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The Political Graveyard: A Database of American History
Politicians in Trouble or Disgrace

Politicians in Trouble or Disgrace: Unspecified and Uncategorized

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in chronological order

  John Williams (1752-1806) — of Charlotte County (now Washington County), N.Y. Born in Barnstable, England, 1752. Colonel in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; member of New York state senate Eastern District, 1777-78, 1782-95; member of New York state assembly from Charlotte County, 1781-82; delegate to New York convention to ratify U.S. constitution from Washington and Clinton counties, 1788; member of New York council of appointment, 1789; U.S. Representative from New York 9th District, 1795-99; county judge in New York, 1800. Expelled for misconduct from the state senate in 1778. Died in Salem, Washington County, N.Y., July 22, 1806 (age about 54 years). Interment at Salem Cemetery, Salem, N.Y.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Memucan Hunt — of Granville County, N.C. Member of North Carolina state senate from Granville County, 1777, 1779-81, 1788; North Carolina state treasurer, 1784-87. In 1786, charges of misconduct were brought against him and heard by the Legislature in joint session; two days later, he was defeated for re-election. Burial location unknown.
  William W. Irvin (1779-1842) — of Lancaster, Fairfield County, Ohio. Born near Charlottesville, Albemarle County, Va., April 5, 1779. Democrat. Lawyer; common pleas court judge in Ohio, 1803-04; impeached and removed from office as judge by the state legislature, 1804; member of Ohio state house of representatives, 1806-07, 1825-27; Speaker of the Ohio State House of Representatives, 1825-26; justice of Ohio state supreme court, 1810-15; candidate for Governor of Ohio, 1822; U.S. Representative from Ohio 9th District, 1829-33. Died March 27, 1842 (age 62 years, 356 days). Interment at Elmwood Cemetery, Lancaster, Ohio.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Thomas McKean (1734-1817) — of New Castle, New Castle County, Del.; Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa. Born in New London Township, Chester County, Pa., March 19, 1734. Lawyer; member of Delaware colonial Assembly, 1765-76; common pleas court judge in Delaware, 1765-74; Delegate to Continental Congress from Delaware, 1774-76; signer, Declaration of Independence, 1776; served in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; member of Delaware house of assembly, 1777-83; President of Delaware, 1777; chief justice of Pennsylvania state supreme court, 1777-99; signer, Articles of Confederation, 1781; delegate to Pennsylvania state constitutional convention, 1789-90; Governor of Pennsylvania, 1799-1808; impeached by the Pennsylvania legislature in 1807, but no trial was ever held. Scotch-Irish ancestry. Died in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., June 24, 1817 (age 83 years, 97 days). Original interment at First Presbyterian Church Cemetery, Philadelphia, Pa.; reinterment in 1843 at Laurel Hill Cemetery, Philadelphia, Pa.
  Relatives: Son of William McKean and Letitia (Finley) McKean; married to the sister-in-law of Francis Hopkinson (1737-1791); married 1763 to Mary Borden (died 1773); married 1774 to Sarah Armitage.
  Political family: Hopkinson-McKean family of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
  McKean County, Pa. is named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: Thomas McKean Thompson McKennanThomas McKean Pettit
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  Robert Potter (c.1800-1842) — of Oxford, Granville County, N.C. Born near Williamsboro, Vance County, N.C., about 1800. Member of North Carolina house of commons from Granville County, 1828, 1834; U.S. Representative from North Carolina 6th District, 1829-31; delegate to Texas Republic Republic constitutional convention from District of Nacogdoches, 1836; signer, Texas Declaration of Independence, 1836; Texas Republic Secretary of the Navy, 1836; member of Texas Republic Senate from District of Red River and Fannin, 1840-42; died in office 1842. Resigned from the U.S. Congress in 1831 after maiming two men in a jealous rage; convicted, and sentenced to six months in prison. Expelled in 1834 from the North Carolina House for cheating at cards. Shot and killed by members of an opposing faction who surrounded his home, in Harrison County (part now in Marion County), Tex., March 2, 1842 (age about 42 years). Original interment at a private or family graveyard, Marion County, Tex.; reinterment in 1928 at Texas State Cemetery, Austin, Tex.
  Potter County, Tex. is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Theophilus Washington Smith (1784-1845) — also known as Theophilus W. Smith — of Edwardsville, Madison County, Ill. Born in New York, New York County, N.Y., September 28, 1784. Studied law in the office of Aaron Burr; lawyer; newspaper editor; candidate for Illinois state attorney general, 1820; member of Illinois state senate, 1823-26; advocated the legalization of slavery in Illinois; justice of Illinois state supreme court, 1825-42; impeached by the Illinois Legislature in 1833, on charges of oppressive conduct and corruption; the Senate acquitted him on a vote of 12-10 (two-thirds required). Died in Chicago, Cook County, Ill., May 6, 1845 (age 60 years, 220 days). Original interment in unknown location; reinterment at Rosehill Cemetery, Chicago, Ill.
  Relatives: Son of Thomas Rodney Smith (1750-1791) and Mary (Thurston) Smith (1754-1820); father of Adeline Clarissa Smith (1812-1866; who married Jesse Burgess Thomas (1777-1853)) and Louise M. Smith (who married Levi Day Boone); uncle of Frances Everallyn Rose (1809-1836; who married William Wallace Irwin).
  Political family: Thomas-Smith-Irwin family of Pennsylvania (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
Andrew Jackson Andrew Jackson (1767-1845) — also known as "Old Hickory"; "The Farmer of Tennessee"; "King Andrew the First" — of Nashville, Davidson County, Tenn. Born, in a log cabin, in The Waxhaws, Lancaster County, S.C., March 15, 1767. Democrat. Lawyer; U.S. Attorney for Tennessee, 1790-97; U.S. Representative from Tennessee at-large, 1796-97; U.S. Senator from Tennessee, 1797-98, 1823-25; justice of Tennessee state supreme court, 1798; general in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812; Governor of Florida Territory, 1821; President of the United States, 1829-37; censured by the U.S. Senate in 1834 over his removal of federal deposits from the Bank of the United States; on January 30, 1835, while attending funeral services at the Capitol Building for Rep. Warren R. Davis of South Carolina, he was shot at with two guns -- which both misfired -- by Richard Lawrence, a house painter (later found not guilty by reason of insanity). Presbyterian. Scotch-Irish ancestry. Member, Freemasons. Killed Charles Dickinson in a pistol duel, May 30, 1806; also dueled with Thomas Hart Benton and Waightstill Avery. Elected in 1910 to the Hall of Fame for Great Americans. Died, of dropsy (congestive heart failure), in Nashville, Davidson County, Tenn., June 8, 1845 (age 78 years, 85 days). Interment at The Hermitage, Nashville, Tenn.; statue erected 1853 at Lafayette Park, Washington, D.C.; statue erected 1856 at Jackson Square, New Orleans, La.
  Relatives: Son of Andrew Jackson (1730-1767) and Elizabeth (Hutchinson) Jackson (1737-1781); married, January 17, 1794, to Rachel (Donelson) Robards (1767-1828; aunt of Andrew Jackson Donelson (1799-1871)).
  Political families: Marshall-Harrison-Randolph-Cabell family of Virginia; Caffery family of Louisiana (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Cross-reference: Francis P. Blair
  Jackson counties in Ala., Ark., Colo., Fla., Ill., Ind., Iowa, Kan., Ky., La., Mich., Miss., Mo., N.C., Ohio, Okla., Ore., Tenn., Tex., W.Va. and Wis., and Hickory County, Mo., are named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: Andrew J. DonelsonAndrew Jackson MillerAndrew J. FaulkAndrew Jackson TitusAndrew Jackson IsacksAndrew Jackson HamiltonAndrew J. HarlanAndrew J. KuykendallAndrew J. ThayerElam A. J. GreeleyAndrew Jackson IngleAndrew J. OgleAndrew Jackson CarrAndrew J. WatermanAndrew J. BentleyAndrew J. RogersWilliam A. J. SparksAndrew Jackson PoppletonAndrew J. HunterAndrew Jackson BryantAndrew J. BealeA. J. ClementsAndrew Jackson BakerAndrew J. FeltA. J. KingAndrew J. SawyerAndrew Jackson GreenfieldAndrew Jackson CaldwellAndrew Jackson GahaganAndrew Jackson BishipAndrew Jackson HoustonAndrew J. CobbAndrew J. MontagueAndrew J. BarchfeldAndrew J. BallietAndrew J. KirkAndrew J. LivingstonA. J. SherwoodAndrew Jackson StewartAndrew J. MayAndrew J. McConnicoAndrew J. SawyerAndrew J. BrewerAndrew BettwyAndrew J. TransueAndrew Jackson GravesAndrew Jackson GilbertAndrew J. GoodwinAndrew J. HinshawAndy YoungAndrew Jackson Kupper
  Coins and currency: His portrait appears on the U.S. $20 bill; from the 1860s until 1927, his portrait appeared on on U.S. notes and certificates of various denominations from $5 to $10,000. In 1861, his portrait appeared on Confederate States $1,000 notes.
  Campaign slogan: "Let the people rule."
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial — Tennessee Encyclopedia
  Books about Andrew Jackson: Robert Vincent Remini, The Life of Andrew Jackson — Robert Vincent Remini, Andrew Jackson : The Course of American Freedom, 1822-1832 — Robert Vincent Remini, Andrew Jackson : The Course of American Democracy, 1833-1845 — Robert Vincent Remini, Andrew Jackson : The Course of American Empire, 1767-1821 — Andrew Burstein, The Passions of Andrew Jackson — David S. Heidler & Jeanne T. Heidler, Old Hickory's War: Andrew Jackson and the Quest for Empire — Donald B. Cole, The Presidency of Andrew Jackson — H. W. Brands, Andrew Jackson : His Life and Times — Jon Meacham, American Lion: Andrew Jackson in the White House — Donald Barr Chidsey, Andrew Jackson, Hero
  Image source: Portrait & Biographical Album of Washtenaw County (1891)
  Henry Smith (1788-1851) — of Texas. Born in Kentucky, May 20, 1788. Delegate to Texas Consultation of 1835 from District of Columbia, 1835; Provisional Governor of Texas, 1835-36; impeached as governor by the provisional council in 1836; Texas Republic Secretary of the Treasury, 1836-38; member of Texas Republic House of Representatives, 1840; went to California for the 1849 Gold Rush. Died in Los Angeles County, Calif., March 4, 1851 (age 62 years, 288 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of James Smith and Magdalen (Woods) Smith.
