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The Political Graveyard: A Database of American History
Sangamon County
Illinois

Cemeteries and Memorial Sites of Politicians in Sangamon County

Index to Locations

  • Unknown location
  • Springfield Calvary Cemetery
  • Springfield Camp Butler National Cemetery
  • Springfield Hutchinson Cemetery
  • Springfield Oak Ridge Cemetery
  • Springfield Old Hutchinson Cemetery
  • Springfield Springfield Cemetery


    Unknown Location
    Sangamon County, Illinois
    Politicians buried here:
      Bluford Wilson (d. 1909) — of Illinois. U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of Illinois, 1869-74. Cherokee Indian ancestry. He was part Cherokee, but the family kept this a secret until 1950. Died in 1909. Interment somewhere.


    Calvary Cemetery
    Springfield, Sangamon County, Illinois
    Politicians buried here:
      James McMahon Graham (1852-1945) — also known as James M. Graham — of Springfield, Sangamon County, Ill. Born in Castleblayney, County Monaghan, Ireland, April 14, 1852. Democrat. Lawyer; member of Illinois state house of representatives, 1885-86; Sangamon County Prosecuting Attorney, 1892-96; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Illinois, 1900, 1920 (alternate); U.S. Representative from Illinois 21st District, 1909-15; defeated, 1914, 1918. Died in Springfield, Sangamon County, Ill., October 23, 1945 (age 93 years, 192 days). Interment at Calvary Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      William H. Chamberlain (1931-c.1979) — of Springfield, Sangamon County, Ill. Born in Springfield, Sangamon County, Ill., January 22, 1931. Democrat. Delegate to Democratic National Convention from Illinois, 1964; secretary of state of Illinois, 1964-65; circuit judge in Illinois, 1965. Catholic. Member, Knights of Columbus; Urban League; American Judicature Society. Died about 1979 (age about 48 years). Interment at Calvary Cemetery.


    Camp Butler National Cemetery
    Springfield, Sangamon County, Illinois
    Politicians buried here:
      Otis B. Duncan — of Springfield, Sangamon County, Ill. Republican. Served in the U.S. Army during World War I; alternate delegate to Republican National Convention from Illinois, 1920. African ancestry. Highest-ranking African-American officer to serve in World War I. Interment at Camp Butler National Cemetery.


    Hutchinson Cemetery
    Springfield, Sangamon County, Illinois
    Politicians formerly buried here:
      William Lee Davidson Ewing (1795-1846) — also known as William L. D. Ewing — of Vandalia, Fayette County, Ill. Born in Logan County, Ky., August 31, 1795. Democrat. Lieutenant Governor of Illinois, 1833-34; Governor of Illinois, 1834; U.S. Senator from Illinois, 1835-37; member of Illinois Democratic State Committee, 1837-38; Illinois state auditor of public accounts, 1843-46; died in office 1846. Died in Springfield, Sangamon County, Ill., March 25, 1846 (age 50 years, 206 days). Original interment at Hutchinson Cemetery; reinterment at Oak Ridge Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Finis Ewing (1773-1841) and Margaret Brevard (Davidson) Ewing (1774-1868); brother of Ephraim Brevard Ewing (1819-1873); married to Caroline S. Berry (1810-1883); granduncle of Ewing Cockrell.
      Political family: Cockrell-South family of Kentucky.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
      Daniel Pope Cook (1794-1827) — of Edwardsville, Madison County, Ill. Born in Scott County, Ky., October 16, 1794. Lawyer; Illinois state attorney general, 1819; U.S. Representative from Illinois at-large, 1819-27; U.S. Commercial Agent (Consul) in Havana, 1827. Died in Scott County, Ky., October 16, 1827 (age 33 years, 0 days). Original interment at Hutchinson Cemetery; reinterment in 1866 at Oak Ridge Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Mary Jane (Mothershead) Cook (1748-1840) and John Dillard Cook (1753-1828); brother of Nathaniel Cook and John Dillard Cook (1789-1852); married, May 6, 1821, to Julia Catherine Edwards (1801-1830; daughter of Ninian Edwards); father of John Pope Cook.
