PoliticalGraveyard.com
The Political Graveyard: A Database of American History
Politicians Killed in the Civil War
(1861-1865)

Very incomplete list!

in chronological order

  John N. Hughes (1831-1861) — of Virginia. Born in 1831. Delegate to Virginia secession convention, 1861. Killed in the Civil War, 1861 (age about 30 years). Burial location unknown.
  Francis Stebbins Bartow (1816-1861) — also known as Francis S. Bartow — of Georgia. Born in Savannah, Chatham County, Ga., September 6, 1816. Lawyer; candidate for U.S. Representative from Georgia 1st District, 1856; delegate to Georgia secession convention, 1861; Delegate from Georgia to the Confederate Provisional Congress, 1861; died in office 1861; colonel in the Confederate Army during the Civil War. Killed by rifle shot, while rallying his men on the Henry House Hill, during the first battle of Manassas, Va., July 21, 1861 (age 44 years, 318 days). Interment at Laurel Grove North Cemetery, Savannah, Ga.
  Relatives: Son of Theodosius Bartow (1775-1856) and Frances Louisa (Stebbins) Bartow (1792-1873); married, April 18, 1844, to Louisa Green Berrien (1827-1913; daughter of John Macpherson Berrien); first cousin twice removed of Theodosia Bartow (1746-1794; who married Aaron Burr (1756-1836)).
  Political families: Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York; Sherman family of Connecticut; Appleton family of Massachusetts; Keeler-Floyd-Sherman-Bangs family of New York; Floyd-Woodbridge-Edwards family of New York; Cornell-Schilplin-Washburn-Burr family of New York; Berrien-Burr-Bartow-Biddle family of Pennsylvania; Hamlin-Bemis-Stowell-Appleton family of Bangor, Maine (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Bartow County, Ga. is named for him.
  The city of Bartow, Florida, is named for him.  — The town of Bartow, Georgia, is named for him.  — The community of Bartow, West Virginia, is named for him.  — Bartow Elementary School (now Otis J. Brock Elementary School), in Savannah, Georgia, was formerly named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS Francis S. Bartow (built 1944, scrapped 1971) was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Richard Hanson Weightman (1816-1861) — of New Mexico. Born in Washington, D.C., December 28, 1816. Delegate to U.S. Congress from New Mexico Territory, 1851; colonel in the Confederate Army during the Civil War. Killed while commanding troops at the battle of Wilson's Creek, near Republic, Greene County, Mo., August 10, 1861 (age 44 years, 225 days). Original interment at Wilson's Creek Battlefield, Near Republic, Greene County, Mo.; reinterment at Springfield National Cemetery, Springfield, Mo.
  Relatives: Married to Susan Bradford Coxe (1818-1869).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Benjamin Johnson Brown (d. 1861) — of Missouri. Member of Missouri state senate, 1850; colonel in the Confederate Army during the Civil War. Killed in the battle of Wilson's Creek, near Republic, Greene County, Mo., August 10, 1861. Original interment at Wilson's Creek Battlefield, Near Republic, Greene County, Mo.; reinterment at Springfield National Cemetery, Springfield, Mo.
  Edward Dickinson Baker (1811-1861) — also known as Edward D. Baker — of Springfield, Sangamon County, Ill.; Galena, Jo Daviess County, Ill.; San Francisco, Calif.; Oregon City, Clackamas County, Ore. Born in London, England, February 24, 1811. Lawyer; member of Illinois state house of representatives, 1837-40; member of Illinois state senate, 1841-45; U.S. Representative from Illinois, 1845-46, 1849-51 (7th District 1845-46, 6th District 1849-51); resigned 1846; colonel in the U.S. Army during the Mexican War; U.S. Senator from Oregon, 1860-61; died in office 1861; general in the Union Army during the Civil War. Killed in battle at Balls Bluff, Loudoun County, Va., October 21, 1861 (age 50 years, 239 days). Interment at San Francisco National Cemetery, San Francisco, Calif.
  Relatives: Married, April 27, 1831, to Mary A. Lee.
  Baker County, Ore. is named for him.
  Fort Baker (previously, Lime Point Military Reservation; renamed Fort Baker in 1897; now part of Golden Gate National Recreation Area), in Marin County, California, is named for him.  — Baker Street, in San Francisco, California, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Josiah McNair Anderson (1807-1861) — also known as Josiah M. Anderson — of Fairview, Williamson County, Tenn. Born near Pikeville, Bledsoe County, Tenn., November 29, 1807. Whig. Lawyer; member of Tennessee state house of representatives, 1833-37; member of Tennessee state senate, 1843-49; Speaker of the Tennessee State Senate, 1843-45, 1847-49; U.S. Representative from Tennessee 3rd District, 1849-51. Just after having made a secession speech, was stabbed and killed, Looneys Creek, Marion County, Tenn., November 8, 1861 (age 53 years, 344 days). Interment a private or family graveyard, Sequatchie County, Tenn.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Benjamin Franklin Terry (1821-1861) — also known as Frank Terry — Born in Russellville, Logan County, Ky., February 18, 1821. Planter; in 1844, he was attacked by two rebellious slaves with knives and axes; railroad builder; delegate to Texas secession convention, 1861; colonel in the Confederate Army during the Civil War. Shot and killed in action while leading Terry's Texas Rangers at the battle of Woodsonville (also called Rowlett's Station), in Hart County, Ky., December 17, 1861 (age 40 years, 302 days). Original interment at a private or family graveyard, Fort Bend County, Tex.; reinterment in 1880 at Glenwood Cemetery, Houston, Tex.
  Presumably named for: Benjamin Franklin
  Relatives: Son of Joseph Royal Terry (1792-1877) and Sarah David (Smith) Terry (1793-1837); brother of David Smith Terry (1823-1889); married, October 12, 1841, to Mary Bingham (1821-1876).
  Political family: Runnels-Terry family of Houston, Texas.
  Terry County, Tex. is named for him.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Alfred Robb (d. 1862) — of Clarksville, Montgomery County, Tenn. Democrat. Delegate to Democratic National Convention from Tennessee, 1860; colonel in the Confederate Army during the Civil War. Mortally wounded in the battle of Fort Donelson, Tennessee, and died soon after, in Clarksville, Montgomery County, Tenn., 1862. Interment at Greenwood Cemetery, Clarksville, Tenn.
  George W. Johnson (1811-1862) — of Georgetown, Scott County, Ky. Born in 1811. Lawyer; delegate to Kentucky secession convention, 1861; Confederate Governor of Kentucky, 1861-62. Shot during a Civil War battle, and died soon after, 1862 (age about 51 years). Interment somewhere in Georgetown, Ky.
  Relatives: Father of Henry V. Johnson (1852-?).
  Political family: Johnson family of Georgetown, Kentucky.
