PoliticalGraveyard.com
The Political Graveyard: A Database of American History
Richland County
South Carolina

Cemeteries and Memorial Sites of Politicians in Richland County

Index to Locations

  • Unknown location
  • Private or family graveyards
  • Columbia Unknown location
  • Columbia Elmwood Cemetery
  • Columbia First Baptist Church Cemetery
  • Columbia First Presbyterian Churchyard
  • Columbia Greenlawn Cemetery
  • Columbia Presbyterian Churchyard
  • Columbia Randolph Cemetery
  • Columbia State House Grounds
  • Columbia Trinity Episcopal Cathedral Cemetery
  • Congaree St. John's Episcopal Churchyard
  • Wateree Old Richmond Presbyterian Churchyard


    Unknown Locations
    Richland County, South Carolina
    Politicians buried here:
      Edward Clarkson Leverette Adams (1876-1946) — also known as Ned Adams — Born in Richland County, S.C., January 5, 1876. Physician; farmer; author; candidate for Lieutenant Governor of South Carolina, 1916, 1922; served in the U.S. Army during World War I. Died in Richland County, S.C., November 1, 1946 (age 70 years, 300 days). Interment somewhere.
      Relatives: Third great-grandson of Joel Adams (1750-1830).
      Political family: Adams family of Congaree, South Carolina.
      William Weston Adams (1786-1831) — Born in Congaree, Richland District (now Richland County), S.C., October 15, 1786. Physician; member of South Carolina state house of representatives, 1816-17. Died in Congaree, Richland District (now Richland County), S.C., 1831 (age about 44 years). Interment somewhere.
      Relatives: Son of Joel Adams and Grace Weston Adams; brother of Joel Adams II; married, November 6, 1811, to Sarah Epps Goodwyn; uncle of James Uriah Adams, James Hopkins Adams (1812-1861) and James Pickett Adams; granduncle of Henry Walker Adams.
      Political family: Adams family of Congaree, South Carolina.
      Joel Adams II (1784-1859) — Born in Congaree, Richland District (now Richland County), S.C., March 6, 1784. Planter; member of South Carolina state house of representatives, 1832-33. Died in Congaree, Richland District (now Richland County), S.C., May 1, 1859 (age 75 years, 56 days). Interment somewhere.
      Relatives: Son of Joel Adams; brother of William Weston Adams (1786-1831); uncle of James Uriah Adams, James Hopkins Adams and James Pickett Adams; granduncle of Henry Walker Adams.
      Political family: Adams family of Congaree, South Carolina.
      Henry Walker Adams (1852-1903) — Born in Richland District (now Richland County), S.C., December 5, 1852. Member of South Carolina state house of representatives, 1894-96. Died in Richland County, S.C., March 3, 1903 (age 50 years, 88 days). Interment somewhere.
      Relatives: Son of James Uriah Adams; nephew of James Hopkins Adams (1812-1861) and James Pickett Adams; grandnephew of Joel Adams II and William Weston Adams; great-grandson of Joel Adams.
      Political family: Adams family of Congaree, South Carolina.


    Private or family graveyard
    Richland County, South Carolina
    Politicians buried here:
      Casper G. Garrett (1865-1947) — also known as C. G. Garrett — of Columbia, Richland County, S.C. Born in Laurens County, S.C., 1865. Republican. Lawyer; teacher and administrator, Allen University; alternate delegate to Republican National Convention from South Carolina, 1928. African Methodist Episcopal. African ancestry. Died, from uremia, in Columbia, Richland County, S.C., November 15, 1947 (age about 82 years). Interment in a private or family graveyard.


    Unknown Location
    Columbia, Richland County, South Carolina
    Politicians buried here:
      Carlos J. Stolbrand (1821-1894) — also known as Carl Johan Stålbrand — of South Carolina. Born in Össjö, Sweden, May 11, 1821. Republican. General in the Union Army during the Civil War; delegate to Republican National Convention from South Carolina, 1868. Died in Charleston, Charleston County, S.C., February 3, 1894 (age 72 years, 268 days). Interment somewhere.