John Tyler John Tyler (1790-1862) — also known as "The Accidental President" — of Williamsburg, Va. Born in Charles City County, Va., March 29, 1790. Whig. Lawyer; member of Virginia state house of delegates, 1811-16, 1823-25, 1839-40; served in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812; U.S. Representative from Virginia 23rd District, 1817-21; Governor of Virginia, 1825-27; U.S. Senator from Virginia, 1827-36; delegate to Virginia state constitutional convention, 1829-30; delegate to Whig National Convention from Virginia, 1839 (Convention Vice-President); Vice President of the United States, 1841; defeated, 1836; President of the United States, 1841-45; delegate to Virginia secession convention, 1861; Delegate from Virginia to the Confederate Provisional Congress, 1861-62; died in office 1862. Episcopalian. English ancestry. A bill to impeach him was defeated in the House of Representatives in January 1843. Died, probably from a stroke, in a hotel room at Richmond, Va., January 18, 1862 (age 71 years, 295 days). Interment at Hollywood Cemetery, Richmond, Va.
  Relatives: Son of John Tyler and Mary (Armistead) Tyler (1761-1797); married, March 20, 1813, to Letitia Christian; married, June 26, 1844, to Julia Gardiner (1820-1889; daughter of David Gardiner (1784-1844)); father of David Gardiner Tyler; third cousin of George Madison; third cousin once removed of Zachary Taylor; third cousin twice removed of John Strother Pendleton, Albert Gallatin Pendleton and Aylett Hawes Buckner; third cousin thrice removed of James Francis Buckner and Bronson Murray Cutting.
  Political families: Saltonstall-Davis-Frelinghuysen-Appleton family of Massachusetts; Meriwether-Kellogg-Tyler family of Virginia and Connecticut; Mapes-Jennings-Denby-Neuman family of New York and Arizona; Tyler-Mapes family of New York (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Cross-reference: Benjamin Tappan
  Tyler County, Tex. is named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: John T. RichJohn T. CuttingJohn Tyler CooperJohn Tyler Hammons
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Books about John Tyler: Oliver P. Chitwood, John Tyler : Champion of the Old South — Norma Lois Peterson, Presidencies of William Henry Harrison and John Tyler — Jane C. Walker, John Tyler : A President of Many Firsts — Edward P. Crapol, John Tyler, the Accidental President — Gary May, John Tyler: The 10th President, 1841-1845 — Donald Barr Chidsey, And Tyler Too
  Image source: Portrait & Biographical Album of Washtenaw County (1891)
  John Louis Hargis (1802-1886) — also known as "Bally John" — of Jackson, Breathitt County, Ky.; Morehead, Rowan County, Ky. Born in Washington County, Va., March 4, 1802. Lawyer; Breathitt County Court Clerk; removed from office as Court Clerk, 1846, over unspecified charges against him; delegate to Kentucky state constitutional convention, 1849; member of Kentucky state house of representatives, 1855-57. Died in Morehead, Rowan County, Ky., April 2, 1886 (age 84 years, 29 days). Interment somewhere in Morehead, Ky.
  Relatives: Father-in-law of Archibald Calloway Cope (1828-1907); father of Thomas Frazier Hargis; uncle of John Seldon Hargis; granduncle of Alexander Hamilton Hargis and James Henderson Hargis.
  Political family: Cockrell-South family of Kentucky.
  Charles Edward Travis (1829-1860) — also known as Charles E. Travis — Born in Alabama, August 8, 1829. Member of Texas state house of representatives, 1853-54. Court-martialed and discharged from the U.S. Cavalry, on charges of conduct unbecoming an officer and a gentleman, based on incidents of alleged slander, unauthorized absence, and cheating at cards. Died, of consumption (tuberculosis) in Washington County, Tex., 1860 (age about 30 years). Interment at Masonic Cemetery, Chappell Hill, Tex.
  Relatives: Son of Rosanna (Cato) Travis and William Barret Travis (1809-1836).
  Jay Gibbons — of Albany County, N.Y. Member of New York state assembly from Albany County 1st District, 1861; expelled from the Assembly, April 18, 1861. Burial location unknown.
  John W. Dawson (1820-1877) — of Fort Wayne, Allen County, Ind. Born in Cambridge, Dearborn County, Ind., October 21, 1820. Farmer; lawyer; newspaper editor; candidate for Indiana state house of representatives, 1854; candidate for secretary of state of Indiana, 1856; candidate for U.S. Representative from Indiana, 1858; Governor of Utah Territory, 1861. In December, 1861, after less than a month as territorial governor, fled Utah amid controversy and scandal. Just east of Salt Lake City, he was attacked by three men and badly injured. Died in Indiana, September 10, 1877 (age 56 years, 324 days). Interment at Lindenwood Cemetery, Fort Wayne, Ind.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  John Harrison Surratt, Jr. (1844-1916) — also known as John H. Surratt, Jr. — of Surrattsville (now Clinton), Prince George's County, Md. Born in Washington, D.C., April 13, 1844. Postmaster at Surrattsville, Md., 1862-63; dismissed as postmaster in 1863 for alleged disloyalty to the Union; became a Confederate courier and spy; he and others attempted to kidnap President Abraham Lincoln; later, the plot to kill the President and other government officials was formulated at his mother's boarding house in Washington; he denied involvement in the assassination, but fled overseas; he was arrested in Alexandria, Egypt, and sent back to the U.S.; tried in a Maryland court in 1867 for his alleged involvement in the murder plot, but the jury couldn't reach a verdict, and a mistrial was declared; treasurer of a steamship company. Died, from pneumonia, in Baltimore, Md., April 21, 1916 (age 72 years, 8 days). Interment at New Cathedral Cemetery, Baltimore, Md.
  Relatives: Son of John Harrison Surratt (1813-1862) and Mary (Jenkins) Surratt (1823-1865; hanged for her part in the conspiracy to assassinate the President and other officials); married 1872 to Mary Victorine Hunter (1846-1926).
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  James Henry Lane (1814-1866) — also known as James H. Lane; "Liberator of Kansas"; "Fighting Jim" — of Lawrenceburg, Dearborn County, Ind.; Lawrence, Douglas County, Kan. Born in Lawrenceburg, Dearborn County, Ind., June 22, 1814. Served in the U.S. Army during the Mexican War; Lieutenant Governor of Indiana, 1849-53; U.S. Representative from Indiana 4th District, 1853-55; delegate to Kansas state constitutional convention, 1855, 1857; Kansas Democratic state chair, 1855; U.S. Senator from Kansas, 1861-66; died in office 1866; general in the Union Army during the Civil War. Member, Freemasons. Deranged, and charged with financial irregularities, he was mortally wounded by a self-inflicted gunshot on July 1, 1866, and died ten days later, near Fort Leavenworth, Leavenworth County, Kan., July 11, 1866 (age 52 years, 19 days). Interment at Oak Hill Cemetery, Lawrence, Kan.
  Relatives: Son of Amos Lane (1778-1849) and Mary (Foote) Lane; brother of George W. Lane; married 1842 to Mary E. Baldridge (granddaughter of Arthur St. Clair).
  Political family: Lane family of Lawrenceburg, Indiana.
  Lane County, Kan. is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
Andrew Johnson Andrew Johnson (1808-1875) — of Carthage, Moore County, N.C.; Greeneville, Greene County, Tenn. Born in Raleigh, Wake County, N.C., December 29, 1808. Mayor of Greeneville, Tenn., 1830; member of Tennessee state house of representatives, 1835; member of Tennessee state senate, 1841; U.S. Representative from Tennessee 1st District, 1843-53; Governor of Tennessee, 1853-57, 1862-65; U.S. Senator from Tennessee, 1857-62, 1875; died in office 1875; Vice President of the United States, 1865; President of the United States, 1865-69; candidate for Democratic nomination for President, 1868. Member, Freemasons; Knights Templar. In 1868, was impeached by the House of Representatives; tried and acquitted by the Senate, which voted 35 to 19 (short of the required two-thirds) on three of the eleven articles of impeachment. Died, after a series of strokes, at his daughter's home in Carter County, Tenn., July 31, 1875 (age 66 years, 214 days). Interment at Andrew Johnson National Cemetery, Greeneville, Tenn.
  Relatives: Married, May 17, 1827, to Eliza McCardle; father of Martha Johnson (who married David Trotter Patterson (1818-1891)).
  Cross-reference: Edmund G. Ross — George T. Brown — Christopher G. Memminger — Thomas Overton Moore — John W. Chanler
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Books about Andrew Johnson: Hans L. Trefousse, Andrew Johnson: A Biography — Howard Means, The Avenger Takes His Place: Andrew Johnson and the 45 Days That Changed the Nation — Paul H. Bergeron, Andrew Johnson's Civil War and Reconstruction — Mary Malone, Andrew Johnson (for young readers)
  Critical books about Andrew Johnson: Nathan Miller, Star-Spangled Men : America's Ten Worst Presidents
  Image source: James G. Blaine, Twenty Years of Congress, vol. 2 (1886)
  W. M. Saunders — Delegate to Florida state constitutional convention from Gadsden and Liberty counties, 1868; expelled from convention. Burial location unknown.
  D. Richards — Delegate to Florida state constitutional convention from Gadsden and Liberty counties, 1868; expelled from convention. Burial location unknown.
  William Woods Holden (1818-1892) — also known as William W. Holden — of Raleigh, Wake County, N.C. Born in Orange County, N.C., November 24, 1818. Newspaper editor; delegate to Democratic National Convention from North Carolina, 1860; delegate to North Carolina secession convention, 1861; Governor of North Carolina, 1865, 1868-70; postmaster at Raleigh, N.C., 1873-81. Methodist. Impeached and removed from office as Governor in 1870, over corruption scandal. Died in Raleigh, Wake County, N.C., March 1, 1892 (age 73 years, 98 days). Interment at Oakwood Cemetery, Raleigh, N.C.
  Relatives: Married to Ann Augusta Young (1819-1852); father of Ida Augustus Holden (who married Calvin Josiah Cowles (1821-1907)); grandfather of Charles Holden Cowles.
  Political families: Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York; Baldwin-Greene-Upson-Hoar family of Connecticut (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  David Christy Butler (1829-1891) — also known as David C. Butler — of Nebraska. Born December 15, 1829. Republican. Member of Nebraska territorial House of Representatives, 1861; member Nebraska territorial council, 1864; Governor of Nebraska, 1867-71; removed 1871; member of University of Nebraska board of regents, 1869-71; impeached on March 4, 1871, and removed from office as Governor on June 2, 1871. Member, Freemasons. Died May 25, 1891 (age 61 years, 161 days). Interment at Pawnee City Cemetery, Pawnee City, Neb.
  Butler County, Neb. is named for him.
