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Politicians in Trouble or Disgrace

Politicians in Trouble: B

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  Michael Badnarik (b. 1954) — of Austin, Travis County, Tex. Born in Hammond, Lake County, Ind., August 1, 1954. Libertarian. Software engineer; candidate for Texas state house of representatives, 2000 (47th District), 2002 (48th District); candidate for President of the United States, 2004; candidate for U.S. Representative from Texas 10th District, 2006. Slovak ancestry. Arrested, in St. Louis, Mo., on October 8, 2004, along with Green Party presidential nominee David Cobb, while protesting their exclusion from presidential debates. Still living as of 2007.
  See also Wikipedia article — Internet Movie Database profile — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Byron Mark Baer (1929-2007) — also known as Byron M. Baer — of Englewood, Bergen County, N.J. Born October 8, 1929. Democrat. Member of New Jersey state house of assembly, 1972-93 (District 13-B 1972-73, 37th District 1974-93); member of New Jersey state senate 37th District, 1994-2005; resigned 2005; delegate to Democratic National Convention from New Jersey, 1996, 2000. While working as a Freedom Rider, registering voters in Mississippi in 1961, was arrested and jailed for 45 days. Died, from complications of congestive heart failure, in an assisted living facility, Englewood, Bergen County, N.J., June 24, 2007 (age 77 years, 259 days). Cremated.
  Relatives: Married to Linda Pollitt (1948?-).
  Cross-reference: June B. Montag
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Frank W. Ballance, Jr. (b. 1942) — of Warrenton, Warren County, N.C. Born in Windsor, Bertie County, N.C., February 15, 1942. Democrat. Lawyer; librarian; college professor; member of North Carolina state house of representatives, 1982-85; member of North Carolina state senate, 1989-2002; delegate to Democratic National Convention from North Carolina, 1996, 2000; U.S. Representative from North Carolina 1st District, 2003-04; resigned 2004; indicted in federal court in September 2004 on federal money laundering charges for diverting state funds through a charitable foundation; pleaded guilty to one count, sentenced to four years in prison, fined $10,000, ordered to pay restitution, and disbarred. African ancestry. Still living as of 2014.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — votes in Congress from the Washington Post — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Byron L. Ballard (b. 1890) — of Lansing, Ingham County, Mich. Born in Fort Worth, Tarrant County, Tex., February 21, 1890. Democrat. Lawyer; law partner of Charles H. Hayden, 1917-30, and of Edmund C. Shields, 1931; chair of Ingham County Democratic Party, 1920-24; candidate for Michigan state senate 14th District, 1926; treasurer of Michigan Democratic Party, 1937; charged on July 20, 1946 (along with 18 other legislators) with accepting bribes to vote against a banking bill, but the entire case collapsed when the star prosecution witness, Charles F. Hemans, refused to testify. Episcopalian. Member, American Bar Association; Rotary; Knights of Pythias; Freemasons; Knights Templar; Elks; Sigma Phi Epsilon. Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Walter Elgin Ballard and Jennie (Peden) Ballard; married, February 16, 1916, to M. Lucille Juzek.
  Ernest Bamberger (1877-1958) — of Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Utah. Born in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Utah, August 11, 1877. Republican. Mining executive; member of Republican National Committee from Utah, 1920-24, 1935; candidate for U.S. Senator from Utah, 1922, 1928. Jewish. Member, Chi Psi. Arrested in 1923, along with three friends, for smoking cigars in the Vienna Cafe, Salt Lake City; however, on March 9, Utah's ban on public smoking was repealed. Died in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Utah, January 11, 1958 (age 80 years, 153 days). Interment at Mt. Olivet Cemetery, Salt Lake City, Utah.
  Relatives: Son of Jacob Emanuel Bamberger (1852-1928) and Bertha (Greenwald) Bamberger (1858-1939); nephew of Simon Bamberger; first cousin of Julian Maas Bamberger (1889-1967).
  Political family: Bamberger family of Salt Lake City, Utah.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  George Thomas Bardwell (1901-1947) — also known as George Bardwell; Thomas George Bardwell — of Denver, Colo. Born in Lake City, Hinsdale County, Colo., October 18, 1901. Communist. Candidate for U.S. Representative from Colorado 1st District, 1934; arrested and prosecuted in the 1930s in connection with a strike; acquitted. Died in a hospital, Denver, Colo., January 19, 1947 (age 45 years, 93 days). Interment at Mt. Olivet Cemetery, Wheat Ridge, Colo.
  Relatives: Son of George D. Bardwell (1866-1908) and Hannah J. (Cunningham) Bardwell (1873-1924); married, April 4, 1923, to Avelina Rella (divorced 1934).
  Joseph Barker (c.1806-1862) — of Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, Pa. Born in Allegheny County, Pa., about 1806. Mayor of Pittsburgh, Pa., 1850-51; defeated, 1851, 1852. In 1849, after an anti-Catholic speech, he was arrested, charged with using obscene language, obstructing the streets, and causing a riot, convicted, and sentenced to a year in prison; elected mayor in 1850 while still incarcerated. While mayor, he was twice arrested on charges of assault and battery. In 1851, he was convicted of riot. Struck and killed by a railroad train, in Ross Township, Allegheny County, Pa., August 2, 1862 (age about 56 years). Interment at Allegheny Cemetery, Pittsburgh, Pa.
  George Gardner Barnard (c.1829-1879) — also known as George G. Barnard — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in Poughkeepsie, Dutchess County, N.Y., about 1829. Democrat. Lawyer; a close ally of corrupt New York City political boss William M. Tweed; Recorder, New York City, 1858-60; Justice of New York Supreme Court 1st District, 1861-72; removed 1872; impeached by the New York legislature in 1872, on charges that he abused his judicial power through the takeover of several railroads, putting them under the control of receivers who were allied with "robber barons" Jay Gould and Jim Fisk; the Union Pacific and other railroads had to relocate their headquarters away from New York City to evade the jurisdiction of Barnard and Justice Albert Cardozo; Barnard was unanimously convicted by the Court of Impeachment, and also barred from holding office of any kind. Died, from Bright's disease, in New York, New York County, N.Y., April 27, 1879 (age about 50 years). Entombed at Green-Wood Cemetery, Brooklyn, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Frederic Barnard (1780-1866) and Margaret (Allen) Barnard (1792-1869); brother of Joseph Folger Barnard (1823-1904); married, June 29, 1859, to Frances Anderson (1840-1874).
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Martin G. Barnes (born c.1949) — also known as Marty Barnes — of Paterson, Passaic County, N.J. Born about 1949. Republican. Mayor of Paterson, N.J., 1997-2002; defeated, 2002. African ancestry. Indicted in federal court in 2002 on 40 counts of bribery and other offenses, over his solicitation and acceptance of more than $200,000 in gratuities from city contractors, including home improvements, designer suits, and paid female companions; pleaded guilty to two counts, including tax evasion, and sentenced in 2003 to 37 months in prison. Still living as of 2003.
William Wallace Barron William Wallace Barron (1911-2002) — also known as W. Wallace Barron; Wally Barron — of Elkins, Randolph County, W.Va. Born in Elkins, Randolph County, W.Va., December 8, 1911. Democrat. Lawyer; served in the U.S. Army during World War II; mayor of Elkins, W.Va., 1949-50; member of West Virginia state house of delegates from Randolph County, 1951-53; resigned 1953; West Virginia state attorney general; elected 1956; Governor of West Virginia, 1961-65. Presbyterian. Member, Freemasons; Shriners; Elks; Moose; Civitan; Odd Fellows; Knights of Pythias; American Bar Association; American Judicature Society; American Legion; Forty and Eight. Convicted of jury tampering in 1971, and sentenced to five years in prison. Died in Charlotte, Mecklenburg County, N.C., November 12, 2002 (age 90 years, 339 days). Interment at Maplewood Cemetery, Elkins, W.Va.
  Relatives: Son of Rev. Frederick H. Barron and Mary (Butler) Barron; married, February 15, 1936, to Opal B. Wilcox (1914-2010).
  Cross-reference: Curtis B. Trent, Jr.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: West Virginia Blue Book 1951
  Tom Joe Barrow (b. 1949) — also known as Tom Barrow — of Detroit, Wayne County, Mich. Born, in Kirwood Hospital, Detroit, Wayne County, Mich., January 12, 1949. Accountant; candidate for mayor of Detroit, Mich., 1985 (primary), 1989, 2009, 2013 (primary); convicted of on federal charges of tax evasion in 1993; served 18 months in prison; his contention that he was wrongfully convicted was later supported by a ruling of the U.S. Tax Court in 2008. African ancestry. Still living as of 2013.
  Relatives: Son of Albert Barrow and Mattie Barrow.
