PoliticalGraveyard.com
The Political Graveyard: A Database of American History
Politicians Born in Log Cabins
(and other very humble frontier dwellings)

Very incomplete list!

in chronological order
  William Cooper (1754-1809) — of New York. Born in a log house, in Smithfield (now part of Philadelphia), Philadelphia County, Pa., December 2, 1754. Merchant; common pleas court judge in New York, 1791; U.S. Representative from New York 10th District, 1795-97, 1799-1801. English ancestry. Died in Albany, Albany County, N.Y., December 22, 1809 (age 55 years, 20 days). Interment at Christ Churchyard, Cooperstown, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of James Cooper (1729-1795) and Hannah (Hibbs) Cooper; married to Elizabeth Fenimore (1752-1817); father of James Fenimore Cooper (1789-1851).
  The village of Cooperstown, New York, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
Andrew Jackson Andrew Jackson (1767-1845) — also known as "Old Hickory"; "The Farmer of Tennessee"; "King Andrew the First" — of Nashville, Davidson County, Tenn. Born, in a log cabin, in The Waxhaws, Lancaster County, S.C., March 15, 1767. Democrat. Lawyer; U.S. Attorney for Tennessee, 1790-97; U.S. Representative from Tennessee at-large, 1796-97; U.S. Senator from Tennessee, 1797-98, 1823-25; justice of Tennessee state supreme court, 1798; general in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812; Governor of Florida Territory, 1821; President of the United States, 1829-37; censured by the U.S. Senate in 1834 over his removal of federal deposits from the Bank of the United States; on January 30, 1835, while attending funeral services at the Capitol Building for Rep. Warren R. Davis of South Carolina, he was shot at with two guns -- which both misfired -- by Richard Lawrence, a house painter (later found not guilty by reason of insanity). Presbyterian. Scotch-Irish ancestry. Member, Freemasons. Killed Charles Dickinson in a pistol duel, May 30, 1806; also dueled with Thomas Hart Benton and Waightstill Avery. Elected in 1910 to the Hall of Fame for Great Americans. Died, of dropsy (congestive heart failure), in Nashville, Davidson County, Tenn., June 8, 1845 (age 78 years, 85 days). Interment at The Hermitage, Nashville, Tenn.; statue erected 1853 at Lafayette Park, Washington, D.C.; statue erected 1856 at Jackson Square, New Orleans, La.
  Relatives: Son of Andrew Jackson (1730-1767) and Elizabeth (Hutchinson) Jackson (1737-1781); married, January 17, 1794, to Rachel (Donelson) Robards (1767-1828; aunt of Andrew Jackson Donelson (1799-1871)).
  Political families: Marshall-Harrison-Randolph-Cabell family of Virginia; Caffery family of Louisiana (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Cross-reference: Francis P. Blair
  Jackson counties in Ala., Ark., Colo., Fla., Ill., Ind., Iowa, Kan., Ky., La., Mich., Miss., Mo., N.C., Ohio, Okla., Ore., Tenn., Tex., W.Va. and Wis., and Hickory County, Mo., are named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: Andrew J. DonelsonAndrew Jackson MillerAndrew J. FaulkAndrew Jackson TitusAndrew Jackson IsacksAndrew Jackson HamiltonAndrew J. HarlanAndrew J. KuykendallAndrew J. ThayerElam A. J. GreeleyAndrew Jackson IngleAndrew J. OgleAndrew Jackson CarrAndrew J. WatermanAndrew J. BentleyAndrew J. RogersWilliam A. J. SparksAndrew Jackson PoppletonAndrew J. HunterAndrew Jackson BryantAndrew J. BealeA. J. ClementsAndrew Jackson BakerAndrew J. FeltA. J. KingAndrew J. SawyerAndrew Jackson GreenfieldAndrew Jackson CaldwellAndrew Jackson GahaganAndrew Jackson BishipAndrew Jackson HoustonAndrew J. CobbAndrew J. MontagueAndrew J. BarchfeldAndrew J. BallietAndrew J. KirkAndrew J. LivingstonA. J. SherwoodAndrew Jackson StewartAndrew J. MayAndrew J. McConnicoAndrew J. SawyerAndrew J. BrewerAndrew BettwyAndrew J. TransueAndrew Jackson GravesAndrew Jackson GilbertAndrew J. GoodwinAndrew J. HinshawAndy YoungAndrew Jackson Kupper
  Coins and currency: His portrait appears on the U.S. $20 bill; from the 1860s until 1927, his portrait appeared on on U.S. notes and certificates of various denominations from $5 to $10,000. In 1861, his portrait appeared on Confederate States $1,000 notes.
  Campaign slogan: "Let the people rule."
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial — Tennessee Encyclopedia
  Books about Andrew Jackson: Robert Vincent Remini, The Life of Andrew Jackson — Robert Vincent Remini, Andrew Jackson : The Course of American Freedom, 1822-1832 — Robert Vincent Remini, Andrew Jackson : The Course of American Democracy, 1833-1845 — Robert Vincent Remini, Andrew Jackson : The Course of American Empire, 1767-1821 — Andrew Burstein, The Passions of Andrew Jackson — David S. Heidler & Jeanne T. Heidler, Old Hickory's War: Andrew Jackson and the Quest for Empire — Donald B. Cole, The Presidency of Andrew Jackson — H. W. Brands, Andrew Jackson : His Life and Times — Jon Meacham, American Lion: Andrew Jackson in the White House — Donald Barr Chidsey, Andrew Jackson, Hero
  Image source: Portrait & Biographical Album of Washtenaw County (1891)
  George F. Shannon (c.1785-1836) — also known as "Peg Leg" — of St. Charles, St. Charles County, Mo. Born in a log cabin in Washington County, Pa., about 1785. Youngest member of the Lewis and Clark expedition, 1804-06; wounded in a skirmish with Indians in 1807 and lost a leg; lawyer; member of Kentucky state house of representatives, 1820-24; circuit judge in Kentucky, 1820; U.S. Attorney for Missouri, 1829-34. Irish ancestry. Member, Freemasons. Died, in a hotel at Palmyra, Marion County, Mo., August 30, 1836 (age about 51 years). Interment at Massey Mill Cemetery, Near Palmyra, Marion County, Mo.
  Relatives: Son of George David Shannon (1758-1803) and Jane (Milligan) Shannon (1758-1823); brother of Thomas Shannon, James Shannon (1791?-1832) and Wilson Shannon; married, September 18, 1813, to Ruth Snowden Price (1793-1833); granduncle of Isaac Charles Parker.
  Political family: Shannon-Shelby family.
  Shannon County, Mo. is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article
James Buchanan James Buchanan (1791-1868) — also known as "The Sage of Wheatland"; "Buck"; "Old Buck" — of Lancaster, Lancaster County, Pa. Born in a log cabin near Mercersburg, Franklin County, Pa., April 23, 1791. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812; lawyer; member of Pennsylvania state house of representatives, 1814; U.S. Representative from Pennsylvania, 1821-31 (3rd District 1821-23, 4th District 1823-31); U.S. Minister to Russia, 1832-33; Great Britain, 1853-56; U.S. Senator from Pennsylvania, 1834-45; resigned 1845; candidate for Democratic nomination for President, 1844, 1848, 1852; U.S. Secretary of State, 1845-49; President of the United States, 1857-61. Presbyterian. Member, Freemasons. Died near Lancaster, Lancaster County, Pa., June 1, 1868 (age 77 years, 39 days). Interment at Woodward Hill Cemetery, Lancaster, Pa.; memorial monument at Meridian Hill Park, Washington, D.C.
  Relatives: Son of James Buchanan (c.1761-1821) and Elizabeth (Speer) Buchanan (1767-1833).
  Cross-reference: David Fullerton Robison — John A. Quitman — John Gallagher Montgomery
  Buchanan counties in Iowa, Mo. and Va. are named for him.
  The city of Buchanan, Michigan, is named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: James B. DukeJames B. CullisonJames Buchanan SigginsJ. B. MarcumJames B. Searcy
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier
  Books about James Buchanan: Philip S. Klein, President James Buchanan: A Biography — Jean H. Baker, James Buchanan — R. G. Horton, The Life And Public Services Of James Buchanan: Late Minister To England And Formerly Minister To Russia, Senator And Representative In Congress, And Sec. Of State
  Critical books about James Buchanan: Nathan Miller, Star-Spangled Men : America's Ten Worst Presidents
  Image source: Portrait & Biographical Album of Washtenaw County (1891)
  David Lowry Swain (1801-1868) — also known as David L. Swain — of Buncombe County, N.C.; Chapel Hill, Orange County, N.C. Born in a log cabin near Asheville, Buncombe County, N.C., January 4, 1801. Whig. Lawyer; member of North Carolina state house of representatives, 1824-30; superior court judge in North Carolina, 1830-32; Governor of North Carolina, 1832-35; president, University of North Carolina, 1835-68. Died in Chapel Hill, Orange County, N.C., August 27, 1868 (age 67 years, 236 days). Interment at Oakwood Cemetery, Raleigh, N.C.