  Abraham Oakey Hall (1826-1898) — also known as A. Oakey Hall; "Elegant Oakey" — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in Albany, Albany County, N.Y., July 26, 1826. Republican. Newspaper reporter; lawyer; delegate to Republican National Convention from New York, 1856; mayor of New York City, N.Y., 1869-72; indicted and tried in 1871-73 on charges of covering up corruption during his mayoralty; acquitted. Presbyterian; later Catholic. English, Welsh, and French ancestry. Died, of heart disease, in Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., October 7, 1898 (age 72 years, 73 days). Entombed at Trinity Cemetery, Manhattan, N.Y.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Henry Clay Warmoth (1842-1931) — also known as Henry C. Warmoth — of Lawrence, Plaquemines Parish, La. Born in McLeansboro, Hamilton County, Ill., May 9, 1842. Republican. Delegate to Republican National Convention from Louisiana, 1868, 1888, 1896, 1900, 1908, 1912; Governor of Louisiana, 1868-72; U.S. Collector of Customs, 1888-92. Episcopalian. Impeached as Governor in 1872 during election contest over successor. Died in New Orleans, Orleans Parish, La., September 30, 1931 (age 89 years, 144 days). Interment at Metairie Cemetery, New Orleans, La.
  Presumably named for: Henry Clay
  Relatives: Married, May 30, 1877, to Sally Durand.
  See also Wikipedia article
  Edmund Jackson Davis (1827-1883) — also known as Edmund J. Davis — of Texas. Born in St. Augustine, St. Johns County, Fla., October 2, 1827. Republican. District judge in Texas, 1856-61; general in the Union Army during the Civil War; delegate to Texas state constitutional convention, 1866; Governor of Texas, 1870-74; defeated, 1873, 1880; member of Republican National Committee from Texas, 1872-74; candidate for U.S. Representative from Texas 10th District, 1882. After his defeat as Governor, he refused to give up the office, and barricaded himself in the state capitol. Died in Austin, Travis County, Tex., February 7, 1883 (age 55 years, 128 days). Interment at Texas State Cemetery, Austin, Tex.
  Relatives: Son-in-law of Forbes N. Britton (1820?-1861).
  Cross-reference: J. Goldsteen Dupree
  Books about Edmund J. Davis: Carl H. Moneyhon, Edmund J. Davis of Texas: Civil War General, Republican Leader, Reconstruction Governor
  Joseph Williams Thorne (b. 1816) — also known as J. Williams Thorne — of Chester County, Pa.; Warren County, N.C. Born in Pennsylvania, December 25, 1816. Republican. Delegate to North Carolina state constitutional convention, 1875; member of North Carolina state house of representatives, 1875; expelled 1875; member of North Carolina state senate; elected 1876. Expelled in 1875 from the North Carolina House as an "infidel," reportedly for his support of Darwin's theory of evolution. Interment at Longwood Cemetery, Longwood, Pa.
  Nehemiah George Ordway (1828-1907) — also known as Nehemiah G. Ordway — of Warner, Merrimack County, N.H. Born in Warner, Merrimack County, N.H., November 10, 1828. Republican. New Hampshire Republican state chair, 1860; member of New Hampshire state house of representatives from Warner, 1875-77; member of New Hampshire state senate 9th District, 1879-80; Governor of Dakota Territory, 1880-84. Indicted on corruption charges in 1883; his criminal trial in 1884 was cut short by a jurisdiction ruling; removed from office by President Arthur. Died July 1, 1907 (age 78 years, 233 days). Interment at Pine Grove Cemetery, Warner, N.H.
  Relatives: Father of George Ordway (1843?-?).
  John Gayfer Berry (1838-1923) — also known as John G. Berry — of Berryville, Otsego County, Mich. Born in 1838. Republican. Member of Michigan state senate 27th District, 1889-90; Michigan land commissioner, 1893-94; defeated, 1890; removed 1894. Removed from office as land commissioner, March 20, 1894. Died in 1923 (age about 85 years). Interment at Evergreen Hills Cemetery, Vanderbilt, Mich.
  Joseph F. Hambitzer — of Michigan. Michigan state treasurer, 1893-94. Removed from office as state treasurer, March 20, 1894. Burial location unknown.
  John W. Jochim — of Michigan. Secretary of state of Michigan, 1893-94. Removed from office, March 20, 1894. Burial location unknown.
  Frank P. Demarest — of Mont Moor, Rockland County, N.Y.; West Nyack, Rockland County, N.Y. Member of New York state assembly from Rockland County, 1888-89, 1891, 1900. Indicted several times on various offenses in 1891-03; tried in 1903 and acquitted; indicted on fraud charges in 1904; he had presented claims against the Town of Clarkstown for services he had not provided; tried in Rockland County and convicted on November 18, 1904. Burial location unknown.
  William Miller Jenkins (1856-1941) — also known as William M. Jenkins — of Arkansas City, Cowley County, Kan.; Kay County, Okla.; Sapulpa, Creek County, Okla. Born in Alliance, Stark County, Ohio, April 25, 1856. Republican. Lawyer; delegate to Republican National Convention from Kansas, 1888; secretary of Oklahoma Territory, 1897-1901; Governor of Oklahoma Territory, 1901. Presbyterian. Removed from office as Governor in a scandal over a sanitarium contract; a later investigation exonerated him. Died in Sapulpa, Creek County, Okla., October 19, 1941 (age 85 years, 177 days). Interment at South Heights Cemetery, Sapulpa, Okla.
  Relatives: Son of William Jenkins and Lydia (Miller) Jenkins; married, December 31, 1878, to Delphina White.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Charles Swayne (1842-1907) — of Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa.; Pensacola, Escambia County, Fla. Born in Guyencourt, New Castle County, Del., August 10, 1842. Republican. Lawyer; candidate for justice of Florida state supreme court, 1888; U.S. District Judge for the Northern District of Florida, 1889-1907; died in office 1907; impeached by the U.S. House of Representatives in December 1904; acquitted in the U.S. Senate. Died July 5, 1907 (age 64 years, 329 days). Burial location unknown.
  Cross-reference: Anthony Higgins
  See also federal judicial profile — Wikipedia article
  Richard J. Butler — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Saloon keeper; member of New York state assembly from New York County 9th District, 1903. Charged in March 1904 with having received stolen property in the form of three barrels of liquor found in the cellar of his saloon, but the magistrate determined that they had been delivered without his knowledge. Burial location unknown.
  John Green Brady (1848-1918) — also known as John G. Brady — of Alaska. Born in New York, New York County, N.Y., May 25, 1848. Governor of Alaska Territory, 1897-1906. Presbyterian. Forced to resign as governor in 1906, after an inquiry about his involvement with the Reynolds-Alaska Development Company. Ill with diabetes, he suffered a stroke and died in Sitka, Alaska, December 17, 1918 (age 70 years, 206 days). Interment at National Cemetery, Sitka, Alaska.
  See also NNDB dossier
  George B. Cox — of Cincinnati, Hamilton County, Ohio. Republican. Delegate to Republican National Convention from Ohio, 1900, 1904, 1908. Political boss of Cincinnati at the turn of the century. Indicted on corruption charges in 1906, but never convicted. Burial location unknown.
  Arthur Cyprian Harper (1866-1948) — also known as Arthur C. Harper — of Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, Calif.; Bakersfield, Kern County, Calif. Born in Columbus, Lowndes County, Miss., 1866. Democrat. Hardware business; mayor of Los Angeles, Calif., 1906-09; resigned 1909; resigned from office as mayor under threat of recall over corruption scandals. Died in Palmdale, Los Angeles County, Calif., December 25, 1948 (age about 82 years). Interment at Angelus-Rosedale Cemetery, Los Angeles, Calif.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Cornelius Hanford (1849-1926) — of Seattle, King County, Wash. Born in Van Buren County, Iowa, April 21, 1849. Republican. Lawyer; member Washington territorial council, 1877; member of Washington territorial House of Representatives, 1889-90; U.S. District Judge for Washington, 1890-1905; U.S. District Judge for the Western District of Washington, 1905-12; resigned 1912. Member, Sons of the American Revolution. Resigned as judge under threat of impeachment, 1912. Died in 1926 (age about 77 years). Interment at Lake View Cemetery, Seattle, Wash.
  Relatives: Son of Edward Hanford and Abby J. (Holgate) Hanford; married, November 15, 1875, to Clara M. Baldwin.
William Sulzer William Sulzer (1863-1941) — also known as "Plain Bill" — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born in Elizabeth, Union County, N.J., March 18, 1863. Lawyer; member of New York state assembly, 1890-94, 1914 (New York County 14th District 1890-92, New York County 10th District 1893-94, New York County 6th District 1914); Speaker of the New York State Assembly, 1893; U.S. Representative from New York, 1895-1912 (11th District 1895-1903, 10th District 1903-12); delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1896, 1900, 1912 (speaker); Governor of New York, 1913; removed 1913; defeated, 1914, 1914. Presbyterian. German and Scotch-Irish ancestry. Member, Freemasons. Impeached and removed from office as governor, 1913. Died in New York City (unknown county), N.Y., November 6, 1941 (age 78 years, 233 days). Interment at Evergreen Cemetery, Hillside, N.J.
  Relatives: Son of Thomas Sulzer and Lydia Sulzer; brother of Charles August Sulzer (1879-1919); married, January 7, 1908, to Clara Rodelheim.
  Cross-reference: Alexander S. Bacon
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Image source: Men of Mark in America (1906)
  Hiram Robert Fowler (1851-1926) — also known as H. Robert Fowler — of Elizabethtown, Hardin County, Ill. Born near Eddyville, Pope County, Ill., February 7, 1851. Democrat. Member of Illinois state house of representatives, 1893-95; member of Illinois state senate, 1900-04; alternate delegate to Democratic National Convention from Illinois, 1908; U.S. Representative from Illinois 24th District, 1911-15; defeated, 1924; in 1915, when the U.S. was still neutral in World War I, he was general counsel for "Labor's National Peace Council," which advocated a weapons embargo against the countries then at war; the organization secretly received funding from German agents; indicted in December 1915, along with Frank Buchanan, Frank S. Monnett, and others, for restraint of trade over the Peace Council's attempts to foment strikes in U.S. munitions plants; stood trial in May 1917, along with (ultimately) six co-defendants; the jury convicted three, but deadlocked over the other four, including Fowler; he was not re-tried. Died January 5, 1926 (age 74 years, 332 days). Interment at Sunset Hill Cemetery, Harrisburg, Ill.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Frank Buchanan (1862-1930) — of Chicago, Cook County, Ill. Born near Madison, Jefferson County, Ind., June 14, 1862. Democrat. Ironworker; U.S. Representative from Illinois 7th District, 1911-17; in 1915, when the U.S. was still neutral in World War I, he was president of "Labor's National Peace Council," which advocated a weapons embargo against the countries then at war; the organization secretly received funding from German agents; when a grand jury investigation was announced, he retaliated by introducing resolutions to impeach U.S. Attorney H. Snowden Marshall; indicted in December 1915, along with H. Robert Fowler, Frank S. Monnett, and others, for restraint of trade over the Peace Council's attempts to foment strikes in U.S. munitions plants; stood trial in May 1917, along with (ultimately) six co-defendants; the jury convicted three, but deadlocked over the other four, including Buchanan; he was not re-tried. Died, of heart disease, in Chicago, Cook County, Ill., April 18, 1930 (age 67 years, 308 days). Interment at Irving Park Boulevard Cemetery, Chicago, Ill.