  Marion S. Barry, Jr. (1936-2014) — also known as Marion Barry — of Washington, D.C. Born in Itta Bena, Leflore County, Miss., March 6, 1936. Democrat. Delegate to Democratic National Convention from District of Columbia, 1972 (alternate), 1980, 1996; mayor of Washington, D.C., 1979-91, 1995-99; convicted in 1990 of misdemeanor cocaine possession after being caught on videotape smoking crack cocaine; sentenced to six months in prison. African ancestry. Member, Alpha Phi Alpha. Died in Washington, D.C., November 23, 2014 (age 78 years, 262 days). Interment at Congressional Cemetery, Washington, D.C.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Critical books about Marion Barry: Jonetta Rose Barras, The Last of the Black Emperors : The Hollow Comeback of Marion Barry in a New Age of Black Leaders
  Paul Charles Barth (1858-1907) — also known as Paul C. Barth — of Louisville, Jefferson County, Ky. Born in Germany, December, 1858. Mayor of Louisville, Ky., 1905-07; removed from office over alleged vote fraud, 1907. Killed himself by gunshot, in the lavatory of his office, Louisville, Jefferson County, Ky., August 21, 1907 (age 48 years, 0 days). Interment at St. Louis Catholic Cemetery, Louisville, Ky.
  Relatives: Son of Jacob Frederick Barth (1819-1864) and Louisa A. (Barth) Barth (1821-1869); married to Jewel Small (1869-1903).
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Kumar P. Barve (b. 1958) — of Gaithersburg, Montgomery County, Md. Born in Schenectady, Schenectady County, N.Y., September 8, 1958. Democrat. Member of Maryland state house of delegates District 17, 1991-; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Maryland, 2000; Presidential Elector for Maryland, 2012. Hindu. Indian subcontinent ancestry. Arrested November 29, 2007, and charged with driving while intoxicated. Still living as of 2012.
  Relatives: Son of Prabhakar Barve and Neera Barve; married to Maureen Quinn.
  See also Wikipedia article
  Thomas H. Bates (b. 1938) — also known as Tom Bates — of Oakland, Alameda County, Calif.; Berkeley, Alameda County, Calif. Born in San Diego, San Diego County, Calif., February 9, 1938. Democrat. Member of California state assembly, 1977-96 (12th District 1977-93, 14th District 1993-96); delegate to Democratic National Convention from California, 1980, 1984, 1988; mayor of Berkeley, Calif., 2002-; charged in 2002 with petty theft in connection with his destruction of 1,000 copies of a student newspaper that had endorsed his opponent; pleaded guilty, was fined, and paid restitution. Still living as of 2012.
  Relatives: Married to Loni Hancock (daughter of Donald S. Harrington (1914-?)).
  Political family: Hancock-Bates-Harrington family of Berkeley, California.
  See also Wikipedia article
  Robert Edmund Bauman (b. 1937) — also known as Robert E. Bauman — of Easton, Talbot County, Md. Born in Bryn Mawr, Montgomery County, Pa., April 4, 1937. Republican. Lawyer; delegate to Republican National Convention from Maryland, 1964, 1972 (alternate); member of Maryland state senate, 1971-73; U.S. Representative from Maryland 1st District, 1973-81; defeated, 1971, 1980. Catholic. Member, Young Americans for Freedom; American Bar Association; Elks; Humane Society; Jaycees; Izaak Walton League; Gay. Pleaded guilty in 1980 to a sex-solicitation charge. Still living as of 1998.
  Relatives: Son of John Carl Bauman and Florence (House) Bauman; married, November 19, 1960, to Carol Gene Dawson (annulled).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  Albert P. Beebe (c.1843-1932) — of Parma town, Monroe County, N.Y. Born about 1843. Republican. Member of New York state assembly from Monroe County 4th District, 1905-06. Indicted on April 9, 1906 on a charge of vote-buying. Died in Parma town, Monroe County, N.Y., November 30, 1932 (age about 89 years). Burial location unknown.
  William Worth Belknap (1829-1890) — also known as William W. Belknap — of Iowa. Born in Newburgh, Orange County, N.Y., September 22, 1829. Lawyer; member of Iowa state house of representatives, 1857-58; general in the Union Army during the Civil War; U.S. Secretary of War, 1869-76. Impeached in 1876 by the House of Representatives for taking bribes; resigned on March 2, 1876. Despite arguments that the Senate lacked jurisdiction after his resignation, an impeachment trial was held; on August 1, the Senate voted 35 to 25 for his conviction, short of the necessary two-thirds. Died, of an apparent heart attack, in Washington, D.C., October 13, 1890 (age 61 years, 21 days). Interment at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Va.
  Relatives: Son of William Goldsmith Belknap (Mexican War general) and Ann (Clark) Belknap; married to Cora LeRoy, Carrie Thompson and Mrs. John Bower; father of Hugh Reid Belknap (1860-1901).
  Mount Belknap, in the Tushar Mountains, Beaver and Piute counties, Utah, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Philip C. Bellfy (b. 1946) — also known as Phil Bellfy — of Sault Ste. Marie, Chippewa County, Mich. Born, in a hospital at Detroit, Wayne County, Mich., April 7, 1946. College teacher; Human Rights candidate for Michigan State University board of trustees, 1976; Human Rights candidate for Presidential Elector for Michigan, 1976; after refusing to remove his hat, was arrested for trespassing in Michigan state capitol building, 1977; Independent candidate for U.S. Representative from Michigan 11th District, 1986; Workers League candidate for Presidential Elector for Michigan, 1988. Chippewa Indian ancestry. Still living as of 2004.
  Parker J. Bena (born c.1963) — of Virginia Beach, Va. Born about 1963. Republican. Presidential Elector for Virginia, 2000. Pleaded guilty in 2001 to possession of child pornography on his home computer; sentenced to 30 months in federal prison and fined $18,000. Still living as of 2001.
  Judah Philip Benjamin (1811-1884) — also known as Judah P. Benjamin; Philippe Benjamin; "Poo Bah of the Confederacy" — of New Orleans, Orleans Parish, La.; London, England; Paris, France. Born in Christiansted, St. Croix, Virgin Islands, August 6, 1811. Lawyer; member of Louisiana state house of representatives, 1842-44; delegate to Louisiana state constitutional convention, 1845; Presidential Elector for Louisiana, 1848; U.S. Senator from Louisiana, 1853-61; Confederate Attorney General, 1861; Confederate Secretary of War, 1861-62; Confederate Secretary of State, 1862-65. Jewish. He fled to Europe in 1865 to avoid arrest by Union forces; he was suspected of involvement in the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln. Fell from a tram car about 1880, and suffered multiple injuries; also developed kidney and heart problems, and died in Paris, France, May 6, 1884 (age 72 years, 274 days). Interment at Père la Chaise Cemetery, Paris, France.
  Relatives: Son of Philip Benjamin and Rebecca (de Mendes) Benjamin; married 1833 to Natalie St. Martin; cousin *** of Henry Michael Hyams (1806-1875).
  Coins and currency: His portrait appeared on the Confederate States $2 note in 1861-64.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  Books about Judah P. Benjamin: Robert Douthat Meade, Judah P. Benjamin: Confederate Statesman — Eli N. Evans, Judah P. Benjamin : The Jewish Confederate
  Bruce Bennett — Arkansas state attorney general, 1957; indicted in 1969 on fraud and conspiracy charges over his relationship with the bankrupt Arkansas Loan and Thrift Corporation. Still living as of 1969.
  George C. Bennett — of Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y. Republican. Newspaper editor; member of New York state assembly from Kings County 8th District, 1872, 1874; candidate for U.S. Representative from New York 4th District, 1874; Brooklyn Commissioner of City Works; indicted, along with John W. Flaherty, in December 1878, for conspiracy to defraud the city of $50,000; tried in 1879 and convicted; fined $250; the conviction was reversed on appeal; delegate to Republican National Convention from New York, 1884. Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Father of Charles Goodwin Bennett (1863-1914).
  William John Bennett (b. 1943) — also known as Bill Bennett — Born in Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y., July 3, 1943. U.S. Secretary of Education, 1985-88; director, U.S. Office of National Drug Control Policy ("Drug Czar"), 1989-91; radio show host; television commentator. Catholic. Member, Kappa Alpha Society. In 2003, news media reported that Bennett had lost millions gambling in Las Vegas, a minor scandal in light of his advocacy for self-discipline and other virtues; he acknowledged that he had done "too much gambling" and that it "set a bad example". Still living as of 2010.
  Relatives: Married, May 29, 1982, to Mary Elayne Glover.
  Cross-reference: Allison H. Eid
  See also Wikipedia article — Internet Movie Database profile
  Robert Julian Bentley (b. 1943) — also known as Robert J. Bentley; "The Love Gov" — of Tuscaloosa, Tuscaloosa County, Ala. Born in Columbiana, Shelby County, Ala., February 3, 1943. Republican. Physician; dermatologist; member of Alabama state house of representatives, 2003-10; delegate to Republican National Convention from Alabama, 2008; Governor of Alabama, 2011-17; resigned 2017; accused in 2016 of having an extramarital affair with Rebekah Caldwell Mason, a politcal advisor on his campaign staff; an impeachment resolution was brought; as part of an agreement with prosecutors, he pleaded guilty to two campaign finance violations, including failing to disclose a $50,000 personal loan to his campaign account; his sentence was suspended, but he was placed on probation, ordered to do community service, and fined $7,000. Still living as of 2017.
