PoliticalGraveyard.com
The Political Graveyard: A Database of American History
Wake County
North Carolina

Cemeteries and Memorial Sites of Politicians in Wake County

Index to Locations

  • Private or family graveyards
  • Cary Hillcrest Cemetery
  • Fuquay-Varina Wake Chapel Memorial Gardens
  • Raleigh City Cemetery
  • Raleigh Montlawn Memorial Park
  • Raleigh Mt. Hope Cemetery
  • Raleigh Nash Square
  • Raleigh Oakwood Cemetery
  • Raleigh Union Square


    Private or family graveyard
    Wake County, North Carolina
    Politicians buried here:
      David Stone (1770-1818) — of Bertie County, N.C. Born in Bertie County, N.C., February 17, 1770. Democrat. Lawyer; U.S. Representative from North Carolina at-large, 1799-1801; U.S. Senator from North Carolina, 1801-07, 1813-14; Governor of North Carolina, 1808-10. Died October 7, 1818 (age 48 years, 232 days). Interment in a private or family graveyard.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page


    Hillcrest Cemetery
    Cary, Wake County, North Carolina
    Politicians buried here:
      Lucie Reavis Royall (1867-1959) — also known as Lucie Virginia Reavis; Lucie V. Reavis — of Cary, Wake County, N.C. Born in Granville County, N.C., May 12, 1867. Republican. Postmaster at Cary, N.C., 1900-14. Female. Died, from renal failure and diabetes, in Duke University Hospital, Durham, Durham County, N.C., January 18, 1959 (age 91 years, 251 days). Interment at Hillcrest Cemetery.
      Relatives: Daughter of George James Reavis (1818-1892) and Martha Hayes (Debnam) Reavis (1834-1914); married, June 1, 1919, to Valerius Addison Royall (1860-1929).
      Epitaph: "The Inspired Word of God / Jesus Christ, My Salvation."
      See also Find-A-Grave memorial


    Wake Chapel Memorial Gardens
    Fuquay-Varina, Wake County, North Carolina
    See also Findagrave page for this location.
    Politicians buried here:
      Lynton Yates Ballentine (1899-1964) — also known as Lynton Y. Ballentine; "Stag" — of Raleigh, Wake County, N.C. Born in Varina, Wake County, N.C., April 6, 1899. Democrat. Dairy farmer; Lieutenant Governor of North Carolina, 1945-49; delegate to Democratic National Convention from North Carolina, 1948; North Carolina commissioner of agriculture, 1949-64; died in office 1964. Died in White Sulphur Springs, Greenbrier County, W.Va., July 19, 1964 (age 65 years, 104 days). Interment at Wake Chapel Memorial Gardens.
      Relatives: Son of James Erastus Ballentine and Lillian (Yates) Ballentine.
      See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail


    City Cemetery
    Raleigh, Wake County, North Carolina
    Politicians buried here:
      William Henry Haywood, Jr. (1801-1852) — also known as William H. Haywood, Jr. — of Raleigh, Wake County, N.C. Born in Raleigh, Wake County, N.C., October 23, 1801. Democrat. Lawyer; member of North Carolina house of commons, 1831, 1834-36; U.S. Attorney for North Carolina, 1840-43; U.S. Senator from North Carolina, 1843-46; resigned 1846. Died in Raleigh, Wake County, N.C., October 7, 1852 (age 50 years, 350 days). Interment at City Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of William Henry Haywood (1770-1857) and Ann (Sheppard) Haywood (1776-1866); brother of Elizabeth Ruffin Haywood (1796-1840; who married Edward Bishop Dudley) and Charity Hare Haywood (1799-1880; who married Charles Manly); uncle of Basil Charles Manly (1839-1882); first cousin of William Dallas Polk Haywood.
      Political family: Manly-Haywood-Polk family of Raleigh, North Carolina (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
      John Sitgreaves (1757-1802) — of North Carolina. Born in England, 1757. Delegate to Continental Congress from North Carolina, 1784; member of North Carolina state legislature, 1784; U.S. Attorney for North Carolina, 1790; U.S. District Judge for North Carolina, 1790-94, 1797-1801; U.S. District Judge for the Edenton, New Bern & Wilmington Districts of North Carolina, 1794-97; U.S. District Judge for the Albemarle, Cape Fear & Pamptico Districts of North Carolina, 1801-02; died in office 1802. Died in Halifax, Halifax County, N.C., March 4, 1802 (age about 44 years). Interment at City Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — federal judicial profile
      Romulus Mitchell Saunders (1791-1867) — also known as Romulus M. Saunders — of Milton, Caswell County, N.C. Born near Milton, Caswell County, N.C., March 3, 1791. Democrat. Member of North Carolina state legislature, 1815-19, 1850-52; U.S. Representative from North Carolina, 1821-27, 1841-45 (9th District 1821-27, 8th District 1841-43, 5th District 1843-45); North Carolina state attorney general, 1828-34; state court judge in North Carolina, 1835-40, 1852-56; candidate for Governor of North Carolina, 1840; U.S. Minister to Spain, 1846-49. Died in Raleigh, Wake County, N.C., April 21, 1867 (age 76 years, 49 days). Interment at City Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — U.S. State Dept career summary
      Charles Manly (1795-1871) — of Wake County, N.C. Born in Chatham County, N.C., May 13, 1795. Whig. Lawyer; Governor of North Carolina, 1849-51. Died in Raleigh, Wake County, N.C., May 1, 1871 (age 75 years, 353 days). Interment at City Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Basil Manly and Elizabeth (Maultsby) Manly; brother of Matthias Evans Manly; married to Charity Hare Haywood (1799-1880; sister of William Henry Haywood, Jr.; first cousin of William Dallas Polk Haywood); father of Basil Charles Manly (1839-1882); uncle of Clement Manly.
      Political family: Manly-Haywood-Polk family of Raleigh, North Carolina (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
      Sion Hart Rogers (1825-1874) — also known as Sion H. Rogers — of Raleigh, Wake County, N.C. Born in North Carolina, 1825. U.S. Representative from North Carolina 4th District, 1853-55, 1871-73; North Carolina state attorney general, 1863-68. Died in 1874 (age about 49 years). Interment at City Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Kenneth Rayner (1808-1884) — of North Carolina. Born in North Carolina, 1808. Member of North Carolina state legislature, 1830; U.S. Representative from North Carolina, 1839-45 (1st District 1839-43, 9th District 1843-45). Died in 1884 (age about 76 years). Interment at City Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Lawrence O'Bryan Branch (1820-1862) — also known as Lawrence O'B. Branch — of Raleigh, Wake County, N.C. Born in Enfield, Halifax County, N.C., November 28, 1820. Democrat. U.S. Representative from North Carolina 4th District, 1855-61; general in the Confederate Army during the Civil War. Killed in the battle of Antietam, Sharpsburg, Washington County, Md., September 17, 1862 (age 41 years, 293 days). Interment at City Cemetery.
      Relatives: Father of William Augustus Blount Branch (1847-1910); nephew of John Branch, Jr..
      Political family: Branch family of Enfield, North Carolina.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Richard Hines (d. 1851) — of Edgecombe County, N.C. Born in Tarboro, Edgecombe County, N.C. Democrat. Member of North Carolina house of commons from Edgecombe County, 1824; U.S. Representative from North Carolina 3rd District, 1825-27; defeated, 1826. Died in Raleigh, Wake County, N.C., November 20, 1851. Interment at City Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      William Dallas Polk Haywood (1810-1894) — also known as William Dallas Haywood — of Raleigh, Wake County, N.C. Born in Halifax County, N.C., 1810. Mayor of Raleigh, N.C., 1857-58, 1867-68. Died in Raleigh, Wake County, N.C., July 1, 1894 (age about 84 years). Interment at City Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Stephen Haywood (1772-1824) and Delia (Hawkins) Haywood (1782-1851); married to Mary Elizabeth Cannon (1815-1894); great-grandson of Philemon Hawkins; first cousin of Elizabeth Ruffin Haywood (1796-1840; who married Edward Bishop Dudley), Charity Hare Haywood (1799-1880; who married Charles Manly) and William Henry Haywood, Jr.; first cousin once removed of Basil Charles Manly; first cousin twice removed of Rufus King Polk, Frank Lyon Polk (1871-1943) and Paul Fletcher Faison; first cousin thrice removed of Elizabeth Polk Guest; first cousin four times removed of Raymond R. Guest.
      Political families: Ashe-Polk family of North Carolina; Polk family; Manly-Haywood-Polk family of Raleigh, North Carolina (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      See also Find-A-Grave memorial
      Absalom Tatom (1742-1802) — of North Carolina. Born in North Carolina, 1742. Republican. Delegate to North Carolina state constitutional convention, 1787; U.S. Representative from North Carolina at-large, 1795-96; member of North Carolina state legislature, 1797. Died December 20, 1802 (age about 60 years). Interment at City Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      William White (1762-1811) — of Lenoir County, N.C. Born in 1762. Member of North Carolina house of commons from Lenoir County, 1792-95; member of North Carolina state senate from Lenoir County, 1795-96, 1798; secretary of state of North Carolina, 1798-1810. Died in 1811 (age about 49 years). Interment at City Cemetery.
      Joel Lane (c.1740-1795) — of North Carolina. Born in Halifax County, N.C., about 1740. Member of North Carolina state legislature, 1770; member of North Carolina state senate, 1782-94; delegate to North Carolina state constitutional convention, 1788, 1789. Provided the site for Raleigh, the capital of North Carolina. Died March 29, 1795 (age about 55 years). Original interment in private or family graveyard; reinterment in 1969 at City Cemetery.
      Relatives: Granduncle of Joseph Lane and David Lowry Swain (1801-1868).
      Political family: Lane-Colquitt family of North Carolina.