    Elmwood Cemetery
    501 Elmwood Avenue
    Columbia, Richland County, South Carolina
    Founded 1854
    Listed in National Register of Historic Places, 1996
    See also Findagrave page for this location.
    Politicians buried here:
      Thomas James Robertson (1823-1897) — also known as Thomas J. Robertson — of Columbia, Richland County, S.C. Born in Fairfield District (now Fairfield County), S.C., August 3, 1823. Republican. Planter; delegate to South Carolina state constitutional convention from Richland County, 1868; U.S. Senator from South Carolina, 1868-77. Died in Columbia, Richland County, S.C., October 13, 1897 (age 74 years, 71 days). Interment at Elmwood Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
      William Elliott Gonzales (1866-1937) — also known as William E. Gonzales; Benigno Elliott Gonzales — of Columbia, Richland County, S.C. Born in Charleston, Charleston County, S.C., April 24, 1866. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army during the Spanish-American War; newspaper editor; U.S. Minister to Cuba, 1913-19; U.S. Ambassador to Peru, 1919-21. Died in Columbia, Richland County, S.C., October 20, 1937 (age 71 years, 179 days). Interment at Elmwood Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Ambrosio José Gonzales (1818-1893) and Harriet Rutledge (Elliott) Gonzales (1839-1869); married, February 2, 1887, to Sarah Cecil Shiver (1869-1932).
      See also U.S. State Dept career summary — Find-A-Grave memorial
      Milledge Luke Bonham (1813-1890) — of South Carolina. Born in Saluda, Edgefield District (now Saluda County), S.C., December 25, 1813. Member of South Carolina state legislature, 1840-44, 1865-67; colonel in the U.S. Army during the Mexican War; U.S. Representative from South Carolina 4th District, 1857-60; general in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; Representative from South Carolina in the Confederate Congress, 1862; Governor of South Carolina, 1862-64. Died in White Sulphur Springs, Greenbrier County, W.Va., August 27, 1890 (age 76 years, 245 days). Interment at Elmwood Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of James Bonham and Sophie (Smith) Bonham; married, November 13, 1845, to Ann Griffin; father of Milledge Lipscomb Bonham; cousin *** of Preston Smith Brooks (1819-1857).
      Political family: Bonham family of Edgefield, South Carolina.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
      Alva Moore Lumpkin (1886-1941) — also known as Alva M. Lumpkin — of Columbia, Richland County, S.C. Born in Milledgeville, Baldwin County, Ga., November 13, 1886. Democrat. Member of South Carolina state legislature, 1920; U.S. Senator from South Carolina, 1941; died in office 1941. Died in Washington, D.C., August 1, 1941 (age 54 years, 261 days). Interment at Elmwood Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
      Christie Benet (1879-1951) — of Columbia, Richland County, S.C. Born in Abbeville, Abbeville County, S.C., December 26, 1879. Democrat. Lawyer; Solicitor, 5th Circuit, 1908-09; U.S. Senator from South Carolina, 1918. Episcopalian. Member, American Bar Association; Rotary; Phi Delta Phi; Phi Beta Kappa; Alpha Tau Omega; Omicron Delta Kappa. Died in Columbia, Richland County, S.C., March 30, 1951 (age 71 years, 94 days). Interment at Elmwood Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of William Christie Benet and Susan (McGowan) Benet; married, October 17, 1906, to Alice Van Yeveren Haskell.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
      Claud Napoleon Sapp (1886-1947) — also known as Claud N. Sapp — of Columbia, Richland County, S.C. Born in Lancaster, Lancaster County, S.C., February 11, 1886. Democrat. Lawyer; member of South Carolina state house of representatives, 1912-14, 1920-24; delegate to Democratic National Convention from South Carolina, 1924, 1928, 1932, 1936; South Carolina Democratic state chair, 1930-34; U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of South Carolina, 1934-47; died in office 1947. Methodist. Member, Omicron Delta Kappa; Freemasons; Elks. Died in Columbia, Richland County, S.C., February 3, 1947 (age 60 years, 357 days). Interment at Elmwood Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Daniel F. Sapp and Mittie (Fulp) Sapp; married, November 20, 1916, to Mary Davis (1892-1937); father of Claud Napoleon Sapp, Jr. (1917-1972) and Joseph D. Sapp.
      Political family: Sapp family of Columbia, South Carolina.
      See also Find-A-Grave memorial
      Joshua Fulton Ensor (1834-1907) — also known as Joshua F. Ensor — of Columbia, Richland County, S.C. Born in Butler, Baltimore County, Md., December 12, 1834. Republican. Served in the Union Army during the Civil War; physician; farmer; candidate for U.S. Representative from South Carolina 4th District, 1890, 1892; postmaster at Columbia, S.C., 1897-1907; delegate to Republican National Convention from South Carolina, 1900. Presbyterian. Member, Freemasons; Knights Templar; Shriners; Grand Army of the Republic. Died in Columbia, Richland County, S.C., August 9, 1907 (age 72 years, 240 days). Interment at Elmwood Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of George Ensor (1806-1865) and Rebecca (Kemp) Ensor (1806-1874); married 1862 to Henrietta Kemp (1838-1916).
      See also Find-A-Grave memorial
      Maxcy Gregg (1814-1862) — of Columbia, Richland District (now Richland County), S.C. Born in Columbia, Richland District (now Richland County), S.C., August 1, 1814. Lawyer; major in the U.S. Army during the Mexican War; delegate to South Carolina secession convention from Richland, 1860-62; general in the Confederate Army during the Civil War. During the Battle of Fredericksburg, he was shot in the spine, mortally wounded, and died two days later, in Fredericksburg, Va., December 15, 1862 (age 48 years, 136 days). Interment at Elmwood Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of James Gregg (1787-1852) and Cornelia Manning (Maxcy) Gregg (1792-1862).
      See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
      Claud Napoleon Sapp, Jr. (1917-1972) — also known as Claud N. Sapp, Jr. — of Columbia, Richland County, S.C. Born in Columbia, Richland County, S.C., October 21, 1917. Served in the U.S. Navy during World War II; member of South Carolina state house of representatives, 1947. Died in Columbia, Richland County, S.C., December 3, 1972 (age 55 years, 43 days). Interment at Elmwood Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Claud Napoleon Sapp and Mary (Davis) Sapp (1892-1937); brother of Joseph D. Sapp (1928-2000).
      Political family: Sapp family of Columbia, South Carolina.
      See also Find-A-Grave memorial — BillionGraves burial record
      Joseph D. Sapp (1928-2000) — of Columbia, Richland County, S.C. Born in Columbia, Richland County, S.C., January 22, 1928. Democrat. Member of South Carolina state house of representatives, 1949-50; delegate to Democratic National Convention from South Carolina, 1964. Died in Columbia, Richland County, S.C., April 14, 2000 (age 72 years, 83 days). Interment at Elmwood Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Claud Napoleon Sapp (1886-1947) and Mary (Davis) Sapp (1892-1937); brother of Claud Napoleon Sapp, Jr..
      Political family: Sapp family of Columbia, South Carolina.
      See also Find-A-Grave memorial


