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Politicians Killed in the Texas War of Independence

Very incomplete list!

in chronological order

  David Crockett (1786-1836) — also known as Davy Crockett; "King of the Wild Frontier" — of Tennessee. Born in Greene County, Tenn., August 17, 1786. Democrat. Member of Tennessee state house of representatives, 1821; U.S. Representative from Tennessee, 1827-31, 1833-35 (9th District 1827-31, 12th District 1833-35); served in the Texas Army during the Texas War of Independence. Member, Freemasons. Killed while defending the Alamo, in San Antonio, Bexar County, Tex., March 6, 1836 (age 49 years, 202 days). Cremated; ashes interred at San Fernando Cathedral, San Antonio, Tex.
  Relatives: Son of John Crockett and Rebecca (Hawkins) Crockett; married, August 16, 1806, to Mary 'Polly' Finley; married 1815 to Elizabeth Patton; father of John Wesley Crockett; first cousin twice removed of Charles Carroll Walcutt (1838-1898).
  Political family: Crockett-Walcutt family of Tennessee.
  Crockett counties in Tenn. and Tex. are named for him.
  The Davy Crockett National Forest (established 1936), in Houston and Trinity counties, Texas, is named for him.
  Personal motto: "Be sure you're right, then go ahead."
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books by David Crockett: A Narrative of the Life of David Crockett of the State of Tennessee
  Books about David Crockett: William C. Davis, Three Roads to the Alamo: The Lives and Fortunes of David Crockett, James Bowie, and William Barret Travis — Constance Rourke, Davy Crockett — Elaine Alphin, Davy Crockett (for young readers)
  William Barret Travis (1809-1836) — also known as William B. Travis — of Claiborne, Monroe County, Ala.; Anahuac, Chambers County, Tex. Born in Red Bank, Edgefield District (now Saluda County), S.C., August 9, 1809. Lawyer; newspaper editor; delegate to Texas Consultation of 1835 from District of Austin, 1835; colonel in the Texas Army during the Texas War of Independence. Member, Freemasons. Killed while defending the Alamo, in San Antonio, Bexar County, Tex., March 6, 1836 (age 26 years, 210 days). Cremated; ashes interred at San Fernando Cathedral, San Antonio, Tex.
  Relatives: Married, October 26, 1828, to Rosanna Cato (1812-1848; divorced 1835); father of Charles Edward Travis (1829-1860).
  Travis County, Tex. is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about William Barret Travis: William C. Davis, Three Roads to the Alamo: The Lives and Fortunes of David Crockett, James Bowie, and William Barret Travis
  Ira J. Westover (d. 1836) — Delegate to Texas Consultation of 1835 from District of Goliad, 1835; served in the Texas Army during the Texas War of Independence. Following the Battle of Coleto, during the Texas War of Independence, he was among those taken prisoner by the Mexican Army; a few days later, he and almost 400 other prisoners were shot to death, an incident now known as the Goliad Massacre, in Goliad, Goliad County, Tex., March 27, 1836. Cremated.
  Junius William Mottley (1812-1836) — also known as William Mottley — of Texas. Born in 1812. Delegate to Texas Republic Republic constitutional convention from District of Goliad, 1836; signer, Texas Declaration of Independence, 1836; served in the Texas Army during the Texas War of Independence. Killed at the battle of San Jacinto, Harris County, Tex., April 21, 1836 (age about 23 years). Interment at San Jacinto Park Cemetery, La Porte, Tex.
  Motley County, Tex. is named for him.
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