  Relatives: Son of Joseph Buchanan and Emeline (Connor) Buchanan; married, March 17, 1898, to Minnie Murphy.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Frank Sylvestor Monnett (b. 1857) — also known as Frank S. Monnett — of Crawford County, Ohio. Born in Kenton, Hardin County, Ohio, March 19, 1857. Lawyer; Ohio state attorney general, 1896-1900; defeated in Democratic primary, 1926; Democratic candidate for U.S. Representative from Ohio 12th District, 1910; in 1915, when the U.S. was still neutral in World War I, he was a committee chair in "Labor's National Peace Council," which advocated a weapons embargo against the countries then at war; the organization secretly received funding from German agents; indicted in December 1915, along with H. Robert Fowler, Frank Buchanan, and others, for restraint of trade over the Peace Council's attempts to foment strikes in U.S. munitions plants; stood trial with seven co-defendants, but during the trial, the charges against him were dismissed. Died in Columbus, Franklin County, Ohio. Interment at Monnett Chapel Graveyard, Dallas Township, Crawford County, Ohio.
  William Lloyd Harding (1877-1934) — also known as William L. Harding — of Des Moines, Polk County, Iowa. Born in Sibley, Osceola County, Iowa, October 3, 1877. Republican. Lawyer; member of Iowa state house of representatives, 1907-13; Lieutenant Governor of Iowa, 1913-17; Governor of Iowa, 1917-21. Methodist. Member, Freemasons. Censured by legislature over pardons scandal, and left office in disgrace in 1921. Died December 17, 1934 (age 57 years, 75 days). Entombed in mausoleum at Graceland Park Cemetery, Sioux City, Iowa.
  Relatives: Son of O. B. Harding and Emalyn (Moyer) Harding; married, January 7, 1907, to Carrie M. Lamoreux.
  Harry Benjamin Wolf (1880-1944) — also known as Harry B. Wolf — of Baltimore, Md. Born in Baltimore, Md., June 16, 1880. Democrat. U.S. Representative from Maryland 3rd District, 1907-09. Jewish. Disbarred, 1922; reinstated, 1940. Died in Baltimore, Md., February 17, 1944 (age 63 years, 246 days). Interment at Hebrew Friendship Cemetery, Baltimore, Md.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Thomas B. Roush (born c.1861) — of Athens, Athens County, Ohio. Born in Ohio, about 1861. Mayor of Athens, Ohio, 1920-22; resigned 1922. Resigned as mayor after his son, the police chief, was caught soliciting and accepting a bribe. Burial location unknown.
John C. Walton John Calloway Walton (1881-1949) — also known as Jack C. Walton; "Rarin' Jack" — of Oklahoma City, Oklahoma County, Okla. Born near Indianapolis, Marion County, Ind., March 6, 1881. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army during the Spanish-American War; engineer; mayor of Oklahoma City, Okla., 1919-23; Governor of Oklahoma, 1923; impeached and removed from office as Governor, 1923; candidate for U.S. Senator from Oklahoma, 1924. Died in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma County, Okla., November 25, 1949 (age 68 years, 264 days). Interment at Rose Hill Burial Park, Oklahoma City, Okla.
  Relatives: Son of Lewis W. Walton (1850-1939) and Emma Sarah (Calloway) Walton (1850-1934); married, February 3, 1905, to Madeline Cecile Orrick (1883-1947).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: City of Oklahoma City
  Ernest Bamberger (1877-1958) — of Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Utah. Born in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Utah, August 11, 1877. Republican. Mining executive; member of Republican National Committee from Utah, 1920-24, 1935; candidate for U.S. Senator from Utah, 1922, 1928. Jewish. Member, Chi Psi. Arrested in 1923, along with three friends, for smoking cigars in the Vienna Cafe, Salt Lake City; however, on March 9, Utah's ban on public smoking was repealed. Died in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Utah, January 11, 1958 (age 80 years, 153 days). Interment at Mt. Olivet Cemetery, Salt Lake City, Utah.
  Relatives: Son of Jacob Emanuel Bamberger (1852-1928) and Bertha (Greenwald) Bamberger (1858-1939); nephew of Simon Bamberger; first cousin of Julian Maas Bamberger (1889-1967).
  Political family: Bamberger family of Salt Lake City, Utah.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Frank Leslie Smith (1867-1950) — also known as Frank L. Smith — of Dwight, Livingston County, Ill. Born in Dwight, Livingston County, Ill., November 24, 1867. Republican. Candidate for Lieutenant Governor of Illinois, 1904; delegate to Republican National Convention from Illinois, 1908, 1920, 1924, 1932, 1936, 1940 (member, Committee to Notify Vice-Presidential Nominee), 1944, 1948; U.S. Collector of Internal Revenue for the 8th Illinois District, 1909; member of Illinois Republican State Central Committee, 1910-25; U.S. Representative from Illinois 17th District, 1919-21; defeated, 1930; Illinois Republican state chair, 1919-25; U.S. Senator from Illinois, 1926-28; defeated, 1920; member of Republican National Committee from Illinois, 1932. Not seated as a U.S. Senator in 1927 due to charges of 'fraud and corruption' in his campaign. Died in Dwight, Livingston County, Ill., August 30, 1950 (age 82 years, 279 days). Interment at Oak Lawn Cemetery, Dwight, Ill.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
Huey P. Long Huey Pierce Long (1893-1935) — also known as Huey P. Long; Hugh Pierce Long; "The Kingfish" — of Shreveport, Caddo Parish, La.; New Orleans, Orleans Parish, La. Born near Winnfield, Winn Parish, La., August 30, 1893. Democrat. Lawyer; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Louisiana, 1928; Governor of Louisiana, 1928-32; member of Democratic National Committee from Louisiana, 1928; impeached by the Louisiana House in 1929 over multiple charges including his attempt to impose an oil tax and his unauthorized demolition of the governor's mansion, but not convicted by the Senate; U.S. Senator from Louisiana, 1932-35; died in office 1935. Baptist. Member, Elks. Shot and mortally wounded by Dr. Carl Weiss (who was immediately killed at the scene), in the Louisiana State Capitol Building, September 8, 1935, and died two days later at Our Lady of the Lake Hospital, Baton Rouge, East Baton Rouge Parish, La., September 10, 1935 (age 42 years, 11 days). Interment at State Capitol Grounds, Baton Rouge, La.
  Relatives: Son of Hugh Pierce Long (1852-1937) and Caledonia Palestine (Tison) Long (1860-1913); brother of George Shannon Long and Earl Kemp Long (1895-1960) (who married Blanche B. Revere); married, April 12, 1913, to Rose McConnell; father of Russell Billiu Long; second cousin once removed of Gillis William Long and Speedy Oteria Long.
  Political family: Long family of Louisiana.
  Cross-reference: Cecil Morgan — John H. Overton — Harvey G. Fields — Gerald L. K. Smith
  The Huey P. Long - O.K. Allen Bridge (opened 1940), which carries U.S. Highway 190 and a rail line over the Mississippi River, between East Baton Rouge Parish and West Baton Rouge Parish, Louisiana, is partly named for him.  — Senador Huey Pierce Long, a street in Asunsion, Paraguay, is named for him.
  Campaign slogan: "Every Man a King."
  Campaign slogan: "Share Our Wealth."
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile
  Books by Huey P. Long: Every Man a King : The Autobiography of Huey P. Long
  Books about Huey P. Long: T. Harry Williams, Huey Long — Harnett T. Kane, Huey Long's Louisiana Hayride: The American Rehearsal for Dictatorship 1928-1940 — Richard D. White, Kingfish: The Reign of Huey P. Long — David R. Collins, Huey P. Long : Talker and Doer (for young readers)
  Image source: KnowLA Encyclopedia of Louisiana
  Henry Simpson Johnston (1867-1965) — also known as Henry S. Johnston — of Perry, Noble County, Okla. Born near Evansville, Vanderburgh County, Ind., December 30, 1867. Democrat. Delegate to Democratic National Convention from Oklahoma, 1912; Governor of Oklahoma, 1927-29. Impeached and removed from office as Governor in 1929. Died in Perry, Noble County, Okla., January 7, 1965 (age 97 years, 8 days). Interment somewhere in Perry, Okla.
  William Scott Vare (1867-1934) — also known as William S. Vare — of Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa. Born in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., December 24, 1867. Republican. Delegate to Republican National Convention from Pennsylvania, 1908, 1912, 1916, 1920, 1924, 1928 (member, Credentials Committee; speaker), 1932; candidate for mayor of Philadelphia, Pa., 1911; U.S. Representative from Pennsylvania 1st District, 1912-23, 1923-27; member of Pennsylvania state senate 1st District, 1923; U.S. Senator from Pennsylvania, 1927-29. Political boss of Philadelphia in the 1920's; unseated as U.S. Senator in 1929 over charges of corruption and fraud in his election. Died in Atlantic City, Atlantic County, N.J., August 7, 1934 (age 66 years, 226 days). Interment at West Laurel Hill Cemetery, Bala Cynwyd, Pa.
  Relatives: Son of Augustus Vare and Abigail (Stites) Vare; brother of George Augustus Vare (1859-1908) and Edwin H. Vare; married, July 29, 1897, to Ida Morris; fourth cousin of Fletcher Wilbur Stites; fourth cousin once removed of Christopher Smith Hand.
  Political family: Vare-Stites family of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Ralph W. Chandless — of Bergen County, N.J. Member of New Jersey state house of assembly from Bergen County, 1924-28; Speaker of the New Jersey State House of Assembly, 1926; member of New Jersey state senate from Bergen County, 1929-30. Expelled from the state senate, December 5, 1930. Burial location unknown.
  Grover M. Moscowitz (1886-1947) — of Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y. Born in Hot Springs, Garland County, Ark., August 31, 1886. Lawyer; U.S. District Judge for the Eastern District of New York, 1925-47; died in office 1947; his practice of giving lucrative bankruptcy receiverships to members of his former partner's law firm was condemned as unethical by the U.S. House on April 8, 1930. Jewish. Member, Freemasons. Died in Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y., March 31, 1947 (age 60 years, 212 days). Cremated.
  Relatives: Son of Morris Moscowitz and Bertha (Less) Moscowitz; married 1911 to Miriam H. Greenebaum; father of Grover M. Moscowitz, Jr. (1916-1998).