      Political family: Edwards-Cook family of Illinois and Nebraska (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      Cook County, Ill. is named for him.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page


    Oak Ridge Cemetery
    1441 Monument Avenue
    Springfield, Sangamon County, Illinois
    Founded 1858
    Politicians buried here:
    Abraham Lincoln Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865) — also known as "Honest Abe"; "Old Abe"; "The Rail-Splitter"; "The Illinois Baboon" — of New Salem, Menard County, Ill.; Springfield, Sangamon County, Ill. Born in a log cabin, Hardin County (part now in Larue County), Ky., February 12, 1809. Republican. Served in the U.S. Army during the Black Hawk War; postmaster; lawyer; member of Illinois state house of representatives, 1834-41; U.S. Representative from Illinois 7th District, 1847-49; candidate for Republican nomination for Vice President, 1856; candidate for U.S. Senator from Illinois, 1858; President of the United States, 1861-65; died in office 1865; His election as president in 1860 precipitated the Civil War; determined to preserve the Union, he led the North to victory on the battlefield, freed the slaves in the conquered states, and in doing this, redefined American nationhood. He was. English ancestry. Elected in 1900 to the Hall of Fame for Great Americans. Shot by the assassin John Wilkes Booth, during a play at Ford's Theater, in Washington, D.C., April 14, 1865; died at Peterson's Boarding House, across the street, the following day, April 15, 1865 (age 56 years, 62 days). Interment at Oak Ridge Cemetery; memorial monument at National Mall, Washington, D.C.; statue erected 1868 at Judiciary Park, Washington, D.C.
      Relatives: Son of Thomas Lincoln (1778-1851) and Nancy (Hanks) Lincoln (1784-1818); married, November 4, 1842, to Mary Ann Todd (1818-1882; sister-in-law of Ninian Wirt Edwards (1809-1889); half-sister-in-law of N. H. R. Dawson; aunt of Martha Dee Todd; grandniece of David Rittenhouse Porter); father of Robert Todd Lincoln; second cousin four times removed of Richard Henry Lee, Francis Lightfoot Lee and Arthur Lee; third cousin twice removed of Levi Lincoln; third cousin thrice removed of Thomas Sim Lee, Henry Lee, Charles Lee, Edmund Jennings Lee and Zachary Taylor; fourth cousin once removed of Levi Lincoln, Jr. and Enoch Lincoln.
      Political families: Lincoln-Lee family; Edwards-Cook family of Illinois and Nebraska (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      Cross-reference: Clement Claiborne Clay, Jr. — Isham N. Haynie — William M. Stone — John Pitcher — Stephen Miller — John T. Stuart — William H. Seward — Henry L. Burnett — Judah P. Benjamin — Robert Toombs — Richard Taylor Jacob — George W. Jones — James Adams — John G. Nicolay — Edward Everett — Stephen T. Logan — Francis P. Blair — John Hay — Henry Reed Rathbone — James A. Ekin — Frederick W. Seward — John H. Surratt — John H. Surratt, Jr. — James Shields
      Lincoln counties in Ark., Colo., Idaho, Kan., La., Minn., Miss., Mont., Neb., Nev., N.M., Okla., Ore., Wash., W.Va., Wis. and Wyo. are named for him.
      The city of Lincoln, Nebraska, is named for him.  — Lincoln Memorial University, in Harrogate, Tennessee, is named for him.  — Lincoln University, in Jefferson City, Missouri, is named for him.  — Lincoln University, near Oxford, Pennsylvania, is named for him.
      Other politicians named for him: Abraham L. KeisterAbraham L. TuckerAbraham L. BrickAbraham L. KelloggAbraham Lincoln BernsteinA. Lincoln ReileyA. L. HelmickAbraham L. SuttonA. Lincoln AckerAbraham L. OsgoodAbraham L. WitmerAbraham L. PhillipsAbraham L. PaytonA. L. AuthA. Lincoln MooreA. Lincoln NiditchAbraham L. RubensteinAbraham L. Davis, Jr.Abraham L. FreedmanA. L. MarovitzLincoln GordonAbraham L. BannerAbraham Lincoln Tosti
      Coins and currency: His portrait has appeared on the U.S. penny (one cent coin) since 1909, and on the $5 bill since 1913. From the 1860s until 1927, his portrait also appeared on U.S. notes and certificates of various denominations from $1 to $500.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — Find-A-Grave memorial