    First Baptist Church Cemetery
    Columbia, Richland County, South Carolina
    Politicians buried here:
      John Joel Chappell (1782-1871) — of South Carolina. Born in Fairfield District (now Fairfield County), S.C., January 19, 1782. Member of South Carolina state legislature, 1810; U.S. Representative from South Carolina 4th District, 1813-17. Died in Lowndes County, Ala., May 23, 1871 (age 89 years, 124 days). Interment at First Baptist Church Cemetery.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page


    First Presbyterian Churchyard
    Columbia, Richland County, South Carolina

    Politicians buried here:
      James Augustus Black (1793-1848) — of South Carolina. Born near Abbeville, Ninety Six District (now Abbeville County), S.C., 1793. Served in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812; iron manufacturer; member of South Carolina state house of representatives, 1826-28, 1832-35; U.S. Representative from South Carolina 1st District, 1843-48; died in office 1848. Died in Washington, D.C., April 3, 1848 (age about 54 years). Interment at First Presbyterian Churchyard; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery, Washington, D.C.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
      Abraham Nott (1768-1830) — of South Carolina. Born in Saybrook (now Deep River), Middlesex County, Conn., February 5, 1768. Lawyer; member of South Carolina state house of representatives, 1796-97; U.S. Representative from South Carolina 4th District, 1799-1801; circuit judge in South Carolina, 1810-19. Died in Fairfield District (now Fairfield County), S.C., June 19, 1830 (age 62 years, 134 days). Interment at First Presbyterian Churchyard.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
      Henry William de Saussure (1763-1839) — also known as Henry W. de Saussure — of Charleston, Charleston County, S.C.; Columbia, Richland County, S.C. Born in Jasper County, S.C., August 16, 1763. Lawyer; delegate to South Carolina state constitutional convention, 1790; member of South Carolina state house of representatives, 1791, 1801, 1806-08; intendant of Charleston, South Carolina, 1797-99. Congregationalist. Died in Columbia, Richland District (now Richland County), S.C., March 26, 1839 (age 75 years, 222 days). Interment at First Presbyterian Churchyard.
      Relatives: Son of Jonathan Daniel Hector de Saussure (1736-1798) and Mary (McPherson) de Saussure (1739-1815); married 1785 to Elizabeth Ford (1767-1821); father of William Ford DeSaussure (1792-1870); uncle of Andrew William Burnet; grandfather of Wilmot Gibbes de Saussure; second great-granduncle of Burnet Rhett Maybank; third great-granduncle of Burnet Rhett Maybank, Jr..
      Political family: Lowndes-DeSaussure-Aiken-Maybank family of Charleston, South Carolina (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
    Other politicians who have monuments here:
      John Hugh Means (1812-1862) — of Buckhead, Fairfield District (now Old Buckhead, Fairfield County), S.C. Born in Fairfield District (now Fairfield County), S.C., August 18, 1812. Planter; Governor of South Carolina, 1850-52; delegate to South Carolina secession convention from Fairfield, 1860-62; died in office 1862; colonel in the Confederate Army during the Civil War. Mortally wounded in the Second Battle of Bull Run (Second Manassas), and died a few days later, in Prince William County, Va., September 1, 1862 (age 50 years, 14 days). Interment a private or family graveyard, Fairfield County, S.C.; cenotaph at First Presbyterian Churchyard.
      See also Find-A-Grave memorial


    Greenlawn Cemetery
    Garner's Ferry Road
    Columbia, Richland County, South Carolina
    Politicians buried here:
      Lee Atwater (1951-1991) — also known as Harvey LeRoy Atwater — of Charleston, Charleston County, S.C. Born in Atlanta, Fulton County, Ga., February 27, 1951. Republican. Delegate to Republican National Convention from South Carolina, 1972; Chairman of Republican National Committee, 1989-91. Member, Alpha Tau Omega. Self proclaimed "dirty tricks" political strategist; rhythm and blues guitarist. Died, from brain cancer, in Washington, D.C., March 29, 1991 (age 40 years, 30 days). Interment at Greenlawn Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Harvey Dillard Atwater and Alma 'Toddy' (Page) Atwater; married 1978 to Sally Dunbar.
      See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — Find-A-Grave memorial
      Books about Lee Atwater: John Brady, Bad Boy : The Life and Politics of Lee Atwater