  Cross-reference: William T. Cowin
  See also federal judicial profile — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Frank E. Edwards — of Seattle, King County, Wash. Mayor of Seattle, Wash., 1928-31; recalled 1931. Recalled from office as mayor in 1931. Burial location unknown.
  Jesse Silbermann (1877-1947) — of Bronx, Bronx County, N.Y. Born in Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y., June 30, 1877. Lawyer; member of New York state assembly from New York County 32nd District, 1908-09; New York City Magistrate, 1920-31; removed from office in July 1931 by the Appellate Division, for being improperly influenced by a party leader in the sentencing of a defendant. Member, Elks; Freemasons. Died, in Mount Sinai Hospital, Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., May 17, 1947 (age 69 years, 321 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Joseph Silbermann and Caroline Silbermann; married to Mabel Saunders.
  Henry Bruckner (1871-1942) — of Bronx, Bronx County, N.Y. Born in Bronx, New York County (now Bronx County), N.Y., June 17, 1871. Democrat. President, Bruckner Beverages; director, Milton Realty Co.; director, American Metal Cap Co.; member of New York state assembly from New York County 35th District, 1901; New York City Commissioner of Public Works, 1902-06; delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1912 (alternate), 1924, 1932 (alternate); U.S. Representative from New York 22nd District, 1913-17; resigned 1917; borough president of Bronx, New York, 1918-33. Member, Freemasons; Rotary; Elks. In 1932, the Seabury investigating committee, looking into corruption in New York City, called him to testify about the wealth he had accumulated; at the conclusion of the investigation, the committee called for his removal as Borough President. Died, from chronic nephritis, in Bronx, Bronx County, N.Y., April 14, 1942 (age 70 years, 301 days). Interment at Woodlawn Cemetery, Bronx, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of John A. Bruckner and Katharine (Schmidt) Bruckner; married, November 17, 1904, to Helen Zobel (c.1879-1930).
  Bruckner Expressway, Bronx, New York, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  James John Joseph Walker (1881-1946) — also known as James J. Walker; Jimmy Walker; "Beau James"; "The Night Mayor" — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born in New York, New York County, N.Y., June 19, 1881. Democrat. Lawyer; songwriter; member of New York state assembly from New York County 5th District, 1910-14; member of New York state senate, 1915-25 (13th District 1915-18, 12th District 1919-25); resigned 1925; delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1924, 1928 (member, Committee on Rules and Order of Business), 1932; mayor of New York City, N.Y., 1926-32; resigned 1932. Catholic. Irish ancestry. Member, Elks. Resigned as mayor during an investigation of corruption in his administration. Died in New York, New York County, N.Y., November 18, 1946 (age 65 years, 152 days). Interment at Gate of Heaven Cemetery, Hawthorne, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of William H. Walker (1852?-?); married to Janet Allen (divorced 1933); married, April 18, 1933, to Betty Compton (actress; divorced 1941).
  See also Wikipedia article — Internet Movie Database profile
  Books about Jimmy Walker: Gerald Leinwand, Mackerels in the Moonlight : Four Corrupt American Mayors
  Frank Hague (1876-1956) — also known as "Sphinx of Jersey City"; "The Boss"; "The Leader" — of Jersey City, Hudson County, N.J. Born in Jersey City, Hudson County, N.J., January 17, 1876. Democrat. Delegate to Democratic National Convention from New Jersey, 1916, 1932; mayor of Jersey City, N.J., 1917-47; member of Democratic National Committee from New Jersey, 1922-52; Vice-Chair of Democratic National Committee, 1929-39; delegate to New Jersey convention to ratify 21st amendment, 1933. Catholic. Irish ancestry. Member, Elks; Knights of Columbus. Powerful leader of Hudson County Democratic "machine"; famously quoted as declaring "I am the law!" Indicted for various crimes but never convicted. Died, from complications of bronchitis and asthma, in New York, New York County, N.Y., January 1, 1956 (age 79 years, 349 days). Entombed at Holy Name Cemetery, Jersey City, N.J.
  Relatives: Son of John D. Hague and Maragaret (Fagen) Hague; married, April 15, 1903, to Jennie W. Warner; uncle of Frank Hague Eggers (1901-1954).
  Opposition slogan (1939): "Home rule, not Hague rule."
  Books about Frank Hague: Richard J. Connors, A Cycle of Power : The Career of Jersey City Mayor Frank Hague — Gerald Leinwand, Mackerels in the Moonlight : Four Corrupt American Mayors
  William C. Hunt — of Cape May County, N.J. Member of New Jersey state house of assembly from Cape May County, 1933-34; member of New Jersey state senate from Cape May County, 1937. Resigned in April 1937 after a court investigation of his election. Burial location unknown.
  Sol Ullman (c.1893-1941) — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born in New York, New York County, N.Y., about 1893. Republican. Lawyer; member of New York state assembly from New York County 6th District, 1919-23; defeated, 1923; indicted by a Federal grand jury in 1921 on charges of conspiring to create a falsified income tax return for a manufacturing company; a trial resulted in a directed verdict of acquittal due to insufficient evidence; alternate delegate to Republican National Convention from New York, 1928; candidate for U.S. Representative from New York 14th District, 1928. Jewish. Member, American Bar Association; Freemasons. Arrested and indicted in 1939 on charges of protecting a physician who performed illegal abortions; in 1941, a dentist was convicted as Ullman's agent in soliciting protection money from physicians, and during the pendency of the criminal charges, disbarment proceedings were brought against him. However, he was never tried, and his obituary states that he was "exonerated". Died, in Lenox Hill Hospital, Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., July 6, 1941 (age about 48 years). Entombed at Union Field Cemetery, Ridgewood, Queens, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Samuel Ullman and Kate Ullman; married to Esther or Estelle Blau.
Irving D. Neustein Irving Daniel Neustein (1901-1979) — also known as Irving D. Neustein — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born in Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., November 30, 1901. Democrat. Lawyer; member of New York state assembly from New York County 6th District, 1931-37; member, New York Unemployment Insurance Appeal Board, 1938-41; when his political activities came under investigation by the U.S. Civil Service Commission as violating the Hatch Act, he resigned; though he was no longer a member, his ouster from the appeal board was ordered two years later. Jewish. Member, Freemasons; Tammany Hall. Died, in Jewish Home for the Aged, Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., December 7, 1979 (age 78 years, 7 days). Burial location unknown.
  Image source: New York Red Book 1936
  Peter B. Carey (1886-1943) — of Chicago, Cook County, Ill. Born in Chicago, Cook County, Ill., November 3, 1886. Democrat. President, Chicago Board of Trade, 1932-35; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Illinois, 1932, 1936, 1940; delegate to Illinois convention to ratify 21st amendment, 1933; Cook County Sheriff, 1942-43. Died, amidst a scandal in his department, from a heart ailment, in Sacred Heart Sanitarium, Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, Wis., November 1, 1943 (age 56 years, 363 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Married to Mary Frances Angsten.
  Herbert E. Lewis (d. 1972) — of Long Beach, Los Angeles County, Calif. Born in Ontario. Served in the U.S. Army during the Spanish-American War; served in the U.S. Army during World War I; mayor of Long Beach, Calif., 1945-47. A member of the "Solid Five," a bloc on the Long Beach city council; all were recalled from office in 1947. Died in 1972. Burial location unknown.
  Joseph Edward Casey (1898-1980) — also known as Joseph E. Casey — of Clinton, Worcester County, Mass. Born in Clinton, Worcester County, Mass., December 27, 1898. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army during World War I; lawyer; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Massachusetts, 1924 (alternate), 1932, 1940, 1944, 1948; U.S. Representative from Massachusetts 3rd District, 1935-43; defeated, 1926, 1928; candidate for U.S. Senator from Massachusetts, 1942. Catholic. Member, Knights of Columbus; Elks; Eagles; American Legion. In 1951-52, a U.S. Senate committee investigated transactions in which a group he led made enormous profits from the purchase and re-sale of surplus U.S. tanker ships following World War II; since federal law required that sales be made only to U.S. citizens, his group allegedly set up several dummy corporations purportedly under American ccontrol, and faked financial statements for them, to buy the tankers on behalf of shipping magnate Aristotle Onassis. A federal indictment against him, over these actions, was unsealed in February 1954, but the charges were dismissed in September. Onassis, also indicted, pleaded guilty and paid a fine. Died September 1, 1980 (age 81 years, 249 days). Interment at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Va.
  Relatives: Son of John Edward Casey and Winifred M. (Carey) Casey; married to Constance Dudley.
  Cross-reference: Julius C. Holmes — Edward R. Stettinius, Jr.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
Julius C. Holmes Julius Cecil Holmes (1899-1968) — also known as Julius C. Holmes — of Lawrence, Douglas County, Kan. Born in Pleasanton, Linn County, Kan., April 24, 1899. Served in the U.S. Army during World War I; Foreign Service officer; U.S. Vice Consul in Marseille, as of 1926; Smyrna, as of 1927-29; Tirana, 1930; general in the U.S. Army during World War II; executive officer, U.S. Joint Chiefs of Staff, 1942; assistant U.S. Secretary of State, 1944-45; U.S. Consul General in Hong Kong, 1959-61; U.S. Ambassador to Iran, 1961-65. In 1951-52, a U.S. Senate committee investigated how a group, including Holmes as well as former U.S. Rep. Joseph E. Casey and former Secretary of State Edward R. Stettinius, Jr., made large profits from the purchase and re-sale of surplus U.S. tanker ships following World War II. Under federal law, ships could be sold only to U.S citizens, so the group allegedly set up several dummy corporations purportedly under American control, and faked financial statements for them, to buy the tankers on behalf of Greek-Argentine shipping magnate Aristotle Onassis. A federal indictment against Holmes was ultimately dropped. Onassis, also indicted, pleaded guilty and paid a fine. Died July 16, 1968 (age 69 years, 83 days). Interment at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Va.
  Relatives: Son of Louella Jane (Trussell) Holmes (1867-1956) and James Reuben Holmes (1868-1946); married to Henrietta Allen (1900-1972).
  See also Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: New York Times, February 24, 1954
  Edward Reilly Stettinius, Jr. (1900-1949) — also known as Edward R. Stettinius, Jr. — Born in Chicago, Cook County, Ill., October 22, 1900. U.S. Secretary of State, 1944-45; U.S. Representative to United Nations, 1945-46. In 1951-52, a U.S. Senate committee investigated transactions in which a group, including Stettinus as well as former U.S. Rep. Joseph E. Casey and diplomat Julius C. Holmes, made large profits from the purchase and re-sale of surplus U.S. tanker ships following World War II. Since federal law required that sales be made only to U.S. citizens, the group allegedly set up dummy corporations purportedly under American control, and faked financial statements for them, to buy the tankers on behalf of Greek-Argentine shipping magnate Aristotle Onassis. Criminal indictments against Casey and Holmes were ultimately dismissed; Onassis pleaded guilty and paid a fine. Died in Greenwich, Fairfield County, Conn., October 31, 1949 (age 49 years, 9 days). Interment at Locust Valley Cemetery, Locust Valley, Long Island, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Edward R. Stettinius and Judith (Carrington) Stettinius.