      Books about Abraham Lincoln: David Herbert Donald, Lincoln — George Anastaplo, Abraham Lincoln : A Constitutional Biography — G. S. Boritt, ed., The Lincoln Enigma : The Changing Faces of an American Icon — Albert J. Beveridge, Abraham Lincoln 1809-1858 — Geoffrey Perret, Lincoln's War : The Untold Story of America's Greatest President as Commander in Chief — David Herbert Donald, We Are Lincoln Men : Abraham Lincoln and His Friends — Edward Steers, Jr., Blood on the Moon: The Assassination of Abraham Lincoln — Mario Cuomo, Why Lincoln Matters : Today More Than Ever — Michael W. Kauffman, American Brutus : John Wilkes Booth and the Lincoln Conspiracies — Doris Kearns Goodwin, Team of Rivals : The Political Genius of Abraham Lincoln — Joshua Wolf Shenk, Lincoln's Melancholy : How Depression Challenged a President and Fueled His Greatness — John Channing Briggs, Lincoln's Speeches Reconsidered — Ronald C. White, Jr., The Eloquent President : A Portrait of Lincoln Through His Words — Harold Holzer, Lincoln at Cooper Union : The Speech That Made Abraham Linco ln President — Michael Lind, What Lincoln Believed : The Values and Convictions of America's Greatest President — Doris Kearns Goodwin, Team of Rivals : The Political Genius of Abraham Lincoln — Michael Burlingame, ed., Abraham Lincoln: The Observations of John G. Nicolay and John Hay — Thomas J. Craughwell, Stealing Lincoln's Body — Roy Morris, Jr., The Long Pursuit: Abraham Lincoln's Thirty-Year Struggle with Stephen Douglas for the Heart and Soul of America — John Stauffer, Giants: The Parallel Lives of Frederick Douglass and Abraham Lincoln — Karen Judson, Abraham Lincoln (for young readers) — Maira Kalman, Looking at Lincoln (for young readers)
      Critical books about Abraham Lincoln: Thomas J. DiLorenzo, The Real Lincoln : A New Look at Abraham Lincoln, His Agenda, and an Unnecessary War
      Fiction about Abraham Lincoln: Gore Vidal, Lincoln: A Novel
      Image source: Portrait & Biographical Album of Washtenaw County (1891)
      Ninian Edwards (1775-1833) — of Kaskaskia, Randolph County, Ill.; Edwardsville, Madison County, Ill. Born in Montgomery County, Md., March 17, 1775. Democrat. Member of Kentucky state house of representatives, 1796-97; state court judge in Kentucky, 1803; justice of Kentucky state supreme court, 1808; Governor of Illinois Territory, 1809-18; U.S. Senator from Illinois, 1818-24; Governor of Illinois, 1826-30; candidate for U.S. Representative from Illinois, 1832. Baptist. Died of cholera, in Belleville, St. Clair County, Ill., July 20, 1833 (age 58 years, 125 days). Original interment somewhere in Belleville, Ill.; reinterment in 1855 at Oak Ridge Cemetery; statue at Ninian Edwards Plaza, Edwardsville, Ill.
      Relatives: Son of Margaret (Beall) Edwards (1750-1826) and Benjamin Edwards; brother of Cyrus Edwards (1793-1877); married, February 20, 1803, to Elvira Lane (1780-1839); father of Julia Catherine Edwards (1801-1830; who married Daniel Pope Cook) and Ninian Wirt Edwards; grandfather of John Pope Cook; granduncle of Richard Lee Metcalfe; great-granduncle of Theodore W. Metcalfe.
      Political family: Edwards-Cook family of Illinois and Nebraska (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      Edwards County, Ill. is named for him.
      The city of Edwardsville, Illinois, is named for him.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
    Shelby M. Cullom Shelby Moore Cullom (1829-1914) — also known as Shelby M. Cullom — of Springfield, Sangamon County, Ill. Born in Monticello, Wayne County, Ky., November 22, 1829. Republican. Lawyer; member of Illinois state house of representatives, 1856, 1860-61, 1872-74; Speaker of the Illinois State House of Representatives, 1861, 1873; candidate for Presidential Elector for Illinois, 1856; U.S. Representative from Illinois 8th District, 1865-71; Governor of Illinois, 1877-83; resigned 1883; U.S. Senator from Illinois, 1883-1913; delegate to Republican National Convention from Illinois, 1884, 1892, 1904 (speaker), 1908. Died in Washington, D.C., January 28, 1914 (age 84 years, 67 days). Interment at Oak Ridge Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Richard Northcraft Cullom (1795-1872) and Elizabeth (Coffey) Cullom (1797-1868); married, December 12, 1855, to Hannah M. Fisher (1831-1861); married, May 5, 1863, to Julia Fisher (1835-1909); father of Eleanor M. 'Ella' Cullom (1856-1902; who married William Barret Ridgely); nephew of Alvin Cullom (1797-1877) and William Cullom.
      Political family: Cullom family (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      The village of Cullom, Illinois, is named for him.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
      Image source: American Monthly Review of Reviews, December 1901
      William Henry Bissell (1811-1860) — also known as William H. Bissell — of Belleville, St. Clair County, Ill. Born in Hartwick, Otsego County, N.Y., April 25, 1811. Democrat. Lawyer; member of Illinois state house of representatives, 1840; colonel in the U.S. Army during the Mexican War; U.S. Representative from Illinois, 1849-55 (1st District 1849-53, 8th District 1853-55); Governor of Illinois, 1857-60; died in office 1860. Catholic. Died in Springfield, Sangamon County, Ill., March 18, 1860 (age 48 years, 328 days). Interment at Oak Ridge Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Luther Bissell and Hannah Bissell; married 1840 to Emily James; married 1852 to Elizabeth Kane (daughter of Elias Kent Kane (1794-1835)).
