PoliticalGraveyard.com
The Political Graveyard: A Database of American History
Burke County
North Carolina

Cemeteries and Memorial Sites of Politicians in Burke County

Index to Locations

  • Private or family graveyards
  • Morganton County Courthouse Grounds
  • Morganton First Presbyterian Churchyard
  • Morganton Forest Hill Cemetery
  • Morganton Swan Ponds Plantation Cemetery
  • Near Morganton Quaker Meadows Cemetery


    Private or family graveyard
    Burke County, North Carolina
    Politicians buried here:
      William Waigstill Avery (1816-1864) — of Morganton, Burke County, N.C. Born in Burke County, N.C., May 25, 1816. Democrat. Lawyer; member of North Carolina state legislature, 1842; delegate to Democratic National Convention from North Carolina, 1860; delegate to North Carolina secession convention, 1861; Delegate from North Carolina to the Confederate Provisional Congress, 1861-62. Mortally wounded while fighting Union guerillas in Tennessee, and died in Morganton, Burke County, N.C., July 3, 1864 (age 48 years, 39 days). Interment in a private or family graveyard.
      Relatives: Son of Isaac Thomas Avery (1785-1864) and Harriet (Erwin) Avery (1795-1858); married, May 27, 1846, to Corrina Mary Morehead (1825-1897; daughter of John Motley Morehead); grandson of Waightstill Avery (1741-1821); second cousin of Lorenzo Burrows; third cousin once removed of Noyes Barber; third cousin twice removed of Horace Billings Packer; fourth cousin of Daniel Packer, Asa Packer, Edwin Barber Morgan, Christopher Morgan, Edwin Denison Morgan and Alfred Avery Burnham; fourth cousin once removed of Judson B. Phelps, Morgan Gardner Bulkeley, William Henry Bulkeley, Robert Asa Packer and William Frederick Morgan Rowland.
      Political families: Kellogg-Adams-Seymour-Chapin family of Connecticut and New York; Fairbanks-Adams family of Massachusetts; Lenoir family of North Carolina; Beakes-Greene-Witter family; Livingston-Schuyler family of New York (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).


    County Courthouse Grounds
    Morganton, Burke County, North Carolina

    Politicians who have monuments here:
      Samuel James Ervin Jr. (1896-1985) — also known as Sam J. Ervin, Jr. — of Morganton, Burke County, N.C. Born in Morganton, Burke County, N.C., September 27, 1896. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army during World War I; lawyer; member of North Carolina state house of representatives, 1923-25, 1931; chair of Burke County Democratic Party, 1924; member of North Carolina Democratic State Executive Committee, 1930-37; superior court judge in North Carolina, 1937-43; U.S. Representative from North Carolina 10th District, 1946-47; justice of North Carolina state supreme court, 1948-54; appointed 1948; U.S. Senator from North Carolina, 1954-74; delegate to Democratic National Convention from North Carolina, 1956, 1964. Presbyterian. Member, American Bar Association; American Judicature Society; American Historical Association; American Legion; Disabled American Veterans; Veterans of Foreign Wars; Farm Bureau; Grange; Sons of the American Revolution; Society of the Cincinnati; Freemasons; Scottish Rite Masons; Royal Arch Masons; Knights Templar; Shriners; Order of Ahepa; Knights of Pythias; Moose; Kiwanis; Junior Order; Newcomen Society; Sigma Upsilon; Phi Delta Phi. Died in Winston-Salem, Forsyth County, N.C., April 23, 1985 (age 88 years, 208 days). Interment at Forest Hill Cemetery; statue at County Courthouse Grounds.
      Relatives: Son of Samuel James Ervin and Laura Theresa (Powe) Ervin; brother of Joseph Wilson Ervin; married, June 18, 1924, to Margaret Bruce Bell; father of Laura Powe Ervin (daughter-in-law of Hallett Sydney Ward) and Samuel James Ervin III (1926-1999).
      Political family: Ervin family of Morganton, North Carolina.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile


    First Presbyterian Churchyard
    Morganton, Burke County, North Carolina
    Politicians buried here:
      Burgess Sidney Gaither (1807-1892) — also known as Burgess S. Gaither — of Morganton, Burke County, N.C. Born in Iredell County, N.C., March 16, 1807. Whig. Lawyer; delegate to North Carolina state constitutional convention, 1835; delegate to Whig National Convention from North Carolina, 1839; member of North Carolina state senate, 1844; candidate for U.S. Representative from North Carolina, 1851, 1853; Representative from North Carolina in the Confederate Congress, 1862-65. Member, Sons of Temperance. Died in Morganton, Burke County, N.C., February 23, 1892 (age 84 years, 344 days). Interment at First Presbyterian Churchyard.
      Relatives: Son of Burgess Gaither (1757-1819) and Milly (Martin) Gaither.
      See also Wikipedia article — OurCampaigns candidate detail


    Forest Hill Cemetery
    Morganton, Burke County, North Carolina
    Politicians buried here:
      Samuel James Ervin Jr. (1896-1985) — also known as Sam J. Ervin, Jr. — of Morganton, Burke County, N.C. Born in Morganton, Burke County, N.C., September 27, 1896. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army during World War I; lawyer; member of North Carolina state house of representatives, 1923-25, 1931; chair of Burke County Democratic Party, 1924; member of North Carolina Democratic State Executive Committee, 1930-37; superior court judge in North Carolina, 1937-43; U.S. Representative from North Carolina 10th District, 1946-47; justice of North Carolina state supreme court, 1948-54; appointed 1948; U.S. Senator from North Carolina, 1954-74; delegate to Democratic National Convention from North Carolina, 1956, 1964. Presbyterian. Member, American Bar Association; American Judicature Society; American Historical Association; American Legion; Disabled American Veterans; Veterans of Foreign Wars; Farm Bureau; Grange; Sons of the American Revolution; Society of the Cincinnati; Freemasons; Scottish Rite Masons; Royal Arch Masons; Knights Templar; Shriners; Order of Ahepa; Knights of Pythias; Moose; Kiwanis; Junior Order; Newcomen Society; Sigma Upsilon; Phi Delta Phi. Died in Winston-Salem, Forsyth County, N.C., April 23, 1985 (age 88 years, 208 days). Interment at Forest Hill Cemetery; statue at County Courthouse Grounds.
      Relatives: Son of Samuel James Ervin and Laura Theresa (Powe) Ervin; brother of Joseph Wilson Ervin; married, June 18, 1924, to Margaret Bruce Bell; father of Laura Powe Ervin (daughter-in-law of Hallett Sydney Ward) and Samuel James Ervin III (1926-1999).
      Political family: Ervin family of Morganton, North Carolina.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile
      Tod Robinson Caldwell (1818-1874) — also known as Tod R. Caldwell — of Burke County, N.C. Born in Morganton, Burke County, N.C., February 19, 1818. Lawyer; Lieutenant Governor of North Carolina, 1868-70; Governor of North Carolina, 1870-74; died in office 1874. Died July 11, 1874 (age 56 years, 142 days). Interment at Forest Hill Cemetery.
      See also National Governors Association biography — Wikipedia article
      Samuel James Ervin III (1926-1999) — Born in Morganton, Burke County, N.C., March 2, 1926. Served in the U.S. Army during World War II; member of North Carolina state house of representatives, 1965-67; superior court judge in North Carolina, 1967-80; Judge of U.S. Court of Appeals for the 4th Circuit, 1980-99; died in office 1999. Presbyterian. Member, Freemasons. Died at Grace Hospital, Morganton, Burke County, N.C., September 18, 1999 (age 73 years, 200 days). Interment at Forest Hill Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Samuel James Ervin Jr.; brother of Laura Powe Ervin (daughter-in-law of Hallett Sydney Ward (1870-1956)); nephew of Joseph Wilson Ervin.
      Political family: Ervin family of Morganton, North Carolina.
      See also Find-A-Grave memorial
      Joseph Wilson Ervin (1901-1945) — of North Carolina. Born in Morganton, Burke County, N.C., March 3, 1901. Democrat. Lawyer; U.S. Representative from North Carolina 10th District, 1945; died in office 1945. Presbyterian. Member, Freemasons. Died in Washington, D.C., December 25, 1945 (age 44 years, 297 days). Interment at Forest Hill Cemetery.
      Relatives: Brother of Samuel James Ervin Jr.; uncle of Samuel James Ervin III (1926-1999).
      Political family: Ervin family of Morganton, North Carolina.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Samuel McDowell Tate (1830-1897) — also known as Samuel McD. Tate — of Morganton, Burke County, N.C. Born in Morganton, Burke County, N.C., September 6, 1830. Democrat. Merchant; postmaster at Morganton, N.C., 1856-60; colonel in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; president, Western North Carolina Railroad, 1865 and 1866-68; member of North Carolina state house of representatives, 1875; delegate to Democratic National Convention from North Carolina, 1876, 1880; North Carolina state treasurer, 1892-94. Presbyterian. Scotch-Irish ancestry. Died June 25, 1897 (age 66 years, 292 days). Interment at Forest Hill Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of David Tate (1802-1836) and Susan Maria (Tate) Tate (1809-1869); married 1865 to Jane Sophronia 'Jennie' Pearson (1843-1902).
      See also Find-A-Grave memorial
      William Carson Ervin (1859-1943) — also known as William C. Ervin — of Lenoir, Caldwell County, N.C.; Morganton, Burke County, N.C. Born in McDowell County, N.C., December 15, 1859. Lawyer; newspaper editor; printer; mayor of Lenoir, N.C., 1888-89. Died in Morganton, Burke County, N.C., July 16, 1943 (age 83 years, 213 days). Interment at Forest Hill Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Lawson Ervin and Evelyn (Moody) Ervin.
      See also Find-A-Grave memorial