  Felix Kirk Zollicoffer (1812-1862) — also known as Felix K. Zollicoffer — of Nashville, Davidson County, Tenn. Born in Bigbyville, Maury County, Tenn., May 19, 1812. Member of Tennessee state senate, 1849; fought a pistol duel with rival editor John L. Martin, in Nashville, Tenn., 1852; U.S. Representative from Tennessee 8th District, 1853-59; general in the Confederate Army during the Civil War. Shot and killed in a Civil War battle near Mill Springs, Wayne County, Ky., January 19, 1862 (age 49 years, 245 days). Interment at Nashville City Cemetery, Nashville, Tenn.; cenotaph at Zollicoffer Park Cemetery, Near Nancy, Pulaski County, Ky.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Benjamin McCulloch (1811-1862) — also known as Ben McCulloch — of Texas. Born November 11, 1811. Member of Texas Republic Congress, 1839; general in the Confederate Army during the Civil War. Killed in the Civil War at Pea Ridge, Benton County, Ark., March 7, 1862 (age 50 years, 116 days). Interment at Texas State Cemetery, Austin, Tex.
  McCulloch County, Tex. is named for him.
  Albert Sidney Johnston (1803-1862) — of Texas. Born in Washington, Mason County, Ky., February 2, 1803. Served in the U.S. Army during the Black Hawk War; served in the Texas Army during the Texas War of Independence; wounded in a duel with Texas Gen. Felix Huston, Februay 7, 1837; Texas Republic Secretary of War, 1838-40; general in the Confederate Army during the Civil War. Shot and killed while leading his forces at the Battle of Shiloh, Hardin County, Tenn., April 6, 1862 (age 59 years, 63 days). He was the highest-ranking officer on either side killed during the war. Original interment at St. Louis Cemetery No. 1, New Orleans, La.; reinterment in 1867 at Texas State Cemetery, Austin, Tex.; statue at South Mall, University of Texas, Austin, Tex.
  Relatives: Son of Dr. John Johnston and Abigail (Harris) Johnston; half-brother of Josiah Stoddard Johnston; married 1829 to Henrietta Preston (sister of William Preston); married 1843 to Eliza Griffin; grandfather of Henrietta Preston Johnston (who married Henry St. George Tucker (1853-1932)).
  Political families: Marshall-Harrison-Randolph-Cabell family of Virginia; Johnston-Preston family of Kentucky and Virginia (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Politician named for him: Albert S. J. Lehr
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Clark L. Owen (1808-1862) — of Texas. Born in Shelby County, Ky., 1808. Served in the Texas Army during the Texas War of Independence; member of Texas Republic Senate from District of Matagorda, Jackson and Victoria, 1841-42; served in the Confederate Army during the Civil War. Killed at the battle of Shiloh, Hardin County, Tenn., April 6, 1862 (age about 53 years). Burial location unknown.
  W. H. L. Wallace (d. 1862) — of Ottawa, La Salle County, Ill. Republican. Delegate to Republican National Convention from Illinois, 1856; general in the Union Army during the Civil War. Shot and killed while leading troops at the Civil War battle of Shiloh near Pittsburg Landing, Hardin County, Tenn., April 6, 1862. Interment a private or family graveyard, La Salle County, Ill.
  Barton S. Kyle (1824-1862) — of Troy, Miami County, Ohio. Born in Miami County, Ohio, 1824. Republican. Delegate to Republican National Convention from Ohio, 1856; served in the Union Army during the Civil War. Member, Freemasons. Killed at the battle of Shiloh, Hardin County, Tenn., April 6, 1862 (age about 37 years). Interment at Rose Hill Cemetery, Troy, Ohio.
  Relatives: Uncle of Thomas Barton Kyle (1856-1915).
  Adley Hogan Gladden (1810-1862) — also known as A. H. Gladden — of Columbia, Richland District (now Richland County), S.C. Born in 1810. Whig. Postmaster at Columbia, S.C., 1841-45; colonel in the U.S. Army during the Mexican War; general in the Confederate Army during the Civil War. Wounded at the Battle of Shiloh and died a few days later, April 12, 1862 (age about 51 years). Interment at Magnolia Cemetery, Mobile, Ala.
  Louis Powell Harvey (1820-1862) — also known as Louis P. Harvey — of Shopiere, Rock County, Wis. Born in East Haddam, Middlesex County, Conn., July 22, 1820. Republican. Delegate to Wisconsin state constitutional convention, 1847; member of Wisconsin state senate, 1854-58; delegate to Republican National Convention from Wisconsin, 1856 (member, Credentials Committee); secretary of state of Wisconsin, 1860-62; Governor of Wisconsin, 1862; died in office 1862. While on a trip to inspect Wisconsin troops after the battle of Shiloh, during the Civil War, fell off a boat and drowned in the Tennessee River, near Pittsburg Landing, Hardin County, Tenn., April 19, 1862 (age 41 years, 271 days). Interment at Forest Hill Cemetery, Madison, Wis.
  Robert Eden Scott (1808-1862) — of Virginia. Born in Warrenton, Fauquier County, Va., April 23, 1808. Member of Virginia state house of delegates, 1835-42, 1845-52; delegate to Virginia state constitutional convention, 1850-51; delegate to Virginia secession convention, 1861; Delegate from Virginia to the Confederate Provisional Congress, 1861-62. Shot and killed, in a Civil War skirmish with a band of Union deserters, in Fauquier County, Va., May 3, 1862 (age 54 years, 10 days). Interment a private or family graveyard, Fauquier County, Va.
  George Taliaferro Ward (c.1810-1862) — also known as George T. Ward — of Leon County, Fla. Born in Fayette County, Ky., about 1810. Whig. Member Florida territorial council, 1833-34; delegate to Florida state constitutional convention from Leon County, 1838-39; candidate for Delegate to U.S. Congress from Florida Territory, 1841; candidate for Governor of Florida, 1852; delegate to Florida secession convention, 1861; Delegate from Florida to the Confederate Provisional Congress, 1861-62; candidate for Senator from Florida in the Confederate Congress, 1861; colonel in the Confederate Army during the Civil War. Shot and killed while leading his regiment in the Civil War battle at Williamsburg, Va., May 5, 1862 (age about 52 years). Interment at Episcopal Cemetery, Williamsburg, Va.
  William High Keim (1813-1862) — also known as William H. Keim — of Reading, Berks County, Pa. Born near Reading, Berks County, Pa., June 13, 1813. Mayor of Reading, Pa., 1848-49; defeated (Whig), 1847; U.S. Representative from Pennsylvania 8th District, 1858-59; general in the Union Army during the Civil War. Died in the military service at Harrisburg, Dauphin County, Pa., May 18, 1862 (age 48 years, 339 days). Interment at Charles Evans Cemetery, Reading, Pa.
  Relatives: Son of Benneville de Benneville Keim and Mary Hottenstein (High) Keim (1792-1833); nephew of George de Benneville Keim (1778-1852); first cousin of George May Keim (1805-1861); first cousin once removed of George de Benneville Keim (1831-1893); first cousin twice removed of George de Benneville Keim (1884-?).