    Presbyterian Churchyard
    Columbia, Richland County, South Carolina
    Politicians buried here:
      Franklin Harper Elmore (1799-1850) — also known as Franklin H. Elmore — of South Carolina. Born in Laurensville, Laurens District (now Laurens, Laurens County), S.C., October 15, 1799. Lawyer; banker; U.S. Representative from South Carolina, 1836-39 (4th District 1836-37, 3rd District 1837-39); U.S. Senator from South Carolina, 1850; died in office 1850. Died in Washington, D.C., May 29, 1850 (age 50 years, 226 days). Interment at Presbyterian Churchyard.
      Relatives: Son of John Archer Elmore; half-brother-in-law of Benjamin Fitzpatrick and Dixon Hall Lewis (1802-1848); half-brother of Rush Elmore and Albert S. Elmore; brother of Benjamin F. Elmore.
      Political family: Elmore family of South Carolina and Alabama.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
      William Ford DeSaussure (1792-1870) — also known as William F. DeSaussure — of Columbia, Richland District (now Richland County), S.C. Born in Charleston, Charleston County, S.C., February 22, 1792. Democrat. Member of South Carolina state legislature, 1830; U.S. Senator from South Carolina, 1852-53; delegate to South Carolina secession convention from Richland, 1860-62. Died in Columbia, Richland County, S.C., March 13, 1870 (age 78 years, 19 days). Interment at Presbyterian Churchyard.
      Relatives: Son of Henry William de Saussure and Elizabeth (Ford) de Saussure (1767-1821); uncle of Wilmot Gibbes de Saussure; first cousin of Andrew William Burnet (1811-1896); first cousin thrice removed of Burnet Rhett Maybank; first cousin four times removed of Burnet Rhett Maybank, Jr..
      Political family: Lowndes-DeSaussure-Aiken-Maybank family of Charleston, South Carolina (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article


    Randolph Cemetery
    Columbia, Richland County, South Carolina
    Founded 1871
    Politicians buried here:
    W. Beverly Nash William Beverly Nash — also known as W. B. Nash — of Richland County, S.C. Born in South Carolina. Republican. Delegate to South Carolina state constitutional convention from Richland County, 1868; member of South Carolina state senate, 1876-78; Presidential Elector for South Carolina, 1876. African ancestry. Interment at Randolph Cemetery.
      Image source: New York Public Library
      Benjamin Franklin Randolph (d. 1868) — also known as Benjamin F. Randolph — of Orangeburg County, S.C. Delegate to South Carolina state constitutional convention from Orangeburg County, 1868. African ancestry. Murdered as he stepped off a train, 1868. Original interment in unknown location; reinterment at Randolph Cemetery.
      Presumably named for: Benjamin Franklin
      Seymour Carroll (1894-1943) — of Columbia, Richland County, S.C. Born in South Carolina, February 14, 1894. Republican. Served in the U.S. Army during World War I; member, Committee to Notify Vice-Presidential Nominee, Republican National Convention, 1940. African ancestry. Died, from nephritis and uremia, in the Veterans Administration hospital, Columbia, Richland County, S.C., March 11, 1943 (age 49 years, 25 days). Interment at Randolph Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Richard Carroll and Mary (Simms) Carroll; married to Bessie Mae Burley.