    Swan Ponds Plantation Cemetery
    Morganton, Burke County, North Carolina
    Politicians buried here:
      Waightstill Avery (1741-1821) — of Burke County, N.C. Born in Groton, New London County, Conn., May 10, 1741. Lawyer; colonel in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; member of North Carolina house of commons, 1776, 1782-83, 1793; North Carolina state attorney general, 1777-79; member of North Carolina state senate, 1796. Fought a pistol duel with Andrew Jackson in 1788; neither man was injured. Died in the judge's chambers at the Burke County Courthouse, Morganton, Burke County, N.C., March 13, 1821 (age 79 years, 307 days). Interment at Swan Ponds Plantation Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Jerusha (Morgan) Avery (1704-1763) and Humphrey Avery; married, October 3, 1778, to Leah Probart Franks (1775-1832); father of Elizabeth Avery (who married William Ballard Lenoir); grandfather of Isaac Thomas Lenoir and William Waigstill Avery; granduncle of Lorenzo Burrows; first cousin four times removed of Horace Billings Packer; second cousin once removed of Noyes Barber; second cousin twice removed of Daniel Packer, Asa Packer, Edwin Barber Morgan, Christopher Morgan, Edwin Denison Morgan and Alfred Avery Burnham; second cousin thrice removed of Judson B. Phelps, Morgan Gardner Bulkeley, William Henry Bulkeley, Robert Asa Packer and William Frederick Morgan Rowland; second cousin four times removed of Henry Brewster Stanton, Jonathan R. Herrick, Erskine Mason Phelps and Spencer Gale Frink; second cousin five times removed of D-Cady Herrick, Herman Arod Gager, Walter Richmond Herrick and Burdette Burt Bliss; third cousin twice removed of Nathan Belcher, Samuel Townsend Douglass (1814-1898), Silas Hamilton Douglas and Joshua Perkins; third cousin thrice removed of Charles Phelps Huntington, George Mortimer Beakes, George Douglas Perkins, Chauncey C. Pendleton, Daniel Parrish Witter, Albert Lemando Bingham, Cornelia Cole Fairbanks, Llewellyn James Barden and Henry Woolsey Douglas.
      Political family: Kellogg-Adams-Seymour-Chapin family of Connecticut and New York (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      Avery County, N.C. is named for him.
      See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial


    Quaker Meadows Cemetery
    Near Morganton, Burke County, North Carolina
    Politicians buried here:
      Joseph McDowell Jr. (1756-1801) — also known as "Quaker Meadows Joe" — of North Carolina. Born in Frederick County, Va., February 15, 1756. Colonel in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; planter; member of North Carolina house of commons, 1785-88, 1791-92; delegate to North Carolina convention to ratify U.S. constitution, 1789; U.S. Representative from North Carolina 1st District, 1797-99. Slaveowner. Died, of apoplexy, in Morganton, Burke County, N.C., February 5, 1801 (age 44 years, 355 days). Interment at Quaker Meadows Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Joseph McDowell (1715-1771) and Margaret (O'Neill) McDowell (1723-1780); married 1783 to Margaret Moffett (1763-1816); father of Joseph Jefferson McDowell (1800-1877); cousin *** of Joseph McDowell (1758-1799).
      Political family: McDowell family of McDowell County, North Carolina.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial

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