PoliticalGraveyard.com
The Political Graveyard: A Database of American History
Politicians Who Received the Medal of Honor
(sometimes called the "Congressional Medal of Honor")

in chronological order

  William Perkins Black (1842-1916) — of Chicago, Cook County, Ill. Born in Woodford County, Ky., November 11, 1842. Democrat. Served in the Union Army during the Civil War; received the Medal of Honor for action at Pea Ridge, Ark., March 7, 1862; lawyer; candidate for U.S. Representative from Illinois, 1886. Member, Grand Army of the Republic. Died January 3, 1916 (age 73 years, 53 days). Interment at Graceland Cemetery, Chicago, Ill.
  Relatives: Son of Rev. John Black and Josephine (Culbertson) Black; married 1869 to Hortensia M. MacGreal.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Thomas Worcester Hyde (1841-1899) — also known as Thomas W. Hyde — of Bath, Sagadahoc County, Maine. Born, of American parents, in Florence (Firenze), Italy, January 15, 1841. Republican. General in the Union Army during the Civil War; received the Medal of Honor for action on September 17, 1862, at Antietam, Maryland; mayor of Bath, Maine, 1880-82. Died in Fort Monroe, Elizabeth City County (now part of Hampton), Va., November 14, 1899 (age 58 years, 303 days). Entombed at Oak Grove Cemetery, Bath, Maine.
  Relatives: Son of Zina Hyde, Jr. and Eleanor Maria (Davis) Hyde; father of John Sedgwick Hyde and Edward Warden Hyde; first cousin once removed of Charles Edward Hyde; second cousin twice removed of Matthew Griswold (1714-1799); second cousin thrice removed of Samuel Huntington; third cousin of William Woodbridge, Isaac Backus and Henry Titus Backus; third cousin once removed of Roger Griswold, Elijah Abel and Matthew Griswold (1833-1919); third cousin twice removed of John Davenport, Joshua Coit, James Davenport, Samuel H. Huntington, Henry Huntington and Gurdon Huntington; third cousin thrice removed of Selden Chapin; fourth cousin of Thomas Hale Sill, Bela Edgerton, Frederick William Lord, Theodore Sill and Alonzo Mark Leffingwell; fourth cousin once removed of Ebenezer Huntington, Theodore Davenport, Nathaniel Huntington, James Huntington, John William Allen, Elisha Mills Huntington, Alfred Peck Edgerton, Benjamin Nicoll Huntington, Joseph Ketchum Edgerton, Alexander Hamilton Waterman, Augustus Frank, George Griswold Sill (1829-1907), Herman Arod Gager and John Leffingwell Randolph.
  Political family: Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
Horace Porter Horace Porter (1837-1921) — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in Huntingdon, Huntingdon County, Pa., April 15, 1837. Republican. General in the Union Army during the Civil War; received the Medal of Honor for action at Chickamauga, September 20, 1863; executive secretary to Pres. Ulysses S. Grant, 1869-73; vice-president, Pullman Palace Car Co. (railroad cars); president, New York West Shore & Buffalo Railroad; delegate to Republican National Convention from New York, 1892; U.S. Ambassador to France, 1897-1905. Member, Union League. Died May 29, 1921 (age 84 years, 44 days). Interment at Old First Methodist Churchyard, West Long Branch, N.J.
  Relatives: Son of David Rittenhouse Porter; nephew of George Bryan Porter (1791-1834) and James Madison Porter; uncle of Emma Porter (who married John Martin Poyer).
  Political family: Lincoln-Lee family (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also U.S. State Dept career summary
  Image source: American Monthly Review of Reviews, July 1902
Julius H. Stahel Julius H. Stahel (1827-1912) — also known as Julius H. Stahel-Számwald — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in Szeged, Hungary, November 5, 1827. Newspaper editor; general in the Union Army during the Civil War; received the Medal of Honor in 1893 for action at the Battle of Piedmont, June 5, 1864; U.S. Consul in Yokohama, 1866-69; Osaka, 1877-84; Hiogo, 1877-84; mining engineer; U.S. Consul General in Shanghai, 1884-85; insurance executive. Hungarian ancestry. Member, Loyal Legion. Died, from angina pectoris, in the Hotel St. James, Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., December 4, 1912 (age 85 years, 29 days). Interment at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Va.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: Empire State Notables (1914)
  Horatio Collins King (1837-1918) — also known as Horatio C. King — of Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y. Born in Portland, Cumberland County, Maine, December 22, 1837. Lawyer; major in the Union Army during the Civil War; Democratic candidate for secretary of state of New York, 1895; Independent Democratic candidate for U.S. Representative from New York 3rd District, 1897; Progressive candidate for New York state comptroller, 1912. Congregationalist. Member, Freemasons; Elks; Loyal Legion; Grand Army of the Republic; Sons of the American Revolution; Phi Beta Kappa. Received Medal of Honor for action near Dinwiddie Court House, Va., March 29, 1865. Died November 15, 1918 (age 80 years, 328 days). Interment at Green-Wood Cemetery, Brooklyn, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Horatio King and Anne (Collins) King; married 1862 to Emma C. Stebbins (died 1864); married 1866 to Esther A. Howard; grandfather of Constance Gray (who married Merwin Kimball Hart (1881-1962)).
  Political family: Hart family of New York.
  Victor Vifquain (1836-1907) — of Saline County, Neb. Born in Brussels, Belgium, May 20, 1836. Colonel in the Union Army during the Civil War; involved in unsuccessful effort to kidnap Confederate president Jefferson Davis; received the Medal of Honor for his actions in the assault of Fort Blakely, Alabama, April 9, 1865; newspaper publisher; delegate to Nebraska state constitutional convention, 1871; Saline County Surveyor, 1871; U.S. Consul in Barranquilla, 1886-87; Colón, 1887-90; Adjutant General of Nebraska, 1890-92; U.S. Consul General in Panama, 1893-97; colonel in the U.S. Army during the Spanish-American War. Died January 7, 1907 (age 70 years, 232 days). Interment at Calvary Cemetery, Lincoln, Neb.
  William H. Withington (1835-1903) — of Jackson, Jackson County, Mich. Born in Dorchester, Boston, Suffolk County, Mass., February 1, 1835. Republican. Colonel in the Union Army during the Civil War; recipient, Medal of Honor; member of Michigan state house of representatives from Jackson County, 1873-74; member of Michigan state senate 6th District, 1891-92; delegate to Republican National Convention from Michigan, 1892. Died in Jackson, Jackson County, Mich., June 27, 1903 (age 68 years, 146 days). Interment at Mt. Evergreen Cemetery, Jackson, Mich.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  James H. Harris (d. 1898) — of North Carolina. Born in St. Mary's County, Md. Republican. Served in the Union Army during the Civil War; received the Medal of Honor in 1874 for action at New Market Heights, Virginia, September 29, 1864; delegate to Republican National Convention from North Carolina, 1868, 1880, 1884, 1888. African ancestry. Died January 28, 1898. Interment at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Va.
  John Frederick Hartranft (1830-1889) — also known as John F. Hartranft — of Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa. Born in New Hanover Township, Montgomery County, Pa., December 16, 1830. Republican. Served in the Union Army during the Civil War; Pennsylvania state auditor general, 1866-72; Governor of Pennsylvania, 1873-79; candidate for Republican nomination for President, 1876; postmaster at Philadelphia, Pa., 1879-80; U.S. Collector of Customs, 1880-83. Received the Medal of Honor in 1886 for action at Bull Run, Va., July 21, 1861. Died October 17, 1889 (age 58 years, 305 days). Interment at Montgomery Cemetery, Norristown, Pa.