    State House Grounds
    Columbia, Richland County, South Carolina

    Politicians who have monuments here:
      James Francis Byrnes (1882-1972) — also known as James F. Byrnes — of Aiken, Aiken County, S.C.; Spartanburg, Spartanburg County, S.C.; Columbia, Richland County, S.C. Born in Charleston, Charleston County, S.C., May 2, 1882. Democrat. Lawyer; newspaper editor; U.S. Representative from South Carolina 2nd District, 1911-25; U.S. Senator from South Carolina, 1931-41; defeated, 1924; delegate to Democratic National Convention from South Carolina, 1936, 1940, 1952; Associate Justice of U.S. Supreme Court, 1941-42; resigned 1942; U.S. Secretary of State, 1945-47; Governor of South Carolina, 1951-55. Episcopalian or Methodist. Member, Freemasons; Knights of Pythias; Junior Order. Died in Columbia, Richland County, S.C., April 9, 1972 (age 89 years, 343 days). Interment at Trinity Episcopal Cathedral Cemetery; statue at State House Grounds.
      Relatives: Son of James Francis Byrnes and Elizabeth E. Byrnes; married, May 2, 1906, to Maude Busch (c.1883-1976); first cousin of Frank Joseph Hogan (1877-1944).
      Cross-reference: James E. Doyle
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — federal judicial profile — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — Find-A-Grave memorial
      Books about James F. Byrnes: David Robertson, Sly and Able: A Political Biography of James F. Byrnes
    Strom Thurmond James Strom Thurmond (1902-2003) — also known as Strom Thurmond — of Edgefield, Edgefield County, S.C.; Aiken, Aiken County, S.C.; Columbia, Richland County, S.C. Born in Edgefield, Edgefield County, S.C., December 5, 1902. School teacher; superintendent of schools; lawyer; member of South Carolina state senate from Edgefield County, 1933-38; resigned 1938; delegate to Democratic National Convention from South Carolina, 1936, 1948, 1952 (member, Committee on Rules and Order of Business), 1956; circuit judge in South Carolina, 1938-46; served in the U.S. Army during World War II; Governor of South Carolina, 1947-51; States Rights candidate for President of the United States, 1948; U.S. Senator from South Carolina, 1954-56, 1956-2003; received 14 electoral votes for Vice-President, 1960; delegate to Republican National Convention from South Carolina, 1972, 1988. Baptist. Member, American Bar Association; Freemasons; Knights Templar; Shriners; Pi Kappa Alpha. Died in Edgefield, Edgefield County, S.C., June 26, 2003 (age 100 years, 203 days). Interment at Willow Brook Cemetery, Edgefield, S.C.; statue erected 1999 at State House Grounds.
      Relatives: Son of John William Thurmond and Eleanor Gertrude Thurmond; married 1947 to Jean Crouch (1926-1960); married 1968 to Nancy Janice Moore.
      Cross-reference: Charles E. Simons, Jr. — Joe Wilson — John Light Napier — Robert Adams
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — votes in Congress from the Washington Post — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — OurCampaigns candidate detail
      Books about Strom Thurmond: Essie May Washington-Williams, Dear Senator : A Memoir by the Daughter of Strom Thurmond — Jack Bass & Marilyn W. Thompson, Strom: The Complicated Personal and Political Life of Strom Thurmond — R. J. Duke, The Centennial Senator: True Stories of Strom Thurmond from the People Who Knew Him Best — Joseph Crespino, Strom Thurmond's America
      Image source: Library of Congress
      Benjamin Ryan Tillman (1847-1918) — also known as Benjamin R. Tillman; "Pitchfork Ben"; "The One-Eyed Plowboy" — of Trenton, Edgefield County, S.C. Born in Edgefield District (now Edgefield County), S.C., August 11, 1847. Democrat. Served in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; lost an eye in 1864; farmer; Governor of South Carolina, 1890-94; delegate to South Carolina state constitutional convention, 1895; U.S. Senator from South Carolina, 1895-1918; died in office 1918; in Februry, 1902, he accused fellow South Carolina senator John McLaurin, of accepting a bribe (in the form of federal patronage) to support a treaty; McLaurin called Tillman a liar, and the two came to blows on the Senate floor; both were censured by the Senate; delegate to Democratic National Convention from South Carolina, 1904, 1912 (member, Platform and Resolutions Committee), 1916; member of Democratic National Committee from South Carolina, 1912-16. English ancestry. Died in Washington, D.C., July 3, 1918 (age 70 years, 326 days). Interment at Ebenezer Cemetery, Trenton, S.C.; statue at State House Grounds.
      Relatives: Son of Benjamin Ryan Tillman, Sr. and Sophia (Hancock) Tillman; brother of George Dionysius Tillman (1826-1902); married 1868 to Sallie Starke.
      Cross-reference: Frazier B. Baker
      Tillman County, Okla. is named for him.
      Politician named for him: Ben T. Leppard
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
      Books about Ben Tillman: Stephen Kantrowitz, Ben Tillman & the Reconstruction of White Supremacy
    Wade Hampton Wade Hampton III (1818-1902) — also known as "Savior of South Carolina" — of Columbia, Richland County, S.C.; Charleston, Charleston County, S.C. Born in Charleston, Charleston County, S.C., March 28, 1818. Democrat. Member of South Carolina state senate, 1858; general in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; Governor of South Carolina, 1876-79; defeated, 1865; U.S. Senator from South Carolina, 1879-91; delegate to Democratic National Convention from South Carolina, 1880; U.S. Railroad Commissioner, 1893-97. Episcopalian. Awarded the Confederate Medal of Honor by the Sons of Confederate Veterans. Lost a leg in an accident in 1878. Died in Columbia, Richland County, S.C., April 11, 1902 (age 84 years, 14 days). Interment at Trinity Episcopal Cathedral Cemetery; statue at State House Grounds.
      Relatives: Son of Wade Hampton (1791-1858) and Ann (FitzSimons) Hampton; married, October 10, 1838, to Margaret Buchanan Frances Preston (1818-1852; daughter of Francis Smith Preston; sister of William Campbell Preston (1794-1860)); married 1858 to Mary Singleton McDuffie (1830-1874; daughter of George McDuffie); grandson of Wade Hampton (1752-1835).
      Political families: Breckinridge-Preston-Cabell-Henry family of Virginia; Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      Hampton County, S.C. is named for him.
      The town of Hampton, South Carolina, is named for him.  — Wade Hampton High School (built 1960, rebuilt 2006), in Greenville, South Carolina, is named for him.  — The Wade Hampton State Office Building (opened 1940), in Columbia, South Carolina, is named for him.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
      Books about Wade Hampton: Walter Brian Cisco, Wade Hampton: Confederate Warrior, Conservative Statesman
      Image source: William C. Roberts, Leading Orators (1884)