    Montlawn Memorial Park
    Raleigh, Wake County, North Carolina
    Politicians buried here:
      Joseph Melville Broughton (1888-1949) — also known as J. Melville Broughton — of Wake County, N.C. Born in Raleigh, Wake County, N.C., November 17, 1888. Democrat. School teacher; lawyer; member of North Carolina state senate, 1927-29; Presidential Elector for North Carolina, 1936; Governor of North Carolina, 1941-45; delegate to Democratic National Convention from North Carolina, 1944, 1948 (member, Credentials Committee); candidate for Democratic nomination for Vice President, 1944; U.S. Senator from North Carolina, 1948-49; died in office 1949. Baptist. Member, American Bar Association; Freemasons; Woodmen; Junior Order. Died, of a heart attack, in Washington, D.C., March 6, 1949 (age 60 years, 109 days). Interment at Montlawn Memorial Park.
      Relatives: Son of Joseph Melville Broughton and Sallie (Harris) Broughton; married, December 14, 1916, to Alice Harper Willson; father of Joseph Melville Broughton, Jr. (1922-1997).
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article


    Mt. Hope Cemetery
    Raleigh, Wake County, North Carolina
    Politicians buried here:
      Clarence Everett Lightner (1921-2002) — also known as Clarence E. Lightner — of Raleigh, Wake County, N.C. Born in Raleigh, Wake County, N.C., August 15, 1921. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army during World War II; funeral director; mayor of Raleigh, N.C., 1973-75; member of North Carolina state senate, 1977-78; delegate to Democratic National Convention from North Carolina, 1996, 2000. Presbyterian. African ancestry. Member, Omega Psi Phi. Died in Raleigh, Wake County, N.C., July 8, 2002 (age 80 years, 327 days). Interment at Mt. Hope Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Calvin E. Lightner and Mammie (Blackmon) Lightner; married 1946 to Marguerite Massey.
      The Clarence E. Lightner Public Safety Center (proposed in 2003, ultimately not built), in Raleigh, North Carolina, was named for him.
      See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial


    Nash Square
    Raleigh, Wake County, North Carolina

    Politicians who have monuments here:
      Josephus Daniels (1862-1948) — of Raleigh, Wake County, N.C. Born in Washington, Beaufort County, N.C., May 18, 1862. Democrat. North Carolina state printer, 1887-93; newspaper editor and publisher; member of Democratic National Committee from North Carolina, 1896-1916; U.S. Secretary of the Navy, 1913-21; delegate to Democratic National Convention from North Carolina, 1924, 1928, 1932, 1940, 1944 (member, Platform and Resolutions Committee; speaker); U.S. Ambassador to Mexico, 1933-41. Methodist. Died in Raleigh, Wake County, N.C., January 15, 1948 (age 85 years, 242 days). Interment at Oakwood Cemetery; statue at Nash Square.
      Relatives: Son of Josephus Daniels and Mary (Cleves) Daniels; married, May 2, 1888, to Addie Worth Bagley (1869-1943; granddaughter of Jonathan Worth); father of Jonathan Worth Daniels (1902-1981).
      Political family: Daniels-Bagley-Worth family of Raleigh, North Carolina.
      See also Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile


    Oakwood Cemetery
    Raleigh, Wake County, North Carolina
    Politicians buried here:
      Josephus Daniels (1862-1948) — of Raleigh, Wake County, N.C. Born in Washington, Beaufort County, N.C., May 18, 1862. Democrat. North Carolina state printer, 1887-93; newspaper editor and publisher; member of Democratic National Committee from North Carolina, 1896-1916; U.S. Secretary of the Navy, 1913-21; delegate to Democratic National Convention from North Carolina, 1924, 1928, 1932, 1940, 1944 (member, Platform and Resolutions Committee; speaker); U.S. Ambassador to Mexico, 1933-41. Methodist. Died in Raleigh, Wake County, N.C., January 15, 1948 (age 85 years, 242 days). Interment at Oakwood Cemetery; statue at Nash Square.
      Relatives: Son of Josephus Daniels and Mary (Cleves) Daniels; married, May 2, 1888, to Addie Worth Bagley (1869-1943; granddaughter of Jonathan Worth); father of Jonathan Worth Daniels (1902-1981).
      Political family: Daniels-Bagley-Worth family of Raleigh, North Carolina.
      See also Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile
      George Edmund Badger (1795-1866) — also known as George E. Badger — of Raleigh, Wake County, N.C. Born in New Bern, Craven County, N.C., April 17, 1795. Lawyer; member of North Carolina state legislature, 1816; superior court judge in North Carolina, 1820-25; U.S. Secretary of the Navy, 1841; U.S. Senator from North Carolina, 1846-55; delegate to North Carolina secession convention, 1861. Died in Raleigh, Wake County, N.C., May 11, 1866 (age 71 years, 24 days). Interment at Oakwood Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Thomas Badger and Lydia (Cogdell) Badger; married, December 24, 1818, to Rebecca Turner (1799-1824); married 1826 to Mary Brown Polk (1808-1835); married, April 16, 1836, to Delia (Haywood) Williams (1807-1876); grandfather of Paul Fletcher Faison (1882-1967).
      Political families: Polk family; Manly-Haywood-Polk family of Raleigh, North Carolina (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
      Augustus Summerfield Merrimon (1830-1892) — also known as A. S. Merrimon — of Asheville, Buncombe County, N.C.; Raleigh, Wake County, N.C. Born near Asheville, Buncombe County, N.C., September 15, 1830. Democrat. Lawyer; member of North Carolina house of commons, 1860-61; served in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; solicitor, 8th Judicial District, 1861-65; superior court judge in North Carolina, 1866-67; candidate for Governor of North Carolina, 1872; U.S. Senator from North Carolina, 1873-79; justice of North Carolina state supreme court, 1883-89; defeated, 1868; chief justice of North Carolina state supreme court, 1889-92; died in office 1892. Died in Raleigh, Wake County, N.C., November 14, 1892 (age 62 years, 60 days). Interment at Oakwood Cemetery.
      Relatives: Father of Mary P. Merrimon (who married Lee Slater Overman (1854-1930)).
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
      Josiah William Bailey (1873-1946) — also known as Josiah W. Bailey — of Raleigh, Wake County, N.C. Born in Warrenton, Warren County, N.C., September 14, 1873. Democrat. Lawyer; Presidential Elector for North Carolina, 1908; U.S. Collector of Internal Revenue for the 4th North Carolina District, 1913-21; U.S. Senator from North Carolina, 1931-46; died in office 1946; delegate to Democratic National Convention from North Carolina, 1932. Baptist. Member, Anti-Saloon League; Omicron Delta Kappa. Died in Raleigh, Wake County, N.C., December 15, 1946 (age 73 years, 92 days). Interment at Oakwood Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Christopher Thomas Bailey and Annie Sarah Bailey; married, August 16, 1916, to Edith Pou.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
    Jesse Helms Jesse Alexander Helms (1921-2008) — also known as Jesse Helms — of Raleigh, Wake County, N.C. Born in Monroe, Union County, N.C., October 18, 1921. Republican. Served in the U.S. Navy during World War II; U.S. Senator from North Carolina, 1973-2003. Baptist. Member, Rotary; Young Americans for Freedom; Freemasons; Exchange Club. Died, in a nursing home at Raleigh, Wake County, N.C., July 4, 2008 (age 86 years, 260 days). Interment at Oakwood Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Jesse Helms; married, October 31, 1942, to Dorothy Jane 'Dot' Coble.
      Cross-reference: Terrence William Boyle — David Rouzer
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — votes in Congress from the Washington Post — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — Find-A-Grave memorial
      Books by Jesse Helms: Here's Where I Stand : A Memoir (2005)
      Image source: North Carolina History Project