  Relatives: Son of Caroline Aycock (Lane) Swain (1761-1812) and George Charles Swain (1763-1829); married to Eleanor Hope White (1800-1883); father of Eleanor Hope Swain (1842-1881; who married Smith Dykins Atkins); grandnephew of Joel Lane; granduncle of James Lowry Robinson (1838-1887); cousin *** of Joseph Lane.
  Political family: Lane-Colquitt family of North Carolina.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Joseph Lane (1801-1881) — of Winchester, Douglas County, Ore. Born in a log cabin near Asheville, Buncombe County, N.C., December 14, 1801. Democrat. Member of Indiana state house of representatives, 1822-23, 1830-33, 1838-39; member of Indiana state senate, 1839-40, 1844-46; general in the U.S. Army during the Mexican War; Governor of Oregon Territory, 1849-50, 1853; Delegate to U.S. Congress from Oregon Territory, 1851-59; candidate for Democratic nomination for President, 1852; U.S. Senator from Oregon, 1859-61; Southern Democratic candidate for Vice President of the United States, 1860; candidate for Oregon state senate, 1880. Baptist; later Catholic. Member, Freemasons. Died in Roseburg, Douglas County, Ore., April 19, 1881 (age 79 years, 126 days). Original interment at Masonic Cemetery, Roseburg, Ore.; reinterment at Memorial Garden Cemetery, Roseburg, Ore.; cenotaph at Lone Fir Cemetery, Portland, Ore.
  Relatives: Father-in-law of Lafayette Mosher; father of La Fayette Lane; grandfather of Harry Lane; grandnephew of Joel Lane (1740?-1795); cousin *** of David Lowry Swain; first cousin by marriage of Walter Terry Colquitt.
  Political family: Lane-Colquitt family of North Carolina.
  Lane County, Ore. is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
Jefferson Davis Jefferson Finis Davis (1808-1889) — also known as Jefferson Davis — of Warrenton, Warren County, Miss.; Warren County, Miss. Born in a log cabin, Fairview, Christian County (now Todd County), Ky., June 3, 1808. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army during the Black Hawk War; candidate for Mississippi state house of representatives, 1843; Presidential Elector for Mississippi, 1844; U.S. Representative from Mississippi at-large, 1845-46; served in the U.S. Army during the Mexican War; U.S. Senator from Mississippi, 1847-51, 1857-61; candidate for Governor of Mississippi, 1851; U.S. Secretary of War, 1853-57; President of the Confederacy, 1861-65. Captured by Union forces in May 1865 and imprisoned without trial for about two years. Died of bronchitis and malaria in New Orleans, Orleans Parish, La., December 6, 1889 (age 81 years, 186 days). Original interment at Metairie Cemetery, New Orleans, La.; reinterment in 1893 at Hollywood Cemetery, Richmond, Va.; memorial monument at Memorial Avenue, Richmond, Va.
  Relatives: Son of Samuel Emory Davis and Jane (Cook) Davis; married, June 17, 1835, to Sarah Knox Taylor (1814-1835; daughter of Zachary Taylor); married, February 25, 1845, to Varina Howell (1826-1906; granddaughter of Richard Howell (1754-1802)); uncle of Mary Bradford (who married Richard Brodhead); granduncle of Jefferson Davis Brodhead and Frances Eileen Hutt (who married Thomas Edmund Dewey).
  Political families: Brodhead-Taylor family of Easton, Pennsylvania; Davis-Howell-Morgan-Agnew family of New Orleans and Shreveport, Louisiana (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Cross-reference: Jesse D. Bright — John H. Reagan — Horace Greeley — Solomon Cohen — George W. Jones — Samuel A. Roberts — William T. Sutherlin — Victor Vifquain — Charles O'Conor
  Jeff Davis County, Ga., Jefferson Davis Parish, La., Jefferson Davis County, Miss. and Jeff Davis County, Tex. are named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: J. Davis BrodheadJefferson D. HostetterJefferson D. BlountJeff DavisJefferson D. HelmsJefferson Davis Parris
  Coins and currency: His portrait appeared on Confederate States 50 cent notes in 1861-64.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books by Jefferson Davis: The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government (1881)
  Books about Jefferson Davis: William J. Cooper, Jr., Jefferson Davis, American : A Biography — Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis : Ex-President of the Confederate States of America : A Memoir by His Wife — William C. Davis, An Honorable Defeat: The Last Days of the Confederate Government — James Ronald Kennedy & Walter Donald Kennedy, Was Jefferson Davis Right? — Robert Penn Warren, Jefferson Davis Gets His Citizenship Back — Herman Hattaway & Richard E. Beringer, Jefferson Davis, Confederate President — Felicity Allen, Jefferson Davis: Unconquerable Heart — Clint Johnson, Pursuit: The Chase, Capture, Persecution, and Surprising Release of Confederate President Jefferson Davis
  Image source: Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper, March 9, 1861
Abraham Lincoln Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865) — also known as "Honest Abe"; "Old Abe"; "The Rail-Splitter"; "The Illinois Baboon" — of New Salem, Menard County, Ill.; Springfield, Sangamon County, Ill. Born in a log cabin, Hardin County (part now in Larue County), Ky., February 12, 1809. Republican. Served in the U.S. Army during the Black Hawk War; postmaster; lawyer; member of Illinois state house of representatives, 1834-41; U.S. Representative from Illinois 7th District, 1847-49; candidate for Republican nomination for Vice President, 1856; candidate for U.S. Senator from Illinois, 1858; President of the United States, 1861-65; died in office 1865; His election as president in 1860 precipitated the Civil War; determined to preserve the Union, he led the North to victory on the battlefield, freed the slaves in the conquered states, and in doing this, redefined American nationhood. He was. English ancestry. Elected in 1900 to the Hall of Fame for Great Americans. Shot by the assassin John Wilkes Booth, during a play at Ford's Theater, in Washington, D.C., April 14, 1865; died at Peterson's Boarding House, across the street, the following day, April 15, 1865 (age 56 years, 62 days). Interment at Oak Ridge Cemetery, Springfield, Ill.; memorial monument at National Mall, Washington, D.C.; statue erected 1868 at Judiciary Park, Washington, D.C.
  Relatives: Son of Thomas Lincoln (1778-1851) and Nancy (Hanks) Lincoln (1784-1818); married, November 4, 1842, to Mary Ann Todd (1818-1882; sister-in-law of Ninian Wirt Edwards (1809-1889); half-sister-in-law of N. H. R. Dawson; aunt of Martha Dee Todd; grandniece of David Rittenhouse Porter); father of Robert Todd Lincoln; second cousin four times removed of Richard Henry Lee, Francis Lightfoot Lee and Arthur Lee; third cousin twice removed of Levi Lincoln; third cousin thrice removed of Thomas Sim Lee, Henry Lee, Charles Lee, Edmund Jennings Lee and Zachary Taylor; fourth cousin once removed of Levi Lincoln, Jr. and Enoch Lincoln.
  Political families: Lincoln-Lee family; Edwards-Cook family of Illinois and Nebraska (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Cross-reference: Clement Claiborne Clay, Jr. — Isham N. Haynie — William M. Stone — John Pitcher — Stephen Miller — John T. Stuart — William H. Seward — Henry L. Burnett — Judah P. Benjamin — Robert Toombs — Richard Taylor Jacob — George W. Jones — James Adams — John G. Nicolay — Edward Everett — Stephen T. Logan — Francis P. Blair — John Hay — Henry Reed Rathbone — James A. Ekin — Frederick W. Seward — John H. Surratt — John H. Surratt, Jr. — James Shields
  Lincoln counties in Ark., Colo., Idaho, Kan., La., Minn., Miss., Mont., Neb., Nev., N.M., Okla., Ore., Wash., W.Va., Wis. and Wyo. are named for him.