  George Washington Roosevelt (1844-1907) — also known as George W. Roosevelt — of Pennsylvania. Born in Chester, Delaware County, Pa., February 14, 1844. Served in the Union Army during the Civil War; U.S. Consular Agent in Sydney, as of 1877; U.S. Consul in Auckland, 1877-79; SAINT Helena, 1879-80; Matanzas, 1880-81; Bordeaux, 1881-89; Brussels, 1889-1905; U.S. Consul General in Brussels, as of 1906. Received the Medal of Honor in 1887 for action at Bull Run, Va., August 30, 1862, and at Gettysburg, Pa., July 2, 1863; severely wounded and lost a leg. Died in Brussels, Belgium, April 14, 1907 (age 63 years, 59 days). Interment at Oak Hill Cemetery, Washington, D.C.
  Presumably named for: George Washington
  Relatives: Son of Solomon Roosevelt (1807-1900) and Elizabeth (Morris) Roosevelt (1811-1859); great-grandson of Nicholas Roosevelt, Jr.; third cousin twice removed of Philip DePeyster and James I. Roosevelt; fourth cousin once removed of Robert Barnwell Roosevelt (1829-1906).
  Political families: Roosevelt family of New York City, New York; Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
Matthew S. Quay Matthew Stanley Quay (1833-1904) — also known as Matthew S. Quay — of Beaver, Beaver County, Pa. Born in Dillsburg, York County, Pa., September 30, 1833. Republican. Lawyer; Beaver County Prothonotary, 1856-61; colonel in the Union Army during the Civil War; member of Pennsylvania state house of representatives from Beaver County, 1865-67; newspaper editor; delegate to Republican National Convention from Pennsylvania, 1872, 1876, 1880, 1888, 1892, 1900; secretary of the commonwealth of Pennsylvania, 1873-78, 1879-82; Pennsylvania Republican state chair, 1878-79, 1902-03; Pennsylvania state treasurer, 1886-87; U.S. Senator from Pennsylvania, 1887-99, 1901-04; died in office 1904; Chairman of Republican National Committee, 1888-91; candidate for Republican nomination for President, 1896; member of Republican National Committee from Pennsylvania, 1896. Manx and American Indian ancestry. Member, Freemasons. Received the Medal of Honor in 1888 for action at Fredericksburg, Va., December 13, 1862. Died in Beaver, Beaver County, Pa., May 28, 1904 (age 70 years, 241 days). Interment at Beaver Cemetery, Beaver, Pa.
  Relatives: Son of Rev. Anderson Quay.
  Cross-reference: William F. Wright
  Quay County, N.M. is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Image source: The Parties and The Men (1896)
  Robert Burns Brown (1844-1916) — also known as Robert B. Brown — of Zanesville, Muskingum County, Ohio. Born in New Concord, Muskingum County, Ohio, October 2, 1844. Republican. Served in the Union Army during the Civil War; newspaper editor and publisher; candidate for Governor of Ohio, 1912; alternate delegate to Republican National Convention from Ohio, 1916. Member, Grand Army of the Republic. Received the Medal of Honor in 1890 for actions at Missionary Ridge, Tennessee, November 25, 1863. Died in Zanesville, Muskingum County, Ohio, July 30, 1916 (age 71 years, 302 days). Interment at Greenwood Cemetery, Zanesville, Ohio.
  Presumably named for: Robert Burns
  Relatives: Son of Alexander Brown and Margaret (Lorimer) Brown; married, May 18, 1887, to Evaline Waters.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Newton Martin Curtis (1835-1910) — also known as N. Martin Curtis — of Ogdensburg, St. Lawrence County, N.Y. Born in De Peyster, St. Lawrence County, N.Y., May 21, 1835. Republican. General in the Union Army during the Civil War; member of New York state assembly from St. Lawrence County 1st District, 1884-90; U.S. Representative from New York 22nd District, 1891-97. Received the Medal of Honor in 1891 for action at Fort Fisher, N.C., January 15, 1865. Died in New York, New York County, N.Y., January 8, 1910 (age 74 years, 232 days). Interment at Ogdensburg Cemetery, Ogdensburg, N.Y.
  Relatives: Married to Emeline Clark (1836-1887).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Byron M. Cutcheon (1836-1908) — of Ypsilanti, Washtenaw County, Mich.; Manistee, Manistee County, Mich.; Grand Rapids, Kent County, Mich. Born in Pembroke, Merrimack County, N.H., May 11, 1836. Republican. Colonel in the Union Army during the Civil War; lawyer; Presidential Elector for Michigan, 1868; Manistee County Prosecuting Attorney, 1873-74; member of University of Michigan board of regents, 1875-81; postmaster; U.S. Representative from Michigan 9th District, 1883-91; defeated, 1890. Member, Grand Army of the Republic; Sons of the American Revolution; Loyal Legion. Received the Medal of Honor in 1891 for action at the Battle of Horseshoe Bend, Ky., May 10, 1863. Died in Ypsilanti, Washtenaw County, Mich., April 12, 1908 (age 71 years, 337 days). Interment at Highland Cemetery, Ypsilanti, Mich.
  Relatives: Son of James M. Cutcheon and Hannah (Tripp) Cutcheon; married, June 22, 1863, to Marie Annie Warner.
  Cross-reference: Ralph Stone
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Martin Thomas McMahon (1838-1906) — also known as Martin T. McMahon — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in Laprairie, Quebec, March 21, 1838. Democrat. Lawyer; general in the Union Army during the Civil War; U.S. Minister to Paraguay, 1868-69; Independent Democratic candidate for U.S. Representative from New York 4th District, 1870; member of New York state assembly from New York County 7th District, 1891; member of New York state senate, 1892-95 (8th District 1892-93, 7th District 1894-95). Received the Medal of Honor in 1891 for action at White Oak Swamp, Virginia, June 30, 1862. Died in New York, 1906 (age about 68 years). Interment at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Va.
  See also U.S. State Dept career summary
  John Henry Moffitt (1843-1926) — also known as John H. Moffitt — of Chateaugay Lake, Franklin County, N.Y. Born near Chazy, Clinton County, N.Y., January 8, 1843. Republican. Served in the Union Army during the Civil War; U.S. Representative from New York 21st District, 1887-91. Received the Medal of Honor in 1891 for action at Gaines Mill, Va., June 27, 1862. Died in Plattsburgh, Clinton County, N.Y., August 14, 1926 (age 83 years, 218 days). Interment at Mt. Carmel Cemetery, Plattsburgh, N.Y.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Samuel Everett Pingree (1832-1922) — also known as Samuel E. Pingree — of Hartford, Windsor County, Vt. Born in Salisbury, Merrimack County, N.H., August 2, 1832. Republican. Lawyer; colonel in the Union Army during the Civil War; delegate to Republican National Convention from Vermont, 1868; Windsor County State's Attorney, 1868-69; Lieutenant Governor of Vermont, 1882-84; Governor of Vermont, 1884-86; received the Medal of Honor in 1891 for action at Lee's Mills, Virginia, April 16, 1862. Baptist. Member, Phi Beta Kappa; Delta Kappa Epsilon. Died June 1, 1922 (age 89 years, 303 days). Interment at Hartford Cemetery, Hartford, Vt.
  Relatives: Son of Stephen Pingree and Judith (True) Pingree; married, September 15, 1869, to Lydia M. Steele; relative *** of Hazen Stuart Pingree (1840-1901).
  Andrew Davidson (b. 1840) — of Cooperstown, Otsego County, N.Y. Born in Morebattle, Roxburghshire, Scotland, February 12, 1840. Served in the Union Army during the Civil War; member of New York state senate 23rd District, 1884-85. Scottish ancestry. Received the Medal of Honor in 1892 for action at Petersburg, Va., July 30, 1864. Interment at Lakewood Cemetery, Cooperstown, N.Y.