    Trinity Episcopal Cathedral Cemetery
    Columbia, Richland County, South Carolina
    Politicians buried here:
      James Francis Byrnes (1882-1972) — also known as James F. Byrnes — of Aiken, Aiken County, S.C.; Spartanburg, Spartanburg County, S.C.; Columbia, Richland County, S.C. Born in Charleston, Charleston County, S.C., May 2, 1882. Democrat. Lawyer; newspaper editor; U.S. Representative from South Carolina 2nd District, 1911-25; U.S. Senator from South Carolina, 1931-41; defeated, 1924; delegate to Democratic National Convention from South Carolina, 1936, 1940, 1952; Associate Justice of U.S. Supreme Court, 1941-42; resigned 1942; U.S. Secretary of State, 1945-47; Governor of South Carolina, 1951-55. Episcopalian or Methodist. Member, Freemasons; Knights of Pythias; Junior Order. Died in Columbia, Richland County, S.C., April 9, 1972 (age 89 years, 343 days). Interment at Trinity Episcopal Cathedral Cemetery; statue at State House Grounds.
      Relatives: Son of James Francis Byrnes and Elizabeth E. Byrnes; married, May 2, 1906, to Maude Busch (c.1883-1976); first cousin of Frank Joseph Hogan (1877-1944).
      Cross-reference: James E. Doyle
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — federal judicial profile — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — Find-A-Grave memorial
      Books about James F. Byrnes: David Robertson, Sly and Able: A Political Biography of James F. Byrnes
    Wade Hampton Wade Hampton III (1818-1902) — also known as "Savior of South Carolina" — of Columbia, Richland County, S.C.; Charleston, Charleston County, S.C. Born in Charleston, Charleston County, S.C., March 28, 1818. Democrat. Member of South Carolina state senate, 1858; general in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; Governor of South Carolina, 1876-79; defeated, 1865; U.S. Senator from South Carolina, 1879-91; delegate to Democratic National Convention from South Carolina, 1880; U.S. Railroad Commissioner, 1893-97. Episcopalian. Awarded the Confederate Medal of Honor by the Sons of Confederate Veterans. Lost a leg in an accident in 1878. Died in Columbia, Richland County, S.C., April 11, 1902 (age 84 years, 14 days). Interment at Trinity Episcopal Cathedral Cemetery; statue at State House Grounds.
      Relatives: Son of Wade Hampton (1791-1858) and Ann (FitzSimons) Hampton; married, October 10, 1838, to Margaret Buchanan Frances Preston (1818-1852; daughter of Francis Smith Preston; sister of William Campbell Preston (1794-1860)); married 1858 to Mary Singleton McDuffie (1830-1874; daughter of George McDuffie); grandson of Wade Hampton (1752-1835).
      Political families: Breckinridge-Preston-Cabell-Henry family of Virginia; Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      Hampton County, S.C. is named for him.
      The town of Hampton, South Carolina, is named for him.  — Wade Hampton High School (built 1960, rebuilt 2006), in Greenville, South Carolina, is named for him.  — The Wade Hampton State Office Building (opened 1940), in Columbia, South Carolina, is named for him.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
      Books about Wade Hampton: Walter Brian Cisco, Wade Hampton: Confederate Warrior, Conservative Statesman
      Image source: William C. Roberts, Leading Orators (1884)
      William Campbell Preston (1794-1860) — also known as William C. Preston — of Columbia, Richland County, S.C. Born in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., December 27, 1794. Lawyer; member of South Carolina state house of representatives, 1828-34; U.S. Senator from South Carolina, 1833-42; resigned 1842. President of South Carolina College 1845-51. Died in Columbia, Richland County, S.C., May 22, 1860 (age 65 years, 147 days). Interment at Trinity Episcopal Cathedral Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Francis Smith Preston and Sarah Buchanan (Campbell) Preston (1778-1846); brother of John Smith Preston and Margaret Buchanan Preston Preston (1818-1852; who married Wade Hampton III); married to Missouri Maria Coalter; nephew of James Patton Preston; uncle of Robert Jefferson Breckinridge, Jr. and William Campbell Preston Breckinridge; grandson of William Preston and William Campbell; grandnephew of Patrick Henry (1736-1799); granduncle of Levin Irving Handy, Desha Breckinridge and Henry Skillman Breckinridge; first cousin of James McDowell, John Buchanan Floyd and George Rogers Clark Floyd; first cousin once removed of John Breckinridge; second cousin of Joseph Cabell Breckinridge, Valentine Wood Southall and Robert Jefferson Breckinridge; second cousin once removed of John Cabell Breckinridge, Peter Augustus Porter (1827-1864) and Stephen Valentine Southall; second cousin twice removed of Clifton Rodes Breckinridge and Peter Augustus Porter (1853-1925); third cousin of James Douglas Breckinridge.
      Political families: Breckinridge-Preston-Cabell-Henry family of Virginia; Marshall-Harrison-Randolph-Cabell family of Virginia (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
      Richard Irvine Manning (1859-1931) — also known as Richard I. Manning — of Sumter, Sumter County, S.C.; Columbia, Richland County, S.C. Born in Homesley Plantation, Sumter County, S.C., August 15, 1859. Democrat. Farmer; member of South Carolina state house of representatives, 1892-96; member of South Carolina state senate, 1898-1906; delegate to Democratic National Convention from South Carolina, 1912 (member, Committee on Rules and Order of Business), 1916; Governor of South Carolina, 1915-19; president, American Products Export and Import Corp.; Cotton Warehouse Co.; National Bank of Sumter; Bank of Mayesville; South Carolina Land & Settlement Assoc.; director, Sumter Telephone Co.; Telephone Manufacturing Co.; Magneto Manufacturing Co.; Palmetto Fire Insurance Co.; New York Life Insurance Co.; Union-Buffalo Mills Co.; Clifton Manufacturing Co.; chairman Peoples State Bank of South Carolina. Episcopalian. Member, Delta Kappa Epsilon; Freemasons; Knights of Pythias. Died in Columbia, Richland County, S.C., September 11, 1931 (age 72 years, 27 days). Interment at Trinity Episcopal Cathedral Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Richard Irvine Manning (1817-1861) and Elizabeth Allen (Sinkler) Manning; married 1881 to Lelia Bernard Meredith; nephew of John Laurence Manning; grandson of Richard Irvine Manning (1789-1836); grandnephew of John Peter Richardson (1801-1864); great-grandnephew of James Burchill Richardson; first cousin once removed of John Peter Richardson (1831-1899); third cousin once removed of James Haselden Manning (1857-1936); third cousin twice removed of James Douglass Manning.
      Political family: Manning-Richardson-Ellerbe-Haselden family of South Carolina.
      Richard Irvine Manning (1789-1836) — of South Carolina. Born near Sumter, Sumter District (now Sumter County), S.C., May 1, 1789. Democrat. Member of South Carolina state house of representatives, 1820; member of South Carolina state senate, 1822; Governor of South Carolina, 1824-26; U.S. Representative from South Carolina, 1834-36 (8th District 1834-35, 7th District 1835-36); died in office 1836. Died in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., May 1, 1836 (age 47 years, 0 days). Interment at Trinity Episcopal Cathedral Cemetery; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery, Washington, D.C.