  Political family: Keim family of Reading, Pennsylvania.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Robert Hopkins Hatton (1826-1862) — of Tennessee. Born in Steubenville, Jefferson County, Ohio, November 2, 1826. Member of Tennessee state house of representatives, 1855; U.S. Representative from Tennessee 5th District, 1859-61; general in the Confederate Army during the Civil War. Killed in the Battle of Seven Pines, near Richmond (unknown county), Va., May 31, 1862 (age 35 years, 210 days). Interment at Cedar Grove Cemetery, Lebanon, Tenn.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Sydenham Moore (1817-1862) — of Greensboro, Hale County, Ala. Born in Rutherford County, Tenn., May 25, 1817. Democrat. State court judge in Alabama, 1840; U.S. Representative from Alabama 4th District, 1857-61; defeated, 1855; colonel in the Confederate Army during the Civil War. Died from wounds received in the Battle of Seven Pines, Virginia, May 31, 1862 (age 45 years, 6 days). Interment at City Cemetery, Greensboro, Ala.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  William McPherson McIntosh (1815-1862) — of Georgia. Born in Elbert County, Ga., February 14, 1815. Democrat. Lawyer; planter; member of Georgia state house of representatives, 1846-47; member of Georgia state senate, 1855-56; Presidential Elector for Georgia, 1860; general in the Confederate Army during the Civil War. Died from gunshot wounds received at the Civil War battle at Garnett's Farm, Henrico County, Va., June, 1862 (age 47 years, 0 days). Interment at Heard Cemetery, Elberton, Ga.
  Relatives: Married, January 27, 1842, to Maria Louisa Allen (1824-1885; daughter of Singleton Walthall Allen; aunt by marriage of Willis B. Adams); father of Jessie McIntosh (who married Peyton M. Hawes) and Anna Cassandra McIntosh (who married Budd Clay Wall (1847-1930)); grandfather of Julia May Cade (who married Albert Sidney Hawes); great-grandfather of Peyton Samuel Hawes.
  Political family: Heard family of Elberton, Georgia.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Samuel Watson Black (1816-1862) — also known as Samuel W. Black — of Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, Pa.; Nebraska City, Otoe County, Neb. Born in Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, Pa., September 3, 1816. Lawyer; colonel in the U.S. Army during the Mexican War; candidate for U.S. Representative from Pennsylvania, 1852; justice of Nebraska territorial supreme court, 1857-59; Governor of Nebraska Territory, 1859-61; colonel in the Union Army during the Civil War. Killed in battle at Gaines Mill, Hanover County, Va., June 27, 1862 (age 45 years, 297 days). Interment at Allegheny Cemetery, Pittsburgh, Pa.
  Stephen Fowler Hale (1816-1862) — of Alabama. Born in Crittenden County, Ark., January 31, 1816. Member of Alabama state legislature, 1843, 1857-61; served in the U.S. Army during the Mexican War; candidate for U.S. Representative from Alabama 4th District, 1853; Delegate from Alabama to the Confederate Provisional Congress, 1861-62; colonel in the Confederate Army during the Civil War. Mortally wounded during the battle of Seven Pines, and died at Richmond, Va., July 18, 1862 (age 46 years, 168 days). Interment at Mesopotamia Cemetery, Eutaw, Ala.
  John Taylor Hughes (1817-1862) — of Missouri. Born in Woodford County, Ky., July 25, 1817. Member of Missouri state house of representatives, 1854; colonel in the Confederate Army during the Civil War. While leading his troops, was killed in battle at Independence, Jackson County, Mo., August 11, 1862 (age 45 years, 17 days). Interment at Woodlawn Cemetery, Independence, Mo.
  Isaac Ingalls Stevens (1818-1862) — of Washington. Born in North Andover, Essex County, Mass., March 25, 1818. Major in the U.S. Army during the Mexican War; Governor of Washington Territory, 1853-57; Delegate to U.S. Congress from Washington Territory, 1857-61; general in the Union Army during the Civil War. Shot and killed at the Civil War battle of Chantilly, Fairfax County, Va., September 1, 1862 (age 44 years, 160 days). Interment at Island Cemetery, Newport, R.I.
  Relatives: Cousin *** of Charles Abbot Stevens (1816-1892) and Moses Tyler Stevens.
  Political family: Stevens family of North Andover, Massachusetts.
  Stevens County, Wash. is named for him.
  Fort Stevens (established 1863; decomissioned 1947; now a state park) in Warrenton, Oregon, was named for him.
  Epitaph: "Who gave to the service of his country a quick and comprehensive mind, a warm and generous heart, a firm will, and a strong arm, and who fell while rallying his command, with the flag of the Republic in his dying grasp, at the battle of Chantilly, Va."
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about Isaac Ingalls Stevens: Joseph Taylor Hazard, Companion of Adventure: A Biography of Isaac Ingalls Stevens, First Governor of Washington
  John Hugh Means (1812-1862) — of Buckhead, Fairfield District (now Old Buckhead, Fairfield County), S.C. Born in Fairfield District (now Fairfield County), S.C., August 18, 1812. Planter; Governor of South Carolina, 1850-52; delegate to South Carolina secession convention from Fairfield, 1860-62; died in office 1862; colonel in the Confederate Army during the Civil War. Mortally wounded in the Second Battle of Bull Run (Second Manassas), and died a few days later, in Prince William County, Va., September 1, 1862 (age 50 years, 14 days). Interment a private or family graveyard, Fairfield County, S.C.; cenotaph at First Presbyterian Churchyard, Columbia, S.C.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Thornton F. Brodhead (1822-1862) — of Pontiac, Oakland County, Mich.; Detroit, Wayne County, Mich. Born in South Newmarket, Rockingham County, N.H., September 22, 1822. Democrat. Lawyer; served in the U.S. Army during the Mexican War; member of Michigan state senate, 1850; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Michigan, 1852; postmaster at Detroit, Mich., 1853-57; colonel in the Union Army during the Civil War. Gravely injured in the Second Battle of Bull Run, and died September 2, 1862 (age 39 years, 345 days). Interment at Elmwood Cemetery, Detroit, Mich.
  Relatives: Son of John Brodhead (1770-1838).
  George Watson Pratt (1830-1862) — also known as George W. Pratt — of Kingston, Ulster County, N.Y. Born in Prattsville, Greene County, N.Y., April 18, 1830. Leather manufacturer; member of New York state senate 10th District, 1858-59; colonel in the Union Army during the Civil War. Shot and wounded at the Second Battle of Bull Run, Va., August 30, 1862, and died as a result, in Albany, Albany County, N.Y., September 11, 1862 (age 32 years, 146 days). Interment at Albany Rural Cemetery, Menands, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Zadock Pratt and Abigail (Watson) Pratt (1807-1834); brother of Julia Harriet Pratt (1832-1898; who married Colin Macrae Ingersoll); married 1855 to Anna Attwood Tibbs (1833-1921); uncle of George Pratt Ingersoll (1861-1927).