      Thomas Bragg (1810-1872) — of Northampton County, N.C.; Raleigh, Wake County, N.C. Born in Warrenton, Warren County, N.C., November 9, 1810. Democrat. Lawyer; member of North Carolina house of commons, 1842; Governor of North Carolina, 1855-59; U.S. Senator from North Carolina, 1859-61; Confederate Attorney General, 1861-62. Presbyterian. When the Civil War began, he left Washington but did not resign his seat in the Senate; one of ten Southern senators expelled in absentia on July 11, 1861. Died in Raleigh, Wake County, N.C., January 21, 1872 (age 61 years, 73 days). Interment at Oakwood Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Walter Clark (1846-1924) — of Raleigh, Wake County, N.C. Born in Halifax County, N.C., August 19, 1846. Democrat. Colonel in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; lawyer; superior court judge in North Carolina, 1885-89; justice of North Carolina state supreme court, 1889-1902; chief justice of North Carolina state supreme court, 1903-24; candidate in primary for U.S. Senator from North Carolina, 1912. Methodist. Died in Wake County, N.C., May 20, 1924 (age 77 years, 275 days). Interment at Oakwood Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of David Clark (1820-1882) and Anna M. (Thorne) Clark (1824-1899); married, January 28, 1874, to Susan Washington Graham (1851-1909; daughter of William Alexander Graham (1804-1875); sister of John Washington Graham, William Alexander Graham (1839-1923) and Augustus Washington Graham; niece of James Graham (1793-1851)).
      Political family: Graham family of Hillsborough, North Carolina.
      See also Find-A-Grave memorial
      Willis Smith (1887-1953) — of Raleigh, Wake County, N.C. Born in Norfolk, Va., December 19, 1887. Democrat. Lawyer; served in the U.S. Army during World War I; member of North Carolina state house of representatives, 1927-32; Speaker of the North Carolina State House of Representatives, 1931-32; delegate to Democratic National Convention from North Carolina, 1944 (member, Committee on Rules and Order of Business), 1952; U.S. Senator from North Carolina, 1950-53; died in office 1953. Methodist. Member, American Bar Association; American Judicature Society; Order of the Coif; American Legion; Forty and Eight; Sigma Phi Epsilon; Omicron Delta Kappa; Phi Delta Phi; Kiwanis. Died in the Bethesda Naval Hospital, Bethesda, Montgomery County, Md., June 26, 1953 (age 65 years, 189 days). Interment at Oakwood Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Willis Smith and Mary Shaw (Creecy) Smith; married, April 30, 1919, to Anna Lee.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Daniel Gould Fowle (1831-1891) — also known as Daniel G. Fowle — of Wake County, N.C. Born in Washington, Beaufort County, N.C., March 3, 1831. Lawyer; Governor of North Carolina, 1889-91; died in office 1891. Died April 7, 1891 (age 60 years, 35 days). Interment at Oakwood Cemetery.
      William Woods Holden (1818-1892) — also known as William W. Holden — of Raleigh, Wake County, N.C. Born in Orange County, N.C., November 24, 1818. Newspaper editor; delegate to Democratic National Convention from North Carolina, 1860; delegate to North Carolina secession convention, 1861; Governor of North Carolina, 1865, 1868-70; postmaster at Raleigh, N.C., 1873-81. Methodist. Impeached and removed from office as Governor in 1870, over corruption scandal. Died in Raleigh, Wake County, N.C., March 1, 1892 (age 73 years, 98 days). Interment at Oakwood Cemetery.
      Relatives: Married to Ann Augusta Young (1819-1852); father of Ida Augustus Holden (who married Calvin Josiah Cowles (1821-1907)); grandfather of Charles Holden Cowles.
      Political families: Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York; Baldwin-Greene-Upson-Hoar family of Connecticut (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      David Lowry Swain (1801-1868) — also known as David L. Swain — of Buncombe County, N.C.; Chapel Hill, Orange County, N.C. Born in a log cabin near Asheville, Buncombe County, N.C., January 4, 1801. Whig. Lawyer; member of North Carolina state house of representatives, 1824-30; superior court judge in North Carolina, 1830-32; Governor of North Carolina, 1832-35; president, University of North Carolina, 1835-68. Died in Chapel Hill, Orange County, N.C., August 27, 1868 (age 67 years, 236 days). Interment at Oakwood Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Caroline Aycock (Lane) Swain (1761-1812) and George Charles Swain (1763-1829); married to Eleanor Hope White (1800-1883); father of Eleanor Hope Swain (1842-1881; who married Smith Dykins Atkins); grandnephew of Joel Lane; granduncle of James Lowry Robinson (1838-1887); cousin *** of Joseph Lane.
      Political family: Lane-Colquitt family of North Carolina.
      See also Find-A-Grave memorial