  The city of Lincoln, Nebraska, is named for him.  — Lincoln Memorial University, in Harrogate, Tennessee, is named for him.  — Lincoln University, in Jefferson City, Missouri, is named for him.  — Lincoln University, near Oxford, Pennsylvania, is named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: Abraham L. KeisterAbraham L. TuckerAbraham L. BrickAbraham L. KelloggAbraham Lincoln BernsteinA. Lincoln ReileyA. L. HelmickAbraham L. SuttonA. Lincoln AckerAbraham L. OsgoodAbraham L. WitmerAbraham L. PhillipsAbraham L. PaytonA. L. AuthA. Lincoln MooreA. Lincoln NiditchAbraham L. RubensteinAbraham L. Davis, Jr.Abraham L. FreedmanA. L. MarovitzLincoln GordonAbraham L. BannerAbraham Lincoln Tosti
  Coins and currency: His portrait has appeared on the U.S. penny (one cent coin) since 1909, and on the $5 bill since 1913. From the 1860s until 1927, his portrait also appeared on U.S. notes and certificates of various denominations from $1 to $500.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about Abraham Lincoln: David Herbert Donald, Lincoln — George Anastaplo, Abraham Lincoln : A Constitutional Biography — G. S. Boritt, ed., The Lincoln Enigma : The Changing Faces of an American Icon — Albert J. Beveridge, Abraham Lincoln 1809-1858 — Geoffrey Perret, Lincoln's War : The Untold Story of America's Greatest President as Commander in Chief — David Herbert Donald, We Are Lincoln Men : Abraham Lincoln and His Friends — Edward Steers, Jr., Blood on the Moon: The Assassination of Abraham Lincoln — Mario Cuomo, Why Lincoln Matters : Today More Than Ever — Michael W. Kauffman, American Brutus : John Wilkes Booth and the Lincoln Conspiracies — Doris Kearns Goodwin, Team of Rivals : The Political Genius of Abraham Lincoln — Joshua Wolf Shenk, Lincoln's Melancholy : How Depression Challenged a President and Fueled His Greatness — John Channing Briggs, Lincoln's Speeches Reconsidered — Ronald C. White, Jr., The Eloquent President : A Portrait of Lincoln Through His Words — Harold Holzer, Lincoln at Cooper Union : The Speech That Made Abraham Linco ln President — Michael Lind, What Lincoln Believed : The Values and Convictions of America's Greatest President — Doris Kearns Goodwin, Team of Rivals : The Political Genius of Abraham Lincoln — Michael Burlingame, ed., Abraham Lincoln: The Observations of John G. Nicolay and John Hay — Thomas J. Craughwell, Stealing Lincoln's Body — Roy Morris, Jr., The Long Pursuit: Abraham Lincoln's Thirty-Year Struggle with Stephen Douglas for the Heart and Soul of America — John Stauffer, Giants: The Parallel Lives of Frederick Douglass and Abraham Lincoln — Karen Judson, Abraham Lincoln (for young readers) — Maira Kalman, Looking at Lincoln (for young readers)
  Critical books about Abraham Lincoln: Thomas J. DiLorenzo, The Real Lincoln : A New Look at Abraham Lincoln, His Agenda, and an Unnecessary War
  Fiction about Abraham Lincoln: Gore Vidal, Lincoln: A Novel
  Image source: Portrait & Biographical Album of Washtenaw County (1891)
  Joseph Emerson Brown (1821-1894) — also known as Joseph E. Brown; Joe Brown — of Atlanta, Fulton County, Ga. Born in a log cabin in Pickens District (now Pickens County), S.C., April 15, 1821. Republican. Member of Georgia state senate, 1849; circuit judge in Georgia, 1855; Governor of Georgia, 1857-65; delegate to Republican National Convention from Georgia, 1868; chief justice of Georgia Supreme Court, 1868-70; U.S. Senator from Georgia, 1880-91. Died in Atlanta, Fulton County, Ga., November 30, 1894 (age 73 years, 229 days). Interment at Oakland Cemetery, Atlanta, Ga.
  Relatives: Father of Joseph Mackey Brown (1851-1932).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Freeborn Garretson Smith (c.1827-1911) — also known as Freeborn G. Smith — of Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y. Born in a log cabin, near Baltimore (unknown county), Md., about 1827. Piano manufacturing business; Prohibition candidate for U.S. Representative from New York, 1890 (3rd District), 1894 (2nd District); Prohibition candidate for mayor of Brooklyn, N.Y., 1891, 1895; Prohibition candidate for Presidential Elector for New York, 1896. Died in Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y., October 9, 1911 (age about 84 years). Interment at Green-Wood Cemetery, Brooklyn, N.Y.
  Presumably named for: Freeborn Garrettson
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
William B. Allison William Boyd Allison (1829-1908) — also known as William B. Allison — of Ashland, Ashland County, Ohio; Dubuque, Dubuque County, Iowa. Born in a log cabin in Perry, Wayne County, Ohio, March 2, 1829. Republican. Lawyer; delegate to Republican National Convention from Iowa, 1860, 1904; colonel in the Union Army during the Civil War; U.S. Representative from Iowa 3rd District, 1863-71; U.S. Senator from Iowa, 1873-1908; died in office 1908; candidate for Republican nomination for President, 1888, 1896. Died, from kidney disease and prostate enlargement, in Dubuque, Dubuque County, Iowa, August 4, 1908 (age 79 years, 155 days). Interment at Linwood Cemetery, Dubuque, Iowa.
  Relatives: Son of John Allison and Mary Allison; married 1854 to Anna Carter.
  Cross-reference: James R. Sheffield
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: American Monthly Review of Reviews, September 1908
  John Strong, Jr. (1830-1913) — also known as "Honest John" — of South Rockwood, Monroe County, Mich. Born, in a log cabin, in Greenfield Township (now part of Detroit), Wayne County, Mich., April 7, 1830. Democrat. Farmer; merchant; member of Michigan state house of representatives, 1861-62, 1879-80 (Wayne County 2nd District 1861-62, Monroe County 2nd District 1879-80); delegate to Democratic National Convention from Michigan, 1880 (alternate), 1892, 1912 (alternate); member of Michigan state senate 5th District, 1881-84; Lieutenant Governor of Michigan, 1891-92; Gold Democratic candidate for Presidential Elector for Michigan, 1896. Member, Freemasons. Founder of South Rockwood, Mich. Lost two fingers on his right hand in a sawmill accident. Died in South Rockwood, Monroe County, Mich., April 2, 1913 (age 82 years, 360 days). Interment at Riverside Cemetery, South Rockwood, Mich.
  Relatives: Son of John Strong, Sr.; nephew by marriage of Frederick Buhl and Christian Henry Buhl; uncle of John Strong Haggerty (1866-1950).
  Political family: Buhl-Strong family of Detroit, Michigan.
James A. Garfield James Abram Garfield (1831-1881) — also known as James A. Garfield — of Hiram, Portage County, Ohio. Born in a log cabin near Orange, Cuyahoga County, Ohio, November 19, 1831. Republican. Lawyer; college professor; president, Eclectic University (now Hiram College); member of Ohio state senate, 1859-61; general in the Union Army during the Civil War; U.S. Representative from Ohio 19th District, 1863-81; President of the United States, 1881; died in office 1881. Disciples of Christ. English ancestry. Member, Freemasons; Delta Upsilon. Shot by the assassin Charles J. Guiteau, in the Baltimore & Potomac Railroad Station, Washington, D.C., July 2, 1881, and died from the effects of the wound and infection, in Elberon, Monmouth County, N.J., September 19, 1881 (age 49 years, 304 days). Interment at Lake View Cemetery, Cleveland, Ohio; statue erected 1887 at Garfield Circle, Washington, D.C.; statue at Golden Gate Park, San Francisco, Calif.
  Relatives: Son of Abram Garfield (1799-1833) and Elizabeth (Ballou) Garfield (1801-1888); married, November 11, 1858, to Lucretia "Crete" Rudolph (1832-1918); father of James Rudolph Garfield; fourth cousin of Eli Thayer; fourth cousin once removed of John Alden Thayer (1857-1917).
  Political families: Conger-Hungerford family; Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Cross-reference: William S. Maynard
  Garfield counties in Colo., Mont., Neb., Okla., Utah and Wash. are named for him.
  Garfield Mountain, in the Cascade Range, King County, Washington, is named for him.  — The city of Garfield, New Jersey, is named for him.
  Politician named for him: James G. Stewart
  Coins and currency: His portrait appeared on the U.S. $20 gold certificate in 1898-1905.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Books about James A. Garfield: Allan Peskin, Garfield: A Biography — Justus D. Doenecke, The Presidencies of James A. Garfield and Chester A. Arthur
  Image source: James G. Blaine, Twenty Years of Congress, vol. 2 (1886)
Russell A. Alger Russell Alexander Alger (1836-1907) — also known as Russell A. Alger — of Detroit, Wayne County, Mich. Born in a log cabin, Lafayette Township, Medina County, Ohio, February 27, 1836. Republican. Lawyer; general in the Union Army during the Civil War; lumber business; delegate to Republican National Convention from Michigan, 1884, 1896; Governor of Michigan, 1885-86; candidate for Republican nomination for President, 1888; Presidential Elector for Michigan, 1888; U.S. Secretary of War, 1897-99; U.S. Senator from Michigan, 1902-07; appointed 1902; died in office 1907. Member, Freemasons; Grand Army of the Republic; Sons of the American Revolution; Loyal Legion. Died in Washington, D.C., January 24, 1907 (age 70 years, 331 days). Entombed at Elmwood Cemetery, Detroit, Mich.