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      William Lee Davidson Ewing (1795-1846) — also known as William L. D. Ewing — of Vandalia, Fayette County, Ill. Born in Logan County, Ky., August 31, 1795. Democrat. Lieutenant Governor of Illinois, 1833-34; Governor of Illinois, 1834; U.S. Senator from Illinois, 1835-37; member of Illinois Democratic State Committee, 1837-38; Illinois state auditor of public accounts, 1843-46; died in office 1846. Died in Springfield, Sangamon County, Ill., March 25, 1846 (age 50 years, 206 days). Original interment at Hutchinson Cemetery; reinterment at Oak Ridge Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Finis Ewing (1773-1841) and Margaret Brevard (Davidson) Ewing (1774-1868); brother of Ephraim Brevard Ewing (1819-1873); married to Caroline S. Berry (1810-1883); granduncle of Ewing Cockrell.
      Political family: Cockrell-South family of Kentucky.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
      William Barret Ridgely (1853-1920) — also known as William B. Ridgely — of Springfield, Sangamon County, Ill. Born in Springfield, Sangamon County, Ill., July 19, 1853. Republican. Vice-president, Springfield Iron Company; banker; postmaster at Springfield, Ill., 1897-99; U.S. Comptroller of the Currency, 1901-08; delegate to Republican National Convention from Illinois, 1908. Died in Washington, D.C., April 30, 1920 (age 66 years, 286 days). Interment at Oak Ridge Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Charles Ridgely (1836-1910) and Jane Maria (Barret) Ridgely (1836-1922); married, October 24, 1882, to Eleanor M. 'Ella' Cullom (1856-1902; daughter of Shelby Moore Cullom); married, December 30, 1905, to Kate Deering; nephew of Redick McKee Ridgely; second great-grandnephew of Samuel Huntington; first cousin twice removed of Nathaniel Huntington, James Huntington and Elisha Mills Huntington; first cousin thrice removed of Samuel H. Huntington; first cousin five times removed of Benjamin Huntington; second cousin four times removed of Joshua Coit, Henry Huntington and Gurdon Huntington; third cousin of Edwin Reed Ridgely and Austin Eugene Lathrop; third cousin once removed of Helen Huntington Hull; third cousin thrice removed of John Davenport, Ebenezer Huntington, James Davenport, Asahel Otis, Augustus Seymour Porter, Samuel Lathrop, Peter Buell Porter, Abel Huntington, Zina Hyde, Jr. and Benjamin Nicoll Huntington; fourth cousin once removed of John Hall Brockway, Abial Lathrop and Hilliard Samuel Ridgely (1874-1937).
      Political family: Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial — Comptrollers of the Currency
      John Riley Tanner (1844-1901) — also known as John R. Tanner — of Illinois. Born in Warrick County, Ind., April 4, 1844. Served in the Union Army during the Civil War; member of Illinois state senate, 1881; Illinois state treasurer, 1887-89; Governor of Illinois, 1897-1901. Died May 23, 1901 (age 57 years, 49 days). Interment at Oak Ridge Cemetery.
      William Jayne (1826-1916) — of Springfield, Sangamon County, Ill. Born in Springfield, Sangamon County, Ill., October 8, 1826. Republican. Mayor of Springfield, Ill., 1859-61; member of Illinois state senate, 1860-61; Governor of Dakota Territory, 1861-63; Delegate to U.S. Congress from Dakota Territory, 1863-64; delegate to Republican National Convention from Illinois, 1884. Died, of apoplexy (stroke), in Springfield, Sangamon County, Ill., March 20, 1916 (age 89 years, 164 days). Interment at Oak Ridge Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      William Joshua Allen (1829-1901) — also known as William J. Allen — of Metropolis, Massac County, Ill.; Marion, Williamson County, Ill.; Cairo, Alexander County, Ill.; Carbondale, Jackson County, Ill. Born in Wilson County, Tenn., June 9, 1829. Democrat. Lawyer; member of Illinois state senate, 1855; U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of Illinois, 1855-59; circuit judge in Illinois 26th Circuit, 1859-61; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Illinois, 1860, 1864, 1868, 1872, 1876, 1884; delegate to Illinois state constitutional convention Williamson and Johnson counties, 1862; U.S. Representative from Illinois, 1862-65 (9th District 1862-63, 13th District 1863-65); delegate to Illinois state constitutional convention 1st District, 1869-70; U.S. District Judge for the Southern District of Illinois, 1887-1901; died in office 1901. Died, of "grippe" (influenza), in Hot Springs, Garland County, Ark., January 26, 1901 (age 71 years, 231 days). Interment at Oak Ridge Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Willis Allen (1806-1859).