      Jonathan Worth (1802-1869) — of Randolph County, N.C. Born in Randolph County, N.C., November 18, 1802. Democrat. Lawyer; North Carolina state treasurer, 1862-65; Governor of North Carolina, 1865-68. Died in Raleigh, Wake County, N.C., September 5, 1869 (age 66 years, 291 days). Interment at Oakwood Cemetery.
      Relatives: Married, October 20, 1824, to Martitia Daniel; grandfather of Addie Worth Bagley (1869-1943; who married Josephus Daniels); great-grandfather of Jonathan Worth Daniels (1902-1981).
      Political family: Daniels-Bagley-Worth family of Raleigh, North Carolina.
      See also Wikipedia article
      Charles Brantley Aycock (1859-1912) — also known as Charles B. Aycock — of Goldsboro, Wayne County, N.C. Born in Nahunta Township, Wayne County, N.C., November 1, 1859. Democrat. Lawyer; superintendent of schools; Presidential Elector for North Carolina, 1888, 1892; U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of North Carolina, 1893-98; Governor of North Carolina, 1901-05. Fell dead, while giving a speech in a theater at Birmingham, Jefferson County, Ala., April 4, 1912 (age 52 years, 155 days). Interment at Oakwood Cemetery; statue at Union Square.
      Relatives: Married 1881 to Verena D. Woodward (died 1890); married 1891 to Cora L. Woodard.
      Daniel Killian Moore (1906-1986) — also known as Dan K. Moore — of Canton, Haywood County, N.C. Born April 2, 1906. Democrat. Delegate to Democratic National Convention from North Carolina, 1964; Governor of North Carolina, 1965-69. Died September 7, 1986 (age 80 years, 158 days). Interment at Oakwood Cemetery.
      See also NNDB dossier
      William Nathan Harrell Smith (1812-1889) — also known as William N. H. Smith — of Murfreesboro, Hertford County, N.C. Born in Murfreesboro, Hertford County, N.C., September 24, 1812. Democrat. Member of North Carolina state legislature, 1840, 1858, 1868; member of North Carolina state senate, 1848; U.S. Representative from North Carolina 1st District, 1859-61; Delegate from North Carolina to the Confederate Provisional Congress, 1861-62; Representative from North Carolina in the Confederate Congress, 1862-65; justice of North Carolina state supreme court, 1878-89. Died in Raleigh, Wake County, N.C., November 14, 1889 (age 77 years, 51 days). Interment at Oakwood Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Edwin Godwin Reade (1812-1894) — of North Carolina. Born in Mt. Tirzah, Person County, N.C., November 13, 1812. U.S. Representative from North Carolina 5th District, 1855-57; Senator from North Carolina in the Confederate Congress, 1864; justice of North Carolina state supreme court, 1865-79. Died in Raleigh, Wake County, N.C., October 18, 1894 (age 81 years, 339 days). Interment at Oakwood Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Basil Charles Manly (1839-1882) — also known as Basil C. Manly — of Raleigh, Wake County, N.C. Born in Raleigh, Wake County, N.C., May 9, 1839. Served in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; mayor of Raleigh, N.C., 1875-82; died in office 1882. Died in Raleigh, Wake County, N.C., May 15, 1882 (age 43 years, 6 days). Interment at Oakwood Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Charles Manly and Charity Hare (Haywood) Manly (1799-1880); married to Lucy Haywood Bryan (1841-1930); nephew of William Henry Haywood, Jr. and Matthias Evans Manly; first cousin of Clement Manly (1853-1928); first cousin once removed of William Dallas Polk Haywood.
      Political family: Manly-Haywood-Polk family of Raleigh, North Carolina (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      See also Find-A-Grave memorial
      John Heritage Bryan (1798-1870) — also known as John H. Bryan — of New Bern, Craven County, N.C.; Raleigh, Wake County, N.C. Born in New Bern, Craven County, N.C., November 4, 1798. Lawyer; member of North Carolina state senate, 1823-24; U.S. Representative from North Carolina 4th District, 1825-29. Died in Raleigh, Wake County, N.C., May 19, 1870 (age 71 years, 196 days). Interment at Oakwood Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Joseph Henry Separk (1830-1875) — of Raleigh, Wake County, N.C. Born in Petersburg, Va., June 25, 1830. Mayor of Raleigh, N.C., 1875; died in office 1875. Died August 30, 1875 (age 45 years, 66 days). Interment at Oakwood Cemetery.
      William Ruffin Cox (1831-1919) — also known as William R. Cox — of Raleigh, Wake County, N.C.; Penelo, Edgecombe County, N.C. Born in Scotland Neck, Halifax County, N.C., March 11, 1831. Democrat. General in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; planter; president, Chatham Coal Field Railroad; district judge in North Carolina 4th District, 1874-75; U.S. Representative from North Carolina 4th District, 1881-87. Member, Freemasons. Died in Richmond, Va., December 26, 1919 (age 88 years, 290 days). Interment at Oakwood Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Thomas C. Cox.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      John Nichols (1834-1917) — of Raleigh, Wake County, N.C. Born near Eagle Rock, Wake County, N.C., November 14, 1834. Republican. Postmaster at Raleigh, N.C., 1881-85; U.S. Representative from North Carolina 4th District, 1887-89; defeated, 1888. Died in Raleigh, Wake County, N.C., September 22, 1917 (age 82 years, 312 days). Interment at Oakwood Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      J. S. Wynne (d. 1934) — of Raleigh, Wake County, N.C. Mayor of Raleigh, N.C., 1909-11. Died in 1934. Interment at Oakwood Cemetery.