  Jacob G. Frick (b. 1838) — of Pottsville, Schuylkill County, Pa. Born in Northumberland County, Pa., January 23, 1838. Republican. Delegate to Republican National Convention from Pennsylvania, 1860, 1868; colonel in the Union Army during the Civil War; received the Medal of Honor in 1892 for action at Fredericksburg, Va., December 13, 1862, and at Chancellorsville, Va., May 5, 1863. Interment at Presbyterian Cemetery, Pottsville, Pa.
Nelson A. Miles Nelson Appleton Miles (1839-1925) — also known as Nelson A. Miles — Born in Westminster, Worcester County, Mass., August 8, 1839. Democrat. General in the Union Army during the Civil War; received the Medal of Honor in 1892 for action at the battle of Chancellorsville, 1863; general in the U.S. Army during the Spanish-American War; Governor of Puerto Rico; candidate for Democratic nomination for President, 1904. Suffered a heart attack and died, while attending a circus, in Washington, D.C., May 15, 1925 (age 85 years, 280 days). Entombed at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Va.
  Relatives: Son of Daniel Miles (1799-1875) and Mary (Curtis) Miles (1802-1875); married, June 30, 1868, to Mary Hoyt Sherman (1842-1904; daughter of Charles Taylor Sherman; niece of William Tecumseh Sherman (1820-1891), Lampson Parker Sherman and John Sherman; granddaughter of Charles Robert Sherman); third cousin once removed of Chauncey Fitch Cleveland, Augustus Sabin Chase (1828-1896), Marden Sabin and Joseph Spalding; third cousin twice removed of Irving Hall Chase; third cousin thrice removed of Augustus Sabin Chase (1897-1970); fourth cousin of William Dean Kellogg; fourth cousin once removed of John Larkin Payson.
  Political families: Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York; Sherman family of Connecticut; Ewing family of Yonkers and New York City, New York; Keeler-Floyd-Sherman-Bangs family of New York; Cameron family of Pennsylvania (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: American Monthly Review of Reviews, July, 1897
  John McAllister Schofield (1831-1906) — also known as John M. Schofield — Born in Gerry, Chautauqua County, N.Y., September 29, 1831. General in the Union Army during the Civil War; U.S. Secretary of War, 1868-69. Member, Loyal Legion. Received the Medal of Honor in 1892 for action at Wilsons Creek, Mo., August 10, 1861. Died in St. Augustine, St. Johns County, Fla., March 4, 1906 (age 74 years, 156 days). Interment at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Va.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Henry Harrison Bingham (1841-1912) — also known as Henry H. Bingham — of Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa. Born in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., December 4, 1841. Republican. Colonel in the Union Army during the Civil War; postmaster at Philadelphia, Pa., 1867-72; delegate to Republican National Convention from Pennsylvania, 1872, 1876, 1884, 1888, 1892, 1896 (alternate; chair, Committee on Rules and Order of Business; speaker), 1900, 1904; U.S. Representative from Pennsylvania 1st District, 1879-1912; died in office 1912. Member, Phi Kappa Psi. Received the Medal of Honor in 1893 for action at Wilderness, Va., May 6, 1864. Died in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., March 22, 1912 (age 70 years, 109 days). Interment at Laurel Hill Cemetery, Philadelphia, Pa.
  Bingham County, Idaho is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
  John Charles Black (1839-1915) — also known as John C. Black — of Danville, Vermilion County, Ill. Born in Lexington, Holmes County, Miss., January 27, 1839. Democrat. Colonel in the Union Army during the Civil War; candidate for Lieutenant Governor of Illinois, 1872; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Illinois, 1884; U.S. Commissioner of Pensions, 1885-89; candidate for Democratic nomination for Vice President, 1888; U.S. Representative from Illinois at-large, 1893-95; defeated, 1866, 1880, 1884; U.S. Attorney for the Northern District of Illinois, 1895-99; delegate to Gold Democrat National Convention from Illinois, 1896; member, U.S. Civil Service Commission, 1903-07. Member, Loyal Legion; Grand Army of the Republic. Received the Medal of Honor in 1893 for action at Prairie Grove, Ark., December 7, 1862. Died in Chicago, Cook County, Ill., August 17, 1915 (age 76 years, 202 days). Interment at Spring Hill Cemetery, Danville, Ill.
  Relatives: Son of Rev. John Black and Josephine (Culbertson) Black; married, September 28, 1867, to Adaline L. Griggs.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Hubert Anton Casimir Dilger (1836-1911) — also known as Hubert Dilger — of Cincinnati, Hamilton County, Ohio; Sangamon County, Ill.; Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa. Born in Sulgen, Germany, March 5, 1836. Republican. Served in the Union Army during the Civil War; Adjutant General of Illinois, 1869-73; appointed 1869. German ancestry. Received the Medal of Honor in 1893 for action in the Battle of Chancellorsville, May 2, 1863. Died in Front Royal, Warren County, Va., May 4, 1911 (age 75 years, 60 days). Interment at Rock Creek Cemetery, Washington, D.C.
  Relatives: Son of Eduard Dilger and Emmeline (Duerr) Dilger.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Guy Vernor Henry (1839-1899) — also known as Guy V. Henry — Born in Fort Smith, Sebastian County, Ark., March 9, 1839. Colonel in the Union Army during the Civil War; received the Medal of Honor in 1893 for action at the Battle of Cold Harbor, June 1, 1864; colonel in the U.S. Army during the Spanish-American War; Governor of Puerto Rico. Died, from pneumonia, in Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., October 27, 1899 (age 60 years, 232 days). Interment at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Va.
  Relatives: Son of William Seton Henry (1816-1851) and Arietta Livingston (Thompson) Henry (1823-1886); married 1864 to Frances Wharton (1843-1873); married to Julia McNair (1844-1917); grandson of John Vernon Henry and Gilbert Livingston Thompson; great-grandson of Smith Thompson and Daniel D. Tompkins; great-grandnephew of Caleb Tompkins; third great-grandnephew of Robert Gilbert Livingston; fourth great-grandson of Gilbert Livingston; fourth great-grandnephew of John Livingston and Robert Livingston (1688-1775); fifth great-grandson of Robert Livingston the Elder; fifth great-grandnephew of Pieter Schuyler and Johannes Schuyler (1668-1747); first cousin twice removed of Jacob Livingston Sutherland; first cousin four times removed of Pierre Van Cortlandt, Jr.; first cousin five times removed of Robert Livingston (1708-1790), Peter Van Brugh Livingston, Philip Livingston, Robert R. Livingston (1718-1775) and William Livingston; first cousin six times removed of Robert Livingston the Younger and Johannes Schuyler (1697-1746); first cousin seven times removed of David Davidse Schuyler and Myndert Davidtse Schuyler; second cousin thrice removed of Enos Thompson Throop, George Bliss Throop, Hamilton Fish and Israel Thompson Hatch; second cousin four times removed of Peter Robert Livingston, Walter Livingston, Philip Peter Livingston (1740-1810), Robert R. Livingston (1746-1813), Henry Brockholst Livingston and Edward Livingston; second cousin five times removed of Stephanus Bayard, Philip John Schuyler, Philip P. Schuyler and Stephen John Schuyler; third cousin twice removed of Israel Dodd Condit, Nicholas Fish and Hamilton Fish, Jr. (1849-1936); third cousin thrice removed of Stephen Van Rensselaer, Philip Schuyler Van Rensselaer, Henry Walter Livingston, Peter Augustus Jay, Rensselaer Westerlo, Edward Philip Livingston, William Jay and Charles Ludlow Livingston; fourth cousin once removed of Jonathan Mayhew Wainwright and Hamilton Fish, Jr. (1888-1991).