  Relatives: Son of David Harford Bentley and Mattie Boyd (Vick) Bentley.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
Thomas Hart Benton Thomas Hart Benton (1782-1858) — also known as "Old Bullion" — of Franklin, Williamson County, Tenn.; St. Louis, Mo. Born near Hillsborough, Orange County, N.C., March 14, 1782. Lawyer; newspaper editor; member of Tennessee state senate, 1809; U.S. Senator from Missouri, 1821-51; U.S. Representative from Missouri 1st District, 1853-55; Benton Democrat candidate for Governor of Missouri, 1856. Fought a duel with Andrew Jackson, who later became a political ally. In April, 1850, he caused a scandal with his attempt to assault Sen. Henry Stuart Foote, of Mississippi, during debate on the Senate floor; he was restrained by other senators. Foote had a cocked pistol in his hand and undoubtedly would have shot him. Died in Washington, D.C., April 10, 1858 (age 76 years, 27 days). Interment at Bellefontaine Cemetery, St. Louis, Mo.
  Relatives: Son of Jesse Benton and Ann (Gooch) Benton; married 1821 to Elizabeth McDowell (1794-1854; sister of James McDowell); father of Jessie Benton (who married John Charles Frémont); uncle of Thomas Hart Benton, Jr. (1816-1879); granduncle of Maecenas Eason Benton.
  Political family: Benton family (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Benton counties in Ark., Ind., Iowa, Minn., Ore. and Wash. are named for him.
  Coins and currency: His portrait appeared on the U.S. $100 gold certificate in the 1880s to 1920s.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Image source: The South in the Building of the Nation (1909)
  D. Stephen Benzie (b. 1893) — of Norway, Dickinson County, Mich. Born in Norway, Dickinson County, Mich., March 10, 1893. Democrat. Road contractor; lumber business; member of Michigan state senate 31st District, 1939-42; defeated, 1942; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Michigan, 1940; charged on January 22, 1944 (along with 19 other current and former state legislators) with accepting bribes; tried, convicted, and sentenced to 3-5 years in prison. Member, Elks. Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Married 1913 to Lillian Wilson.
Julius S. Berg Julius S. Berg (1895-1938) — of Bronx, Bronx County, N.Y. Born in New York, New York County, N.Y., July 15, 1895. Democrat. Lawyer; served in the U.S. Army during World War I; injured in combat and lost a leg; member of New York state assembly from Bronx County 3rd District, 1923-30; member of New York state senate 22nd District, 1931-38; died in office 1938. Jewish. Member, American Legion; Jewish War Veterans; Veterans of Foreign Wars; Disabled American Veterans; Freemasons; Elks; Knights of Pythias. Indicted on charges of receiving money for his aid in procuring liquor licenses and arranging for concessions at the New York World's Fair; that same day, he killed himself by gunshot, in his law office, Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., July 20, 1938 (age 43 years, 5 days). Interment at Mt. Ararat Cemetery, East Farmingdale, Long Island, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Morris Berg and Celia (Weinstein) Berg; married, June 20, 1920, to Rose Schram.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: New York Red Book 1936
  Philip J. Berg (b. 1944) — also known as Phil Berg — of Lafayette Hill, Montgomery County, Pa. Born in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., April 14, 1944. Democrat. Lawyer; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Pennsylvania, 1992; candidate in primary for U.S. Senator from Pennsylvania, 2000; in 2001, he issued a formal demand that U.S. Supreme Court Justices Sandra Day O'Connor, Clarence Thomas, and Antonin Scalia be disbarred for their participation in the Bush v. Gore decision; in 2004, he filed a federal lawsuit under the Racketeer Influencd and Corrupt Organizations (RICO) Act, accusing President George W. Bush, and 155 other defendants, of complicity in the 9/11 terrorist attacks (the case was dismissed); in 2008, he sued in federal court, contending that Barack Obama was born in Kenya and not eligible to be President (the case was dismissed); sued by clients and disciplined by Pennsylvania legal authorities for malpractice, mostly due to neglect of cases entrusted to him, missing legal deadlines, and failure to keep clients informed; his law license was suspended for two years in 2013, and he ultimately agreed to be disbarred in 2015. Still living as of 2018.
  See also Wikipedia article — Encyclopedia of American Loons
  Alexander J. Bergen — of Suffolk County, N.Y. Member of New York state assembly from Suffolk County 2nd District, 1861. Outraged by a criticism published in the newspaper, he assaulted the editor of the Suffolk County Democrat, in 1861, and was later prosecuted and fined $25. Burial location unknown.
Victor L. Berger Victor Luitpold Berger (1860-1929) — also known as Victor L. Berger — of Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, Wis. Born in Nieder-Rehbach, Austria, February 28, 1860. Socialist. Emigrated to the United States in 1878; school teacher; newspaper editor; U.S. Representative from Wisconsin 5th District, 1911-13, 1919, 1923-29; defeated, 1904, 1920; candidate for U.S. Senator from Wisconsin, 1918; delegate to Socialist National Convention from Wisconsin, 1920; Chairman of Socialist Party, 1927-29. Jewish ancestry. Member, International Typographical Union. He and Eugene V. Debs founded the Socialist Party. He opposed U.S. entry into World War I; in Chicago in 1918, he was tried and convicted under the Espionage Act, and sentenced to twenty years in prison; elected to Congress anyway, he was denied a seat in 1919-21 to to alleged disloyalty. In 1921, the U.S. Supreme Court reversed his conviction; the cases against him were withdrawn; he resumed his seat in Congress in 1923. Injured in a streetcar accident, and subsequently died, in Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, Wis., August 7, 1929 (age 69 years, 160 days). Interment at Forest Home Cemetery, Milwaukee, Wis.
  Relatives: Son of Ignatz Berger and Julia Berger; married, December 4, 1897, to Meta Schlicting.
  Cross-reference: William F. Kruse — Adolph Germer — J. Louis Engdahl — Irwin St. John Tucker
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: Marxists Internet Archive
  Joseph Bermel (1860-1921) — of Middle Village, Queens, Queens County, N.Y. Born in Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y., April 8, 1860. Stonecutter; Newtown town supervisor in the 1890s; charged with financial irregularities; tried and acquitted; borough president of Queens, New York, 1906-08; resigned 1908; resigned as borough president after a grand jury presented charges against him, related to fraud and bribery in connection with the city's purchase of Kissena Park in Queens. Member, Elks; Royal Arcanum; Foresters. Died in Carlsbad, Czechoslovakia (now Karlovy Vary, Czechia), July 28, 1921 (age 61 years, 111 days). Interment at St. John's Cemetery, Middle Village, Queens, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Charles Bermel and Elizabeth (Cohn) Bermel; married, October 21, 1884, to Anna Mary Timmes.
  William Berri (1848-1917) — of Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y. Born in Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y., September 12, 1848. Republican. Carpet merchant; printing business; newspaper publisher; officer or director of banks, electric utilities, and the New York Telephone Company; delegate to Republican National Convention from New York, 1904, 1908, 1912, 1916; delegate to New York state constitutional convention at-large, 1915; member, New York State Board of Regents, 1916-17. Congregationalist. Member, Union League. In 1911, he was arraigned on a charge of criminal libel over an article he published in his newspaper, brought by three candidates for Supreme Court, Herbert T. Ketcham, Patrick E. Callahan, and William Willett, Jr.; the case was withdrawn a few days later when the other two candidates discovered that Willett had indeed (as Berri charged) paid bribes for his nomination. Died in Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y., April 19, 1917 (age 68 years, 219 days). Interment at Green-Wood Cemetery, Brooklyn, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of William Berri ; married 1869 to Frances Williams Morris (died c.1910).
  John Gayfer Berry (1838-1923) — also known as John G. Berry — of Berryville, Otsego County, Mich. Born in 1838. Republican. Member of Michigan state senate 27th District, 1889-90; Michigan land commissioner, 1893-94; defeated, 1890; removed 1894. Removed from office as land commissioner, March 20, 1894. Died in 1923 (age about 85 years). Interment at Evergreen Hills Cemetery, Vanderbilt, Mich.
  Mary Frances Berry (b. 1938) — Born in Nashville, Davidson County, Tenn., February 17, 1938. Lawyer; writer; university professor; member, U.S. Civil Rights Commission, 1978-2004; chair, U.S. Civil Rights Commission, 1993-99; arrested during an anti-apartheid sit-in at the South African Embassy in Washington, 1984. Female. African ancestry. Still living as of 2014.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile
  Anthony Joseph Bevilacqua (1923-2012) — also known as Anthony Bevilacqua — of Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa.; Wynnewood, Montgomery County, Pa. Born in Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y., June 17, 1923. Republican. Catholic priest; bishop of Pittsburgh, 1983-88; archbishop of Philadelphia, 1988-2003; cardinal from 1991; offered prayer, Republican National Convention, 2000 ; accused in 2003-04 of protecting priests who were suspected of sexually abusing children; later, it was found that he had ordered a subordinate to destroy a list of 35 abusive priests, and that he had punished a priest who had raised concerns about possible abuse. Catholic. Italian ancestry. Died in Wynnewood, Montgomery County, Pa., January 31, 2012 (age 88 years, 228 days). Entombed at Cathedral Basilica of Sts. Peter and Paul, Philadelphia, Pa.