  Political family: Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  John Basil Lamar (1812-1862) — also known as John B. Lamar — of Macon, Bibb County, Ga. Born in Milledgeville, Baldwin County, Ga., November 5, 1812. Democrat. Member of Georgia state house of representatives, 1837; U.S. Representative from Georgia at-large, 1843; served in the Confederate Army during the Civil War. Mortally wounded in the battle at Cramptons Gap, Frederick County (part now in Washington County), Md., and died the following day, September 15, 1862 (age 49 years, 314 days). Interment at Rose Hill Cemetery, Macon, Ga.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Lawrence O'Bryan Branch (1820-1862) — also known as Lawrence O'B. Branch — of Raleigh, Wake County, N.C. Born in Enfield, Halifax County, N.C., November 28, 1820. Democrat. U.S. Representative from North Carolina 4th District, 1855-61; general in the Confederate Army during the Civil War. Killed in the battle of Antietam, Sharpsburg, Washington County, Md., September 17, 1862 (age 41 years, 293 days). Interment at City Cemetery, Raleigh, N.C.
  Relatives: Father of William Augustus Blount Branch (1847-1910); nephew of John Branch, Jr..
  Political family: Branch family of Enfield, North Carolina.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Allison Nelson (1822-1862) — of Atlanta, Fulton County, Ga.; Meridian, Bosque County, Tex. Born in Fulton County, Ga., March 11, 1822. Served in the U.S. Army during the Mexican War; member of Georgia state house of representatives, 1849-53; mayor of Atlanta, Ga., 1855; resigned 1855; member of Texas state house of representatives, 1860; delegate to Texas secession convention, 1861; general in the Confederate Army during the Civil War. Died, a war casualty, near Austin, Lonoke County, Ark., October 7, 1862 (age 40 years, 210 days). Interment at Mt. Holly Cemetery, Little Rock, Ark.
  Relatives: Son of John B. Nelson.
  See also Wikipedia article
  James Streshly Jackson (1823-1862) — of Kentucky. Born in Fayette County, Ky., September 27, 1823. U.S. Representative from Kentucky 2nd District, 1861; general in the Union Army during the Civil War. Killed by rifle shot in the Battle of Perryville, Boyle County, Ky., October 8, 1862 (age 39 years, 11 days). Interment at Riverside Cemetery, Hopkinsville, Ky.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  William Sydney Wilson (1816-1862) — of Port Gibson, Claiborne County, Miss. Born in Snow Hill, Worcester County, Md., November 7, 1816. Democrat. Member of Mississippi state legislature, 1858-59, 1860-61; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Mississippi, 1860; Delegate from Mississippi to the Confederate Provisional Congress, 1861; major in the Confederate Army during the Civil War. Mortally wounded at the battle of Sharpsburg on September 17, 1862, and died November 3, 1862 (age 45 years, 361 days). Interment at Makemie Memorial Presbyterian Churchyard, Snow Hill, Md.
  Relatives: Son of Ephraim King Wilson (1771-1834); brother of Ephraim King Wilson (1821-1891).
  Political family: Wilson family of Snow Hill, Maryland.
  Thomas Reade Rootes Cobb (1823-1862) — of Georgia. Born in Jefferson County, Ga., April 10, 1823. Delegate from Georgia to the Confederate Provisional Congress, 1861-62; general in the Confederate Army during the Civil War. Shot and killed in the battle of Fredericksburg, Stafford County, Va., December 13, 1862 (age 39 years, 247 days). Interment at Oconee Hill Cemetery, Athens, Ga.
  Relatives: Brother of Howell Cobb; father-in-law of Hoke Smith (1855-1931).
  Political family: Cobb family of Athens, Georgia.
  Maxcy Gregg (1814-1862) — of Columbia, Richland District (now Richland County), S.C. Born in Columbia, Richland District (now Richland County), S.C., August 1, 1814. Lawyer; major in the U.S. Army during the Mexican War; delegate to South Carolina secession convention from Richland, 1860-62; general in the Confederate Army during the Civil War. During the Battle of Fredericksburg, he was shot in the spine, mortally wounded, and died two days later, in Fredericksburg, Va., December 15, 1862 (age 48 years, 136 days). Interment at Elmwood Cemetery, Columbia, S.C.
  Relatives: Son of James Gregg (1787-1852) and Cornelia Manning (Maxcy) Gregg (1792-1862).
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Jacob Babbitt (1809-1862) — of Bristol, Bristol County, R.I. Born in Bristol, Bristol County, R.I., May 9, 1809. Democrat. Banker; cotton manufacturer; member of Rhode Island state house of representatives, 1850; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Rhode Island, 1860; major in the Union Army during the Civil War. Shot and wounded (in a "friendly fire" accident) during the Civil War battle of Fredericksburg, Va., and died ten days later, in Mansion House Hospital, Alexandria, Va., December 23, 1862 (age 53 years, 228 days). Interment at Juniper Hill Cemetery, Bristol, R.I.
  Relatives: Son of Jacob Babbitt (1769-1850) and Bathsheba (Stoddard) Babbitt (1773-1852); married, October 7, 1826, to Abby Eliza Briggs (1808-1882); first cousin once removed of Elijah Babbitt (1795-1887) and George Henry Babbitt; first cousin twice removed of Francis Sanford Babbitt.
  Political families: Pendleton family of Connecticut; Greene family of Providence, Rhode Island; Starkweather-Pendleton family of Preston, Connecticut; Beakes-Greene-Jennings family of Michigan; Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Epitaph: "Know this, if I fall, it will be in defense of our beloved Constitution."
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Ebenezer Allen (1804-1863) — of Orono, Penobscot County, Maine; Galveston, Galveston County, Tex. Born in Newport, Sullivan County, N.H., April 8, 1804. Lawyer; Texas Republic Secretary of State, 1844-45, 1845-46; Attorney General of the Texas Republic, 1844-45; Texas state attorney general, 1850-52; railroad promoter; served in the Confederate Army during the Civil War. Died in the Civil War in Richmond, Va., 1863 (age about 59 years). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of David Allen and Hannah (Wilcox) Allen; married 1833 to Sylvina Morse.
  The city of Allen, Texas, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article
  Thomas B. Monroe, Jr. (died c.1863) — of Lexington, Fayette County, Ky. Born in Frankfort, Franklin County, Ky. Secretary of state of Kentucky, 1859-61; major in the Confederate Army during the Civil War. Killed in the Confederate service during the Civil War, about 1863. Burial location unknown.
  Josiah Gale (1828-1863) — of Galesburg, Knox County, Ill. Born in 1828. Democrat. Postmaster at Galesburg, Ill., 1858-61. Died in the military service, 1863 (age about 35 years). Interment at Hope Cemetery, Galesburg, Ill.