  Political families: Livingston-Schuyler family of New York; Roosevelt family of New York City, New York (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Philip Sidney Post (1833-1895) — also known as P. Sidney Post — of Galesburg, Knox County, Ill. Born in Florida, Orange County, N.Y., March 19, 1833. Republican. Lawyer; general in the Union Army during the Civil War; U.S. Consul in Vienna, 1866-74; U.S. Consul General in Vienna, 1874-79; U.S. Representative from Illinois 10th District, 1887-95; died in office 1895. Member, Grand Army of the Republic. Received the Medal of Honor in 1893 for action at the Battle of Nashville. Died in Washington, D.C., January 6, 1895 (age 61 years, 293 days). Interment at Hope Cemetery, Galesburg, Ill.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  William Young Warren Ripley (1832-1905) — also known as William Y. W. Ripley — of Vermont. Born in Middlebury, Addison County, Vt., December 31, 1832. Republican. General in the Union Army during the Civil War; delegate to Republican National Convention from Vermont, 1868; Presidential Elector for Vermont, 1880. Received the Medal of Honor in 1893 for action in the Battle of Malvern Hill, Va., July 1, 1862. Died in Rutland, Rutland County, Vt., December 16, 1905 (age 72 years, 350 days). Interment at Evergreen Cemetery, Rutland, Vt.
  Relatives: Son of William Young Ripley (1797-1875) and Jane Betsey (Warren) Ripley (1808-1884); married to Cornelia Ann Thomas (1836-1907).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain (1828-1914) — also known as Joshua L. Chamberlain — of Brunswick, Cumberland County, Maine. Born in Brewer, Penobscot County, Maine, September 8, 1828. General in the Union Army during the Civil War; Governor of Maine, 1867-71; president, Bowdoin College; U.S. Surveyor of Customs, 1909. Member, Grand Army of the Republic; Loyal Legion; American Historical Association. Received the Medal of Honor in 1893 for action as commander of the 20th Maine, at Battle of Gettysburg, Pa., July 2, 1863. Died February 24, 1914 (age 85 years, 169 days). Interment at Pine Grove Cemetery, Brunswick, Maine.
  Relatives: Son of Joshua Chamberlain and Sarah Dupree (Brastow) Chamberlain; married, December 7, 1855, to Frances Caroline Adams.
  Adelbert Ames (1835-1933) — of Lowell, Middlesex County, Mass. Born in Rockland, Knox County, Maine, October 31, 1835. Republican. General in the Union Army during the Civil War; Governor of Mississippi, 1868-70, 1874-76; U.S. Senator from Mississippi, 1870-74; general in the U.S. Army during the Spanish-American War. Received the Medal of Honor in 1894 for action in the Battle of Bull Run, July 21, 1861. Died in Ormond (now Ormond Beach), Volusia County, Fla., April 12, 1933 (age 97 years, 163 days). Interment at Hildreth Cemetery, Lowell, Mass.
  Relatives: Married, July 21, 1870, to Blanche Butler (1847-1939; daughter of Benjamin Franklin Butler (1818-1893)); father of Butler Ames.
  Political family: Ames-Butler family of Lowell, Massachusetts.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
Amos J. Cummings Amos Jay Cummings (1841-1902) — also known as Amos J. Cummings — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in Conklin, Broome County, N.Y., May 15, 1841. Democrat. Served in the Union Army during the Civil War; newspaper work; U.S. Representative from New York, 1887-89, 1889-94, 1895-1902 (6th District 1887-89, 9th District 1889-93, 11th District 1893-94, 10th District 1895-1902); defeated, 1894; died in office 1902; delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1892, 1896. Received Medal of Honor in 1894 for action at Salem Heights, Va., May 4, 1863. Died in Baltimore, Md., May 2, 1902 (age 60 years, 352 days). Interment at Clinton Cemetery, Irvington, N.J.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Image source: The Parties and The Men (1896)
  John Cleveland Robinson (1817-1897) — also known as John C. Robinson — of Binghamton, Broome County, N.Y. Born in Binghamton, Broome County, N.Y., April 10, 1817. Republican. Served in the U.S. Army during the Mexican War; general in the Union Army during the Civil War; alternate delegate to Republican National Convention from New York, 1872; Lieutenant Governor of New York, 1873-74. Member, Grand Army of the Republic. Received the Medal of Honor in 1894 for action at Laurel Hill, Va., May 8, 1864. Died February 18, 1897 (age 79 years, 314 days). Interment at Spring Forest Cemetery, Binghamton, N.Y.; statue at Gettysburg National Military Park, Gettysburg, Pa.
Benjamin F. Tracy Benjamin Franklin Tracy (1830-1915) — also known as Benjamin F. Tracy — of Tioga County, N.Y.; Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y.; New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in Owego, Tioga County, N.Y., April 26, 1830. Republican. Lawyer; Tioga County District Attorney, 1853-59; member of New York state assembly from Tioga County, 1862; colonel in the Union Army during the Civil War; U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of New York, 1866-77; judge of New York Court of Appeals, 1881-83; U.S. Secretary of the Navy, 1889-93; Presidential Elector for New York, 1896; candidate for mayor of New York City, N.Y., 1897. Received the Medal of Honor in 1895 for action at Wilderness, Va., May 6, 1864. Died in Tioga County, N.Y., August 6, 1915 (age 85 years, 102 days). Interment at Green-Wood Cemetery, Brooklyn, N.Y.
  Presumably named for: Benjamin Franklin
  Relatives: Married 1851 to Delinda Catlin (sister of Isaac Swartwood Catlin); great-grandfather of Frederic René Coudert, Jr. (1898-1972).
  Political family: Coudert-Catlin-Tracy family of New York City, New York.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: American Monthly Review of Reviews, November 1897
  Thomas Wilson Bradley (1844-1920) — also known as Thomas W. Bradley — of Walden, Orange County, N.Y. Born in Yorkshire, England, April 6, 1844. Republican. Served in the Union Army during the Civil War; member of New York state assembly from Orange County 1st District, 1876; delegate to Republican National Convention from New York, 1884 (alternate), 1892, 1896, 1900, 1908; U.S. Representative from New York 20th District, 1903-13. Member, Loyal Legion. Received the Medal of Honor in 1896 for action at Chancellorsville, Va., May 3, 1863. Died in Walden, Orange County, N.Y., May 30, 1920 (age 76 years, 54 days). Interment at Wallkill Valley Cemetery, Walden, N.Y.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
William J. Sewell William Joyce Sewell (1835-1901) — also known as William J. Sewell — of Camden, Camden County, N.J. Born in Castlebar, County Mayo, Ireland, December 6, 1835. Republican. Colonel in the Union Army during the Civil War; railroad executive; member of New Jersey state senate from Camden County, 1873-81; delegate to Republican National Convention from New Jersey, 1876, 1880, 1884, 1888, 1892, 1896 (speaker), 1900; U.S. Senator from New Jersey, 1881-87, 1895-1901; died in office 1901. Received the Medal of Honor in 1896 for action at Chancellorsville, Va., May 3, 1863. Died in Camden, Camden County, N.J., December 27, 1901 (age 66 years, 21 days). Interment at Harleigh Cemetery, Camden, N.J.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Image source: American Monthly Review of Reviews, February 1902
  Robert S. Robertson (1839-1906) — of Fort Wayne, Allen County, Ind. Born in Argyle, Washington County, N.Y., April 16, 1839. Colonel in the Union Army during the Civil War; Lieutenant Governor of Indiana, 1887-89. Received the Medal of Honor in 1897 for action at Corbins Bridge, Va., May 8, 1864. Died August 25, 1906 (age 67 years, 131 days). Interment at Lindenwood Cemetery, Fort Wayne, Ind.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
Daniel E. Sickles Daniel Edgar Sickles (1819-1914) — also known as Daniel E. Sickles; "Devil Dan" — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in New York, New York County, N.Y., October 20, 1819. Lawyer; member of New York state assembly from New York County, 1847; member of New York state senate 3rd District, 1856-57; U.S. Representative from New York, 1857-61, 1893-95 (3rd District 1857-61, 10th District 1893-95); defeated (Democratic), 1894; general in the Union Army during the Civil War; delegate to Republican National Convention from New York, 1868; U.S. Minister to Spain, 1869-74; delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1892. Member, Grand Army of the Republic. Shot and killed Philip Barton Key, his wife's lover and the son of the author of the national anthem, at Lafayette Park, Washington, D.C, 1859; charged with murder, but with the help of his attorney Edwin M. Stanton, was acquitted after the first successful plea of temporary insanity in U.S. legal history. Received the Medal of Honor in 1897 for action at the Battle of Gettysburg, July 2, 1863; lost a leg in that battle; his amputated leg was displayed at the Army Medical Museum, where he frequently visited it in later years. Died in New York, New York County, N.Y., May 3, 1914 (age 94 years, 195 days). Interment at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Va.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — U.S. State Dept career summary
  Books about Daniel E. Sickles: Thomas M. Keneally, American Scoundrel : The Life of the Notorious Civil War General Dan Sickles
  Image source: Official NY: from Cleveland to Hughes (1911)
  Voltaire Paine Twombly (1842-1918) — also known as Voltaire P. Twombly — of Van Buren County, Iowa. Born in Farmington, Van Buren County, Iowa, February 21, 1842. Served in the Union Army during the Civil War; Iowa state treasurer, 1885-91. Received the Medal of Honor in 1897 for action at the battle of Fort Donelson, February 15, 1862. Died in Des Moines, Polk County, Iowa, February 24, 1918 (age 76 years, 3 days). Interment at Pitsburg Rural Cemetery, Keosauqua, Iowa.