  Epitaph: "Blessed Are The Pure In Heart."
  See also Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Clark E. Tucker (1897-1971) — of Kansas City, Wyandotte County, Kan. Born December 1, 1897. Republican. Served in the U.S. Navy during World War I; lawyer; mayor of Kansas City, Kan., 1947-55; indicted in 1952, along with two city commissioners, on charges related to city procurement of asphalt. Died December 18, 1971 (age 74 years, 17 days). Interment at Highland Park Cemetery, Kansas City, Kan.
  Roger Alfred Davis (1889-1967) — also known as Roger A. Davis — of Hartly, Kent County, Del. Born in Delaware, March 2, 1889. Grocer; member of Delaware state house of representatives from Kent County 4th District, 1931-32, 1953-54; arrested, in April 1954, by Maryland State Police, on U.S. Route 50, and charged with drunk and reckless driving, as well as disorderly conduct; jailed overnight, pleaded guilty, and fined. Died in Hartly, Kent County, Del., December 6, 1967 (age 78 years, 279 days). Interment at Odd Fellows Cemetery, Camden, Del.
  Relatives: Son of Robert Alfred Davis (1845-1928) and Sarah Ann (Jones) Davis (1850-1937); married 1918 to Hannah Boulden Kirk (1895-1971); father of Roger Elmer Davis; third cousin thrice removed of Daniel Rodney and Caleb Rodney (1767-1840).
  Political families: Rodney family of Delaware; Lawrence-Andrew-Rodney-Parrish family of Adel, Georgia (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Hugh W. Cross (b. 1896) — of Jerseyville, Jersey County, Ill. Born in Jerseyville, Jersey County, Ill., August 24, 1896. Republican. Member of Illinois state house of representatives 38th District, 1933-40; Speaker of the Illinois State House of Representatives, 1939-40; Lieutenant Governor of Illinois, 1941-49; delegate to Republican National Convention from Illinois, 1944, 1948; member, Interstate Commerce Commission, 1949-55; resigned under fire from the Interstate Commerce Commission in 1955, following a unanimous vote of the Senate Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations to open an inquiry into the propriety of his actions influencing the award of a Chicago transportation contract; the committee later reported that he had "made a mistake and acted indiscreetly". Member, American Legion; Freemasons; Shriners; Jesters; Elks; Alpha Tau Omega; Phi Delta Phi. Burial location unknown.
  Charles G. Johnson (1880-1957) — also known as Gus Johnson — of Sacramento, Sacramento County, Calif. Born October 12, 1880. Republican. California state treasurer, 1923-56; resigned 1956; alternate delegate to Republican National Convention from California, 1932. Resigned under fire in 1956, while subject of an inquiry into over $100,000 in unpaid personal loans from banks with state-deposited funds; no charges were ever filed. Died, four days after suffering a stroke, at Sutter Hospital, Sacramento, Sacramento County, Calif., October 14, 1957 (age 77 years, 2 days). Burial location unknown.
  See also Wikipedia article
  John F. Scibetta — of Lodi, Bergen County, N.J. Mayor of Lodi, N.J., 1960. Recalled from office on corruption charges in 1960. Still living as of 1960.
  Paul Taylor Powell (1902-1970) — also known as Paul Powell — of Vienna, Johnson County, Ill. Born in Vienna, Johnson County, Ill., January 21, 1902. Democrat. Delegate to Democratic National Convention from Illinois, 1944, 1948, 1952, 1956, 1960, 1964; chair of Johnson County Democratic Party, 1950; Speaker of the Illinois State House of Representatives, 1959-63; secretary of state of Illinois, 1965-70; died in office 1970; in 1966, his office was investigated for corruption; he was exonerated, but his chief investigator was indicted for theft of state funds. Died in Rochester, Olmsted County, Minn., October 10, 1970 (age 68 years, 262 days). About $800,000 cash was found in shoeboxes in his room at the St. Nicholas Hotel, Springfield, Ill. Interment at Fraternal Cemetery, Vienna, Ill.
  Books about Paul Powell: Robert E. Hartley, Paul Powell of Illinois : Lifelong Democrat
  Adam Clayton Powell, Jr. (1908-1972) — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born in New Haven, New Haven County, Conn., November 29, 1908. Democrat. Baptist minister; U.S. Representative from New York, 1945-71 (22nd District 1945-53, 16th District 1953-63, 18th District 1963-71); delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1952, 1960, 1964; cited for contempt of court in 1966 for refusing to pay damages in a lawsuit against him; on February 28, 1967, he was expelled from the House of Representatives on charges of unbecoming conduct and misusing public funds; the Supreme Court overturned the expulsion in 1969. Baptist. African ancestry. Member, Alpha Phi Alpha; Elks. Died, of prostate cancer, in Jackson Memorial Hospital, Miami, Dade County (now Miami-Dade County), Fla., April 4, 1972 (age 63 years, 127 days). Cremated; ashes scattered in a private or family graveyard, Bahamas.
  Relatives: Son of Adam Clayton Powell, Sr. (1865-1953; minister) and Mattie (Fletcher) Powell; married, March 8, 1933, to Isabel Washington (divorced 1945); married, August 1, 1945, to Hazel Scott (divorced 1960); married, December 15, 1960, to Yvette Marjorie Diago (Flores) Powell; father of Adam Clayton Powell IV (1962-).
  Adam Clayton Powell Jr. Boulevard (formerly part of Seventh Avenue), in Manhattan, New York, is named for him.  — The Adam Clayton Powell State Office Building (opened 1974 as the Harlem State Office Building; renamed 1983), in Manhattan, New York, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Books by Powell,Adam Clayton,Jr.: Adam by Adam: The Autobiography of Adam Clayton Powell, Jr.
  Books about Powell,Adam Clayton,Jr.: Tisha Hamilton, Adam Clayton Powell, Jr.: The Political Biography of an American Dilemma — Wil Haygood, King of the Cats: The Life and Times of Adam Clayton Powell, Jr.
  W. Bernard Smith (b. 1930) — of Logan, Logan County, W.Va. Born in Logan, Logan County, W.Va., September 7, 1930. Democrat. Lawyer; member of West Virginia state senate 7th District, 1969-72; removed 1972. Member, American Bar Association; Elks; Sigma Alpha Epsilon. Expelled from West Virginia State Senate, January 27, 1972. Still living as of 1972.
  Relatives: Son of B. H. Smith and Dolly (Chafin) Smith; married to DeLena A. Powell.
  John J. Peluso (b. 1923) — also known as "Johnny TV" — of Newport, Campbell County, Ky. Born June 1, 1923. Mayor of Newport, Ky., 1964-68, 1976-80; defeated, 1971, 1983. Indicted in 1973 on charges of possession of stolen bonds; later dismissed. Convicted in 1983 of promoting gambling. Indicted in 1984 on federal charges of bribery and conspiracy; pleaded guilty to perjury in 1985; sentenced to ten years in prison; released in 1989. Still living as of 2001.
  George Gordon Battle Liddy (b. 1930) — also known as G. Gordon Liddy — Born in Hoboken, Hudson County, N.J., November 30, 1930. Conservative. Served in the U.S. Army during the Korean conflict; FBI agent; lawyer; candidate for U.S. Representative from New York 28th District, 1968. Irish and Italian ancestry. Organized and directed the burglaries of the Democratic National Committee headquarters in the Watergate complex in May and June 1972; the resulting Watergate scandal led to President Richard Nixon's resignation in 1974; convicted on charges of burglary and wiretapping; sentenced to 20 years in prison and fined $40,000; released in 1977 after serving four and a half years; became a popular radio talk show host. Still living as of 2014.
  Relatives: Son of Sylvester J. Liddy and Maria (Abbaticchio) Liddy; married, November 9, 1957, to Frances Ann Purcell; father of Tom Liddy (1962-).
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Henry J. Cianfrani (1923-2002) — also known as "Buddy Brown"; "The Pizza" — of Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa. Born in a hospital, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., March 19, 1923. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army during World War II; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Pennsylvania, 1956, 1960, 1964; member of Pennsylvania state house of representatives, 1963-66; member of Pennsylvania state senate 1st District, 1967-78. Catholic. Member, Veterans of Foreign Wars; American Legion; Sons of Italy. Convicted in 1977 on federal charges of racketeering and mail fraud for padding his Senate payroll; sentenced to five years in federal prison; served 27 months; released in 1980. Died, following a stroke, in Hahnemann University Hospital, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., July 3, 2002 (age 79 years, 106 days). Burial location unknown.
  Cross-reference: Robert A. Brady
  Robert Bullock (1929-1999) — also known as Bob Bullock — of Texas. Born in Hillsboro, Hill County, Tex., July 10, 1929. Democrat. Member of Texas state house of representatives; elected 1956, 1958; secretary of state of Texas, 1971-72; Texas state comptroller, 1975-90; Lieutenant Governor of Texas, 1991-99. Investigated by a grand jury in 1978, but no indictment resulted. Died in Austin, Travis County, Tex., June 18, 1999 (age 69 years, 343 days). Interment at Texas State Cemetery, Austin, Tex.
  Frederick Waldron Phelps (b. 1929) — also known as Fred Phelps — of Topeka, Shawnee County, Kan. Born in Meridian, Lauderdale County, Miss., November 13, 1929. Democrat. Lawyer; disbarred by the state of Kansas in 1979 over harassment of a court reporter and perjury during the proceedings; in 1985, nine Federal judges filed a disciplinary complaint against him over alleged false accusations, which led to an agreement that he cease law practice in Federal court; pastor of the Westboro Baptist Church, which is widely reviled for its extreme hatred of homosexuals, and its tactics, such as picketing at military funerals; candidate in primary for Governor of Kansas, 1990, 1994, 1998; candidate in primary for U.S. Senator from Kansas, 1992; candidate for mayor of Topeka, Kan., 1993, 1997. Baptist. Still living as of 2014.
  Relatives: Step-son of Olive (Briggs) Phelps (1899-1985); son of Frederick Wade Phelps (1893-1977) and Catherine Idalette (Johnson) Phelps (c.1907-1935); married, May 15, 1952, to Margie Marie Simms.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — OurCampaigns candidate detail
Edwin Edwards Edwin Washington Edwards (b. 1927) — also known as Edwin Edwards; "Fast Eddie" — of Crowley, Acadia Parish, La. Born in Marksville, Avoyelles Parish, La., August 7, 1927. Democrat. Lawyer; member of Louisiana state senate 35th District, 1964-65; U.S. Representative from Louisiana 7th District, 1965-72; Governor of Louisiana, 1972-80, 1984-88, 1992-96; justice of Louisiana state supreme court, 1980. Catholic. Member, American Legion; Lions. Charged in federal court in 1985 with racketeering involving hospital licenses; his first trial ended in hung jury; acquitted in second trial. Convicted in federal court in 2000 on seventeen counts of fraud and racketeering over a scheme to extort money from applicants for casino licenses; sentenced in 2001 to ten years in federal prison and fined $250,000. Still living as of 2014.