  Relatives: Son of George Washington Gale (1789-1861) and Harriet (Selden) Gale (1800-1840); brother of William Selden Gale (1822-1900); grandson of Charles Selden; granduncle of George Candee Gale.
  Political family: Gale-Selden family of Galesburg, Illinois.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  John M. Wimer (1810-1863) — of St. Louis, Mo. Born in Amherst County, Va., May 8, 1810. Democrat. Mayor of St. Louis, Mo., 1843-44, 1857-58; postmaster at St. Louis, Mo., 1845-49; served in the Confederate Army during the Civil War. Killed in action at Hartville, Wright County, Mo., January 11, 1863 (age 52 years, 248 days). Interment at Bellefontaine Cemetery, St. Louis, Mo.
  James Reily (1811-1863) — of Texas. Born in Hamilton, Butler County, Ohio, July 3, 1811. Lawyer; major in the Texas Army during the Texas War of Independence; member of Texas Republic House of Representatives, 1840-41; Texas Republic Minister to the United States, 1841-42; member of Texas state house of representatives, 1853-54; U.S. Consul in SAINT Petersburg, as of 1856; colonel in the Confederate Army during the Civil War. Presbyterian; later Episcopalian. Member, Freemasons. Killed in the Battle of Camp Bisland, on Bayou Teche, near Franklin, St. Mary Parish, La., April 14, 1863 (age 51 years, 285 days). Interment at Lexington Cemetery, Lexington, Ky.
  Relatives: Son of John Reily and Nancy (Hunter) Reily; married, March 4, 1834, to Ellen Hart Ross (grandniece of Henry Clay (1777-1852)).
  Political family: Clay family of Kentucky (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Robert Lafayette Crawford (1825-1863) — of Lancaster, Lancaster District (now Lancaster County), S.C. Born in Lancaster County, S.C., 1825. Delegate to South Carolina secession convention from Lancaster, 1860-62; served in the Confederate Army during the Civil War. Killed at Suffolk, Va., April 20, 1863 (age about 37 years). Interment at Old First Presbyterian Church Graveyard, Lancaster, S.C.
  H. G. Berry (1824-1863) — of Rockland, Knox County, Maine. Born August 27, 1824. Democrat. Mayor of Rockland, Maine, 1856; general in the Union Army during the Civil War. Killed in battle at Chancellorville, Spotsylvania County, Va., May 3, 1863 (age 38 years, 249 days). Interment at Achorn Cemetery, Rockland, Maine.
  Randal William McGavock (1826-1863) — of Nashville, Davidson County, Tenn. Born in Nashville, Davidson County, Tenn., August 10, 1826. Mayor of Nashville, Tenn., 1858-59; colonel in the Confederate Army during the Civil War. Killed in battle near Raymond, Hinds County, Miss., May 12, 1863 (age 36 years, 275 days). Entombed at Mt. Olivet Cemetery, Nashville, Tenn.
  Relatives: Son of Jacob McGavock (1790-1878) and Louisa Caroline (Grundy) McGavock (1798-1878); married to Seraphina Deery (1835-1918; who later married Connally Findlay Trigg and Augustus Herman Pettibone (1835-1918)).
  Political families: Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York; Marshall-Harrison-Randolph-Cabell family of Virginia (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  William Barksdale (1821-1863) — of Columbus, Lowndes County, Miss. Born in Rutherford County, Tenn., August 21, 1821. Served in the U.S. Army during the Mexican War; U.S. Representative from Mississippi, 1853-61 (at-large 1853-55, 3rd District 1855-61); general in the Confederate Army during the Civil War. Killed in battle at Gettysburg, Adams County, Pa., July 2, 1863 (age 41 years, 315 days). Interment at Greenwood Cemetery, Jackson, Miss.
  Relatives: Son of Nancy Harvey (Lester) Barksdale (1784-1825) and William Barksdale (1787-1834); brother of Ethelbert Barksdale (1824-1893); second cousin of George Annesley Barksdale; second cousin once removed of William Randolph Barksdale and Champe Terrell Barksdale; second cousin twice removed of Alfred Dickinson Barksdale; third cousin twice removed of Allen Arnold Barksdale and Randolph Hunter Barksdale.
  Political family: Barksdale family of Virginia.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Eliakim Sherrill (1813-1863) — of Shandaken, Ulster County, N.Y. Born in Greenville, Ulster County, N.Y., February 16, 1813. U.S. Representative from New York 10th District, 1847-49; member of New York state senate 10th District, 1854-55; served in the Union Army during the Civil War. Mortally wounded in battle, and died the next day, at Gettysburg, Adams County, Pa., July 4, 1863 (age 50 years, 138 days). Interment at Washington Street Cemetery, Geneva, N.Y.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Langdon Cheves, Jr. (1814-1863) — Born in Pennsylvania, 1814. Engineer; delegate to South Carolina secession convention from St. Peter's, 1860-62; served in the Confederate Army during the Civil War. Hit by a shell, and killed, while defending the Confederate-held battery on Morris Island, Charleston, Charleston County, S.C., July 10, 1863 (age about 49 years). Interment at Magnolia Cemetery, Charleston, S.C.
  Relatives: Son of Langdon Cheves and Mary Elizabeth (Dulles) Cheves (1789-1836); married to Charlotte Lorain McCord (1819-1879); granduncle of Lewis Wardlaw Haskell (1868-1938); first cousin twice removed of John Foster Dulles and Allen Welsh Dulles.
  Political family: Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Robert Ludwell Yates Peyton (1822-1863) — of Missouri. Born in Loudoun County, Va., February 8, 1822. Member of Missouri state senate, 1858; colonel in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; Delegate from Missouri to the Confederate Provisional Congress, 1862; Senator from Missouri in the Confederate Congress, 1862-63; died in office 1863. Died, apparently of malaria contracted while while defending Vicksburg, in Bladon Springs, Choctaw County, Ala., September 3, 1863 (age 41 years, 207 days). Burial location unknown.
  Thomas Ruffin (1820-1863) — of Goldsboro, Wayne County, N.C. Born in Louisburg, Franklin County, N.C., September 9, 1820. Democrat. U.S. Representative from North Carolina 2nd District, 1853-61; Delegate from North Carolina to the Confederate Provisional Congress, 1861-62; colonel in the Confederate Army during the Civil War. Mortally wounded in a cavalry fight before the Battle of Bristoe Station, and died while a prisoner of war, at Alexandria, Va., October 13, 1863 (age 43 years, 34 days). Interment a private or family graveyard, Franklin County, N.C.
  Relatives: Distant cousin *** of Thomas Ruffin (1787-1870).