  Relatives: Son of Luigi Bevilacqua and Maria (Codella) Bevilacqua.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Jello Biafra (b. 1958) — also known as Eric Reed Boucher; "Occupant"; "Count Ringworm" — of San Francisco, Calif. Born in Boulder, Boulder County, Colo., June 17, 1958. Co-founder, lead singer, and songwriter for the punk rock band Dead Kennedys (1978-86); founder of the Alternative Tentacles record label; candidate for mayor of San Francisco, Calif., 1979; charged, in Los Angeles in 1986, with distributing obscene "harmful matter" in the form of a sexually explicit print distributed with a Dead Kennedys record album; following a trial, the jury deadlocked, a mistrial was declared, and charges were dismissed; Biafra went on to become a spoken word performer; on May 7, 1994, he was assaulted and injured at a music club in Berkeley, Calif., by five or six attackers who called him a "sellout". Atheist. Still living as of 2014.
  Relatives: Son of Stanley Boucher and Virginia Boucher; married, October 31, 1981, to Therese Soder.
  Campaign slogan: "There's always room for Jello."
  Personal motto: "Don't hate the media, become the media."
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Mario Biaggi (1917-2015) — of Bronx, Bronx County, N.Y. Born in Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., October 26, 1917. Police officer; U.S. Representative from New York, 1969-88 (24th District 1969-73, 10th District 1973-83, 19th District 1983-88); defeated, 1988 (Republican), 1992 (Democratic primary); delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1972, 1980, 1984; Conservative candidate for mayor of New York City, N.Y., 1973. Catholic. Italian ancestry. Indicted in 1987 on federal charges that he had accepted bribes from former Brooklyn political boss Meade Esposito in in return for influence on federal contracts for a Brooklyn ship-repair company; convicted on September 22, 1987 of obstructing justice and accepting illegal gratuities; sentenced to prison and fined. Tried in 1988 on federal racketeering charges in connection with the Wedtech Corporation; convicted on August 4, 1988 on 15 felony counts. Resigned from Congress following the Wedtech conviction; served more than two years in prison. Died in Bronx, Bronx County, N.Y., June 24, 2015 (age 97 years, 241 days). Interment at Gate of Heaven Cemetery, Hawthorne, N.Y.
  Relatives: Married to Marie Wassil (1918-1997).
  Campaign slogan (1973): "He wins, you win."
  Campaign slogan (1973): "He's right for what's wrong with New York."
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Theodore Gilmore Bilbo (1877-1947) — also known as Theodore G. Bilbo — of Poplarville, Pearl River County, Miss. Born near Poplarville, Pearl River County, Miss., October 13, 1877. Democrat. School teacher; lawyer; farmer; member of Mississippi state senate, 1908-12; Lieutenant Governor of Mississippi, 1912-16; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Mississippi, 1912 (alternate), 1916 (member, Committee on Permanent Organization), 1928, 1936, 1940, 1944; Governor of Mississippi, 1916-20, 1928-32; U.S. Senator from Mississippi, 1935-47; died in office 1947. Baptist. Scotch-Irish ancestry. Member, Freemasons; Knights Templar; Shriners; Elks; Odd Fellows; Ku Klux Klan. Author of the book Take Your Choice: Separation or Mongrelization, which advocated deportation of all Black Americans to Africa. During the 1946 campaign, in a radio address, he called on "every red-blooded Anglo-Saxon man in Mississippi to resort to any means to keep hundreds of Negroes from the polls in the July 2 primary. And if you don't know what that means, you are just not up to your persuasive measures." After he won re-election, the Senate, appalled at his racist views and tactics, refused to seat him, and started an investigation. Died, of mouth cancer, in a hospital at New Orleans, Orleans Parish, La., August 21, 1947 (age 69 years, 312 days). Interment at Juniper Grove Cemetery, Near Poplarville, Pearl River County, Miss.
  Relatives: Son of James Oliver Bilbo and Beedy (Wallace) Bilbo; married, May 25, 1898, to Lillian S. Herrington; married, January 27, 1903, to Linda R. Gaddy.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Charles A. Binder (1857-1891) — also known as John Roth — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in New York, New York County, N.Y., November 2, 1857. Lawyer; member of New York state assembly from New York County 10th District, 1884, 1886; accused in 1891 of embezzling $20,000 from the estate of Barbara Hausman; fled and became a fugitive, traveling under the alias "John Roth". German ancestry. Wounded by self-inflicted gunshot, in his room at the Sheridan House Hotel, and died there early the next morning, in Elizabeth, Union County, N.J., May 17, 1891 (age 33 years, 196 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Margaret Binder.
  See also Wikipedia article
  Hiram Bingham (1875-1956) — of New Haven, New Haven County, Conn.; Salem, New London County, Conn. Born in Honolulu, Island of Oahu, Honolulu County, Hawaii, November 19, 1875. Republican. Explorer; delegate to Republican National Convention from Connecticut, 1916 (alternate), 1920 (alternate), 1924, 1928 (member, Resolutions Committee), 1932, 1936 (vice-chair, Resolutions Committee); Presidential Elector for Connecticut, 1916; colonel in the U.S. Army during World War I; Lieutenant Governor of Connecticut, 1923-25; Governor of Connecticut, 1925; U.S. Senator from Connecticut, 1924-33; defeated, 1932; censured by the U.S. Senate on November 4, 1929, for employing a paid lobbyist as his chief clerk. Member, Freemasons. Died in Washington, D.C., June 6, 1956 (age 80 years, 200 days). Interment at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Va.
  Relatives: Son of Rev. Hiram Bingham (1831-1908) and Clara Minerva (Brewster) Bingham (1834-1903); married, November 20, 1900, to Alfreda Mitchell; married, June 28, 1937, to Suzanne Carroll Hill; father of Hiram Bingham, Jr., Alfred Mitchell Bingham and Jonathan Brewster Bingham; second cousin five times removed of Benjamin Huntington; third cousin once removed of Bela Edgerton and Heman Ticknor; third cousin thrice removed of Matthew Griswold (1714-1799), Jonathan Brace, Joshua Coit, Augustus Seymour Porter, Samuel Lathrop and Peter Buell Porter; fourth cousin of Alfred Peck Edgerton and Joseph Ketchum Edgerton; fourth cousin once removed of Elijah Abel, William Woodbridge, Henry Meigs, Isaac Backus, Samuel George Andrews, Martin Olds, Harrison Blodget and Henry Titus Backus.
  Political families: Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York; Waterman-Huntington family of Connecticut and New York; Wolcott-Wadsworth family of Connecticut and Maryland; Wolcott-Packwood-Griswold family of Connecticut; Hosmer-Griswold-Parsons family of Middletown, Connecticut (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  William C. Birk (1885-1950) — of Baraga, Baraga County, Mich. Born in Calumet, Houghton County, Mich., November 6, 1885. Republican. Member of Michigan state house of representatives from Ontonagon District, 1927-34; defeated, 1934, 1936; member of Michigan state senate 32nd District, 1941-42; defeated, 1938, 1942, 1944; charged on December 16, 1944, along with other legislators, with accepting bribes; tried in 1945 and convicted; sentenced to three to five years in prison. German ancestry. Died in 1950 (age about 64 years). Burial location unknown.
  Luke Pryor Blackburn (1816-1887) — also known as Luke P. Blackburn — of Kentucky. Born in Woodford County, Ky., June 16, 1816. Physician; member of Kentucky state house of representatives, 1843; Governor of Kentucky, 1879-83. Baptist. In 1865, he was tried and acquitted in a Toronto court for violating Canadian neutrality, in connection with a Confederate scheme to spread yellow fever in Northern cities. Died in Frankfort, Franklin County, Ky., September 14, 1887 (age 71 years, 90 days). Interment at Frankfort Cemetery, Frankfort, Ky.
  Relatives: Son of Edward Mitchell Blackburn (1787-1867) and Lavinia St. Clair (Bell) Blackburn (1794-1863); brother of Joseph Clay Stiles Blackburn; married, November 24, 1835, to Ella Boswell; married, November 17, 1857, to Julia Churchill; uncle of Corinne Blackburn (1869-1958; who married William Holt Gale); granduncle of Smith Alford Blackburn; great-granduncle of Charles Milton Blackburn; first cousin twice removed of Gabriel Slaughter; third cousin of Charles Rice Slaughter (1819-1862); third cousin once removed of Robert Pryor Henry, John Flournoy Henry and Gustavus Adolphus Henry.