  Henry Algernon du Pont (1838-1926) — also known as Henry A. du Pont — of Wilmington, New Castle County, Del.; Winterthur, New Castle County, Del. Born in Eleutherian Mills, New Castle County, Del., July 30, 1838. Republican. Colonel in the Union Army during the Civil War; received the Medal of Honor in 1898 for his handling of the retreat at the Battle of Cedar Creek, Va., October 19, 1864; president, Wilmington and Northern Railroad, 1879-1899; candidate for Presidential Elector for Delaware, 1892; delegate to Republican National Convention from Delaware, 1896, 1908, 1912; U.S. Senator from Delaware, 1906-17; defeated, 1916; Presidential Elector for Delaware, 1920. Episcopalian. Died in Winterthur, New Castle County, Del., December 31, 1926 (age 88 years, 154 days). Interment at Du Pont de Nemours Cemetery, Wilmington, Del.
  Relatives: Son of Henry DuPont and Louisa (Gerhard) du Pont (1816-1900); married 1874 to Mary Pauline Foster (1849-1902); first cousin once removed of Charles Irénée du Pont, Thomas Coleman du Pont, Alfred Irénée du Pont, Pierre Samuel du Pont, Francis Irenee du Pont, Edward Green Bradford, Jr. and Elizabeth Bradford du Pont Bayard; first cousin twice removed of Francis Victor du Pont, Henry Belin du Pont, Jr., Lammot du Pont Copeland, Thomas Francis Bayard III, Ethel du Pont (1916-1965; who married Franklin Delano Roosevelt, Jr.), Reynolds du Pont and Alexis Irenee du Pont Bayard (1918-1985); first cousin thrice removed of Eleuthere Irenee du Pont, Pierre Samuel du Pont IV and Richard Henry Bayard.
  Political families: DuPont family of Wilmington, Delaware; Livingston-Schuyler family of New York; Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Charles Edward Phelps (1833-1908) — also known as Charles E. Phelps — of Baltimore, Md. Born in Guilford, Windham County, Vt., May 1, 1833. General in the Union Army during the Civil War; U.S. Representative from Maryland 3rd District, 1865-69; municipal judge in Maryland, 1882-1908. Episcopalian. Received the Medal of Honor in 1898 for action at Laurel Hill, Va., May 8, 1864. Died in Baltimore, Md., December 27, 1908 (age 75 years, 240 days). Interment at Woodlawn Cemetery, Woodlawn, Md.
  Relatives: Son of John Phelps (1777-1849) and Almira (Hart) Phelps (1793-1884); second cousin of Charles Phelps Huntington; second cousin twice removed of Josiah Quincy; third cousin thrice removed of Noah Phelps (1740-1809); fourth cousin once removed of Silas Wright, Jr., Marshall Chapin, William Dean Kellogg and Everett Chamberlin Benton.
  Political families: Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York; Floyd-Woodbridge-Edwards family of New York (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
Theodore Roosevelt Theodore Roosevelt (1858-1919) — also known as "T.R."; "Teddy"; "The Colonel"; "The Hero of San Juan Hill"; "The Rough Rider"; "Trust-Buster"; "The Happy Warrior"; "The Bull Moose" — of New York, New York County, N.Y.; Oyster Bay, Nassau County, Long Island, N.Y. Born in New York, New York County, N.Y., October 27, 1858. Member of New York state assembly from New York County 21st District, 1882-84; delegate to Republican National Convention from New York, 1884, 1900; candidate for mayor of New York City, N.Y., 1886; colonel in the U.S. Army during the Spanish-American War; Governor of New York, 1899-1901; Vice President of the United States, 1901; President of the United States, 1901-09; defeated (Progressive), 1912; candidate for Republican nomination for President, 1916. Christian Reformed. Dutch ancestry. Member, Freemasons; Phi Beta Kappa; Delta Kappa Epsilon; Alpha Delta Phi; Union League. Received the Medal of Honor for leading a charge up San Juan Hill during battle there, July 1, 1898. While campaigning for president in Milwaukee, Wis., on October 14, 1912, was shot in the chest by John F. Schrank; despite the injury, he continued his speech for another hour and a half before seeking medical attention. Awarded Nobel Peace Prize in 1906; elected to the Hall of Fame for Great Americans in 1950. Died in Oyster Bay, Nassau County, Long Island, N.Y., January 6, 1919 (age 60 years, 71 days). Interment at Youngs Memorial Cemetery, Oyster Bay, Long Island, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Theodore Roosevelt, Sr. (1831-1878) and Martha (Bulloch) Roosevelt (1835-1884); brother of Corinne Roosevelt Robinson and Anna L. Roosevelt (1855-1931; who married William Sheffield Cowles (1846-1923)); married, October 27, 1880, to Alice Hathaway Lee (1861-1884); married, December 2, 1886, to Edith Kermit Carow (1861-1948; first cousin once removed of Daniel Putnam Tyler); father of Alice Lee Roosevelt (who married Nicholas Longworth) and Theodore Roosevelt, Jr.; nephew of Robert Barnwell Roosevelt; uncle of Theodore Douglas Robinson (1883-1934), Eleanor Roosevelt (who married Franklin Delano Roosevelt (1882-1945)), Corinne Robinson Alsop and William Sheffield Cowles (1898-1986); grandnephew of James I. Roosevelt; granduncle of James Roosevelt, Elliott Roosevelt, Corinne A. Chubb, Franklin Delano Roosevelt, Jr. and John deKoven Alsop; great-grandfather-in-law of William Floyd Weld; great-grandnephew of William Bellinger Bulloch; second great-grandson of Archibald Bulloch; second cousin twice removed of Philip DePeyster; second cousin thrice removed of Nicholas Roosevelt, Jr.; third cousin twice removed of Martin Van Buren; fourth cousin once removed of Franklin Delano Roosevelt (1882-1945).