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — federal judicial profile
      James Carroll Robinson (1823-1886) — also known as James C. Robinson — of Marshall, Clark County, Ill. Born near Paris, Edgar County, Ill., August 19, 1823. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army during the Mexican War; U.S. Representative from Illinois, 1859-65, 1871-75 (7th District 1859-63, 11th District 1863-65, 8th District 1871-73, 12th District 1873-75); candidate for Governor of Illinois, 1864. Died, of "congestion of the brain" (presumably a stroke or cerebral hemorrhage), in Springfield, Sangamon County, Ill., November 3, 1886 (age 63 years, 76 days). Interment at Oak Ridge Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      William McKendree Springer (1836-1903) — also known as William M. Springer — of Springfield, Sangamon County, Ill. Born in Sullivan County, Ind., May 30, 1836. Democrat. Lawyer; member of Illinois Democratic State Committee, 1860-62; member of Illinois state house of representatives, 1871-72; defeated, 1860; U.S. Representative from Illinois, 1875-95 (12th District 1875-83, 13th District 1883-95); U.S. District Judge for Indian Territory, 1895-99. Died, of pneumonia, in Washington, D.C., December 4, 1903 (age 67 years, 188 days). Interment at Oak Ridge Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Rev. Thomas Burchard Springer (1795-1861) and Catherine (Sandusky) Springer (1796-1872); married, December 15, 1859, to Rebecca Ruter (1832-1904); first cousin twice removed of Durand William Springer (1866-1943).
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Loren Edgar Wheeler (1862-1932) — also known as Loren E. Wheeler — of Springfield, Sangamon County, Ill. Born in Havana, Mason County, Ill., October 7, 1862. Republican. Mayor of Springfield, Ill., 1897-1901; delegate to Republican National Convention from Illinois, 1900; postmaster at Springfield, Ill., 1901-14; U.S. Representative from Illinois 21st District, 1915-23, 1925-27; defeated, 1922, 1926. Died, of pernicious anemia, in Springfield, Sangamon County, Ill., January 8, 1932 (age 69 years, 93 days). Interment at Oak Ridge Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      James Austin Connolly (1843-1914) — also known as James A. Connolly — of Springfield, Sangamon County, Ill. Born in Newark, Essex County, N.J., March 8, 1843. Republican. Lawyer; colonel in the Union Army during the Civil War; member of Illinois state house of representatives, 1873-76; U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of Illinois, 1876-85, 1889-93; U.S. Representative from Illinois 17th District, 1895-99; defeated, 1886. Member, Grand Army of the Republic. Died, of cerebral hemorrhage, in Springfield, Sangamon County, Ill., December 15, 1914 (age 71 years, 282 days). Entombed in mausoleum at Oak Ridge Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of William Connolly and Margaret (Maguire) Connolly; married, February 9, 1862, to Mary Dunn.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Daniel Pope Cook (1794-1827) — of Edwardsville, Madison County, Ill. Born in Scott County, Ky., October 16, 1794. Lawyer; Illinois state attorney general, 1819; U.S. Representative from Illinois at-large, 1819-27; U.S. Commercial Agent (Consul) in Havana, 1827. Died in Scott County, Ky., October 16, 1827 (age 33 years, 0 days). Original interment at Hutchinson Cemetery; reinterment in 1866 at Oak Ridge Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Mary Jane (Mothershead) Cook (1748-1840) and John Dillard Cook (1753-1828); brother of Nathaniel Cook and John Dillard Cook (1789-1852); married, May 6, 1821, to Julia Catherine Edwards (1801-1830; daughter of Ninian Edwards); father of John Pope Cook.
      Political family: Edwards-Cook family of Illinois and Nebraska (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      Cook County, Ill. is named for him.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Ben Franklin Caldwell (1848-1924) — of Chatham, Sangamon County, Ill. Born near Carrollton, Greene County, Ill., August 2, 1848. Democrat. Banker; farmer; member of Illinois state house of representatives, 1882-86; member of Illinois state senate, 1890-94; U.S. Representative from Illinois, 1899-1905, 1907-09 (17th District 1899-1903, 21st District 1903-05, 1907-09); defeated, 1904; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Illinois, 1912. Member, Freemasons. Died, of miocarditis, in Springfield, Sangamon County, Ill., December 29, 1924 (age 76 years, 149 days). Interment at Oak Ridge Cemetery.
      Presumably named for: Benjamin Franklin
      Relatives: Son of John Caldwell and Mary J. Caldwell; married, May 27, 1873, to Julia F. Cloyd.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      John Alexander McClernand (1812-1900) — also known as John A. McClernand — of Shawneetown, Gallatin County, Ill.; Springfield, Sangamon County, Ill. Born in Breckinridge County, Ky., May 30, 1812. Democrat. Lawyer; served in the U.S. Army during the Black Hawk War; newspaper publisher; Presidential Elector for Illinois, 1840, 1852; member of Illinois Democratic State Committee, 1841-46, 1852-56; member of Illinois state legislature, 1840; U.S. Representative from Illinois, 1843-51, 1859-61 (2nd District 1843-51, 6th District 1859-61); general in the Union Army during the Civil War; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Illinois, 1876 (Convention President; member, Resolutions Committee; speaker), 1880. Died in 1900 (age about 88 years). Interment at Oak Ridge Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Books about John A. McClernand: Richard L. Kiper, Major General John Alexander McClernand : Politician in Uniform
      John Todd Stuart (1807-1885) — also known as John T. Stuart — of Springfield, Sangamon County, Ill. Born near Lexington, Fayette County, Ky., November 10, 1807. Lawyer; law partner of Abraham Lincoln; member of Illinois state house of representatives, 1833-37; U.S. Representative from Illinois, 1839-43, 1863-65 (3rd District 1839-43, 8th District 1863-65); member of Illinois state senate 12th District, 1849-50. Died November 23, 1885 (age 78 years, 13 days). Interment at Oak Ridge Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Samuel Hubbel Treat (d. 1887) — also known as Samuel H. Treat — of Illinois. Justice of Illinois state supreme court, 1841-55. Died March 27, 1887. Interment at Oak Ridge Cemetery.