  Political families: Blackburn-Slaughter-Buckner-Madison family of Kentucky; Pendleton-Lee family (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  The Blackburn Correctional Complex (opened 1972), in Lexington, Kentucky, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about Luke Pryor Blackburn: Nancy Disher Baird, Luke Pryor Blackburn : Physician, Governor, Reformer
  Rod R. Blagojevich (b. 1956) — also known as Rod Blagojevich; "Blago" — of Chicago, Cook County, Ill. Born in Chicago, Cook County, Ill., December 10, 1956. Democrat. Lawyer; member of Illinois state house of representatives, 1993-96; U.S. Representative from Illinois 5th District, 1997-2003; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Illinois, 2000, 2004, 2008; Governor of Illinois, 2003-09; solicited bribes from potential candidates for appointment to Barack Obama's vacant U.S. Senate seat; arrested by federal agents in December 2008, and set for trial on federal corruption charges; in January 2009, based on charges that he abused his authority and attempted to sell authorizations, vetoes, and appointments, he was impeached by the Illinois House, convicted by a unanimous vote of the Illinois Senate, and prohibited from holding public office in the state; tried in federal court in 2010-11, and after a mistrial, was ultimately found guilty on eighteen counts, including bribery and extortion; sentenced to 14 years in federal prison; an appeal later overturned five of the eighteen convictions, but did not change his prison sentence. Serbian ancestry. Still living as of 2019.
  Relatives: Married to Patricia 'Patti' Mell (daughter of Richard F. Mell; sister of Deborah Mell (1968-)).
  Political family: Mell-Blagojevich family of Chicago, Illinois.
  Cross-reference: Daniel Lipinski
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — votes in Congress from the Washington Post — NNDB dossier — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Books by Rod Blagojevich: The Governor (2009)
  Books about Rod Blagojevich: Elizabeth Brackett, Pay to Play: How Rod Blagojevich Turned Political Corruption Into a National Sideshow — Jeff Coen & John Chase, Golden: How Rod Blagojevich Talked Himself out of the Governor's Office and into Prison
  James Blair (1786-1834) — of South Carolina. Born in The Waxhaws, Lancaster County, S.C., September 26, 1786. Democrat. Planter; sheriff; U.S. Representative from South Carolina, 1821-22, 1829-34 (9th District 1821-22, 8th District 1829-34); resigned 1822; died in office 1834; in 1832, he assaulted newspaper editor Duff Green, breaking some bones, and fined $350. Scotch-Irish ancestry. Died from a self-inflicted gunshot, in Washington, D.C., April 1, 1834 (age 47 years, 187 days). Interment at Congressional Cemetery, Washington, D.C.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  James Lawrence Blair (1854-1904) — also known as James L. Blair — of St. Louis, Mo. Born in St. Louis, Mo., April 2, 1854. Lawyer; president, St. Louis Board of Police Commissioners, 1884; general counsel, St. Louis World's Fair (Louisiana Purchase Exposition), 1901-03; indicted in December, 1903, for forgery of two deeds of trust to obtain a loan from an estate he managed. Member, American Bar Association; Loyal Legion; Sons of the Revolution. Died, either from suicide (which he had attempted at least twice before) or from "congestion of the brain", in Eustis, Lake County, Fla., January 16, 1904 (age 49 years, 289 days). Interment at Bellefontaine Cemetery, St. Louis, Mo.
  Relatives: Son of Francis Preston Blair, Jr. and Apolline Agatha (Alexander) Blair (1828-1908); nephew of Montgomery Blair; grandson of Francis Preston Blair; great-grandson of James Blair; first cousin of Francis Preston Blair Lee and Gist Blair; first cousin once removed of Edward Brooke Lee; first cousin twice removed of Blair Lee III and Edward Brooke Lee, Jr.; second cousin thrice removed of John Eager Howard; third cousin once removed of William Julian Albert and Joseph Wingate Folk; third cousin twice removed of George Howard, Benjamin Chew Howard and Carey Estes Kefauver; third cousin thrice removed of George Nicholas, Wilson Cary Nicholas and John Nicholas; fourth cousin of Talbot Jones Albert and Ethel Gist Cantrill (1876-1954).
  Political family: Lee-Randolph family of Maryland and Virginia (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Fenton L. Bland, Jr. (b. 1962) — of Petersburg, Va. Born in Petersburg, Va., March 7, 1962. Democrat. Mortician; member of Virginia state house of delegates 63rd District, 2002-05; resigned 2005; alternate delegate to Democratic National Convention from Virginia, 2004; pleaded guilty, January 26, 2005 to one count of conspiracy to commit bank fraud; sentenced in April to 57 months in prison and ordered to pay $1.2 million in restitution; surrendered his funeral director's license rather than contest charges of ethical violations. Baptist. African ancestry. Member, Kappa Alpha Psi. Still living as of 2006.
  Donald L. Blankenship (b. 1950) — also known as Don Blankenship — of Sprigg, Mingo County, W.Va. Born in Stopover, Pike County, Ky., March 14, 1950. Accountant; coal mining executive; chairman and CEO of Massey Energy, 2000-10; in April 2010, an explosion at the company's Upper Big Branch coal mine killed 29 miners; convicted on a charge of conspiring to violate mine safety standards; served one year in prison; Constitution candidate for President of the United States, 2020. Still living as of 2020.
  See also Wikipedia article — Ballotpedia article — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Leonard Ray Blanton (1930-1996) — also known as Ray Blanton — of Adamsville, McNairy County, Tenn. Born in Hardin County, Tenn., April 10, 1930. Democrat. Member of Tennessee state house of representatives, 1964-66; U.S. Representative from Tennessee 7th District, 1967-73; defeated in primary, 1988; candidate for U.S. Senator from Tennessee, 1972; Governor of Tennessee, 1975-79. Methodist. Member, Lions; Moose; Shriners; Freemasons. Ousted as Governor amid charges of selling pardons; later convicted of conspiracy to sell liquor licenses and served 23 months in prison. Died, of kidney disease, at Jackson-Madison County Hospital, Jackson, Madison County, Tenn., November 22, 1996 (age 66 years, 226 days). Interment at Shiloh Church Cemetery, Shiloh, Tenn.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — NNDB dossier
  Thomas Lindsay Blanton (1872-1957) — also known as Thomas L. Blanton — of Abilene, Taylor County, Tex. Born in Houston, Harris County, Tex., October 25, 1872. Democrat. Lawyer; district judge in Texas 42nd District, 1908-16; U.S. Representative from Texas, 1917-29, 1930-37 (16th District 1917-19, 17th District 1919-29, 1930-37). Presbyterian. Member, Knights of Pythias; Freemasons; Knights Templar; Shriners; Odd Fellows; Woodmen. Censured in 1921 for inserting a letter into the Congressional Record which contained words said to be "unspeakable, vile, foul, filthy, profane, blasphemous and obscene." A motion to expel him from the House of Representatives failed by eight votes. Indicted in 1923 for criminal libel over his claim that former U.S. Rep. Oscar Callaway had urged his frends not to buy Liberty bonds during World War I. Died in Albany, Shackelford County, Tex., August 11, 1957 (age 84 years, 290 days). Interment at Albany Cemetery, Albany, Tex.
  Relatives: Son of Thomas Lindsay Blanton; brother of Annie Webb Blanton (1870-1945); married to May Louise Matthews.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  Eugene S. Blease (1877-1963) — of Newberry, Newberry County, S.C. Born in Newberry County, S.C., January 28, 1877. Democrat. Lawyer; member of South Carolina state house of representatives, 1901-02, 1922-24; member of South Carolina state senate, 1905-06; mayor of Newberry, S.C., 1920-21; justice of South Carolina state supreme court, 1927-31; chief justice of South Carolina state supreme court, 1931-34; resigned 1934; candidate in primary for U.S. Senator from South Carolina, 1942; delegate to Democratic National Convention from South Carolina, 1944. Methodist. On September 8, 1905, he shot and killed his brother-in-law, Joe Ben Coleman, in Saluda, S.C.; charged with murder, he pleaded self-defense and was found not guilty. Died December 27, 1963 (age 86 years, 333 days). Interment at Rosemont Cemetery, Newberry, S.C.
  Relatives: Son of Henry Horatio Blease and Elizabeth (Satterwhite) Blease; half-brother of Coleman Livingston Blease (1868-1942).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
Charles S. Blondy Charles S. Blondy (1905-1982) — of Detroit, Wayne County, Mich. Born in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., January 29, 1905. Democrat. Constable; real estate business; member of Michigan state senate, 1941-64 (5th District 1941-54, 4th District 1955-64); defeated in primary, 1934, 1938; charged on July 20, 1946 (along with 18 other legislators) with accepting bribes to vote against a banking bill, but the entire case collapsed when the star prosecution witness, Charles F. Hemans, refused to testify; candidate in primary for U.S. Representative from Michigan 1st District, 1964. Jewish. Member, B'nai B'rith. Died in Southfield, Oakland County, Mich., January 28, 1982 (age 76 years, 364 days). Interment at Hebrew Memorial Park, Clinton Township, Macomb County, Mich.