  Political families: Roosevelt family of New York City, New York; Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York; Monroe family of Virginia and Washington (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Cross-reference: Gifford Pinchot — David J. Leahy — William Barnes, Jr. — Oliver D. Burden — William J. Youngs — George B. Cortelyou — Mason Mitchell — Frederic MacMaster — John Goodnow — William Loeb, Jr.
  Roosevelt counties in Mont. and N.M. are named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: Theodore BassettTheodore R. McKeldinTheodore R. KupfermanTheodore Roosevelt Britton, Jr.
  Personal motto: "Speak softly and carry a big stick."
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about Theodore Roosevelt: James MacGregor Burns & Susan Dunn, The Three Roosevelts: Patrician Leaders Who Transformed America — H. W. Brands, T.R : The Last Romantic — Edmund Morris, Theodore Rex — Edmund Morris, The Rise of Theodore Roosevelt — John Morton Blum, The Republican Roosevelt — Richard D. White, Jr., Roosevelt the Reformer : Theodore Roosevelt as Civil Service Commissioner, 1889-1895 — Frederick W. Marks III, Velvet on Iron : The Diplomacy of Theodore Roosevelt — James Chace, 1912 : Wilson, Roosevelt, Taft and Debs : The Election that Changed the Country — Patricia O'Toole, When Trumpets Call : Theodore Roosevelt After the White House — Candice Millard, The River of Doubt : Theodore Roosevelt's Darkest Journey — Lewis Einstein, Roosevelt : His Mind in Action — Rick Marshall, Bully!: The Life and Times of Theodore Roosevelt: Illustrated with More Than 250 Vintage Political Cartoons
  Image source: American Monthly Review of Reviews, October 1901
Leonard Wood Leonard Wood (1860-1927) — Born in Winchester, Cheshire County, N.H., October 9, 1860. Republican. Physician; received the Medal of Honor in 1898 for his actions during an Indian war in 1886; served in the U.S. Army during the Spanish-American War; commander of the "Rough Riders"; Military Governor of Cuba, 1899-1902; major general in the Philippine-American War, 1902-06; first Army Chief of Staff; candidate for Republican nomination for President, 1920; Governor-General of the Philippine Islands, 1921-27; died in office 1927. English ancestry. Died, following surgery for a brain tumor, in the Peter Bent Brigham Hospital, Boston, Suffolk County, Mass., August 7, 1927 (age 66 years, 302 days). Interment at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Va.
  Relatives: Son of Charles Jewett Wood (1829-1880) and Caroline E. (Hagar) Wood (1836-1915); married 1890 to Louisa Adriana Condit Smith (1869-1943).
  Fort Leonard Wood, in Pulaski County, Missouri, is named for him.
  Politician named for him: Leonard W. Hall
  See also Wikipedia article — Internet Movie Database profile — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: American Monthly Review of Reviews, September 1902
Richmond Pearson Hobson Richmond Pearson Hobson (1870-1937) — also known as Richmond P. Hobson; "The Most Kissed Man in America"; "The Father of American Prohibition" — of Greensboro, Hale County, Ala.; Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, Calif. Born in Greensboro, Hale County, Ala., August 17, 1870. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Navy during the Spanish-American War; Presidential Elector for Alabama, 1904; U.S. Representative from Alabama 6th District, 1907-15. Advocate for nation-wide alcohol prohibition; received the Medal of Honor in 1933 for action at Santiago de Cuba in February, 1898. Died in New York, New York County, N.Y., March 16, 1937 (age 66 years, 211 days). Interment at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Va.
  Relatives: Son of James Marcellus Hobson and Sarah Croom (Pearson) Hobson; married, May 25, 1905, to Grizelda Houston Hull; uncle of James Hobson Morrison, Sr. (1908-2000).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Books by Richmond P. Hobson: The Sinking of the Merrimac (1900) — America Must Be Mistress of the Seas (1902) — Why America Should Hold Naval Supremacy (1903) — Paramount Importance of Immediate Naval Expansion (1904) — Buck Jones at Annapolis (1907) — Diplomacy And The Fleet (1908) — Arbitration and Armaments (1908) — In Line of Duty (1909) — America's War Policy (1910) — Fortification of the Panama Canal (1911) — The Great Destroyer [alcohol] (1911) — Our Country's Destiny (1913) — Destroying the Great Destroyer (1915) — America and the World War (1917) — The Great Reform (1918) — Alcohol and the Human Race (1919)
  Image source: American Monthly Review of Reviews, September 1908
  Isaac Swartwood Catlin (1835-1916) — also known as Isaac S. Catlin — of Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y. Born in Owego, Tioga County, N.Y., July 8, 1835. Republican. Mayor of Owego, N.Y., 1860-61; colonel in the Union Army during the Civil War; wounded during Battle of the Crater, Petersburg, Va., July 1864, and lost his right leg; received the Medal of Honor for his actions that day; lawyer; candidate for mayor of Brooklyn, N.Y., 1885. Suffered a stroke, and died a week later, in the Hotel St. George, Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y., January 19, 1916 (age 80 years, 195 days). Interment at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Va.
  Relatives: Son of Nathaniel Catlin and Jane (Brodhead) Catlin; brother of Delinda Catlin (who married Benjamin Franklin Tracy (1830-1915)); married 1862 to Virginia H. S. Bacon (1842-1913).
  Political family: Coudert-Catlin-Tracy family of New York City, New York.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  William Edgar Simonds (1842-1903) — also known as William E. Simonds — of Canton, Hartford County, Conn. Born in Collinsville, Canton, Hartford County, Conn., November 24, 1842. Republican. Lawyer; member of Connecticut state house of representatives, 1885; Speaker of the Connecticut State House of Representatives, 1885; U.S. Representative from Connecticut 1st District, 1889-91; defeated, 1890. Received the Medal of Honor in 1899 for actions at the Battle of Irish Bend, Louisiana, April 14, 1863. Died in Hartford, Hartford County, Conn., March 14, 1903 (age 60 years, 110 days). Interment at Canton Center Cemetery, Canton, Conn.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  Hiram Iddings Bearss (1875-1938) — also known as Hiram I. Bearss — of Peru, Miami County, Ind. Born in Peru, Miami County, Ind., April 13, 1875. Republican. Served in the U.S. Marine Corps during Spanish-American War; received the Medal of Honor for his actions in the Philippine Islands, 1901-02; served in the U.S. Marine Corps during World War I; delegate to Republican National Convention from Indiana, 1920, 1936. Died in an automobile accident, in Columbia City, Whitley County, Ind., August 28, 1938 (age 63 years, 137 days). Interment at Mt. Hope Cemetery, Peru, Ind.
  Relatives: Son of Franklin Wallace Bearss (1846-1942) and Desdemonia (Iddings) Bearss (1849-1923); married, May 1, 1904, to Louise A. Madden; nephew of George Russell Bearss and Albert Cole Bearss (1836-?); grandson of Daniel Robert Bearss.
  Political family: Bearss family of Peru, Indiana.
  The USS Bearss (built 1943, scapped 1976), a U.S. Navy destroyer, was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  John McCreath Farquhar (1832-1918) — also known as John M. Farquhar — of Buffalo, Erie County, N.Y. Born near Ayr, Scotland, April 17, 1832. Republican. Major in the Union Army during the Civil War; U.S. Representative from New York 32nd District, 1885-91; defeated, 1902; member, U.S. Industrial Commission, 1898-1902. Member, International Typographical Union. Received the Medal of Honor in 1902, for action at Stone River, Tenn., December 31, 1862. Died in Buffalo, Erie County, N.Y., April 24, 1918 (age 86 years, 7 days). Interment at Forest Lawn Cemetery, Buffalo, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of John Farquhar and Marion (McCreath) Farquhar; married 1882 to Jane Wood.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Webb Cook Hayes (1856-1934) — also known as Webb C. Hayes — of Fremont, Sandusky County, Ohio. Born in Cincinnati, Hamilton County, Ohio, March 20, 1856. Served in the U.S. Army during the Spanish-American War; member of Ohio state legislature, 1910. Received the Medal of Honor in 1902 for action at Vigan, Luzon, Philippines, December 4, 1899. Died July 26, 1934 (age 78 years, 128 days). Interment at Spiegel Grove, Fremont, Ohio.