      Relatives: Son of Laurence P. Manning (1756-1804) and Susannah (Richardson) Manning; father of John Laurence Manning; nephew of James Burchill Richardson; grandfather of Richard Irvine Manning (1859-1931); first cousin and brother-in-law of John Peter Richardson (1801-1864); first cousin once removed of John Peter Richardson (1831-1899); first cousin thrice removed of James Haselden Manning; first cousin four times removed of James Douglass Manning.
      Political family: Manning-Richardson-Ellerbe-Haselden family of South Carolina.
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
      Hugh Smith Thompson (1836-1904) — of South Carolina. Born January 24, 1836. Governor of South Carolina, 1882-86. Died November 20, 1904 (age 68 years, 301 days). Interment at Trinity Episcopal Cathedral Cemetery.
      John Laurence Manning (1816-1889) — also known as John L. Manning — of Fulton, Clarendon District (now Clarendon County), S.C. Born in Clarendon County, S.C., January 29, 1816. Democrat. Planter; member of South Carolina state house of representatives, 1842-46, 1865-67; member of South Carolina state senate, 1846-52, 1861-65; Governor of South Carolina, 1852-54; delegate to South Carolina secession convention from Clarendon, 1860-62; colonel in the Confederate Army during the Civil War. Episcopalian. Died in Camden, Kershaw County, S.C., October 29, 1889 (age 73 years, 273 days). Interment at Trinity Episcopal Cathedral Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Richard Irvine Manning (1789-1836) and Elizabeth Peyre (Richardson) Manning (1794-1873); married to Susan Frances Hampton and Sallie Bland Clarke; nephew of John Peter Richardson (1801-1864); uncle of Richard Irvine Manning (1859-1931); grandnephew of James Burchill Richardson; first cousin of John Peter Richardson (1831-1899); second cousin twice removed of James Haselden Manning; second cousin thrice removed of James Douglass Manning.
      Political family: Manning-Richardson-Ellerbe-Haselden family of South Carolina.
      See also Find-A-Grave memorial
      Wade Hampton (1752-1835) — Born in Virginia, 1752. Democrat. Colonel in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; member of South Carolina state house of representatives, 1779-86, 1791; U.S. Representative from South Carolina 4th District, 1795-97, 1803-05; Presidential Elector for South Carolina, 1800; general in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812. Reputed to be the wealthiest planter in America; owned more than 3,000 slaves in 1830. Died in Columbia, Richland County, S.C., February 4, 1835 (age about 82 years). Interment at Trinity Episcopal Cathedral Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Anthony Hampton and Anne (Preston) Hampton; married 1783 to Martha (Epps) Howell (1753-1784); married 1786 to Harriet Flud (1768-1794); married 1801 to Mary Cantey (1779-1863); father of Caroline Martha Hampton (1807-1883; who married John Smith Preston); grandfather of Wade Hampton III (1818-1902).
      Political family: Breckinridge-Preston-Cabell-Henry family of Virginia (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      Other politicians named for him: Wade H. GibbesWade H. FisherWade H. EllisWade H. LasseterWade H. HarrisWade H. KitchensW. H. PhillipsWade H. FowlerWade H. PepperWade H. Insley, Sr.Wade H. MassieWade H. GarrettWade H. CreekmoreWade H. Crowder, Jr.Wade H. McReynoldsWade H. BallardWade H. McCree, Jr.Wade H. Ballard IIIWade H. Franklin
      See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
      John Smith Preston (1809-1881) — also known as John S. Preston — of Columbia, Richland County, S.C. Born in Abingdon, Washington County, Va., April 20, 1809. Democrat. Lawyer; planter; member of South Carolina state senate, 1848-56; delegate to Democratic National Convention from South Carolina, 1860; delegate to South Carolina secession convention from Richland, 1861-62; general in the Confederate Army during the Civil War. Died in Columbia, Richland County, S.C., May 1, 1881 (age 72 years, 11 days). Interment at Trinity Episcopal Cathedral Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of Francis Smith Preston and Sarah Buchanan (Campbell) Preston (1778-1846); brother of William Campbell Preston (1794-1860); married, April 28, 1830, to Caroline Hampton (1807-1883; daughter of Wade Hampton); nephew of James Patton Preston; uncle of Robert Jefferson Breckinridge, Jr. and William Campbell Preston Breckinridge; grandson of William Preston and William Campbell; grandnephew of Patrick Henry; granduncle of Levin Irving Handy, Desha Breckinridge and Henry Skillman Breckinridge; first cousin of James McDowell, John Buchanan Floyd and George Rogers Clark Floyd; first cousin once removed of John Breckinridge; second cousin of Joseph Cabell Breckinridge, Valentine Wood Southall and Robert Jefferson Breckinridge; second cousin once removed of John Cabell Breckinridge, Peter Augustus Porter (1827-1864) and Stephen Valentine Southall; second cousin twice removed of Clifton Rodes Breckinridge and Peter Augustus Porter (1853-1925); third cousin of James Douglas Breckinridge.
      Political families: Breckinridge-Preston-Cabell-Henry family of Virginia; Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
      See also Find-A-Grave memorial
      Peter Horry (1743-1815) — Born in Georgetown County, S.C., 1743. Planter; general in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; member of South Carolina state house of representatives, 1782, 1792-94; member of South Carolina state senate, 1785-87. French Huguenot ancestry. Died in Columbia, Richland County, S.C., February 28, 1815 (age about 71 years). Interment at Trinity Episcopal Cathedral Cemetery.
      Relatives: Son of John Horry (1709-1770) and Anne (Robert) Horry (1720-1759); married to Margaret Mary Guignard (1745-1817); first cousin once removed of Elias Edward Horry (1773-1834).
      Horry County, S.C. is named for him.
      See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
      James Parsons Carroll (1809-1883) — of South Carolina. Born in Charleston, Charleston County, S.C., April 10, 1809. Member of South Carolina state house of representatives, 1838-40; member of South Carolina state senate, 1853-54, 1858-59; delegate to South Carolina secession convention from Edgefield, 1860-62. Died August 24, 1883 (age 74 years, 136 days). Interment at Trinity Episcopal Cathedral Cemetery.
      Joseph Daniel Pope (1820-1908) — of Beaufort, Beaufort District (now Beaufort County), S.C. Born in Beaufort District (now Beaufort County), S.C., March 6, 1820. Delegate to South Carolina secession convention from St. Helena, 1860-62. Died in Columbia, Richland County, S.C., March 21, 1908 (age 88 years, 15 days). Interment at Trinity Episcopal Cathedral Cemetery.
      Relatives: Married to Catherine Scott (1828-1895).
      See also Find-A-Grave memorial