      Anthony Lausett Knapp (1828-1881) — also known as Anthony L. Knapp — of Jerseyville, Jersey County, Ill. Born in Middletown, Orange County, N.Y., June 14, 1828. Democrat. Member of Illinois state senate, 1859; U.S. Representative from Illinois, 1861-65 (6th District 1861-63, 10th District 1863-65). Died May 24, 1881 (age 52 years, 344 days). Original interment at Springfield Cemetery; reinterment at Oak Ridge Cemetery.
      Relatives: Brother of Robert McCarty Knapp (1831-1889).
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      William Allen Northcott (1854-1917) — also known as William A. Northcott — of Greenville, Bond County, Ill.; Springfield, Sangamon County, Ill. Born in Murfreesboro, Rutherford County, Tenn., January 28, 1854. Republican. Lawyer; Bond County State's Attorney, 1882-92; Lieutenant Governor of Illinois, 1897-1905; alternate delegate to Republican National Convention from Illinois, 1904; U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of Illinois, 1905-14; president, Inter-Ocean Casualty Co. Episcopalian. Member, Modern Woodmen of America; Odd Fellows; Elks; Knights of Pythias; Freemasons. Died January 25, 1917 (age 62 years, 363 days). Interment at Oak Ridge Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son-in-law of Nathaniel S. Dresser; son of Robert Saunders Northcott (Civil War general) and Mary (Cunningham) Northcott; brother of Elliott Northcott (1869-1946); married, September 11, 1882, to Ada R. Stoutzenberg.
      Political family: Northcott family of Illinois.
      Frank Stoddard Dickson (1876-1953) — also known as Frank S. Dickson — of Ramsey, Fayette County, Ill. Born in Hillsboro, Montgomery County, Ill., October 6, 1876. Republican. U.S. Representative from Illinois 23rd District, 1905-07; Adjutant General of Illinois, 1910-22; appointed 1910. Died in Washington, D.C., February 24, 1953 (age 76 years, 141 days). Interment at Oak Ridge Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
      Ninian Wirt Edwards (1809-1889) — also known as Ninian W. Edwards — of Sangamon County, Ill. Born April 15, 1809. Democrat. Illinois state attorney general, 1834-35; member of Illinois state house of representatives, 1837-41, 1849-53; member of Illinois state senate, 1845-49; delegate to Illinois state constitutional convention from Sangamon County, 1847; Illinois superintendent of public instruction, 1854-57. Died September 2, 1889 (age 80 years, 140 days). Interment at Oak Ridge Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Ninian Edwards; married, February 18, 1832, to Elizabeth P. Todd (sister-in-law of Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865)).
      Political families: Lee-Randolph family of Maryland and Virginia; Lincoln-Lee family; Edwards-Cook family of Illinois and Nebraska; Pendleton-Lee family (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      John Pope Cook (1825-1910) — also known as John P. Cook — of Springfield, Sangamon County, Ill.; Ransom, Hillsdale County, Mich. Born in Belleville, St. Clair County, Ill., June 12, 1825. Mayor of Springfield, Ill., 1855; Sangamon County Sheriff, 1856; general in the Union Army during the Civil War. Died in Ransom, Hillsdale County, Mich., October 12, 1910 (age 85 years, 122 days). Interment at Oak Ridge Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Daniel Pope Cook and Julia Catherine (Edwards) Cook (1801-1830); married, October 20, 1847, to Susan A. Lamb (1828-1890); married, September 16, 1889, to Mary Eliza Baker (1860-1948); nephew of Nathaniel Cook and John Dillard Cook (1789-1852); grandson of Ninian Edwards; grandnephew of Cyrus Edwards; great-grandson of Benjamin Edwards; second cousin of Richard Lee Metcalfe; second cousin once removed of Theodore W. Metcalfe.
      Political family: Edwards-Cook family of Illinois and Nebraska (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      See also Find-A-Grave memorial
      Isham N. Haynie (c.1822-1866) — of Alexander County, Ill. Born about 1822. Republican. Member of Illinois state house of representatives, 1850; common pleas court judge in Illinois, 1857; candidate for Presidential Elector for Illinois, 1860; candidate for U.S. Representative from Illinois 9th District, 1862; served in the Union Army during the Civil War; Adjutant General of Illinois, 1865-66; appointed 1865; died in office 1866. Was present in Peterson's Boarding House when Abraham Lincoln died. Died May 21, 1866 (age about 44 years). Interment at Oak Ridge Cemetery.