      Winder Russell Harris (1888-1973) — also known as Winder R. Harris — of Norfolk, Va. Born in Raleigh, Wake County, N.C., December 3, 1888. Democrat. U.S. Representative from Virginia 2nd District, 1941-44. Died in Alexandria, Va., February 24, 1973 (age 84 years, 83 days). Interment at Oakwood Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Thomas Charles Fuller (1832-1901) — of North Carolina. Born in Fayetteville, Cumberland County, N.C., February 27, 1832. Served in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; Representative from North Carolina in the Confederate Congress, 1864-65. Died in Raleigh, Wake County, N.C., October 20, 1901 (age 69 years, 235 days). Interment at Oakwood Cemetery.
    James Y. Joyner James Yadkin Joyner (1862-1954) — also known as James Y. Joyner — of La Grange, Lenoir County, N.C.; Goldsboro, Wayne County, N.C.; Greensboro, Guilford County, N.C. Born in Davidson County, N.C., August 7, 1862. School teacher and principal; Lenoir County Superintendent of Schools, 1882-83; lawyer; college professor; North Carolina superintendent of public instruction, 1902-19; one of the organizers of the Virginia-Carolina Tobacco Growers Cooperative Association, 1922. Baptist. Died in Lenoir County, N.C., January 24, 1954 (age 91 years, 170 days). Interment at Oakwood Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of John Joyner (1821-1863) and Sarah Ann 'Sallie' (Wooten) Joyner (1828-1863); married 1887 to Effie Harper Rouse (1866-1930).
      See also Find-A-Grave memorial
      Image source: American Review of Reviews, January 1922
      Leonidas Lafayette Polk (1837-1892) — of North Carolina. Born in Anson County, N.C., April 24, 1837. Member of North Carolina house of commons, 1860; colonel in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; delegate to North Carolina state constitutional convention, 1866; newspaper editor; North Carolina commissioner of agriculture, 1877-80; national president of the Farmers' Alliance. Baptist. Member, Grange. Founder of Polkton, N.C. Elected to the North Carolina Agricultural Hall of Fame in 1957. Died from a bladder hemorrhage, in Washington, D.C., June 11, 1892 (age 55 years, 48 days). Interment at Oakwood Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Andrew Polk and Sereba Autry Polk; married 1857 to Sarah Pamela Gaddy.
      Epitaph: "Editor, orator, patriot, Christian. The friend of popular education and civil liberty."
      See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
      Ivey Goodman Riddick (1861-1920) — also known as Ivey G. Riddick — of Franklin County, N.C. Born in Wake County, N.C., December 3, 1861. Physician; member of North Carolina state house of representatives from Franklin County, 1903-04. Died, from throat cancer, in Raleigh, Wake County, N.C., January 1, 1920 (age 58 years, 29 days). Interment at Oakwood Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Willie Goodman Riddick (1835-1911) and Annie Ivey (Jones) Riddick (1836-1900); married 1888 to Annie Dunn (1864-1949).
      See also Find-A-Grave memorial
    Paul F. Faison Paul Fletcher Faison (1882-1967) — also known as Paul F. Faison — of Raleigh, Wake County, N.C.; Philippines; Canton (Guangzhou), China; Tientsin, China; Tokyo, Japan. Born in Raleigh, Wake County, N.C., November 15, 1882. Lawyer; U.S. Vice Consul in Canton, 1918-19. Died in Tokyo, Japan, November 18, 1967 (age 85 years, 3 days). Interment at Oakwood Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Paul Fletcher Faison (1840-1896) and Annice Haywood (Badger) Faison (1841-1898); married, November 19, 1920, to Eugenie Demetrie Babushkina; married, March 9, 1948, to Nadia Kamershtain; married 1952 to Daphne Spratt (1905-1989); grandson of George Edmund Badger; third great-grandson of Philemon Hawkins; first cousin twice removed of William Dallas Polk Haywood; third cousin of Rufus King Polk (1866-1902) and Frank Lyon Polk; third cousin once removed of Elizabeth Polk Guest; third cousin twice removed of Raymond R. Guest.
      Political families: Polk family; Manly-Haywood-Polk family of Raleigh, North Carolina (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      See also Find-A-Grave memorial
      Image source: U.S. passport application (1918)