  Relatives: Son of Russell Alger (died 1849) and Caroline (Moulton) Alger (1809-1848); brother of Charles Moulton Alger; married, April 2, 1861, to Annette H. Henry (1840-1919); father of Frederick Moulton Alger (1876-1933) (who married Mary Eldridge Swift); grandfather of Frederick Moulton Alger, Jr..
  Political family: Alger family of Detroit, Michigan.
  Alger County, Mich. is named for him.
  The village of Alger, Ohio, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: Portrait & Biographical Album of Washtenaw County (1891)
  David Augustus Boody (1837-1930) — also known as David A. Boody; "Grand Old Man of Brooklyn"; "Grand Old Man of Wall Street" — of Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y. Born, in a log cabin built by his father, in Jackson, Waldo County, Maine, August 13, 1837. Democrat. Lawyer; banker; stockbroker; delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1888; U.S. Representative from New York 2nd District, 1891; defeated (Independent Democratic), 1882; resigned 1891; mayor of Brooklyn, N.Y., 1892-93; defeated, 1893. Presbyterian. Died in Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y., January 20, 1930 (age 92 years, 160 days). Interment at Green-Wood Cemetery, Brooklyn, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of David Boody and Lucretia Boody; married to Alice H. Treat.
  David A. Boody Junior High School, in Brooklyn, New York, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  William Henry Harrison Beadle (1838-1915) — also known as William H. H. Beadle — of Madison, Lake County, S.Dak. Born, in a log cabin at Howard, Parke County, Ind., January 1, 1838. Republican. Colonel in the Union Army during the Civil War; lawyer; member of Republican National Committee from Dakota Territory, 1872-; member of Dakota territorial House of Representatives, 1877-79; Dakota Territory superintendent of public instruction, 1879-86; president, Madison State Normal School (now Dakota State University), 1889-1906. Member, Freemasons. Died in San Francisco, Calif., November 15, 1915 (age 77 years, 318 days). Interment at Riverside Cemetery, Albion, Mich.
  Presumably named for: William Henry Harrison
  Relatives: Son of James Ward Beadle and Elizabeth (Bright) Beadle; married, May 18, 1863, to Ellen S. (Rich) Chapman.
  Beadle County, S.Dak. is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article
  Isaac Charles Parker (1838-1896) — also known as Isaac C. Parker; "Hanging Judge" — of St. Joseph, Buchanan County, Mo. Born in a log cabin near Barnesville, Belmont County, Ohio, October 15, 1838. Republican. Lawyer; served in the Union Army during the Civil War; Presidential Elector for Missouri, 1864; circuit judge in Missouri, 1868-70; U.S. Representative from Missouri, 1871-75 (7th District 1871-73, 9th District 1873-75); U.S. District Judge for the Western District of Arkansas, 1875-96. As judge, sentenced more than 160 people to death, of whom 79 were hanged. Died in Fort Smith, Sebastian County, Ark., November 17, 1896 (age 58 years, 33 days). Interment at Fort Smith National Cemetery, Fort Smith, Ark.
  Relatives: Son of Joseph Parker (1809-1878) and Jane (Shannon) Parker (1809-1870); married to Mary O'Toole (1839-1926); grandnephew of George F. Shannon, Thomas Shannon, James Shannon (1791?-1832) and Wilson Shannon.
  Political family: Shannon-Shelby family.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about Isaac C. Parker: Roger H. Tuller, Let No Guilty Man Escape : A Judicial Biography of 'Hanging Judge' Isaac C. Parker
  Freeman Webb Allison (1845-1929) — also known as Freeman W. Allison — of Putnam Township, Livingston County, Mich. Born in a log house, in Putnam Township, Livingston County, Mich., April 24, 1845. Democrat. School teacher; farmer; member of Michigan state house of representatives from Livingston County, 1897-98; defeated, 1898. Member, Freemasons. Fell from a load of hay, and died as a result, in Putnam Township, Livingston County, Mich., August 3, 1929 (age 84 years, 101 days). Interment at Lakeview Cemetery, Howell, Mich.
  Relatives: Son of Timothy Allison and Ann (Carr) Allison; married 1870 to Martha 'Mattie' Benedict (1843-1924); married 1925 to Ann Meade.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Charles Eugene Otis (1846-1917) — also known as Charles E. Otis — of St. Paul, Ramsey County, Minn. Born, in a log cabin, Prairieville, Barry County, Mich., May 11, 1846. Democrat. District judge in Minnesota 2nd District, 1889-1902; candidate for justice of Minnesota state supreme court, 1904. Died November 26, 1917 (age 71 years, 199 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Isaac Otis (1798-1853) and Caroline Abigail (Curtiss) Otis; brother of George Lorenzo Otis; married to Elizabeth Noyes Ransom (niece of Epaphroditus Ransom); first cousin once removed of Harris F. Otis (1816-1861); second cousin of John Grant Otis; second cousin thrice removed of Samuel Allyne Otis; third cousin once removed of John Otis; third cousin twice removed of Harrison Gray Otis.
  Political family: Otis family of Connecticut (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
Albert B. Cummins Albert Baird Cummins (1850-1926) — also known as Albert B. Cummins — of Des Moines, Polk County, Iowa. Born, in a log house, near Carmichaels, Greene County, Pa., February 15, 1850. Republican. Lawyer; member of Iowa state house of representatives, 1888; member of Republican National Committee from Iowa, 1896-1900; delegate to Republican National Convention from Iowa, 1896, 1904, 1924; Governor of Iowa, 1902-08; U.S. Senator from Iowa, 1908-26; died in office 1926; candidate for Republican nomination for President, 1912, 1916. Congregationalist. Died of a heart attack, in Des Moines, Polk County, Iowa, July 30, 1926 (age 76 years, 165 days). Interment at Woodland Cemetery, Des Moines, Iowa.
  Relatives: Son of Thomas Layton Cummins and Sarah (Baird) Cummins; married, June 24, 1874, to Ida Lucette Gallery.
  The World War II Liberty ship SS Albert B. Cummins (built 1943, scrapped 1961) was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: American Monthly Review of Reviews, September 1901
  Alva Adams (1850-1922) — of Pueblo, Pueblo County, Colo. Born in a log cabin in Iowa County, Wis., May 14, 1850. Democrat. Hardware merchant; member of Colorado state legislature, 1876; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Colorado, 1880 (Convention Vice-President); Governor of Colorado, 1887-89, 1897-99, 1905; member of Democratic National Committee from Colorado, 1908-. Member, Freemasons. Died at a sanitarium in Battle Creek, Calhoun County, Mich., November 1, 1922 (age 72 years, 171 days). Interment at Roselawn Cemetery, Pueblo, Colo.
  Relatives: Son of John Adams and Eliza (Blanchard) Adams (1832-1911); brother of William Herbert Adams (1861-1954); married to Ella Charlotte Nye (1851-1931); father of Alva Blanchard Adams; uncle of Harry Wilfred Adams; grandfather of Alva Blanchard Adams, Jr..
  Political family: Adams family of Pueblo, Colorado.
  Adams County, Colo. is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Christian Gallmeyer (1850-1932) — of Grand Rapids, Kent County, Mich. Born in a log cabin in Adams County, Ind., October 4, 1850. Manufacturer; mayor of Grand Rapids, Mich., 1918-20. Died December 2, 1932 (age 82 years, 59 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Ernst Gallmeyer and Sophia (Reinking) Gallmeyer; married 1877 to Elizabeth Lisette Hilsman.
  James Stephen Hogg (1851-1906) — also known as Jim Hogg — of Wood County, Tex. Born in a log cabin, near Rusk, Cherokee County, Tex., March 24, 1851. Democrat. Wood County Attorney, 1878-80; District Attorney, 7th District, 1880-84; Texas state attorney general, 1886-90; Governor of Texas, 1891-95. Died March 3, 1906 (age 54 years, 344 days). Interment at Oakwood Cemetery, Austin, Tex.
  Relatives: Father of Ima Hogg (philanthropist and social figure).
  Jim Hogg County, Tex. is named for him.