  Relatives: Son of Rutherford Birchard Hayes (1822-1893).
  Smedley Darlington Butler (1881-1940) — also known as Smedley Butler; "The Fighting Quaker"; "Old Gimlet Eye" — of Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa. Born in West Chester, Chester County, Pa., July 30, 1881. Republican. Major general in U.S. Marine Corps; received a Medal of Honor for the capture of Veracruz, Mexico, 1914; received another for the capture of Fort Riviere, Haiti, 1915; Philadelphia police commissioner, 1924-25; arrested and court-martialed in 1931 over his unauthorized disclosure of an incident unflattering to Italian dictator Italian Benito Mussolini; retired from the service rather than apologize to Mussolini; candidate in primary for U.S. Senator from Pennsylvania, 1932. Quaker. Died in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., June 21, 1940 (age 58 years, 327 days). Interment at Oaklands Cemetery, West Chester, Pa.
  Relatives: Son of Thomas Stalker Butler and Maud Mary (Darlington) Butler; married, June 30, 1905, to Ethel Conway Peters (1879-1962); grandson of Smedley Darlington and Samuel Butler; second great-grandnephew of Edward Darlington (1755-1825); first cousin thrice removed of Isaac Darlington, William Darlington (1782-1863), Esther Darlington (1793-1877; who married James B. Roberts), Edward Darlington (1795-1884) and William Darlington (1804-1879); second cousin twice removed of Edward C. Darlington; fourth cousin of Darlington Hoopes (1896-1989).
  Political family: Darlington-Butler family of West Chester, Pennsylvania.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Willis Winter Bradley (1884-1954) — also known as Willis W. Bradley — of Long Beach, Los Angeles County, Calif. Born in Ransomville, Niagara County, N.Y., June 28, 1884. Republican. Served in the U.S. Navy during World War I; Governor of Guam, 1929-31; U.S. Representative from California 18th District, 1947-49; defeated, 1948; member of California state assembly, 1953-54; died in office 1954. Member, American Legion; Veterans of Foreign Wars; Disabled American Veterans; Freemasons; Knights Templar; Shriners; Elks; Moose. Received the Medal of Honor, for action on U.S.S. Pittsburgh, July 23, 1917. Suffered a heart attack during the noon recess of a legislative hearing, and died soon after at Cottage Hospital, Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara County, Calif., August 27, 1954 (age 70 years, 60 days). Interment at Fort Rosecrans National Cemetery, San Diego, Calif.
  Relatives: Son of Willis W. Bradley and Sarah Anne (Johnson) Bradley; married, October 16, 1907, to Sue Worthington Cox.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  William Joseph Donovan (1883-1959) — also known as William J. Donovan; "Wild Bill" — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born in Buffalo, Erie County, N.Y., January 1, 1883. Republican. Lawyer; colonel in the U.S. Army during World War I; candidate for Lieutenant Governor of New York, 1922; U.S. Attorney for the Western District of New York, 1922-24; candidate for Governor of New York, 1932; general in the U.S. Army during World War II; U.S. Ambassador to Thailand, 1953-54. Catholic. Member, American Bar Association; American Legion; Phi Kappa Psi; Phi Delta Phi. Received the Medal of Honor for action during World War I. During World War II, he founded and led the U.S. Office of Strategic Services, which later became the Central Intelligence Agency. Died at Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Washington, D.C., February 8, 1959 (age 76 years, 38 days). Interment at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Va.
  Relatives: Son of Timothy P. Donovan and Anna (Lennon) Donovan; married, July 15, 1914, to Ruth Rumsey.
  See also U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier
  Edouard Victor Michel Izac (1891-1990) — also known as Edouard V. M. Izac — of San Diego, San Diego County, Calif. Born in Cresco, Howard County, Iowa, December 18, 1891. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Navy during World War I; U.S. Representative from California, 1937-47 (20th District 1937-43, 23rd District 1943-47); defeated, 1934, 1946; delegate to Democratic National Convention from California, 1940, 1944 (member, Platform and Resolutions Committee). Received the Medal of Honor for actions as a German prisoner of war in 1918. Died in Fairfax, Va., January 18, 1990 (age 98 years, 31 days). Interment at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Va.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
Douglas MacArthur Douglas MacArthur (1880-1964) — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born in Little Rock, Pulaski County, Ark., January 26, 1880. Republican. General in the U.S. Army during World War I; general in the U.S. Army during World War II; received the Medal of Honor for his defense of the Philippines in 1942; repeatedly disavowed any intention of becoming a candidate for any public office, but his supporters persisted in putting his name forward; speaker, Republican National Convention, 1952 ; candidate for U.S. Senator from New York, 1956. Died, from primary biliary cirrhosis (an auto-immune disorder), in Washington, D.C., April 5, 1964 (age 84 years, 70 days). Entombed at MacArthur Memorial, Norfolk, Va.; statue at United States Military Academy, West Point, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Arthur MacArthur and Mary Pinkney (Hardy) MacArthur; married 1922 to Louise Brooks; married, April 30, 1937, to Jean Marie Faircloth (1898-2000); uncle of Douglas MacArthur II (1909-1997); grandson of Arthur MacArthur (1815-1896).
  Political families: MacArthur family of Pennsylvania; Dodge-Duke-Cromwell family of Detroit, Michigan (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Cross-reference: Irvine H. Sprague
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: U.S. Army Center of Military History
  Maurice L. Britt (1919-1995) — also known as Footsie Britt — of Arkansas. Born in Carlisle, Lonoke County, Ark., June 29, 1919. Republican. Served in the U.S. Army during World War II; Lieutenant Governor of Arkansas, 1967-71; candidate for Governor of Arkansas, 1986. Baptist. Member, American Legion; Rotary; Kiwanis. Professional football player for the Detroit Lions. Wounded during World War II and lost his right arm. Received the Medal of Honor for action at Mignano, Italy, in November 1943. Died November 26, 1995 (age 76 years, 150 days). Interment at National Cemetery, Little Rock, Ark.
  Joseph Jacob Foss (1915-2003) — also known as Joe Foss; "The American Ace of Aces" — of Sioux Falls, Minnehaha County, S.Dak.; Scottsdale, Maricopa County, Ariz. Born in Sioux Falls, Minnehaha County, S.Dak., April 17, 1915. Republican. Served in the U.S. Marine Corps during World War II; received the Medal of Honor for action over Guadalcanal in 1942-43; delegate to Republican National Convention from South Dakota, 1948 (alternate), 1956, 1960; speaker, 1952, 1956; member of South Dakota state house of representatives 10th District, 1949-50, 1953-54; Governor of South Dakota, 1955-59; candidate for U.S. Representative from South Dakota, 1958; Commissioner, American Football League, 1960; elected to National Aviation Hall of Fame, 1984; president, National Rifle Association, 1988-90. Methodist. Member, American Legion; National Rifle Association; Freemasons; Shriners; Elks. Died, from the effects of a stroke, in Scottsdale, Maricopa County, Ariz., January 1, 2003 (age 87 years, 259 days). Interment at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Va.