    Union Square
    Raleigh, Wake County, North Carolina

    Politicians who have monuments here:
      Zebulon Baird Vance (1830-1894) — also known as Zebulon B. Vance — of Asheville, Buncombe County, N.C.; Charlotte, Mecklenburg County, N.C. Born in Asheville, Buncombe County, N.C., May 13, 1830. Democrat. Member of North Carolina state legislature, 1854; U.S. Representative from North Carolina 8th District, 1858-61; colonel in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; Governor of North Carolina, 1862-65, 1877-79; U.S. Senator from North Carolina, 1879-94; died in office 1894. Died in Washington, D.C., April 14, 1894 (age 63 years, 336 days). Interment at Riverside Cemetery, Asheville, N.C.; statue at Union Square.
      Relatives: Son of David Vance (1792-1844) and Elmira Margaret (Baird) Vance (1802-1878); brother of Robert Brank Vance (1828-1899); married to Harriette Newell Espy (1832-1878) and Florence Steele (1840-1924); father of Thomas Malvern Vance; nephew of Robert Brank Vance (1793-1827).
      Political family: Vance family of Asheville, North Carolina.
      Cross-reference: Lee S. Overman
      Vance County, N.C. is named for him.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
      Books about Zebulon B. Vance: Cordelia Camp, Governor Vance : a life for young people (for young readers)
      Charles Brantley Aycock (1859-1912) — also known as Charles B. Aycock — of Goldsboro, Wayne County, N.C. Born in Nahunta Township, Wayne County, N.C., November 1, 1859. Democrat. Lawyer; superintendent of schools; Presidential Elector for North Carolina, 1888, 1892; U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of North Carolina, 1893-98; Governor of North Carolina, 1901-05. Fell dead, while giving a speech in a theater at Birmingham, Jefferson County, Ala., April 4, 1912 (age 52 years, 155 days). Interment at Oakwood Cemetery; statue at Union Square.
      Relatives: Married 1881 to Verena D. Woodward (died 1890); married 1891 to Cora L. Woodard.


  • "Enjoy the hospitable entertainment of a political graveyard."
    Henry L. Clinton, Apollo Hall, New York City, February 3, 1872
    The Political Graveyard

    The Political Graveyard is a web site about U.S. political history and cemeteries. Founded in 1996, it is the Internet's most comprehensive free source for American political biography, listing 312,576 politicians, living and dead.
      The listings are incomplete; development of the database is a continually ongoing project.  
      Information on this page — and on all other pages of this site — is believed to be accurate, but is not guaranteed. Users are advised to check with other sources before relying on any information here.  
      The official URL for this page is: https://politicalgraveyard.com/geo/NC/WK-buried.html.  
      Links to this or any other Political Graveyard page are welcome, but specific page addresses may sometimes change as the site develops.  
      If you are searching for a specific named individual, try the alphabetical index of politicians.  
      More information: FAQ; privacy policy; cemetery links.  
      If you find any error or omission in The Political Graveyard, or if you have information to share, please see the biographical checklist and submission guidelines.  
    Copyright notices: (1) Facts are not subject to copyright; see Feist v. Rural Telephone. (2) Politician portraits displayed on this site are 70-pixel-wide monochrome thumbnail images, which I believe to constitute fair use under applicable copyright law. Where possible, each image is linked to its online source. However, requests from owners of copyrighted images to delete them from this site are honored. (3) Original material, programming, selection and arrangement are © 1996-2019 Lawrence Kestenbaum. (4) This work is also licensed for free non-commercial re-use, with attribution, under a Creative Commons License.
    Site information: The Political Graveyard is created and maintained by Lawrence Kestenbaum, who is solely responsible for its structure and content. — The mailing address is The Political Graveyard, P.O. Box 2563, Ann Arbor MI 48106. — This site is hosted by HDL. — The Political Graveyard opened on July 1, 1996; the last full revision was done on March 10, 2021.

    Creative 
Commons License Follow polgraveyard on Twitter [Amazon.com]