  John Montgomery Garman (1851-1926) — also known as John M. Garman — of Tunkhannock, Wyoming County, Pa.; Nanticoke, Luzerne County, Pa.; Wilkes-Barre, Luzerne County, Pa. Born in a log house near Thompsontown, Juniata County, Pa., September 1, 1851. Democrat. School principal; superintendent of schools; Luzerne County District Attorney, 1892-94; Pennsylvania Democratic state chair, 1896-99; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Pennsylvania, 1896, 1900, 1904, 1908; common pleas court judge in Pennsylvania, 1910-26. German and Scotch-Irish ancestry. Member, Freemasons. Died in Wilkes-Barre, Luzerne County, Pa., November 25, 1926 (age 75 years, 85 days). Interment at Sunnyside Cemetery, Tunkhannock, Pa.
  Relatives: Son of John Levi Garman (1818-1866) and Margaret Garman (1822-1898); married, October 25, 1882, to Nellie Mitchell Carver (1862-1935).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
Charles W. Fairbanks Charles Warren Fairbanks (1852-1918) — also known as Charles W. Fairbanks — of Indianapolis, Marion County, Ind. Born in a log cabin near Unionville Center, Union County, Ohio, May 11, 1852. Republican. Lawyer; delegate to Republican National Convention from Indiana, 1896 (Temporary Chair; speaker; chair, Committee to Notify Vice-Presidential Nominee), 1900, 1904, 1912; U.S. Senator from Indiana, 1897-1905; resigned 1905; Vice President of the United States, 1905-09; defeated, 1916; candidate for Republican nomination for President, 1908, 1916. Died in Indianapolis, Marion County, Ind., June 4, 1918 (age 66 years, 24 days). Interment at Crown Hill Cemetery, Indianapolis, Ind.
  Relatives: Son of Loriston Monroe Fairbanks and Mary Adelaide de Forest (Smith) Fairbanks; brother of Newton Hamilton Fairbanks; married 1874 to Cornelia Cole (daughter of Philander B. Cole); first cousin once removed of Merton William Fairbank; third cousin once removed of Isaac Davis; third cousin twice removed of Leone Fairbanks Burrell and Douglas Stanley Fairbanks; fourth cousin of Edward Livingston Davis, Wilson Henry Fairbank, John Barnard Fairbank and Alexander Warren Fairbank; fourth cousin once removed of Livingston Davis; relative *** of Earl Fairbanks (1860-?).
  Political family: Davis family (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Image source: Moore's Hoosier Cyclopedia (1905)
  Woodbridge Nathan Ferris (1853-1928) — also known as Woodbridge N. Ferris; "The Big Rapids Schoolmaster"; "The Good Grey Governor" — of Big Rapids, Mecosta County, Mich. Born in a log cabin near Spencer, Tioga County, N.Y., January 6, 1853. Democrat. Superintendent of schools; founder and president, Ferris Institute, later Ferris State University; candidate for U.S. Representative from Michigan 11th District, 1892; candidate for Michigan superintendent of public instruction, 1902; candidate for University of Michigan board of regents, 1907; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Michigan, 1912 (Honorary Vice-President), 1916, 1924; Governor of Michigan, 1913-16; defeated, 1904, 1920; president, Big Rapids Savings Bank; U.S. Senator from Michigan, 1923-28; died in office 1928; candidate for Democratic nomination for President, 1924. Died, of bronchial pneumonia, in Washington, D.C., March 23, 1928 (age 75 years, 77 days). Interment at Highland View Cemetery, Big Rapids, Mich.
  Relatives: Son of John Ferris, Jr. and Estella (Reed) Ferris; married 1874 to Helen Frances Gillespie (1853-1917); married 1921 to Mary Ethel McCloud (1890?-?).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Lucas Lugers (1853-1927) — also known as Luke Lugers — of Holland, Ottawa County, Mich. Born in a log house, Laketown Township, Allegan County, Mich., February 2, 1853. Republican. Lumber business; member of Michigan state house of representatives from Ottawa County 1st District, 1899-1902; member of Michigan state senate 23rd District, 1907-08. Christian Reformed. Dutch ancestry. Died, of prostate cancer, in Holland, Ottawa County, Mich., December 25, 1927 (age 74 years, 326 days). Interment at Graafschap Cemetery, Holland, Mich.
  Relatives: Son of Benjamin Lugers and Henrietta (Brinkman) Lugers; married to Lucretia A. Ellenbaas.
John W. Boehne John William Boehne, Sr. (1856-1946) — also known as John W. Boehne — of Evansville, Vanderburgh County, Ind. Born in a log cabin in Scott Township, Vanderburgh County, Ind., October 28, 1856. Democrat. General Manager, Indiana Stove Works; mayor of Evansville, Ind., 1906-09; defeated, 1901; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Indiana, 1908; U.S. Representative from Indiana 1st District, 1909-13. Lutheran. Died in Evansville, Vanderburgh County, Ind., December 27, 1946 (age 90 years, 60 days). Interment at Lutheran Cemetery, Evansville, Ind.
  Relatives: Son of Gerhard H. Boehne and Elizabeth Boehne; married, November 26, 1885, to Emilie Ide; father of John William Boehne, Jr. (1895-1973).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Image source: City of Evansville
  John Gaston Grant (1858-1923) — also known as John G. Grant; "Cornbread John" — of Hendersonville, Henderson County, N.C. Born, in a log cabin, in Edneyville Township, Henderson County, N.C., January 1, 1858. Republican. Member of North Carolina state house of representatives, 1889; Henderson County Sheriff, 1892-96; U.S. Representative from North Carolina 10th District, 1909-11. Died in Hendersonville, Henderson County, N.C., June 21, 1923 (age 65 years, 171 days). Interment at Oakdale Cemetery, Hendersonville, N.C.
  Relatives: Son of William Colin Grant and Sarah Elizabeth (Freeman) Grant.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Louis William Fairfield (1858-1930) — also known as Louis W. Fairfield — of Angola, Steuben County, Ind. Born in a log cabin near Wapakoneta, Auglaize County, Ohio, October 15, 1858. Republican. Newspaper editor; college teacher; candidate for Indiana state senate, 1912; U.S. Representative from Indiana 12th District, 1917-25. Died in Joliet, Will County, Ill., February 20, 1930 (age 71 years, 128 days). Interment at Circle Hill Cemetery, Angola, Ind.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
Chase S. Osborn Chase Salmon Osborn (1860-1949) — also known as Chase S. Osborn — of Sault Ste. Marie, Chippewa County, Mich. Born in a log house in Huntington County, Ind., January 22, 1860. Republican. Newspaper publisher; postmaster at Sault Ste. Marie, Mich., 1889-93; member of Michigan Republican State Executive Committee, 1899; member of Michigan Republican State Central Committee, 1899; member of University of Michigan board of regents, 1908-11; appointed 1908; delegate to Republican National Convention from Michigan, 1908; Governor of Michigan, 1911-12; defeated, 1914; candidate in primary for U.S. Senator from Michigan, 1918, 1930; candidate for Republican nomination for Vice President, 1928; candidate for Presidential Elector for Michigan, 1936. Presbyterian. English, French, and Irish ancestry. Member, Kiwanis; Lions; Knights of Pythias; Audubon Society; National Rifle Association; Sigma Chi; Sigma Delta Chi; Pi Gamma Mu; Sons of the American Revolution; Elks; Freemasons; Odd Fellows; Grange. Died April 11, 1949 (age 89 years, 79 days). Interment a private or family graveyard, Chippewa County, Mich.
  Presumably named for: Salmon P. Chase
  Relatives: Son of George A. Osborn and Margaret (Fannon) Osborn; married, May 7, 1881, to Lillian G. Jones.
  Image source: Michigan Manual 1911
  Charles Curtis (1860-1936) — also known as "Square Shooter"; "The Whisperer" — of Topeka, Shawnee County, Kan. Born in a log cabin at Eugene (now part of Topeka), Shawnee County, Kan., January 25, 1860; his mother was one-quarter blood Kansa/Osage Indian. Republican. Lawyer; Shawnee County Prosecuting Attorney, 1884-88; U.S. Representative from Kansas, 1893-1907 (4th District 1893-99, 1st District 1899-1907); resigned 1907; U.S. Senator from Kansas, 1907-13, 1915-29; delegate to Republican National Convention from Kansas, 1908; candidate for Republican nomination for President, 1924, 1928; Vice President of the United States, 1929-33; defeated, 1932. Protestant. English, French, and Kansa/Osage Indian ancestry. Died of a heart attack, in Washington, D.C., February 8, 1936 (age 76 years, 14 days). Interment at Topeka Cemetery, Topeka, Kan.