  Relatives: Son of Goldie (Grodsky) Blondy (1878-1945) and Hyman Blondy (1882-1946); married to Frances Goldberg (1912-1980).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: Michigan Manual 1957-58
  William Blount (1749-1800) — Born in Windsor, Bertie County, N.C., April 6, 1749. Member of North Carolina house of commons, 1781, 1783; Delegate to Continental Congress from North Carolina, 1782-83, 1786-87; member, U.S. Constitutional Convention, 1787; member of North Carolina state senate, 1788; Governor of Southwest Territory, 1790-96; delegate to Tennessee state constitutional convention, 1796; U.S. Senator from Tennessee, 1796-97; member of Tennessee state senate, 1798-1800; died in office 1800; Speaker of the Tennessee State Senate, 1798-99. Presbyterian. Became involved in a conspiracy to turn Florida over to British control; when this plot was uncovered in 1797, was expelled from the U.S. Senate; afterwards, on July 7, 1797, he was impeached, but the Senate dropped the matter for lack of jurisdiction. Died in Knoxville, Knox County, Tenn., March 21, 1800 (age 50 years, 349 days). Interment at First Presbyterian Church Cemetery, Knoxville, Tenn.
  Relatives: Son of Jacob Blount and Barbara (Gray) Blount; half-brother of William Blount; brother of Thomas Blount (1759-1812); married, February 12, 1778, to Mary Grainger; father of William Grainger Blount.
  Political family: Blount family of North Carolina.
  Blount County, Tenn. is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Albert Howard Blumenthal (1928-1984) — also known as Albert H. Blumenthal — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y.; Larchmont, Westchester County, N.Y. Born in Flatbush, Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y., October 13, 1928. Liberal. Lawyer; member of New York state assembly, 1963-76 (New York County 5th District 1963-65, 73rd District 1966, 67th District 1967-72, 69th District 1973-76); candidate for mayor of New York City, N.Y., 1973. Jewish. Member, American Civil Liberties Union; American Jewish Congress; American Bar Association; Americans for Democratic Action. In December, 1975, he was indicted on perjury charges over his testimony about a 1971 meeting where he was alleged to intercede on behalf of a nursing home operator; later, bribery charges were added; in April, 1976, all the charges were ruled to be without factual basis, and dismissed. Died, presumably from cancer, in the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., July 8, 1984 (age 55 years, 269 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Bennet M. Blumenthal and Matilda Blumenthal; married, May 18, 1958, to Joel Marie Winik.
  Albert Edward Bogdon (1891-1927) — also known as Albert E. Bogdon — of Denver, Colo. Born in Mahanoy City, Schuylkill County, Pa., 1891. Republican. Lawyer; member of Colorado state senate 1st District, 1925-27; died in office 1927. While visiting his mistress, (scandalous behavior at the time), he was shot and killed by her estranged husband, Joseph S. Minter, in Denver, Colo., June 10, 1927 (age about 35 years). Entombed in mausoleum at Crown Hill Cemetery, Wheat Ridge, Colo.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Ricardo Jerome Bordallo (1927-1990) — also known as Ricardo J. Bordallo; Ricky Bordallo — of Agana (now Hagatna), Guam. Born in Agana (now Hagatna), Guam, December 11, 1927. Democrat. Restaurant owner; automobile dealer; member of Guam legislature, 1956-70; Guam Democratic Party chair, 1960-63, 1971-73; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Guam, 1964; Governor of Guam, 1975-78, 1983-86; defeated, 1970; Convicted in 1987 on corruption charges, including bribery, obstruction of justice, and witness tampering; sentenced to nine years in prison and fined; some of the charges were overturned on appeal in 1988; resentenced to four years in prison in December, 1989. Catholic. Chamorro ancestry. Just before he was to report to prison, he chained himself to a statue of Chief Quipuha, in a busy traffic circle at rush hour; wrapped in a Guam flag and wearing a sign saying "I regret I have but one life to give for my island," he shot and killed himself, in Agana (now Hagatna), Guam, February 1, 1990 (age 62 years, 52 days). Interment at Pigo Catholic Cemetery, Hagatna, Guam.
  Relatives: Son of Baltazar Jeronimo 'B. J.' Bordallo (1900-1984) and Josefina Torres (Pangelinan) Bordallo (1906-1945); brother of Paul Joseph Bordallo (1930-2007); married 1953 to Madeleine Mary Zeien.
  Political family: Bordallo family of Minnesota.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Sara B. Bost (born c.1948) — of Irvington, Essex County, N.J. Born about 1948. Mayor of Irvington, N.J., 1994-2002. Female. African ancestry. Indicted in April 2002 on federal bribery and witness tampering charges; pleaded guilty in April 2003 to one count of witness tampering; sentenced to one year in prison. Still living as of 2004.
  Charles E. Bowles (1884-1957) — of Detroit, Wayne County, Mich. Born in Yale, St. Clair County, Mich., March 24, 1884. Republican. Lawyer; recorder's court judge in Michigan, 1926-29; resigned 1929; mayor of Detroit, Mich., 1930; candidate for U.S. Representative from Michigan 15th District, 1932, 1934; candidate for circuit judge in Michigan 3rd Circuit, 1941; candidate for Michigan state house of representatives from Wayne County 1st District, 1950, 1952. Member, Optimist Club. Recalled from office as Mayor in 1930 over charges that he had sold out to gangsters and the Ku Klux Klan. Died July 30, 1957 (age 73 years, 128 days). Interment at Evergreen Cemetery, Detroit, Mich.
  Relatives: Son of Alfred Bowles and Mary (Lutz) Bowles; married, June 1, 1915, to Ruth Davis.
  D. Michael Boyle (b. 1944) — of Omaha, Douglas County, Neb. Born in Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, Calif., January 19, 1944. Mayor of Omaha, Neb., 1981-87. Catholic. Member, American Bar Association. Recalled from office as mayor in 1987. Still living as of 1997.
  William Marshall Boyle, Jr. (1903-1961) — also known as William M. Boyle, Jr.; Bill Boyle — of Kansas City, Jackson County, Mo. Born in Leavenworth, Leavenworth County, Kan., February 2, 1903. Democrat. Lawyer; Director, Kansas City Police, 1939; Chairman of Democratic National Committee, 1949-51; investigated in 1951 by the Senate Investigating Committee over his acceptance of fees from the American Lithifold Corporation of St. Louis, in return for using his influence as Democratic national chair to obtain loans for the company from the U.S. Reconstruction Finance Corporation; claimed to have been vindicated, but ultimately resigned under fire. Irish ancestry. Died in Washington, D.C., August 30, 1961 (age 58 years, 209 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Clara Boyle; married to Genevieve Hayde.
  James D. Brackenrich (b. 1936) — also known as J. D. Brackenrich — of Lewisburg, Greenbrier County, W.Va. Born in Greenbrier County, W.Va., January 23, 1936. Democrat. Engineer; surveyor; member of West Virginia state senate 11th District, 1987-93; resigned 1993. Baptist. Member, Freemasons; Elks; National Rifle Association. Pleaded guilty on May 1, 1996 to a misdemeanor charge of filling wetlands without a Clean Water Act permit. Still living as of 1996.
  Relatives: Son of James Brackenrich and Helen Brackenrich; married 1958 to Patricia Griffith.
Anne Braden Anne McCarty Braden (1924-2006) — also known as Anne Braden; Anne McCarty — of Louisville, Jefferson County, Ky. Born in Louisville, Jefferson County, Ky., July 28, 1924. Newspaper reporter; labor organizer; civil rights activist starting in the 1940s; in May 1954, to fight segregation, she and her husband bought a house in a white neighborhood on behalf of a Black family; this sparked furious and violent opposition and the bombing of the house; she and others were charged with sedition; her husband was the first to be convicted, but then, in 1956, all state sedition laws were struck down; Communist candidate for Presidential Elector for Kentucky, 1972. Female. Episcopalian. Died in Louisville, Jefferson County, Ky., March 6, 2006 (age 81 years, 221 days). Interment at Eminence Cemetery, Eminence, Ky.
  Relatives: Married 1948 to Carl Braden (1914-1975).
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: Kentucky Center for African-American Heritage
  William H. Bradley (1859-1925) — of Greenville, Montcalm County, Mich. Born in Spencer Township, Kent County, Mich., February 26, 1859. Republican. Wholesale grocer; mayor of Greenville, Mich., 1908-09; member of Michigan state senate 18th District, 1909-12. In 1911, he was accused of bribery by Sherman M. Townsend, a former Sergeant-at-Arms of the state senate; an investigation was conducted; a resolution to expel him from the Senate failed on a vote of 14 to 15. Died in 1925 (age about 66 years). Interment at Forest Home Cemetery, Greenville, Mich.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  William M. Bradley (b. 1892) — of Detroit, Wayne County, Mich. Born in Detroit, Wayne County, Mich., May 22, 1892. Democrat. Member of Michigan state senate 5th District, 1937-40; defeated in primary, 1934, 1940, 1942, 1952; charged on January 22, 1944 (along with 19 other current and former state legislators) with accepting bribes; tried, convicted, and sentenced to 3-5 years in prison. Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of William A. Bradley and Mary (Riley) Bradley; married 1912 to Edwardine Lenahan.
  John Green Brady (1848-1918) — also known as John G. Brady — of Alaska. Born in New York, New York County, N.Y., May 25, 1848. Governor of Alaska Territory, 1897-1906. Presbyterian. Forced to resign as governor in 1906, after an inquiry about his involvement with the Reynolds-Alaska Development Company. Ill with diabetes, he suffered a stroke and died in Sitka, Alaska, December 17, 1918 (age 70 years, 206 days). Interment at National Cemetery, Sitka, Alaska.
