemasons. Slaveowner. Died in Nashville, Davidson County, Tenn., December 19, 1840 (age 63 years, 99 days). Interment at Mt. Olivet Cemetery, Nashville, Tenn.
  Grundy counties in Ill., Iowa, Mo. and Tenn. are named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  Button Gwinnett (1735-1777) — of Savannah, Chatham County, Ga. Born in Down Hatherly, Gloucestershire, England, March 3, 1735. Planter; Delegate to Continental Congress from Georgia, 1776; signer, Declaration of Independence, 1776; delegate to Georgia state constitutional convention, 1777; Governor of Georgia, 1777. Mortally wounded in a duel with Lachlan McIntosh, on May 16, 1777, and died three days later, near Savannah, Chatham County, Ga., May 19, 1777 (age 42 years, 77 days). Interment at Colonial Park Cemetery, Savannah, Ga.; memorial monument at Constitution Gardens, Washington, D.C.
  Relatives: Married 1757 to Ann Bourne.
  Gwinnett County, Ga. is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Joseph Habersham (1751-1815) — of Savannah, Chatham County, Ga. Born in Savannah, Chatham County, Ga., July 28, 1751. Colonel in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; Delegate to Continental Congress from Georgia, 1785; delegate to Georgia convention to ratify U.S. constitution, 1788; mayor of Savannah, Ga., 1792-93; U.S. Postmaster General, 1795-1801. Member, Freemasons. Died in Savannah, Chatham County, Ga., November 17, 1815 (age 64 years, 112 days). Interment at Colonial Park Cemetery, Savannah, Ga.
  Relatives: Son of James Habersham (1712-1775) and Mary (Bolton) Habersham (1724-1763); brother of John Habersham (1754-1799); married to Isabella Rae; uncle of Richard Wylly Habersham.
  Political family: Habersham family of Savannah, Georgia.
  Habersham County, Ga. is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Augustus Caesar Hall (1814-1861) — also known as Augustus Hall — of Keosauqua, Van Buren County, Iowa. Born in Batavia, Genesee County, N.Y., April 29, 1814. Democrat. Lawyer; U.S. Representative from Iowa 1st District, 1855-57; justice of Nebraska territorial supreme court, 1858-61; died in office 1861; chief justice of Nebraska territorial supreme court, 1858-61; died in office 1861. Died in Bellevue, Sarpy County, Neb., February 1, 1861 (age 46 years, 278 days). Interment at Prospect Hill Cemetery, Omaha, Neb.
  Presumably named for: Augustus Caesar
  Hall County, Neb. is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Lyman Hall (1724-1790) — of Georgia. Born in Wallingford, New Haven County, Conn., April 12, 1724. Delegate to Continental Congress from Georgia, 1775; signer, Declaration of Independence, 1776; Governor of Georgia, 1783-84. Congregationalist. Died October 19, 1790 (age 66 years, 190 days). Original interment in private or family graveyard; reinterment at Courthouse Grounds, Augusta, Ga.; memorial monument at Constitution Gardens, Washington, D.C.
  Relatives: Ancestor *** of Homer William Hall (1870-1954).
  Hall County, Ga. is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article
  Warren DeWitt Clinton Hall (1788-1867) — also known as Warren D. C. Hall — of Texas. Born in Guilford County, N.C., 1788. Delegate to Texas Convention of 1832 from District of Liberty, 1832; delegate to Texas Consultation of 1835 from District of Columbia, 1835; Texas Republic Secretary of War, 1836. Died April 8, 1867 (age about 78 years). Interment at Trinity Episcopal Cemetery, Galveston, Tex.
  Hall County, Tex. is named for him.
Alexander Hamilton Alexander Hamilton (1757-1804) — also known as "Alexander the Coppersmith" — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in Charles Town, Nevis, January 11, 1757. Served in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; lawyer; Delegate to Continental Congress from New York, 1782-83; member of New York state assembly from New York County, 1786-87; member, U.S. Constitutional Convention, 1787; delegate to New York convention to ratify U.S. constitution from New York County, 1788; U.S. Secretary of the Treasury, 1789-95. Episcopalian. Scottish and French ancestry. Member, Freemasons; Society of the Cincinnati. Elected to the Hall of Fame for Great Americans in 1915. Shot and mortally wounded in a duel with Aaron Burr, on July 11, 1804, and died the next day in New York, New York County, N.Y., July 12, 1804 (age 47 years, 183 days). Interment at Trinity Churchyard, Manhattan, N.Y.; statue at Treasury Building Grounds, Washington, D.C.; statue at Commonwealth Avenue Mall, Boston, Mass.
  Relatives: Son of James Hamilton and Rachel (Faucette) Hamilton; married, December 14, 1780, to Elizabeth Schuyler (1757-1854; daughter of Philip John Schuyler; sister of Philip Jeremiah Schuyler); father of Alexander Hamilton Jr., James Alexander Hamilton (1788-1878) and William Stephen Hamilton; great-grandfather of Robert Ray Hamilton; second great-grandfather of Laurens M. Hamilton; ancestor *** of Robert Hamilton Woodruff.
  Political families: Livingston-Schuyler family of New York; VanRensselaer family of Albany, New York (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Cross-reference: Nathaniel Pendleton — Robert Troup — John Tayler — William P. Van Ness
  Hamilton counties in Fla., Ill., Ind., Kan., Neb., N.Y., Ohio and Tenn. are named for him.
  The city of Hamilton, Ohio, is named for him.  — Hamilton Hall (dormitory, built 1926), at Harvard University Business School, Boston, Massachusetts, is named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: Alexander H. BuellAlexander H. HolleyHamilton FishAlexander H. StephensAlexander H. BullockAlexander H. BaileyAlexander H. RiceAlexander Hamilton JonesAlexander H. WatermanAlexander H. CoffrothAlexander H. DudleyAlexander H. RevellAlexander Hamilton HargisAlexander Hamilton PhillipsAlex Woodle
  Coins and currency: His portrait appears on the U.S. $10 bill; from the 1860s to the 1920s, his portrait also appeared on U.S. notes and certificates of various denominations from $2 to $1,000.