  Relatives: Son of Oren A. Curtis and Helen (Pappan) Curtis; married, November 27, 1884, to Annie E. Baird (1861-1924); father of Leona Curtis Knight (1888?-?); third great-grandson of "White Hair" Pawhuska (Great Osage chief for whom Pawhuska, Okla. is named).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile
  Joseph Ellis Blackburn (1860-1928) — also known as Joseph E. Blackburn — of Columbus, Franklin County, Ohio. Born in a log cabin in Farmington, Belmont County, Ohio, June 30, 1860. Republican. Glass mold maker; organizer, president, and secretary, mold-maker's union; druggist; member of Ohio state house of representatives, 1895; Ohio dairy and food commissioner, 1897-1901. Died in Springfield, Clark County, Ohio, 1928 (age about 68 years). Interment at Masonic Home Cemetery, Springfield, Ohio.
  Relatives: Married 1880 to Dora C. Harkin (1858-1937).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  John Albert Johnson (1861-1909) — also known as Albert Johnson — of St. Peter, Nicollet County, Minn. Born in a log cabin, near St. Peter, Nicollet County, Minn., July 28, 1861. Democrat. Candidate for Minnesota state house of representatives District 17, 1888; member of Minnesota state senate 20th District, 1899-1902; Governor of Minnesota, 1905-09; died in office 1909; candidate for Democratic nomination for President, 1908. Presbyterian. Swedish ancestry. Member, Elks; Woodmen. Died in Rochester, Olmsted County, Minn., September 20, 1909 (age 48 years, 54 days). Interment at Greenhill Cemetery, St. Peter, Minn.; statue at State Capitol Grounds, St. Paul, Minn.; statue at Nicollet County Courthouse Grounds, St. Peter, Minn.
  See also Wikipedia article — Minnesota Legislator record
  James Carson Needham (1864-1942) — also known as James C. Needham — of Modesto, Stanislaus County, Calif.; San Diego, San Diego County, Calif. Born, in an covered wagon en route to California, at Carson City, Nev., September 17, 1864. Republican. Lawyer; candidate for California state senate, 1890; U.S. Representative from California, 1899-1913 (7th District 1899-1903, 6th District 1903-13); superior court judge in California, 1919-34. Member, Phi Kappa Psi. Died in Modesto, Stanislaus County, Calif., July 11, 1942 (age 77 years, 297 days). Interment at Masonic Cemetery, Modesto, Calif.
  Relatives: Son of Charles E. Needham and Olive L. (Drake) Needham; married, July 1, 1894, to Dora Deetta Parsons.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Nicholas Egbert Knight (b. 1866) — also known as N. E. Knight — of Castlewood, Hamlin County, S.Dak.; Thomas, Hamlin County, S.Dak. Born in a log house, Eau Claire County, Wis., October 15, 1866. Republican. Member of South Dakota state house of representatives, 1913-16, 1931-32 (30th District 1913-16, 28th District 1931-32); South Dakota commissioner of school and public lands, 1917-25. Methodist. Member, Elks. Burial location unknown.
  See also Wikipedia article
  Frederick H. Rollins (b. 1867) — of Winona County, Minn. Born in a log cabin near Caledonia, Houston County, Minn., September 30, 1867. Physician; served in the U.S. Army during World War I; member of Minnesota state senate 2nd District; elected 1930; defeated, 1934. Burial location unknown.
  Agnes Mason Giddings (1867-1927) — also known as Agnes Giddings; Agnes Eurelia Mason; Mrs. E. C. Giddings; "Famous Feminist" — of Fort Collins, Larimer County, Colo. Born in a log cabin, in Fort Collins, Larimer County, Colo., October 31, 1867; she was the first pioneer child born at Fort Collins, and the cabin is preserved at the Fort Collins Historical Museum. Republican. Alternate delegate to Republican National Convention from Colorado, 1924; Presidential Elector for Colorado, 1924. Female. Member, Order of the Eastern Star. Died, from a paralytic stroke, in Fort Collins, Larimer County, Colo., June 18, 1927 (age 59 years, 230 days). Interment at Grandview Cemetery, Fort Collins, Colo.
  Relatives: Daughter of Augustine Mason and Charlotte Mason; married, December 25, 1888, to Edwin Chester 'Chet' Giddings.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  James Robert Barkley (1869-1948) — of Iowa. Born in a log cabin in Davis County, Iowa, February 13, 1869. Lawyer; member of Iowa state senate 3rd District, 1945-47. Presbyterian. Member, Freemasons; Woodmen; Odd Fellows. Died in Iowa Methodist Hospital, Des Moines, Polk County, Iowa, July 26, 1948 (age 79 years, 164 days). Interment at Oakland Cemetery, Moulton, Iowa.
  Booker Dalton (1869-1948) — of Stuart, Patrick County, Va. Born, in a log house, in Patrick County, Va., December 13, 1869. Farmer; District Commissioner of Revenue, 1910-12, 1923-26; member of Virginia state house of delegates from Patrick County, 1914-15; Patrick County Commissioner of Revenue, 1927-39. Primitive Baptist. Lost one eye in an accident. Died, from a stroke, in Stuart, Patrick County, Va., December 13, 1948 (age 79 years, 0 days). Interment at Stuart Cemetery, Stuart, Va.
  Relatives: Son of Willis Dalton (1836-1909) and Lucy Ann (Howell) Dalton (1844-1916); married, February 14, 1894, to Lilla Susan Shockley (1875-1970); father of Grady W. Dalton (1908-1986).
  William Barbour Pedigo (1870-1932) — also known as W. B. Pedigo; "Bill Bob" — of Patrick County, Va.; Parkersburg, Wood County, W.Va.; Wausau, Marathon County, Wis. Born, in a log cabin, at Elamsville, Patrick County, Va., January 28, 1870. Republican. Lawyer; Patrick County Commonwealth Attorney, 1895-99; candidate in primary for West Virginia state house of delegates, 1906; mayor of Parkersburg, W.Va., 1907-11. Baptist. French ancestry. Died, of tuberculosis, in Tampa, Hillsborough County, Fla., October 23, 1932 (age 62 years, 269 days). Interment at Myrtle Hill Memorial Park, Tampa, Fla.
  Andrew L. Moore (1870-1935) — of Pontiac, Oakland County, Mich. Born in a log house in West Bloomfield Township, Oakland County, Mich., October 28, 1870. Republican. Lawyer; delegate to Michigan state constitutional convention 12th District, 1907-08; member of Michigan state senate 12th District, 1933-35; died in office 1935. Member, Knights of Pythias; Odd Fellows; Maccabees. Died December 2, 1935 (age 65 years, 35 days). Burial location unknown.
Cordell Hull Cordell Hull (1871-1955) — also known as "Father of the United Nations" — of Carthage, Smith County, Tenn. Born in a log cabin at Olympus, Overton County (now Pickett County), Tenn., October 2, 1871. Democrat. Lawyer; member of Tennessee state house of representatives, 1893-97; served in the U.S. Army during the Spanish-American War; circuit judge in Tennessee, 1903-07; U.S. Representative from Tennessee 4th District, 1907-21, 1923-31; defeated, 1920; member of Democratic National Committee from Tennessee, 1914-24; Chairman of Democratic National Committee, 1921-24; candidate for Democratic nomination for President, 1928, 1940, 1944; U.S. Senator from Tennessee, 1931-33; U.S. Secretary of State, 1933-44; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Tennessee, 1936. Baptist; later Episcopalian. Received the Nobel Peace Prize in 1945. Died, of heart disease and tuberculosis, at Bethesda Naval Hospital, Bethesda, Montgomery County, Md., July 23, 1955 (age 83 years, 294 days). Entombed at Washington National Cathedral, Washington, D.C.
  Relatives: Son of William Hull and Elizabeth (Riley) Hull.
  Cross-reference: Thomas K. Finletter
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books by Cordell Hull: The Memoirs of Cordell Hull
  Books about Cordell Hull: Julius William Pratt, Cordell Hull, 1933-44
  Image source: U.S. postage stamp (1963)
Dora H. Stockman Dora Hall Stockman (1872-1948) — also known as Dora H. Stockman; Dora Hall; Dora Weinkauf — of Lansing, Ingham County, Mich.; East Lansing, Ingham County, Mich. Born in a log cabin at Marilla, Manistee County, Mich., August 4, 1872. Republican. School teacher; Lecturer of the Michigan State Grange, and editor of the Grange paper, the Michigan Patron; songwriter; member of Michigan state board of agriculture, 1920-31; Dry candidate for delegate to Michigan convention to ratify 21st amendment from Ingham County 2nd District, 1933; member of Michigan state house of representatives from Ingham County 2nd District, 1939-46. Female. Member, Grange; Women's Christian Temperance Union. First woman to hold statewide elective office in Michigan. Died in California, 1948 (age about 75 years). Interment at Hurd Cemetery, DeWitt Township, Clinton County, Mich.