  Political family: Ruffin-Thomas family of North Carolina.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Francis M. Rotch (c.1822-1863) — of Morris, Otsego County, N.Y. Born about 1822. Farmer; member of New York state senate 20th District, 1860-61; colonel in the Union Army during the Civil War. Contracted an unspecified disease while with the Army of the Potomac during the Civil War, and died from it about a year later, in Morris, Otsego County, N.Y., November 28, 1863 (age about 41 years). Interment at Hillington Cemetery, Morris, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Francis Rotch.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Henry Marchmore Shaw (1819-1864) — also known as Henry M. Shaw — of Indiantown (now Shawboro), Currituck County, N.C. Born in Newport, Newport County, R.I., November 20, 1819. Democrat. Physician; U.S. Representative from North Carolina 1st District, 1853-55, 1857-59; colonel in the Confederate Army during the Civil War. Scotch-Irish ancestry. While assembling with other Confederate troops for an expedition, he was shot and killed, near New Bern, Craven County, N.C., February 1, 1864 (age 44 years, 73 days). Interment at Shawboro Cemetery, Shawboro, N.C.
  Relatives: Son of John Allen Shaw and Betty (Marchmore) Shaw.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Franklin Gaillard (1829-1864) — of Columbia, Richland County, S.C. Born in Pineville, Berkeley County, S.C., April 26, 1829. Democrat. Newspaper editor; delegate to Democratic National Convention from South Carolina, 1860; colonel in the Confederate Army during the Civil War. Killed in the Battle of the Wilderness, in Orange County, Va., May 6, 1864 (age 35 years, 10 days). Interment at Confederate Cemetery, Fredericksburg, Va.
  Relatives: Son of Thomas Gaillard (1790-1864) and Marianne Gendron (Palmer) Gaillard (1793-1860); married to Catherine Cordes Porcher (1832-1856); first cousin of Peter Charles Gaillard and Peter Gaillard Snowden; first cousin once removed of John Gaillard; first cousin twice removed of Thomas Porcher Stoney; first cousin thrice removed of John Palmer Gaillard, Jr.; second cousin of Theodore Gaillard Hunt (1805-1893) and Peter Porcher Bonneau; fourth cousin of Francis James Porcher and William Porcher Miles.
  Political family: Gaillard family of Charleston, South Carolina.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  James Samuel Wadsworth (1807-1864) — also known as James S. Wadsworth — of New York. Born in Geneseo, Livingston County, N.Y., October 30, 1807. Republican. Candidate for Governor of New York, 1862; general in the Union Army during the Civil War. Member, Skull and Bones. Died of wounds received in the Battle of the Wilderness, in Spotsylvania County, Va., May 8, 1864 (age 56 years, 191 days). Interment at Temple Hill Cemetery, Geneseo, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of James Wadsworth (1768-1844) and Naomi (Wolcott) Wadsworth (1776-1831); married, May 11, 1834, to Mary Craig Wharton (1814-1874); father of Charles Frederick Wadsworth and James Wolcott Wadsworth; grandfather of James Wolcott Wadsworth, Jr.; great-grandson of Erastus Wolcott; great-grandfather of James Jermiah Wadsworth; great-grandnephew of Oliver Wolcott, Sr.; second great-grandson of Roger Wolcott (1679-1767); second great-grandfather of James Wadsworth Symington; first cousin once removed of Edward Oliver Wolcott; first cousin twice removed of Oliver Wolcott, Jr., Roger Griswold and Frederick Wolcott; second cousin thrice removed of William Pitkin; third cousin of John William Allen, Henry Titus Backus, Christopher Parsons Wolcott, Matthew Griswold (1833-1919) and Roger Wolcott (1847-1900); third cousin once removed of Gaylord Griswold, Samuel Clesson Allen, Henry Leavitt Ellsworth, William Wolcott Ellsworth, Eli Coe Birdsey (1799-1843), George Harrison Hall and Alfred Wolcott; third cousin twice removed of Matthew Griswold (1714-1799), Daniel Pitkin, Eli Coe Birdsey (1843-1929), Lawson Wooding Hall and Selden Chapin; third cousin thrice removed of Frederic Lincoln Chapin; fourth cousin of Morris Woodruff, Elisha Hunt Allen and George Washington Wolcott; fourth cousin once removed of Theodore Dwight, Timothy Pitkin, Charles Robert Sherman, Edmund Holcomb, George Catlin Woodruff, Lewis Bartholomew Woodruff, Albert Asahel Bliss, Philemon Bliss, William Chapman Williston, William Fessenden Allen, Alfred Clark Chapin, Franklin Darius Hale, Adrian Rowe Wadsworth, Sr., Frederick Hobbes Allen (1858-1937) and Clarence Seymour Wadsworth.
  Political families: Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York; Morris-Ingersoll family of New York and Connecticut; Wolcott-Wadsworth family of Connecticut and Maryland; Conger-Hungerford family (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Charles Pinckney Brown (1823-1864) — of Charleston, Charleston District (now Charleston County), S.C. Born in South Carolina, May, 1823. School teacher; delegate to South Carolina secession convention from St. James, Goose Creek, 1860-62; served in the Confederate Army during the Civil War. Killed in battle at Drewrys Bluff, Chesterfield County, Va., May 14, 1864 (age about 41 years). Interment at Magnolia Cemetery, Charleston, S.C.
  Relatives: Son of Sarah Elizabeth (Smith) Brown (1793-1874) and Charles Tennent Brown (1795-1840); great-grandnephew of Rawlins Lowndes; first cousin twice removed of Thomas Lowndes and William Jones Lowndes; first cousin thrice removed of Elias Boudinot; second cousin thrice removed of Volkert Petrus Douw, Jeremiah Van Rensselaer, Robert Van Rensselaer, Hendrick Kiliaen Van Rensselaer and Killian Killian Van Rensselaer; third cousin twice removed of Leonard Gansevoort, Leonard Gansevoort, Jr., Jacob Rutsen Van Rensselaer, Philip Jeremiah Schuyler and Burnet Rhett Maybank; third cousin thrice removed of Burnet Rhett Maybank, Jr.; fourth cousin once removed of Philip Schuyler, James Alexander Hamilton (1788-1878) and Peter Gansevoort.
  Political families: Livingston-Schuyler family of New York; VanRensselaer family of Albany, New York (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Albert Gallatin Jenkins (1830-1864) — of Virginia. Born in Cabell County, Va. (now W.Va.), November 10, 1830. Democrat. U.S. Representative from Virginia 11th District, 1857-61; Representative from Virginia in the Confederate Congress, 1862; general in the Confederate Army during the Civil War. Mortally wounded in the Battle of Cloyds Mountain, and died near Dublin, Pulaski County, Va., May 21, 1864 (age 33 years, 193 days). Original interment at New Dublin Presbyterian Cemetery, Dublin, Va.; reinterment at Spring Hill Cemetery, Huntington, W.Va.