  Relatives: Son of Clarence W. Edwards and Agnes (Brouillette) Edwards; married, April 5, 1949, to Elaine Lucille Schwartzenburg (1929-2018).
  Cross-reference: Jack P. F. Gremillion — Camille F. Gravel, Jr.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile
  Books about Edwin Edwards: Tyler Bridges, Bad Bet on the Bayou : The Rise of Gambling in Louisiana and the Fall of Governor Edwin Edwards — John Maginnis, The Last Hayride — John Maginnis, Cross to Bear
  Image source: KnowLA Encyclopedia of Louisiana
  Donald R. Manes (1934-1986) — also known as "The King of Queens" — of Flushing, Queens, Queens County, N.Y.; Jamaica, Queens, Queens County, N.Y. Born in Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y., January 18, 1934. Democrat. Lawyer; borough president of Queens, New York, 1971-86; resigned 1986; delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1980, 1984. On January 10, 1986, he was found driving erratically and bleeding from slashes to his wrist and ankle; at first he claimed he had been abducted, but then admitted his wounds were self-inflicted; while he was hospitalized, a criminal investigation against him became public. Stabbed himself in the heart, and died soon after, at Booth Memorial Medical Center, Flushing, Queens, Queens County, N.Y., March 13, 1986 (age 52 years, 54 days). Interment at Mt. Ararat Cemetery, East Farmingdale, Long Island, N.Y.
  Relatives: Married to Marlene Warshofsky.
  See also Wikipedia article
  D. Michael Boyle (b. 1944) — of Omaha, Douglas County, Neb. Born in Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, Calif., January 19, 1944. Mayor of Omaha, Neb., 1981-87. Catholic. Member, American Bar Association. Recalled from office as mayor in 1987. Still living as of 1997.
  Fofó Iosefa Fiti Sunia (b. 1937) — also known as Fofó I. F. Sunia — of Pago Pago, American Samoa. Born in Fagasá, Pago Pago, American Samoa, March 13, 1937. Democrat. Member of American Samoa senate, 1970-78; Delegate to U.S. Congress from American Samoa, 1981-88; resigned 1988; indicted in 1988 on charges of running a payroll padding scheme, and resigned as Delegate. Samoan ancestry. Still living as of 1989.
  Relatives: Son of Fiti Sunia; brother of Tauese Pita Fiti Sunia and Ipulasi Aitofele Sunia (1943-).
  Political family: Sunia family.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Alan MacGregor Cranston (1914-2000) — also known as Alan Cranston — of Los Altos Hills, Santa Clara County, Calif.; Sacramento, Sacramento County, Calif.; Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, Calif. Born in Palo Alto, Santa Clara County, Calif., June 19, 1914. Democrat. Journalist; served in the U.S. Army during World War II; real estate business; delegate to Democratic National Convention from California, 1956, 1960, 1964, 1968, 1972, 1988 (speaker); California state controller, 1959-67; U.S. Senator from California, 1969-93; defeated in primary, 1964; candidate for Democratic nomination for President, 1984. Protestant. Member, United World Federalists. Sued by Adolf Hitler over his unexpurgated translation into English of Mein Kampf. Reprimanded by the Senate in 1991 over his dealings with Lincoln Savings and Loan president Charles Keating. Died in Los Altos, Santa Clara County, Calif., December 31, 2000 (age 86 years, 195 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of William Cranston and Carol (Dixon) Cranston; married, November 6, 1940, to Geneva McMath (divorced 1951); married 1978 to Norma Weintraub.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — votes in Congress from the Washington Post — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile
  Caspar Willard Weinberger (1917-2006) — also known as Caspar W. Weinberger; Cap Weinberger; "Cap the Knife" — of San Francisco, Calif.; Hillsborough, San Mateo County, Calif. Born in San Francisco, Calif., August 18, 1917. Republican. Served in the U.S. Army during World War II; member of California state assembly, 1953-56; delegate to Republican National Convention from California, 1956 (alternate), 1960 (member, Committee on Rules and Order of Business); California Republican state chair, 1964; member, Federal Trade Commission, 1969-70; chair, Federal Trade Commission, 1970; chair, Federal Trade Commission; director, U.S. Office of Management and Budget; U.S. Secretary of Health, Education and Welfare, 1973-75; U.S. Secretary of Defense, 1981-87. Episcopalian. Jewish ancestry. Member, Phi Beta Kappa. Received the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1987. To forestall any prosecution for alleged misdeeds in connection with the Iran-Contra affair, he was pardoned by President George Bush in 1992. Died, of kidney ailments and pneumonia, in Eastern Maine Medical Center, Bangor, Penobscot County, Maine, March 28, 2006 (age 88 years, 222 days). Interment at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Va.
  Relatives: Step-son of Cerise (Carpenter) Weinberger; son of Herman Weinberger; married, August 12, 1942, to Jane Dalton.
  Epitaph: "Peace Through Strength"
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books by Caspar Weinberger: Fighting for Peace: Seven Critical Years in the Pentagon (1990) — In the Arena : A Memoir of the 20th Century, with Gretchen Roberts — Home of the Brave, with Wynton C. Hall — The Next War, with Peter Schweizer
  Fiction by Caspar Weinberger: Chain of Command, with Peter Schweizer
  Daniel David Rostenkowski (1928-2010) — also known as Dan Rostenkowski; "Rosty"; "Chicago Powerhouse" — of Chicago, Cook County, Ill. Born in Chicago, Cook County, Ill., January 2, 1928. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army during the Korean conflict; member of Illinois state house of representatives, 1953-55; member of Illinois state senate, 1955-59; U.S. Representative from Illinois, 1959-95 (8th District 1959-93, 5th District 1993-95); defeated, 1994; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Illinois, 1960, 1964, 1968, 1976, 1984 (delegation chair), 1988, 1992. Catholic. Member, Veterans of Foreign Wars; Knights of Columbus; Kiwanis; Moose. Indicted in 1994 on 17 felony charges; pleaded guilty in April 1996 to two counts of misuse of public funds; sentenced to seventeen months in federal prison; released in 1997. Died August 11, 2010 (age 82 years, 221 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Joseph P. Rostenkowski (1896?-?).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — votes in Congress from the Washington Post — NNDB dossier
  Carroll Hubbard, Jr. (b. 1937) — of Mayfield, Graves County, Ky. Born in Murray, Calloway County, Ky., July 7, 1937. Democrat. Alternate delegate to Democratic National Convention from Kentucky, 1960; member of Kentucky state senate, 1968-75; U.S. Representative from Kentucky 1st District, 1975-93; candidate in primary for Governor of Kentucky, 1979. Baptist. Pleaded guilty in 1994 to conspiring to defraud the Federal Elections Commission, and to theft of government property; sentenced to three years in prison. Still living as of 2014.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — votes in Congress from the Washington Post — NNDB dossier
  Judith K. Moriarty (b. 1942) — of Pettis County, Mo. Born February 2, 1942. Democrat. Secretary of state of Missouri, 1993-94; removed 1994. Female. Impeached and removed from office, 1994. Still living as of 1994.
  Sam Solon (1931-2001) — also known as "Senator Sam" — of Duluth, St. Louis County, Minn. Born in Duluth, St. Louis County, Minn., June 25, 1931. Democrat. School teacher; member of Minnesota state house of representatives, 1971-72; member of Minnesota state senate, 1973-2001; died in office 2001. Eastern Orthodox. Greek ancestry. Pleaded guilty in 1995 to telecommunications fraud for letting his ex-wife make $2,430 in calls on his State Senate telephone line; reprimanded by the Senate in 1996. Died, of liver cancer, in St. Mary's Medical Center, Duluth, St. Louis County, Minn., December 28, 2001 (age 70 years, 186 days). Burial location unknown.
  The Solon Campus Center (built 1995, named 2001), at the University of Minnesota Duluth, is named for him.
  Doris Allen (1936-1999) — of California. Born in Kansas City, Jackson County, Mo., May 26, 1936. Republican. Member of California state assembly, 1982-95; Speaker of the California State Assembly, 1995; candidate for California state senate, 1990. Female. Was recalled from office in 1995 after becoming Speaker with mainly Democratic support. Died, of stomach and colon cancer, at a hospice in Colorado Springs, El Paso County, Colo., September 22, 1999 (age 63 years, 119 days). Interment somewhere in Cripple Creek, Colo.
  James Guy Tucker, Jr. (b. 1943) — also known as Jim Guy Tucker, Jr. — of Arkansas. Born in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma County, Okla., June 13, 1943. Democrat. Arkansas state attorney general, 1973-77; U.S. Representative from Arkansas 2nd District, 1977-79; candidate for U.S. Senator from Arkansas, 1978; Lieutenant Governor of Arkansas, 1991-92; Governor of Arkansas, 1992-96. Presbyterian. Resigned in July 1996 after his conviction on federal charges brought by independent counsel Kenneth Starr. Still living as of 2014.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — NNDB dossier
  Newt Gingrich (b. 1943) — also known as Newton Leroy McPherson; "Nuclear Newt" — of Carrollton, Carroll County, Ga. Born in Harrisburg, Dauphin County, Pa., June 17, 1943. Republican. College professor; author; U.S. Representative from Georgia 6th District, 1979-99; defeated, 1974, 1976; Speaker of the U.S. House, 1995-99. Baptist; later Catholic. Reprimanded in 1997 by the House of Representatives, and fined $300,000, over false statements he had made during an investigation of his use of tax-exempt organizations for partisan advocacy. Still living as of 2020.