      Ozias Mather Hatch (1814-1893) — also known as Ozias M. Hatch — of Pike County, Ill. Born in 1814. Member of Illinois state legislature, 1840; secretary of state of Illinois, 1857-65. Died in 1893 (age about 79 years). Interment at Oak Ridge Cemetery.
      Erastus Newton Bates (1828-1898) — also known as Erastus N. Bates — of Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minn.; Centralia, Marion County, Ill.; Chicago, Cook County, Ill. Born in Plainfield, Hampshire County, Mass., February 29, 1828. Lawyer; delegate to Minnesota state constitutional convention 11th District, 1857; member of Minnesota state senate 4th District, 1857-58; general in the Union Army during the Civil War; member of Illinois state house of representatives, 1866-67; Illinois state treasurer, 1869-73. Died in Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minn., May 29, 1898 (age 70 years, 0 days). Interment at Oak Ridge Cemetery.
      Relatives: First cousin of Erastus N. Bates (1845-1917).
      See also Find-A-Grave memorial — Minnesota Legislator record
      William Butler — of Sangamon County, Ill. Illinois state treasurer, 1859-63. Interment at Oak Ridge Cemetery.
      Earle Benjamin Searcy (b. 1887) — also known as Earl B. Searcy — of Springfield, Sangamon County, Ill. Born in Palmyra, Macoupin County, Ill., May 14, 1887. Republican. Served in the U.S. Army during World War I; real estate broker; member of Illinois state house of representatives 45th District, 1921-23; member of Illinois state senate 45th District, 1923-45; clerk of the Illinois supreme court; elected 1944. Christian. Member, American Legion; Freemasons; Knights Templar; Shriners; Elks; Disabled American Veterans. One of the founding members of the American Legion. Interment at Oak Ridge Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of James Buchanan Searcy (1859?-?).
      David L. Phillips (1823-1880) — of Anna, Union County, Ill.; Springfield, Sangamon County, Ill. Born in Williamson County, Ill., October 28, 1823. Republican. School teacher; minister; delegate to Republican National Convention from Illinois, 1860; newspaper managing editor; postmaster at Springfield, Ill., 1877-80. Died in Springfield, Sangamon County, Ill., June 19, 1880 (age 56 years, 235 days). Interment at Oak Ridge Cemetery.
      Relatives: Married to Charlotte Tate (1824-1899).
      See also Find-A-Grave memorial
      Stephen Trigg Logan (1800-1880) — also known as Stephen T. Logan — of Barren County, Ky.; Springfield, Sangamon County, Ill. Born in Franklin County, Ky., February 24, 1800. Republican. Lawyer; Barren County Commonwealth Attorney, 1822-32; circuit judge in Illinois, 1835-40; law partner of Abraham Lincoln, 1841-44; member of Illinois state house of representatives, 1843-47, 1855-56; delegate to Illinois state constitutional convention from Sangamon County, 1847; delegate to Republican National Convention from Illinois, 1860. Died in Springfield, Sangamon County, Ill., July 24, 1880 (age 80 years, 151 days). Interment at Oak Ridge Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of David Logan and Mary (Trigg) Logan; grandson of Stephen Trigg (1742-1782).
      Political family: Trigg family of Virginia.
      Logan County, Ill. may have been named for him.
      Stuart Mason Allen (1902-1943) — also known as Stuart Allen — of St. Paul, Ramsey County, Minn. Born in St. Paul, Ramsey County, Minn., December 13, 1902. Foreign Service officer; U.S. Vice Consul in Tientsin, 1929-32; U.S. Consul in Chefoo, as of 1938; Vancouver, 1942-43, died in office 1943. Died in Vancouver, British Columbia, July 5, 1943 (age 40 years, 204 days). Interment at Oak Ridge Cemetery.
      Relatives: Married, April 13, 1935, to Bess Meredith Smith (1912-1985).
      See also Find-A-Grave memorial
      Redick McKee Ridgely (1830-1914) — also known as Redick M. Ridgely — of Springfield, Sangamon County, Ill. Born in St. Louis, Mo., March 29, 1830. Democrat. Postmaster at Springfield, Ill., 1894-96; member of Illinois state house of representatives, 1900; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Illinois, 1908. Died in Springfield, Sangamon County, Ill., June 23, 1914 (age 84 years, 86 days). Interment at Oak Ridge Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Nicholas Henry Ridgely (1800-1888) and Jane Olivia (Vincent) Ridgely (1800-1833); married, July 1, 1850, to Margaret Aitken (1835-1878); married to Maria Foster (1847-1914); uncle of William Barret Ridgely; second cousin once removed of Edwin Reed Ridgely; third cousin twice removed of Hilliard Samuel Ridgely (1874-1937).