  Relatives: Daughter of Leander Hall and Lucy Jane (Bennet) Hall; married, August 8, 1889, to Francis M. Stockman (died 1932); married 1947 to Gustof Weinkauf.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: Michigan Manual 1927
T. C. Townsend Thomas Chasteene Townsend (1877-1949) — also known as T. C. Townsend — of Charleston, Kanawha County, W.Va. Born in a log cabin overlooking the New River, in Mountain Cove, Fayette County, W.Va., August 14, 1877. Republican. Lawyer; West Virginia state tax commissioner, 1908-11, 1929-35; Kanawha County Prosecuting Attorney, 1913-17; candidate for Governor of West Virginia, 1932; delegate to Republican National Convention from West Virginia, 1936 (member, Committee on Rules and Order of Business), 1940, 1944. Died in Charleston, Kanawha County, W.Va., November 5, 1949 (age 72 years, 83 days). Cremated.
  Relatives: Son of Benjamin Mason Townsend and Julia (Rule) Townsend; married 1901 to Annie Burdette.
  Image source: West Virginia Blue Book 1929
Alben W. Barkley Alben William Barkley (1877-1956) — also known as Alben W. Barkley; Willie Alben Barkley; "Dear Alben"; "Little Alby"; "Veep" — of Paducah, McCracken County, Ky. Born in a log cabin near Lowes, Graves County, Ky., November 24, 1877. Democrat. Lawyer; McCracken County Prosecuting Attorney, 1906-09; county judge in Kentucky, 1909-13; U.S. Representative from Kentucky 1st District, 1913-27; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Kentucky, 1920, 1924, 1928, 1932, 1936, 1940, 1944 (speaker), 1948 (Temporary Chair; chair, Committee to Notify Vice-Presidential Nominee), 1952; candidate in primary for Governor of Kentucky, 1923; U.S. Senator from Kentucky, 1927-49, 1955-56; died in office 1956; candidate for Democratic nomination for Vice President, 1944; Vice President of the United States, 1949-53. Methodist. Member, Delta Tau Delta; Phi Alpha Delta; Odd Fellows; Elks. Died of a heart attack while speaking at the Washington and Lee University Mock Democratic Convention, Lexington, Va., April 30, 1956 (age 78 years, 158 days). Interment at Mt. Kenton Cemetery, Near Paducah, McCracken County, Ky.
  Relatives: Son of John Wilson Barkley and Electra Eliza (Smith) Barkley; married, June 23, 1903, to Dorothy Brower (died 1947); married, November 18, 1949, to Jane Hadley; father of Laura Louise Barkley (who married Douglas MacArthur II (1909-1997)).
  Political families: MacArthur family of Pennsylvania; Dodge-Duke-Cromwell family of Detroit, Michigan (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  C. V. Whitney's thoroughbread racehorse "The Veep" (born 1948), was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about Alben W. Barkley: Polly Ann Davis, Alben W. Barkley, Senate Majority Leader and Vice President — James K. Libbey, Dear Alben : Mr. Barkley of Kentucky
  Image source: Truman Library
  Melvin Alvah Traylor (1878-1934) — also known as Melvin A. Traylor — of Malone, Hill County, Tex.; Ballinger, Runnels County, Tex.; East St. Louis, St. Clair County, Ill.; Chicago, Cook County, Ill. Born, in a log cabin near Breeding, Adair County, Ky., October 21, 1878. Democrat. Lawyer; banker; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Illinois, 1928, 1932; candidate for Democratic nomination for President, 1932. Died, of pneumonia, in Chicago, Cook County, Ill., February 14, 1934 (age 55 years, 116 days). Interment at Rosehill Cemetery, Chicago, Ill.
  Relatives: Son of James Milton Traylor and Kitty (Harvey) Traylor; married to Dorothy Arnold Yerby.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Edward Martin (1879-1967) — also known as Ed Martin — of Washington, Washington County, Pa. Born in a log cabin, Ten Mile, Washington Township, Greene County, Pa., September 18, 1879. Republican. Served in the U.S. Army during the Spanish-American War; lawyer; colonel in the U.S. Army during World War I; president, Dunn Mar Oil and Gas Company; president, Consumers Fuel Company; director, Citizens National Bank; director, Washington County Fire Insurance Co.; Pennsylvania state auditor general, 1925-29; Pennsylvania Republican state chair, 1928-34; Pennsylvania state treasurer, 1929-33; delegate to Republican National Convention from Pennsylvania, 1932, 1936, 1940 (member, Credentials Committee), 1944, 1948, 1952 (speaker), 1956, 1960; candidate for Republican nomination for Vice President, 1932; Adjutant General of Pennsylvania, 1939-43; general in the U.S. Army during World War II; Governor of Pennsylvania, 1943-47; U.S. Senator from Pennsylvania, 1947-59. Presbyterian. Member, Veterans of Foreign Wars; American Legion; Freemasons; Elks. Died in Washington, Washington County, Pa., March 19, 1967 (age 87 years, 182 days). Interment at Green Mount Cemetery, Waynesburg, Pa.
  Relatives: Son of Joseph T. Martin and Hannah M. (Bristor) Martin; married, December 1, 1909, to Charity Scott.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — NNDB dossier
  James Everett Sanders (1882-1950) — also known as Everett Sanders — of Terre Haute, Vigo County, Ind. Born in a log cabin near Coalmont, Clay County, Ind., March 8, 1882. Republican. School teacher; lawyer; U.S. Representative from Indiana 5th District, 1917-25; secretary to President Calvin Coolidge, 1925-29; Chairman of Republican National Committee, 1932-34. Baptist. Member, Elks. Died, from a heart ailment, in his law office, in Washington, D.C., May 12, 1950 (age 68 years, 65 days). Interment at Highland Lawn Cemetery, Terre Haute, Ind.
  Relatives: Son of James Sanders and Melissa Everal (Stark) Sanders; married, December 13, 1903, to Ella Neal; married to Hilda Sims.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — NNDB dossier
  Oscar Kelly Allen (1882-1936) — also known as O. K. Allen — of Louisiana. Born in a log cabin in Winn Parish, La., August 8, 1882. Democrat. School teacher; member of Louisiana state senate, 1920; Governor of Louisiana, 1932-36; died in office 1936. Baptist. Member, Freemasons. Died, from a cerebral hemorrhage, in the Louisiana Governor's mansion, Baton Rouge, East Baton Rouge Parish, La., January 28, 1936 (age 53 years, 173 days). Interment at Winnfield Cemetery, Winnfield, La.
  Relatives: Son of Asa Levi Allen and Sophronia (Perkins) Allen; brother of Asa Leonard Allen (1891-1969); married, December 4, 1912, to Florence Scott Love (1894-1938).
  Cross-reference: Richard W. Leche
  The Huey P. Long - O.K. Allen Bridge (opened 1940), which carries U.S. Highway 190 and a rail line over the Mississippi River, between East Baton Rouge Parish and West Baton Rouge Parish, Louisiana, is partly named for him.
  Epitaph: "A friend to man, a follower of God, great builder, courageous leader, humble in life, exalted in death."
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  George Shannon Long (1883-1958) — also known as George S. Long — of Oklahoma; Monroe, Ouachita Parish, La.; Pineville, Rapides Parish, La. Born in a log cabin, Tunica, Winn Parish, La., September 11, 1883. Democrat. Dentist; lawyer; member of Oklahoma state house of representatives, 1920-22; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Louisiana, 1948; U.S. Representative from Louisiana 8th District, 1953-58; died in office 1958. Member, Freemasons. Died in the Bethesda Naval Hospital, Bethesda, Montgomery County, Md., March 22, 1958 (age 74 years, 192 days). Interment at Greenwood Memorial Park, Pineville, La.
  Relatives: Son of Hugh Pierce Long (1852-1937) and Caledonia Palestine (Tison) Long (1860-1913); brother of Huey Pierce Long (who married Rose McConnell) and Earl Kemp Long (1895-1960) (who married Blanche B. Revere); uncle of Russell Billiu Long; second cousin once removed of Gillis William Long and Speedy Oteria Long.