  Relatives: Married, August 9, 1942, to June Shakstad; married 1967 to Donna Wild Hall.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile
  Clyde L. Choate (1920-2001) — of Anna, Union County, Ill. Born in West Frankfort, Franklin County, Ill., June 28, 1920. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army during World War II; member of Illinois state house of representatives, 1947-79 (50th District 1947-57, 58th District 1957-67, 59th District 1967-79); delegate to Democratic National Convention from Illinois, 1956 (alternate), 1964, 1972. Member, American Legion; Veterans of Foreign Wars; Disabled American Veterans; Elks; Moose; Purple Heart. Received the Medal of Honor for action near Bruyeres, France, October 25, 1944. Died October 5, 2001 (age 81 years, 99 days). Interment at Anna City Cemetery, Anna, Ill.
  Choate Mental Health Center (state mental hospital), in Anna, Illinois, is named for him.
  Peter Joseph Dalessandro (b. 1918) — also known as Peter J. Dalessandro — of Watervliet, Albany County, N.Y. Born in Watervliet, Albany County, N.Y., May 19, 1918. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army during World War II; member of New York state senate, 1947-57 (35th District 1947-54, 36th District 1955-57); resigned 1957. Italian ancestry. Member, Amvets; Catholic War Veterans; Elks; Veterans of Foreign Wars; American Legion. Received the Medal of Honor for action near Kalterherberg, Germany, December 22, 1944. Presumed deceased. Burial location unknown.
  Nathan Green Gordon (1916-2008) — of Morrilton, Conway County, Ark. Born in Morrilton, Conway County, Ark., September 4, 1916. Democrat. Lawyer; served in the U.S. Navy during World War II; Lieutenant Governor of Arkansas, 1947-67; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Arkansas, 1960. Received the Medal of Honor for action in Kavieng Harbor in the Bismarck Sea, February 15, 1944. Died September 8, 2008 (age 92 years, 4 days). Burial location unknown.
  See also NNDB dossier
  Theodore Roosevelt, Jr. (1887-1944) — of Oyster Bay, Nassau County, Long Island, N.Y. Born in Oyster Bay, Nassau County, Long Island, N.Y., September 13, 1887. Republican. Farmer; colonel in the U.S. Army during World War I; member of New York state assembly from Nassau County 2nd District, 1920-21; delegate to Republican National Convention from New York, 1924, 1928, 1940; candidate for Governor of New York, 1924; Governor of Puerto Rico, 1929-32; Governor-General of the Philippine Islands, 1932-33; general in the U.S. Army during World War II. Member, American Legion. Principal founder of the American Legion in 1919. Participated in the invasion of Nazi-occupied France, on D-Day, June 6, 1944, and received a posthumous Medal of Honor for his actions that day; died a month later, of exhaustion and heart failure, in Normandy, France, July 12, 1944 (age 56 years, 303 days). Interment at Normandy American Cemetery, Collevelle-sur-Mer, France; cenotaph at Youngs Memorial Cemetery, Oyster Bay, Long Island, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Theodore Roosevelt and Edith Kermit (Carow) Roosevelt (1861-1948); half-brother of Alice Lee Roosevelt (who married Nicholas Longworth); married, June 20, 1910, to Eleanor Butler Alexander; nephew of Corinne Roosevelt Robinson; grandnephew of Robert Barnwell Roosevelt; great-grandnephew of James I. Roosevelt (1795-1875); second great-grandnephew of William Bellinger Bulloch; third great-grandson of Archibald Bulloch; first cousin of Theodore Douglas Robinson, Eleanor Roosevelt, Corinne Robinson Alsop and William Sheffield Cowles; first cousin once removed of James Roosevelt, Elliott Roosevelt, Corinne A. Chubb, Franklin Delano Roosevelt, Jr. and John deKoven Alsop; first cousin twice removed of Daniel Putnam Tyler; second cousin thrice removed of Philip DePeyster; second cousin four times removed of Nicholas Roosevelt, Jr..
  Political families: Roosevelt family of New York City, New York; Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Joseph Robert Kerrey (b. 1943) — also known as Bob Kerrey — of Nebraska. Born in Lincoln, Lancaster County, Neb., August 27, 1943. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Navy during the Vietnam War; Governor of Nebraska, 1983-87; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Nebraska, 1996, 2000; speaker, 1988; U.S. Senator from Nebraska, 1989-; candidate for Democratic nomination for President, 1992. Congregationalist. Member, Veterans of Foreign Wars; Disabled American Veterans; American Legion; Lions; Sertoma. Received the Medal of Honor for action at Nha Trang Bay, Vietnam, 1969, when he lost a leg. Still living as of 2014.
  The Bob Kerrey Pedestrian Bridge (opened 2008), across the Missouri River between Omaha, Nebraska and Council Bluffs, Iowa, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — votes in Congress from the Washington Post — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile
  Books by Bob Kerrey: When I Was A Young Man : A Memoir by Bob Kerrey (2002)
  Books about Bob Kerrey: Gregory L. Vistica, The Education of Lieutenant Kerrey
  James Bond Stockdale (1923-2005) — also known as James B. Stockdale — Born in Abingdon, Knox County, Ill., December 23, 1923. U.S. Navy pilot and vice admiral; received the Medal of Honor in 1976 for his actions as a prisoner of war in Vietnam.; candidate for Vice President of the United States, 1992. Member, Alpha Tau Omega. Died, probably from Alzheimer's disease, in Coronado, San Diego County, Calif., July 5, 2005 (age 81 years, 194 days). Burial location unknown.
  See also NNDB dossier
  Daniel Ken Inouye (1924-2012) — also known as Daniel K. Inouye — of Honolulu, Island of Oahu, Honolulu County, Hawaii. Born in Honolulu, Island of Oahu, Honolulu County, Hawaii, September 7, 1924. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army during World War II; lawyer; member of Hawaii territorial House of Representatives, 1954-58; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Hawaii Territory, 1956; member of Hawaii territorial senate, 1958-59; U.S. Representative from Hawaii at-large, 1959-63; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Hawaii, 1960, 1972, 1980, 1996, 2000, 2004, 2008 (delegation chair); Temporary Chair, 1968; speaker, 1968; Co-Chair, 1984; U.S. Senator from Hawaii, 1963-. Methodist. Japanese ancestry. Member, American Bar Association; Disabled American Veterans; Phi Delta Phi; Lions. Lost his right arm as the result of a combat injury in Italy during World War II. His Distinguished Service Cross was upgraded in 2000 to a Medal of Honor. First American of Japanese descent to serve in Congress. Died, from respiratory failure, in Walter Reed Hospital, Bethesda, Montgomery County, Md., December 17, 2012 (age 88 years, 101 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Hyotaro I. Inouye and Kame Imanaga Inouye; married, June 12, 1949, to Margaret Shinobu Awamura.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — votes in Congress from the Washington Post — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile
  Charles Seymour Kettles (1930-2019) — also known as Charles S. Kettles — of Ypsilanti, Washtenaw County, Mich. Born in Ypsilanti, Washtenaw County, Mich., January 9, 1930. Republican. Engineer; automobile dealer; served in the U.S. Army during the Vietnam war; following his courageous actions as a helicopter pilot in Vietnam in 1967, which saved 44 lives, he received the Distinguished Service Cross; in 2016, that award was upgraded to a Medal of Honor; candidate for mayor of Ypsilanti, Mich., 1993. Died in Ypsilanti, Washtenaw County, Mich., January 21, 2019 (age 89 years, 12 days). Interment at Highland Cemetery, Ypsilanti, Mich.
  The Charles Kettles VA Medical Center, in Ann Arbor, Michigan, is named for him.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
"Enjoy the hospitable entertainment of a political graveyard."
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The Political Graveyard

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