      Political family: Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      See also Find-A-Grave memorial
      Vincent Y. Dallman — of Springfield, Sangamon County, Ill. Democrat. Delegate to Democratic National Convention from Illinois, 1924, 1932, 1936, 1956, 1960; U.S. Collector of Internal Revenue for the 8th Illinois District, 1941-51. Interment at Oak Ridge Cemetery.
      William M. Vicars (1906-1959) — of Pontiac, Livingston County, Ill. Born in Braidwood, Will County, Ill., October 20, 1906. Democrat. Lawyer; member of Illinois state house of representatives, 1935-45; candidate for Illinois state auditor of public accounts, 1944; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Illinois, 1948 (alternate), 1952. Died in Springfield, Sangamon County, Ill., February 14, 1959 (age 52 years, 117 days). Interment at Oak Ridge Cemetery.
      Bushrod Ebenezer Hoppin (1828-1923) — also known as Bushrod E. Hoppin — of Madison County, N.Y.; Sangamon County, Ill. Born in Lebanon, Madison County, N.Y., September 2, 1828. Republican. Farmer; member of New York state assembly from Madison County 1st District, 1867. Died in Arlington, Middlesex County, Mass., April 20, 1923 (age 94 years, 230 days). Interment at Oak Ridge Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Curtis Hoppin (1785-1868) and Mary (Buck) Hoppin (1787-1851); married to Mary Parmenter (1830-1919); fifth great-grandnephew of Robert Treat; first cousin twice removed of Benjamin Trumbull; second cousin once removed of Lyman Trumbull; third cousin once removed of George Smith Catlin; third cousin twice removed of Ebenezer Huntington and Lancelot Phelps; third cousin thrice removed of Noah Phelps, Chauncey Goodrich, Elizur Goodrich, Augustus Seymour Porter and Peter Buell Porter; fourth cousin of Edwin Carpenter Pinney; fourth cousin once removed of Jabez Williams Huntington, Charles Robert Sherman (1788-1829), Alvah Nash, James Phelps, Samuel DeWitt Maltby, Benjamin Josiah Maltby and Claude Carpenter Pinney.
      Political families: Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York; Sherman family of Connecticut; Appleton family of Massachusetts; Wolcott-Wadsworth family of Connecticut and Maryland; Woodruff-Hornblower-Seymour-Wadsworth family of Connecticut (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      See also Find-A-Grave memorial
      Jacob Bunn, Jr. (1864-1926) — of Springfield, Sangamon County, Ill. Born in Springfield, Sangamon County, Ill., October 21, 1864. Republican. President, Illinois Watch Co. (watch manufacturers); president, Sangamo Electric Co.; president, Springfield Marine Bank; delegate to Republican National Convention from Illinois, 1924. Died, from cirrhosis of the liver, in Springfield, Sangamon County, Ill., May 10, 1926 (age 61 years, 201 days). Interment at Oak Ridge Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Jacob Bunn (1814-1897; industrialist) and Elizabeth (Ferguson) Bunn; married to Mildred Jeffress.
      William Converse Staley (1899-1978) — also known as W. Converse Staley — of Springfield, Sangamon County, Ill. Born in Springfield, Sangamon County, Ill., September 28, 1899. Republican. President, Baker Manufacturing Company, makers of heavy equipment; delegate to Republican National Convention from Illinois, 1944, 1948. Died April 27, 1978 (age 78 years, 211 days). Interment at Oak Ridge Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Edward E. Staley and Elsie (Converse) Staley; married 1920 to Jennie Barnes (1898-1981; divorced); married to Ann Zgaga (1908-1991).
      See also Find-A-Grave memorial


    Old Hutchinson Cemetery
    Springfield, Sangamon County, Illinois
    Politicians buried here:
      Milton Carpenter (1808-1848) — of Hamilton County, Ill. Born in Kentucky, 1808. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army during the Black Hawk War; member of Illinois state house of representatives, 1834-41; member of Illinois Democratic State Committee, 1839-41; Illinois state treasurer, 1841-48; died in office 1848. Baptist. Died in Springfield, Sangamon County, Ill., August 13, 1848 (age about 40 years). Interment at Old Hutchinson Cemetery.


    Springfield Cemetery
    Springfield, Sangamon County, Illinois
    Politicians formerly buried here:
      Anthony Lausett Knapp (1828-1881) — also known as Anthony L. Knapp — of Jerseyville, Jersey County, Ill. Born in Middletown, Orange County, N.Y., June 14, 1828. Democrat. Member of Illinois state senate, 1859; U.S. Representative from Illinois, 1861-65 (6th District 1861-63, 10th District 1863-65). Died May 24, 1881 (age 52 years, 344 days). Original interment at Springfield Cemetery; reinterment at Oak Ridge Cemetery.
      Relatives: Brother of Robert McCarty Knapp (1831-1889).
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page


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