  Presumably named for: Albert Gallatin
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Henry Clark Gilbert (1818-1864) — also known as Henry C. Gilbert — of Coldwater, Branch County, Mich. Born in Salina (now part of Syracuse), Onondaga County, N.Y., July 14, 1818. Democrat. Candidate for Michigan state house of representatives, 1849; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Michigan, 1852; colonel in the Union Army during the Civil War. Mortally wounded at the battle of Resaca, Georgia, and died nine days later at the Military Hospital, Chattanooga, Hamilton County, Tenn., May 24, 1864 (age 45 years, 315 days). Interment at Oak Grove Cemetery, Coldwater, Mich.
  Peter Augustus Porter (1827-1864) — also known as Peter A. Porter — of Niagara Falls, Niagara County, N.Y. Born in Black Rock (now part of Buffalo), Erie County, N.Y., July 17, 1827. Member of New York state assembly from Niagara County 2nd District, 1862; colonel in the Union Army during the Civil War. Episcopalian. Killed by enemy gunshot while leading troops in battle, Cold Harbor, Hanover County, Va., June 3, 1864 (age 36 years, 322 days). Interment at Oakwood Cemetery, Niagara Falls, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Peter Buell Porter and Letitia Preston (Breckinridge) Porter (1786-1831); married, March 30, 1852, to Mary Cabell Breckinridge (1826-1854; granddaughter of John Breckinridge); married, November 9, 1859, to Josephine Morris (1832-1892); father of Peter Augustus Porter; nephew of Augustus Seymour Porter (1769-1849), Joseph Cabell Breckinridge and Robert Jefferson Breckinridge; great-grandnephew of William Preston and William Cabell; first cousin of Augustus Seymour Porter (1798-1872), Peter Buell Porter, Jr., John Cabell Breckinridge, Robert Jefferson Breckinridge, Jr. and William Campbell Preston Breckinridge; first cousin once removed of James Douglas Breckinridge, Benjamin William Sheridan Cabell (1793-1862), Clifton Rodes Breckinridge, Levin Irving Handy, Desha Breckinridge and Henry Skillman Breckinridge; first cousin twice removed of William Cabell, Jr., Francis Smith Preston, William Henry Cabell and James Patton Preston; second cousin of Carter Henry Harrison, William Lewis Cabell and George Craighead Cabell; second cousin once removed of William Campbell Preston, James McDowell, John Buchanan Floyd, John Smith Preston, George Rogers Clark Floyd, Edward Carrington Cabell, Ulysses Simpson Grant, Benjamin Earl Cabell and Carter Henry Harrison II; second cousin twice removed of Frederick Dent Grant, Ulysses Simpson Grant, Jr. and Earle Cabell; second cousin thrice removed of Benjamin Huntington; third cousin of John William Leftwich; third cousin once removed of John Davenport, Joshua Coit, James Davenport, Henry Huntington, Gurdon Huntington, Samuel Lathrop and Abel Huntington; third cousin twice removed of Samuel Huntington, Henry Scudder, Asa H. Otis and Alvred Bayard Nettleton; third cousin thrice removed of Daniel Frederick Webster, Lovel Davis Parmelee and Theron Ephron Catlin; fourth cousin of Ebenezer Huntington, Gaylord Griswold, Benjamin Trumbull, Parmenio Adams, Elisha Phelps, Lancelot Phelps, Theodore Davenport, Abijah Blodget and Benjamin Nicoll Huntington; fourth cousin once removed of Samuel H. Huntington, Jabez Williams Huntington, Abiel Case, Samuel George Andrews, Harrison Blodget, John Hall Brockway, Jairus Case, Lorenzo Burrows, Norman A. Phelps, Anson Levi Holcomb, George Smith Catlin, Waitman Thomas Willey, Lyman Trumbull, William Dean Kellogg, John Smith Phelps, William Gleason, Jr., Almon Case, James Phelps, Robert Coit, Jr., Samuel Lathrop Bronson, Abial Lathrop, Roger Wolcott and Allen Jacob Holcomb.
  Political families: Marshall-Harrison-Randolph-Cabell family of Virginia; Breckinridge-Preston-Cabell-Henry family of Virginia; Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York; Walker-Bolling family of Huntsville, Alabama (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Laurence Massillon Keitt (1824-1864) — also known as L. M. Keitt — of Orangeburg, Orangeburg District (now Orangeburg County), S.C. Born in Orangeburg District (part now in Calhoun County), S.C., October 4, 1824. Democrat. Planter; lawyer; member of South Carolina state house of representatives, 1848; U.S. Representative from South Carolina 3rd District, 1853-55, 1855-56, 1856-60; censured by the House in 1856 for aiding Rep. Preston S. Brooks in his caning attack on Sen. Charles Sumner; resigned; re-elected to his seat within a month; delegate to South Carolina secession convention from Orange, 1860-62; Delegate from South Carolina to the Confederate Provisional Congress, 1861-62; colonel in the Confederate Army during the Civil War. Mortally wounded at the battle of Cold Harbor, and died the next day, near Richmond (unknown county), Va., June 4, 1864 (age 39 years, 244 days). Interment at West End Cemetery, St. Matthews, S.C.
  Relatives: Son of George Keitt (1794-1861) and Mary Magdaleine (Wannamaker) Keitt (1805-1848); nephew of John Jacob Wannamaker (1801-1864); first cousin once removed of William Whetstone Wannamaker, Jr.; first cousin twice removed of William Whetstone Wannamaker III.
  Political family: Wannamaker family of Orangeburg, South Carolina.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  William Waigstill Avery (1816-1864) — of Morganton, Burke County, N.C. Born in Burke County, N.C., May 25, 1816. Democrat. Lawyer; member of North Carolina state legislature, 1842; delegate to Democratic National Convention from North Carolina, 1860; delegate to North Carolina secession convention, 1861; Delegate from North Carolina to the Confederate Provisional Congress, 1861-62. Mortally wounded while fighting Union guerillas in Tennessee, and died in Morganton, Burke County, N.C., July 3, 1864 (age 48 years, 39 days). Interment a private or family graveyard, Burke County, N.C.
  Relatives: Son of Isaac Thomas Avery (1785-1864) and Harriet (Erwin) Avery (1795-1858); married, May 27, 1846, to Corrina Mary Morehead (1825-1897; daughter of John Motley Morehead); grandson of Waightstill Avery (1741-1821); second cousin of Lorenzo Burrows; third cousin once removed of Noyes Barber; third cousin twice removed of Horace Billings Packer; fourth cousin of Daniel Packer, Asa Packer, Edwin Barber Morgan, Christopher Morgan, Edwin Denison Morgan and Alfred Avery Burnham; fourth cousin once removed of Judson B. Phelps, Morgan Gardner Bulkeley, William Henry Bulkeley, Robert Asa Packer and William Frederick Morgan Rowland.