  See also NNDB dossier
  Kevin Patrick Brady (b. 1955) — also known as Kevin Brady — of The Woodlands, Montgomery County, Tex. Born in Vermillion, Clay County, S.Dak., April 11, 1955. Republican. Member of Texas state house of representatives 15th District, 1991-96; U.S. Representative from Texas 8th District, 1997-; arrested on October 7, 2005, near Vermillion, S.D., and charged with driving while intoxicated. Catholic. Member, Rotary. Still living as of 2014.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — votes in Congress from the Washington Post — NNDB dossier
  Thomas Jefferson Brady (1839-1904) — also known as Thomas J. Brady; T. J. Brady — Born in Muncie, Delaware County, Ind., February 12, 1839. Lawyer; general in the Union Army during the Civil War; newspaper publisher; U.S. Consul in SAINT Thomas, 1870-75; second assistant U.S. Postmaster General; indicted in 1881 as a participant in the Star Route bribery scheme; found guilty, but a judge set aside the conviction; retried and acquitted. Died April 22, 1904 (age 65 years, 70 days). Burial location unknown.
  Presumably named for: Thomas Jefferson
  Relatives: Son of John Brady (1803-1884); married, May 10, 1864, to Emeline Wolf.
  See also Wikipedia article
  Thomas Bragg (1810-1872) — of Northampton County, N.C.; Raleigh, Wake County, N.C. Born in Warrenton, Warren County, N.C., November 9, 1810. Democrat. Lawyer; member of North Carolina house of commons, 1842; Governor of North Carolina, 1855-59; U.S. Senator from North Carolina, 1859-61; Confederate Attorney General, 1861-62. Presbyterian. When the Civil War began, he left Washington but did not resign his seat in the Senate; one of ten Southern senators expelled in absentia on July 11, 1861. Died in Raleigh, Wake County, N.C., January 21, 1872 (age 61 years, 73 days). Interment at Oakwood Cemetery, Raleigh, N.C.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Ernest King Bramblett (1901-1966) — also known as Ernest K. Bramblett — of Pacific Grove, Monterey County, Calif. Born in Fresno, Fresno County, Calif., April 25, 1901. Republican. Insurance business; mayor of Pacific Grove, Calif., 1938-46; U.S. Representative from California, 1947-55 (11th District 1947-53, 13th District 1953-55). Protestant. Member, Phi Delta Kappa; Elks; Moose; Rotary; Freemasons; Scottish Rite Masons; Knights Templar; Shriners. Investigated by a federal grand jury in Washington over payroll padding in his office; he had hired his wife, received kickbacks from employees who did no work, and made false statements to the House disbursing officer; indicted on 18 counts in June 1953; pleaded not guilty; tried in February 1954; convicted on seven counts; his conviction was stayed pending appeal, but ultimately upheld by the U.S. Supreme Court; fined $5,000, placed on one-year probation, and separately required to pay restitution. Died December 27, 1966 (age 65 years, 246 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of James Mitchell Bramblett and Bettie Frances (King) Bramblett; married, May 5, 1924, to Lois Candace Bowker.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Frank James Brasco (1932-1998) — also known as Frank J. Brasco — of New York. Born in Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y., October 15, 1932. Democrat. Lawyer; U.S. Representative from New York 11th District, 1967-75. Catholic. Indicted in 1973, along with his uncle Joseph Brasco, on federal bribery conspiracy charges, over payoffs received from a Bronx trucking company which was seeking mail hauling contracts from the Post Office; the first trial led to a hung jury; retried and convicted; sentenced to five years in prison, with all but three months suspended, fined $10,000, and disbarred. Died October 19, 1998 (age 66 years, 4 days). Burial location unknown.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  John Cabell Breckinridge (1821-1875) — also known as John C. Breckinridge — of Lexington, Fayette County, Ky. Born near Lexington, Fayette County, Ky., January 16, 1821. Democrat. Lawyer; major in the U.S. Army during the Mexican War; member of Kentucky state house of representatives, 1849-51; U.S. Representative from Kentucky 8th District, 1851-55; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Kentucky, 1856; Vice President of the United States, 1857-61; Southern Democratic candidate for President of the United States, 1860; U.S. Senator from Kentucky, 1861; general in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; Confederate Secretary of War, 1865. Presbyterian. Member, Freemasons. Expelled from the U.S. Senate on December 4, 1861 for his participation in the Confederate military. Fled to Cuba at the end of the war, and lived in England and Canada until 1869. Died, from lung disease and liver cirrhosis, in Lexington, Fayette County, Ky., May 17, 1875 (age 54 years, 121 days). Interment at Lexington Cemetery, Lexington, Ky.
  Relatives: Son of Mary Clay (Smith) Breckinridge (1787-1864) and Joseph Cabell Breckinridge; married 1840 to Elizabeth Lucas (1825-1889); married, December 12, 1843, to Mary Cyrene Burch (1826-1907); father of Clifton Rodes Breckinridge; nephew of Robert Jefferson Breckinridge; grandson of John Breckinridge; great-grandson of John Witherspoon; great-grandnephew of William Preston and William Cabell; first cousin of Peter Augustus Porter (1827-1864), Robert Jefferson Breckinridge, Jr. and William Campbell Preston Breckinridge; first cousin once removed of James Douglas Breckinridge, Benjamin William Sheridan Cabell (1793-1862), Peter Augustus Porter (1853-1925), Levin Irving Handy, Desha Breckinridge and Henry Skillman Breckinridge; first cousin twice removed of William Cabell, Jr., Francis Smith Preston, William Henry Cabell and James Patton Preston; second cousin of Carter Henry Harrison, William Lewis Cabell and George Craighead Cabell; second cousin once removed of William Campbell Preston, James McDowell, John Buchanan Floyd, John Smith Preston, George Rogers Clark Floyd, Edward Carrington Cabell, Benjamin Earl Cabell and Carter Henry Harrison II; second cousin twice removed of Earle Cabell; third cousin of John William Leftwich.
  Political families: Marshall-Harrison-Randolph-Cabell family of Virginia; Breckinridge-Preston-Cabell-Henry family of Virginia; Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York; Walker-Bolling family of Huntsville, Alabama (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  The city of Breckenridge, Missouri, is named for him.  — The city of Breckenridge, Colorado, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial — BillionGraves burial record
  Books about John C. Breckinridge: William C. Davis, An Honorable Defeat: The Last Days of the Confederate Government — Frank Hopkins Heck, Proud Kentuckian, John C. Breckinridge, 1821-1875 — William C. Davis, Breckinridge : Statesman, Soldier, Symbol
  William Campbell Preston Breckinridge (1837-1904) — also known as William C. P. Breckinridge — of Lexington, Fayette County, Ky. Born in Baltimore, Md., August 28, 1837. Democrat. Colonel in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; lawyer; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Kentucky, 1876, 1880; U.S. Representative from Kentucky 7th District, 1885-95; defeated (Gold Democratic), 1896. Member, Freemasons; Knights Templar. In 1894, he was successfully sued for breach of promise by a former mistress; he acknowledged the affair, affair, but the scandal ended his political career. Died, of apoplexy, in Lexington, Fayette County, Ky., November 18, 1904 (age 67 years, 82 days). Interment at Lexington Cemetery, Lexington, Ky.
  Relatives: Son of Robert Jefferson Breckinridge and Ann Sophonisba (Preston) Breckinridge (1803-1844); brother of Robert Jefferson Breckinridge, Jr.; married, March 17, 1859, to Lucretia Hart Clay (1839-1860; daughter of Thomas Hart Clay); married, September 19, 1861, to Issa Desha (1843-1892; granddaughter of Joseph Desha); married to Louisa Rucks (Scott) Wing (1845-1920); father of Desha Breckinridge; nephew of Joseph Cabell Breckinridge, William Campbell Preston and John Smith Preston; uncle of Levin Irving Handy and Henry Skillman Breckinridge; grandson of John Breckinridge and Francis Smith Preston; grandnephew of James Patton Preston; granduncle of John Bayne Breckinridge; great-grandson of William Preston and William Campbell; great-grandnephew of William Cabell and Patrick Henry; first cousin of John Cabell Breckinridge and Peter Augustus Porter (1827-1864); first cousin once removed of James Douglas Breckinridge, Benjamin William Sheridan Cabell (1793-1862), James McDowell, John Buchanan Floyd, George Rogers Clark Floyd, Clifton Rodes Breckinridge and Peter Augustus Porter (1853-1925); first cousin twice removed of William Cabell, Jr. and William Henry Cabell; second cousin of Carter Henry Harrison, William Lewis Cabell and George Craighead Cabell; second cousin once removed of Valentine Wood Southall, Edward Carrington Cabell, Benjamin Earl Cabell and Carter Henry Harrison II; second cousin twice removed of Earle Cabell; third cousin of John William Leftwich and Stephen Valentine Southall.