  Political family: Long family of Louisiana.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  Edward Wester Creal (1883-1943) — also known as Edward W. Creal — of Hodgenville, Larue County, Ky. Born in a log house near Mt. Sherman, Larue County, Ky., November 20, 1883. Democrat. U.S. Representative from Kentucky 4th District, 1935-43; died in office 1943. Died in Hodgenville, Larue County, Ky., October 13, 1943 (age 59 years, 327 days). Interment at Red Hill Cemetery, Hodgenville, Ky.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
Eugene C. Pulliam Eugene Collins Pulliam (1889-1975) — also known as Eugene C. Pulliam — of Indianapolis, Marion County, Ind. Born, in a sod dugout, in Grant County, Kan., May 3, 1889. Republican. Newspaper editor and publisher; director, New York Central Railroad; delegate to Republican National Convention from Indiana, 1952 (speaker), 1956. Methodist. Member, Sigma Delta Chi; Delta Kappa Epsilon; Freemasons; Elks; Rotary. Died in Phoenix, Maricopa County, Ariz., June 23, 1975 (age 86 years, 51 days). Interment at Oak Hill Cemetery, Lebanon, Ind.
  Relatives: Son of Rev. Irvin Brown Pulliam (1859-1946) and Martha Ellen (Collins) Pulliam (1860-1932); married 1912 to Myrta Smith (1887-1917); married 1919 to Martha Ott (1891-1991; divorced 1941); married 1941 to Nina G. Mason (1906-1997); grandfather of James Danforth Quayle (1947-).
  Political family: Quayle-Pulliam family of Indianapolis, Indiana.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: The Arizona Republic, August 31, 2011
  Brazilla Carroll Reece (1889-1961) — also known as B. Carroll Reece — of Butler, Johnson County, Tenn.; Johnson City, Washington County, Tenn. Born in a log cabin near Butler, Johnson County, Tenn., December 22, 1889. Republican. School teacher; served in the U.S. Army during World War I; lawyer; banker; U.S. Representative from Tennessee 1st District, 1921-31, 1933-47, 1951-61; died in office 1961; delegate to Republican National Convention from Tennessee, 1932, 1936, 1944, 1948 (speaker), 1956, 1960; member of Republican National Committee from Tennessee, 1939-40; Chairman of Republican National Committee, 1946-48; candidate for U.S. Senator from Tennessee, 1948; Tennessee Republican state chair, 1958. Baptist. Member, American Bar Association; American Economic Association; American Statistical Association; American Academy of Political and Social Science; Delta Sigma Pi; Freemasons; Shriners. Died, in Bethesda Naval Hospital, Bethesda, Montgomery County, Md., March 19, 1961 (age 71 years, 87 days). Interment at Monte Vista Memorial Park, Johnson City, Tenn.
  Relatives: Son of John Isaac Reece and Sarah E. (Maples) Reece; married, October 30, 1923, to Louise Goff (1898-1970) (daughter of Guy Despard Goff).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  Asa Leonard Allen (1891-1969) — also known as A. Leonard Allen — of Winnfield, Winn Parish, La. Born in a log cabin near Winnfield, Winn Parish, La., January 5, 1891. Democrat. Superintendent of schools; lawyer; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Louisiana, 1936; U.S. Representative from Louisiana 8th District, 1937-53. Baptist. Member, Freemasons; Royal Arch Masons; Scottish Rite Masons; Order of the Eastern Star; Shriners; Knights of Pythias. Died January 5, 1969 (age 78 years, 0 days). Interment at Winnfield Cemetery, Winnfield, La.
  Relatives: Son of Asa Levi Allen and Sophronia (Perkins) Allen; brother of Oscar Kelly Allen (1882-1936); married, August 25, 1915, to Lottie Mae Thompson.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Clarence A. Reid (1892-1978) — of Detroit, Wayne County, Mich. Born in a log cabin, Saltcreek Township, Pickaway County, Ohio, December 11, 1892. Republican. Served in the U.S. Army during World War I; lawyer; candidate in primary for U.S. Representative from Michigan 15th District, 1932; member of Michigan state senate 18th District, 1941-48, 1951-52; defeated, 1934, 1938, 1948; Lieutenant Governor of Michigan, 1953-54; defeated, 1954, 1956, 1960, 1962. Member, Freemasons; Lions; Eagles; Elks; Forty and Eight; American Legion; American Bar Association. Died in 1978 (age about 85 years). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Married to Grace Mapes.
  Milward Lee Simpson (1897-1993) — also known as Milward L. Simpson — of Cody, Park County, Wyo. Born in a log cabin, Jackson, Teton County, Wyo., November 12, 1897. Republican. Served in the U.S. Army during World War I; member of Wyoming state house of representatives, 1926-27; delegate to Republican National Convention from Wyoming, 1936 (member, Resolutions Committee), 1952; Governor of Wyoming, 1955-59; defeated, 1958; U.S. Senator from Wyoming, 1962-67; defeated, 1940. Episcopalian. Member, American Legion; Forty and Eight; Rotary; Freemasons; Elks; Eagles; Moose; Alpha Tau Omega. Died, of Parkinson's disease, in a nursing home at Cody, Park County, Wyo., June 10, 1993 (age 95 years, 210 days). Interment at Riverside Cemetery, Cody, Wyo.
  Relatives: Father of Alan Kooi Simpson (1931-).
  Cross-reference: James G. Watt
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — NNDB dossier
  Roy Benjamin Aune (1900-1993) — also known as Roy B. Aune — of Fergus Falls, Otter Tail County, Minn.; Parkers Prairie, Otter Tail County, Minn. Born in a log cabin, near Fergus Falls, Otter Tail County, Minn., April 9, 1900. Superintendent of schools; member of Minnesota state house of representatives District 50, 1945-50. Lutheran. Norwegian ancestry. Member, Rotary; Elks; Freemasons. Died, following a stroke, in the Lake Region Nursing Home, Fergus Falls, Otter Tail County, Minn., June 1, 1993 (age 93 years, 53 days). Interment at Fort Snelling National Cemetery, Minneapolis, Minn.
  Relatives: Son of John Johansen Aune (1858-1943) and Ragnhild (Braaten) Aune (1867-1945).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial — Minnesota Legislator record
  Carl Taylor (1905-2001) — of Waukesha, Waukesha County, Wis. Born, in a sod house, in Oklahoma, December 7, 1905. Republican. Banker; alternate delegate to Republican National Convention from Wisconsin, 1944, 1952. Died, in Avalon Manor Nursing Home, Waukesha, Waukesha County, Wis., September 22, 2001 (age 95 years, 289 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Married 1926 to Alma Neely (died 1996); father of Don L. Taylor (1924?-).
  Benjamin Reifel (1906-1990) — also known as Ben Reifel — of South Dakota. Born in a log cabin near Parmelee, Todd County, S.Dak., September 19, 1906. Republican. Served in the U.S. Army during World War II; U.S. Representative from South Dakota 1st District, 1961-71. Episcopalian. German and Sioux Indian ancestry. Died in Sioux Falls, Minnehaha County, S.Dak., January 2, 1990 (age 83 years, 105 days). Burial location unknown.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Willard M. Munger (1911-1999) — also known as Willard Munger; "Mr. Environment" — of Duluth, St. Louis County, Minn. Born in a log house, Otter Tail County, Minn., January 20, 1911. Democrat. Member of Minnesota state house of representatives, 1955-64, 1967-99 (District 59 1955-64, District 59-B 1967-72, District 7-A 1973-99); defeated, 1934, 1952; died in office 1999; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Minnesota, 1960; candidate for Minnesota state senate 59th District, 1964. Served in the Minnesota House longer than anyone else in the state's history. Died, of liver cancer, in the hospice unit of of St. Mary's Hospital, Duluth, St. Louis County, Minn., July 11, 1999 (age 88 years, 172 days). Interment at Oneota Cemetery, Duluth, Minn.
  Relatives: Son of Harry Lyman Munger (1883-1959) and Elsie B. E. (Zuehlsdorff) Munger (1888-1982); married, July 19, 1934, to Martha B. Winter (1915-1960).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial — Minnesota Legislator record
  John W. Metzger (1914-1984) — of Denver, Colo. Born in a sod hut on the prairie near Sterling, Logan County, Colo., April 4, 1914. Democrat. Lawyer; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Colorado, 1948; Colorado state attorney general, 1949-50; candidate for Governor of Colorado, 1952. Died, of prostate cancer, in Denver, Colo., January 25, 1984 (age 69 years, 296 days). Entombed in mausoleum at Fairmount Cemetery, Denver, Colo.
  Frank Hartman (b. 1918) — of Flint, Genesee County, Mich. Born in a log cabin at McMillan, Luce County, Mich., December 8, 1918. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army Air Force in World War II; superintendent of schools; member of Michigan state board of education, 1961-64; member of Michigan State University board of trustees, 1965-72. Presbyterian. Member, Elks; Freemasons. Presumed deceased. Burial location unknown.

"Enjoy the hospitable entertainment of a political graveyard."
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The Political Graveyard

The Political Graveyard is a web site about U.S. political history and cemeteries. Founded in 1996, it is the Internet's most comprehensive free source for American political biography, listing 312,576 politicians, living and dead.
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