  Relatives: Son of Newton Searles McPherson and Kathleen (Daugherty) McPherson; married, June 19, 1962, to Jackie Battley (divorced 1981); married, August 8, 1981, to Marianne Ginther (divorced 2000); married, August 18, 2000, to Callista Louise Bisek; step-father of Robert Gingrich.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — votes in Congress from the Washington Post — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — OurCampaigns candidate detail — Encyclopedia of American Loons
  Books by Newt Gingrich: Winning The Future: A 21st Century Contract with America (2005) — Saving Lives & Saving Money : Transforming Health and Healthcare, with Dana Pavey & Anne Woodbury — To Renew America (1995) — Lessons Learned the Hard Way: A Personal Report (1998) — Ronald Reagan: Rendezvous with Destiny, with Callista Gingrich & David N. Bossie (2011) — A Nation Like No Other: Why American Exceptionalism Matters (2011)
  Fiction by Newt Gingrich: Gettysburg: A Novel of the Civil War, with William R. Forstchen — Grant Comes East, with William R. Forstchen — Never Call Retreat : Lee and Grant: The Final Victory, with William R. Forstchen — 1945, with William R. Forstchen
  Books about Newt Gingrich: Mel Steely, The Gentleman from Georgia : The Biography of Newt Gingrich — Richard B. Cheney & Lynne V. Cheney, Kings Of The Hill : How Nine Powerful Men Changed The Course of American History
  Critical books about Newt Gingrich: David Maraniss & Michael Weisskopf, Tell Newt to Shut Up : Prize-Winning Washington Post Journalists Reveal How Reality Gagged the Gingrich Revolution — John K. Wilson, Newt Gingrich: Capitol Crimes and Misdemeanors
  John Westergaard (1931-2003) — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born July 2, 1931. Democrat. Candidate for New York state senate, 1960; campaign treasurer for Daniel Patrick Moynihan, 1965-94; delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1996. Norwegian ancestry. The Securities and Exchange Commission filed civil fraud charges against him in 2000; Paul J. Curran volunteered to serve as defense counsel pro bono; in 2001, the fraud charges were withdrawn, and the case was settled with no penalty. Died, of prostate cancer, at Calvary Hospice, Bronx, Bronx County, N.Y., January 31, 2003 (age 71 years, 213 days). Burial location unknown.
  Timothy J. Brill (born c.1960) — also known as Tim Brill — of Washington; Fairbanks, Fairbanks North Star Borough, Alaska. Born about 1960. Independent candidate for U.S. Representative from Washington 9th District, 1992. Pleaded guilty in August 2000 to mail fraud in connection with the failure of his mountaineering business; sentenced to a year and a day in federal prison. Still living as of 2001.
  David A. Brock (b. 1936) — of Hopkinton, Merrimack County, N.H. Born in 1936. U.S. Attorney for New Hampshire, 1969-72; superior court judge in New Hampshire, 1976-78; justice of New Hampshire state supreme court, 1978-86; chief justice of New Hampshire state supreme court, 1986-. Impeached in 2000 by the New Hampshire House of Representatives on several charges including improperly influencing a lower court judge and lying to a legislative committee; acquitted by the New Hampshire Senate. Still living as of 2000.
  Cross-reference: W. Stephen Thayer III — Sherman D. Horton, Jr. — John T. Broderick, Jr.
  John T. Broderick, Jr. (b. 1947) — of Manchester, Hillsborough County, N.H. Born in 1947. Justice of New Hampshire state supreme court, 1995-. Investigated in 2000 by the Judiciary Committee of the New Hampshire House of Representatives in connection with the charges against Chief Justice David A. Brock and Justice W. Stephen Thayer III, but articles of impeachment against him were rejected by the House. Arrested in October 2000 for assault against his 30-year-old son. but charges were dropped. Still living as of 2001.
  Sherman D. Horton, Jr. (b. 1931) — of Hillsborough, Hillsborough County, N.H. Born in 1931. Justice of New Hampshire state supreme court, 1990-2000. Investigated in 2000 by the Judiciary Committee of the New Hampshire House of Representatives in connection with the charges against Chief Justice David A. Brock and Justice W. Stephen Thayer III, but articles of impeachment against him were rejected by the House. Still living as of 2000.
  Relatives: Brother-in-law of William R. Johnson (1930-).
  Greg Tarver — of Louisiana. Member of Louisiana state senate, 1990. Tried and acquitted in 2000 on federal racketeering charges. Still living as of 2000.
  W. Stephen Thayer III (b. 1946) — of Manchester, Hillsborough County, N.H. Born in 1946. U.S. Attorney for New Hampshire, 1981-84; justice of New Hampshire state supreme court, 1986-2000. Allegedly asked Chief Justice David A. Brock not to appoint a certain lower court judge to a panel of judges that would hear the appeal of his divorce case; following an investigation, he was forced to resign in 2000 from the New Hampshire Supreme Court. Still living as of 2000.
  Cross-reference: Sherman D. Horton, Jr. — John T. Broderick, Jr.
  Lena Swanson (born c.1938) — of Bremerton, Kitsap County, Wash. Born in Oklahoma, about 1938. Democrat. Member of Washington state senate 35th District, 1997. Female. Pleaded guilty to charges of soliciting unlawful payments from veterans and former prisoners of war. Still living as of 2001.
  Carl Tommy Cruz Gutierrez (b. 1941) — also known as Carl T. C. Gutierrez — of Agana (now Hagatna), Guam. Born in Agana Heights, Guam, October 15, 1941. Democrat. Construction business; member of Guam senate, 1973-86, 1989-94; Governor of Guam, 1995-2002; defeated, 1978 (Independent), 1986 (primary), 2006 (primary); delegate to Democratic National Convention from Guam, 1996, 2000; indicted on political corruption charges, but never convicted. Catholic. Still living as of 2006.
  Relatives: Son of Tomas Taitano Gutierrez and Rita Benavente (Cruz) Gutierrez; married, September 7, 1963, to Geraldine Chance 'Geri' Torres.
  See also Wikipedia article
  John Grosvenor Rowland (b. 1957) — also known as John G. Rowland — of Danbury, Fairfield County, Conn. Born in Waterbury, New Haven County, Conn., May 24, 1957. Republican. Insurance agent; member of Connecticut state house of representatives, 1981-84; U.S. Representative from Connecticut 5th District, 1985-91; Governor of Connecticut, 1995-2004; defeated, 1990; resigned 2004; delegate to Republican National Convention from Connecticut, 2000; Pleaded guilty to federal corruption charges in 2004; served ten months in prison. Catholic. Member, Tau Kappa Epsilon. Still living as of 2014.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Peggy A. Lautenschlager (b. 1955) — also known as Peg Lautenschlager — of Fond du Lac, Fond du Lac County, Wis. Born in Fond du Lac, Fond du Lac County, Wis., November 22, 1955. Democrat. Lawyer; Winnebago County District Attorney, 1985-88; member of Wisconsin state assembly, 1989-93; candidate for U.S. Representative from Wisconsin 6th District, 1992; U.S. Attorney for the Western District of Wisconsin, 1993-2001; Wisconsin state attorney general, 2003-07; defeated in primary, 2006; in February 2004, en route from Madison to Fond du Lac, she accidentally drove a state-owned car into a ditch; pleaded guilty to driving while intoxicated and refusing a blood test; lost her license for a year, paid a fine of $784, and a self-imposed penalty of $3,250; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Wisconsin, 2004, 2008. Female. Member, Phi Beta Kappa. Still living as of 2011.
  Relatives: Married to Bill Rippl.
  See also Wikipedia article
  Ernest L. Fletcher (b. 1952) — also known as Ernie Fletcher; "Big Ern" — of Lexington, Fayette County, Ky. Born in Mt. Sterling, Montgomery County, Ky., November 12, 1952. Republican. Physician; pastor; member of Kentucky state house of representatives, 1994-96; U.S. Representative from Kentucky 6th District, 1999-2003; defeated, 1996; Governor of Kentucky, 2003-07; delegate to Republican National Convention from Kentucky, 2004; in 2005-06, an investigation of hiring practices in violation of the state's merit system law led to grand jury indictments of the Governor and some of his staff; Fletcher pardoned his staff members to protect them from prosecution; ultimately he admitted wrong-doing and agreed to reorganize the Kentucky Personnel Board. Baptist. Still living as of 2014.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — votes in Congress from the Washington Post — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Joshua Selassie Wolf (b. 1982) — also known as Josh Wolf — of San Francisco, Calif. Born in California, June 8, 1982. Video journalist; jailed 226 days by a federal court for his refusal to turn over to prosecutors his tapes of anarchist protesters clashing with police during a 2005 demonstration; released in April 2007; candidate for mayor of San Francisco, Calif., 2007. Jewish ancestry. Still living as of 2007.
  See also Wikipedia article
  Alan G. Hevesi — of Forest Hills, Queens, Queens County, N.Y. Democrat. University professor; member of New York state assembly, 1971-93 (25th District 1971-72, 28th District 1973-93); delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1984, 1996, 2000, 2004; New York City controller, 1994-2001; candidate for mayor of New York City, N.Y., 2001 (Democratic primary), 2001 (Liberal); New York state comptroller, 2003-06; resigned 2006. Jewish. Pleaded guilty to fraud charges over his use of a state employee to chauffeur his wife, December 22, 2006, and fined $5,000. Still living as of 2006.
  Relatives: Father of Daniel Hevesi (1959?-) and Andrew Hevesi.
  Political family: Hevesi family of Queens, New York.
  See also Wikipedia article — Internet Movie Database profile
  Michael Kent Winder (b. 1976) — also known as Mike Winder; "Richard Burwash" — of West Valley City, Salt Lake County, Utah. Born in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Utah, January 27, 1976. Republican. Vice-president, Winder Farms dairy; historian; mayor of West Valley City, Utah, 2010-; reprimanded by the city council in 2011 for writing news articles for local media outlets under an assumed name, Richard Burwash; also forced to resign from his job with public relations firm. Mormon. Still living as of 2012.
  Relatives: Married to Karyn Hermansen.
  See also Wikipedia article
  Benígno Repeki Fitial (b. 1945) — also known as Benígno Fitial — Born in Saipan, Northern Mariana Islands, November 27, 1945. Governor of Northern Mariana Islands, 2006-13; resigned 2013; impeached by the Northern Mariana Islands House of Representatives in February 2013; he resigned rather than face trial in the Senate. Satawalese ancestry. Still living as of 2013.
  Relatives: Married to Josepina 'Josie' Padiermos.
  See also Wikipedia article
"Enjoy the hospitable entertainment of a political graveyard."
Henry L. Clinton, Apollo Hall, New York City, February 3, 1872
The Political Graveyard

The Political Graveyard is a web site about U.S. political history and cemeteries. Founded in 1996, it is the Internet's most comprehensive free source for American political biography, listing 312,576 politicians, living and dead.
  The listings are incomplete; development of the database is a continually ongoing project.  
  Information on this page — and on all other pages of this site — is believed to be accurate, but is not guaranteed. Users are advised to check with other sources before relying on any information here.  
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Copyright notices: (1) Facts are not subject to copyright; see Feist v. Rural Telephone. (2) Politician portraits displayed on this site are 70-pixel-wide monochrome thumbnail images, which I believe to constitute fair use under applicable copyright law. Where possible, each image is linked to its online source. However, requests from owners of copyrighted images to delete them from this site are honored. (3) Original material, programming, selection and arrangement are © 1996-2019 Lawrence Kestenbaum. (4) This work is also licensed for free non-commercial re-use, with attribution, under a Creative Commons License.
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