    St. John's Episcopal Churchyard
    Congaree, Richland County, South Carolina
    Politicians buried here:
      James Hopkins Adams (1812-1861) — also known as James H. Adams — of Gadsden, Richland District (now Richland County), S.C. Born in Congaree, Richland District (now Richland County), S.C., March 15, 1812. Planter; member of South Carolina state house of representatives, 1834-37, 1840-41, 1848-49; member of South Carolina state senate, 1851-54; Presidential Elector for South Carolina, 1852; Governor of South Carolina, 1854-56; delegate to South Carolina secession convention from Richland, 1860-61; died in office 1861. Episcopalian. Died in Columbia, Richland District (now Richland County), S.C., July 13, 1861 (age 49 years, 120 days). Interment at St. John's Episcopal Churchyard.
      Relatives: Son of Henry Walker Adams and Mary Goodwyn Adams; married 1832 to Jane Margaret Scott; nephew of Joel Adams II and William Weston Adams (1786-1831); uncle of Henry Walker Adams (1852-1903); grandson of Joel Adams; first cousin of James Uriah Adams and James Pickett Adams.
      Political family: Adams family of Congaree, South Carolina.
      See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
      James Pickett Adams (1828-1904) — Born in Richland District (now Richland County), S.C., September 2, 1828. Democrat. Lawyer; member of South Carolina state house of representatives, 1858-61, 1888-89; major in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; delegate to Democratic National Convention from South Carolina, 1872. Died in Richland County, S.C., November 1, 1904 (age 76 years, 60 days). Interment at St. John's Episcopal Churchyard.
      Relatives: Nephew of Joel Adams II and William Weston Adams (1786-1831); uncle of Henry Walker Adams; grandson of Joel Adams; first cousin of James Uriah Adams and James Hopkins Adams.
      Political family: Adams family of Congaree, South Carolina.
      Joel Adams (1750-1830) — of South Carolina. Born in Virginia, February 4, 1750. Served in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; planter; member of South Carolina state house of representatives, 1814-15. Baptist. Died in Congaree, Richland District (now Richland County), S.C., July 9, 1830 (age 80 years, 155 days). Interment at St. John's Episcopal Churchyard.
      Relatives: Married to Grace Weston; father of Joel Adams II and William Weston Adams; grandfather of James Uriah Adams, James Hopkins Adams and James Pickett Adams; great-grandfather of Henry Walker Adams; second great-grandfather of Weston Adams II; third great-grandfather of Edward Clarkson Leverette Adams and Robert Adams, (VI; 1963-).
      Political family: Adams family of Congaree, South Carolina.
      See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
      James Uriah Adams (1812-1871) — Born in Richland District (now Richland County), S.C., February 12, 1812. Planter; member of South Carolina state house of representatives, 1864. Died in Richland County, S.C., March 7, 1871 (age 59 years, 23 days). Interment at St. John's Episcopal Churchyard.
      Relatives: Father of Henry Walker Adams; nephew of Joel Adams II and William Weston Adams; grandson of Joel Adams; first cousin of James Hopkins Adams (1812-1861) and James Pickett Adams.
      Political family: Adams family of Congaree, South Carolina.


    Old Richmond Presbyterian Churchyard
    Wateree, Richland County, South Carolina
    Politicians buried here:
      Jefferson Blakely Bates (1896-1966) — also known as Jeff B. Bates — of Columbia, Richland County, S.C. Born in Wateree, Richland County, S.C., October 16, 1896. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Navy during World War I; member of South Carolina state house of representatives from Richland County, 1923-26; member of South Carolina state senate from Richland County, 1935-40; South Carolina state treasurer, 1940; delegate to Democratic National Convention from South Carolina, 1952, 1956. Presbyterian. Member, Sigma Alpha Epsilon; Kiwanis. Died August 17, 1966 (age 69 years, 305 days). Interment at Old Richmond Presbyterian Churchyard.
      Relatives: Son of John M. Bates and Amanda (Scott) Bates.


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