  Political families: Pendleton family of Connecticut; Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York; Beakes-Greene-Jennings family of Michigan; Livingston-Schuyler family of New York; Lenoir-Avery family of North Carolina (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Samuel Allen Rice (1828-1864) — also known as Samuel A. Rice — of Mahaska County, Iowa. Born in Cattaraugus County, N.Y., January 27, 1828. Lawyer; Iowa state attorney general, 1856-61; general in the Union Army during the Civil War. Mortally wounded at Jenkins' Ferry, Ark., April 30, 1864, and died at Oskaloosa, Mahaska County, Iowa, July 6, 1864 (age 36 years, 161 days). Interment at Forest Cemetery, Oskaloosa, Iowa.
  Alexander Wilkin (c.1820-1864) — of St. Paul, Ramsey County, Minn. Born in Orange County, N.Y., about 1820. Served in the U.S. Army during the Mexican War; lawyer; secretary of Minnesota Territory, 1851-53; colonel in the Union Army during the Civil War. Killed in battle at Tupelo, Lee County, Miss., July 14, 1864 (age about 44 years); highest ranking volunteer from Minnesota to be killed in the Civil War. Burial location unknown.
  Wilkin County, Minn. is named for him.
  William Allison Owens (1833-1864) — also known as William A. Owens — of Charlotte, Mecklenburg County, N.C. Born September 19, 1833. Mayor of Charlotte, N.C., 1861-62; colonel in the Confederate Army during the Civil War. Shot and wounded at the Civil War battle of Snicker's Gap, and died the next day, July 19, 1864 (age 30 years, 304 days). Interment at Settler's Cemetery, Charlotte, N.C.
  William Jones (1803-1864) — of Spencer County, Ind. Born in Vincennes, Knox County, Ind., 1803. Whig. Member of Indiana state house of representatives, 1838-41; colonel in the Union Army during the Civil War. Died in battle at Atlanta, Fulton County, Ga., July 22, 1864 (age about 61 years). Burial location unknown.
  Philemon Thomas Herbert (1825-1864) — also known as Philemon T. Herbert — of Mariposa, Mariposa County, Calif.; El Paso, El Paso County, Tex. Born in Pine Apple, Wilcox County, Ala., November 1, 1825. Democrat. Lawyer; member of California state assembly, 1853-55 (10th District 1853-54, 6th District 1854-55); U.S. Representative from California at-large, 1855-57; in 1856, drunk at breakfast, he shot and killed Thomas Keating, a waiter at the Willard Hotel in Washington; charged with murder, twice tried, and eventually acquitted; colonel in the Confederate Army during the Civil War. Wounded at the Battle of Mansfield, April 8, 1864, and died in Kingston, DeSoto Parish, La., July 23, 1864 (age 38 years, 265 days). Interment at Evergreen Cemetery, Kingston, La.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  John Gregg (1828-1864) — of Texas. Born in Lawrence County, Ala., September 28, 1828. State court judge in Texas, 1856; delegate to Texas secession convention, 1861; Delegate from Texas to the Confederate Provisional Congress, 1861-62; general in the Confederate Army during the Civil War. Killed in action on the Charles City Road near Richmond (unknown county), Va., October 7, 1864 (age 36 years, 9 days). Interment at Odd Fellows Cemetery, Aberdeen, Miss.
  Gregg County, Tex. is named for him.
  Michael Cook (1828-1864) — of Rice County, Minn. Born in Morris County, N.J., March 17, 1828. Carpenter; member of Minnesota state senate, 1857-62 (5th District 1857-60, 8th District 1861-62); major in the Union Army during the Civil War. Wounded in the Civil War battle of Nashville, and died eleven days later in the Cumberland field hospital, Nashville, Davidson County, Tenn., December 27, 1864 (age 36 years, 285 days). Interment at Oak Ridge Cemetery, Faribault, Minn.
  Relatives: Son of Richard Cook (1787-1880) and Nellie Louisa (Courter) Cook (1793-1845).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial — Minnesota Legislator record
  Henry G. Bailly (1828-1865) — of Hastings, Dakota County, Minn. Born October 29, 1828. Democrat. Postmaster at Hastings, Minn., 1854-55; member Minnesota territorial council 6th District, 1856-57; delegate to Minnesota state constitutional convention 6th District, 1857; member of Minnesota state senate 3rd District, 1857-58; served in the Union Army during the Civil War. French and American Indian ancestry. Died, from his war wounds, in Minnesota, January 7, 1865 (age 36 years, 70 days). Interment at Bellwood Cemetery, Near Hastings, Dakota County, Minn.
  Relatives: Son of Alexis C. Bailly and Lucy (Faribault) Bailly (1808-1855); brother of Alexis Phillip Bailly (1826-1899); nephew of Alexander Faribault.
  Political family: Bailly-Faribault family of Mendota, Minnesota.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial — Minnesota Legislator record
  Silas Allen Yerkes (1834-1865) — also known as Silas Yerkes — of Vergennes, Kent County, Mich. Born near Manchester, Washtenaw County, Mich., October 14, 1834. Republican. Farmer; member of Michigan state board of agriculture, 1861; resigned 1861; major in the Union Army during the Civil War. Methodist. Badly wounded at the battle of Chickamauga, September 19, 1863, and apparently died as a result, in Vergennes, Kent County, Mich., October 26, 1865 (age 31 years, 12 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Anthony Yerkes and Esther (Allen) Yerkes.
  Cassius Fairchild (1829-1868) — of Madison, Dane County, Wis. Born in 1829. Democrat. Member of Wisconsin state assembly, 1860; served in the Union Army during the Civil War. Died, from war wounds, 1868 (age about 39 years). Interment at Forest Hill Cemetery, Madison, Wis.
  Relatives: Son of Jairus C. Fairchild (1801-1862); brother of Lucius Fairchild.
  Political family: Fairchild family of Madison, Wisconsin.
  Jacob Carl Maria DeGress (1842-1894) — also known as Jacob Carl DeGress — of Austin, Travis County, Tex. Born in Cologne (Köln), Germany, April 23, 1842. Republican. Colonel in the Union Army during the Civil War; Texas superintendent of public instruction, 1871-74; mayor of Austin, Tex., 1877-80; postmaster at Austin, Tex., 1881-85, 1889-93. Catholic. Died, of complications of his Civil War wounds, in Austin, Travis County, Tex., March 21, 1894 (age 51 years, 332 days). Interment at Oakwood Cemetery, Austin, Tex.
  Relatives: Son of Carl Franz Wilhelm von Gress and Johanna Walburga (di Bramino) von Gress; married, January 1, 1867, to Elizabeth Buckner 'Bettie' Young (1844-1880); married, August 2, 1882, to Willie Mae Johnston (1860-1944).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
"Enjoy the hospitable entertainment of a political graveyard."
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The Political Graveyard

The Political Graveyard is a web site about U.S. political history and cemeteries. Founded in 1996, it is the Internet's most comprehensive free source for American political biography, listing 312,576 politicians, living and dead.
  The listings are incomplete; development of the database is a continually ongoing project.  
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