  Political families: Marshall-Harrison-Randolph-Cabell family of Virginia; Breckinridge-Preston-Cabell-Henry family of Virginia; Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York; Walker-Bolling family of Huntsville, Alabama (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Walter Ellsworth Brehm (1892-1971) — also known as Walter E. Brehm — of Logan, Hocking County, Ohio; Millersport, Fairfield County, Ohio. Born in Somerset, Perry County, Ohio, May 25, 1892. Republican. Dentist; member of Ohio state house of representatives, 1938-42; U.S. Representative from Ohio 11th District, 1943-53. Member, Grange; Freemasons; Knights Templar; Shriners; Odd Fellows; Eagles; Elks; Kiwanis; Psi Omega. Convicted in 1951 of illegally accepting campaign contributions from a clerk in his office, and fined $5,000. Died in Columbus, Franklin County, Ohio, August 24, 1971 (age 79 years, 91 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Gilbert M. Brehm and Lucy E. (Lenhart) Brehm; married, September 20, 1923, to Lucille Fountain.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  George Breitman (1916-1986) — also known as Albert Parker; Philip Blake; Chester Hofla; Anthony Massini; John F. Petrone; G. Sloane — of Newark, Essex County, N.J.; Detroit, Wayne County, Mich.; Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born in Newark, Essex County, N.J., February 28, 1916. Socialist. Became a socialist agitator in Newark, N.J., 1935; arrested about 1936 and charged with inciting riots; jailed for a week; founding member of the Socialist Workers Party, 1937; member of its National Committee, 1939-81; Socialist Workers candidate for U.S. Senator from New Jersey, 1940, 1942, 1946, 1948, 1954; editor-in-chief of the weekly newspaper, The Militant, 1941-43, 1946-54; writer under several different pen names; Socialist Workers candidate for Presidential Elector for New Jersey, 1952; Socialist Workers candidate for Presidential Elector for Michigan, 1960, 1964. Member, International Typographical Union. Expelled from the Socialist Workers Party for "disloyalty," 1984. Died, following a heart attack, in Beekman Downtown Hospital, Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., April 19, 1986 (age 70 years, 50 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Benjamin Breitman and Pauline (Trattler) Breitman; married 1940 to Dorothea Katz (1914-2004).
  See also Wikipedia article
  William C. Brennan, Jr. (1918-2000) — of Far Rockaway, Queens, Queens County, N.Y.; Elmhurst, Queens, Queens County, N.Y. Born in New York City (unknown county), N.Y., October 11, 1918. Democrat. Police officer; served in the U.S. Army Air Force in World War II; lawyer; member of New York state assembly from Queens County 2nd District, 1955-64; member of New York state senate 12th District, 1967-68; Justice of New York Supreme Court, 1970-85; resigned 1985. Member, American Legion; Disabled American Veterans; Elks. In July 1985, he was indicted in Federal court for accepting bribes in return for reducing or dismissing charges in criminal cases involving organized crime figures; also charged with extortion; pleaded not guilty and tried; did not testify in his own defense; convicted in December 1985, sentenced to five years in prison, and fined $209,000. He was released from prison in May 1988. Died May 8, 2000 (age 81 years, 210 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Married 1941 to Gloria M. Lauer.
  Lorenzo Brentano (1813-1891) — also known as Lorenz Peter Carl Brentano — of Chicago, Cook County, Ill. Born in Mannheim, Germany, November 4, 1813. Republican. In Germany, he participated in the 1849 revolution; arrested and sentenced to life imprisonment; escaped to the United States; member of Illinois state house of representatives 61st District, 1863-65; delegate to Republican National Convention from Illinois, 1864; Presidential Elector for Illinois, 1868; U.S. Consul in Dresden, 1872-76; U.S. Representative from Illinois 3rd District, 1877-79. German ancestry. Died in Chicago, Cook County, Ill., September 18, 1891 (age 77 years, 318 days). Interment at Graceland Cemetery, Chicago, Ill.
  Relatives: Married to Caroline Brentano (1819-1893); father of Theodore Brentano (1854-1940).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Willis M. Brewer (1892-1972) — of Pontiac, Oakland County, Mich. Born in 1892. Democrat. Candidate for U.S. Representative from Michigan 6th District, 1924; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Michigan, 1928 (alternate), 1952; candidate for secretary of state of Michigan, 1928; chairman, Oakland County Board of Auditors; in 1931, he was charged with embezzling $2,500 from the county; convicted, and sentenced to five to fifteen years in prison; his sentence was commuted by Gov. William A. Comstock in 1933; member of Michigan Democratic State Central Committee, 1947. Member, American Legion. Died in 1972 (age about 80 years). Burial location unknown.
  Daniel Baugh Brewster (1923-2007) — also known as Daniel B. Brewster — of Glyndon, Baltimore County, Md. Born in Baltimore County, Md., November 23, 1923. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Marine Corps during World War II; member of Maryland state house of delegates, 1951-58; U.S. Representative from Maryland 2nd District, 1959-63; U.S. Senator from Maryland, 1963-69; defeated, 1968; candidate for Democratic nomination for President, 1964; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Maryland, 1964; speaker, 1968. Episcopalian. Member, American Bar Association. Indicted in 1969 on charges of accepting an illegal gratuity; after trial, conviction, and reversal, pleaded no contest, 1975. Died, of liver cancer, in Owings Mills, Baltimore County, Md., August 19, 2007 (age 83 years, 269 days). Interment at St. Thomas Episcopal Church Cemetery, Owings Mills, Md.
  Relatives: Son of Daniel Baugh Brewster, Sr. (1896-1934) and Ottolie Young (Wickes) Brewster; married 1967 to Anne Moen Bullitt (1924-2007; daughter of William Christian Bullitt); married 1976 to Judy Lynn Aarsand; nephew of Anna Willis Baugh Brewster (1894-1974; who married Francis White (1892-1961)); great-grandson of Benjamin Harris Brewster; second great-grandson of Robert John Walker; third great-grandson of Jonathan Hoge Walker and Richard Bache, Jr.; third great-grandnephew of George Mifflin Dallas (1792-1864); fourth great-grandson of Richard Bache and Alexander James Dallas; fifth great-grandson of Benjamin Franklin; first cousin thrice removed of Robert Walker Irwin; first cousin four times removed of George Mifflin Dallas (1839-1917); fourth cousin once removed of Claiborne de Borda Pell.
  Political family: Bache-Dallas family of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Blaine Jackson Brickwood (1888-1949) — also known as Blaine J. Brickwood — of Chicago, Cook County, Ill. Born in Chicago, Cook County, Ill., February 5, 1888. Lawyer; Honorary Consul for Venezuela in Chicago, Ill., 1915-20; on November 18, 1917, while driving, he struck and killed Walter Israel; censured by the coroner's jury which investigated the death; indicted on a charge of manslaughter; following a trial in June 1920, he was found not guilty by a jury; meanwhile, he was arrested on a charge of embezzlement. Died in Cook County, Ill., March 13, 1949 (age 61 years, 36 days). Interment at Forest Home Cemetery, Forest Park, Ill.
  Relatives: Son of Genevieve (Jackson) Brickwood (1851-1938) and Albert William Brickwood (1854-1915); brother of Albert William Brickwood, Jr. (1879-1941); married, November 16, 1912, to Bertie H. Meloy; nephew of John Thomas Brickwood.
  Political family: Brickwood family of Chicago and Forest Park, Illinois.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Jesse David Bright (1812-1875) — also known as Jesse D. Bright — of Madison, Jefferson County, Ind.; Jeffersonville, Clark County, Ind. Born in Norwich, Chenango County, N.Y., December 18, 1812. Democrat. State court judge in Indiana, 1834-39; member of Indiana state senate, 1841-43; Lieutenant Governor of Indiana, 1843-45; U.S. Senator from Indiana, 1845-62; member of Kentucky state house of representatives, 1867-71; Presidential Elector for Kentucky, 1868. Presbyterian. Expelled from the U.S. Senate, February 5, 1862, over alleged disloyalty to the Union, as evidenced by a letter of introduction he wrote for an arms merchant, addressed to Confederate president Jefferson Davis. Died in Baltimore, Md., May 20, 1875 (age 62 years, 153 days). Interment at Green Mount Cemetery, Baltimore, Md.
  Relatives: Brother of Michael Graham Bright (1803-1881).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  Timothy J. Brill (born c.1960) — also known as Tim Brill — of Washington; Fairbanks, Fairbanks North Star Borough, Alaska. Born about 1960. Independent candidate for U.S. Representative from Washington 9th District, 1992. Pleaded guilty in August 2000 to mail fraud in connection with the failure of his mountaineering business; sentenced to a year and a day in federal prison. Still living as of 2001.
  John Quinn Brisben (1934-2012) — also known as J. Quinn Brisben — of Chicago, Cook County, Ill. Born in Enid, Garfield County, Okla., September 6, 1934. Socialist. School teacher; poet; candidate for Vice President of the United States, 1976; briefly jailed in Florida as a result of his participation in a disability rights demonstration in Orlando, Fla., 1992; candidate for President of the United States, 1992. Member, American Federation of Teachers. Died in Chicago, Cook County, Ill., April 17, 2012 (age 77 years, 224 days). Burial location unknown.
  See also Wikipedia article
  John August Britting (1898-1968) — also known as John A. Britting — of East Farmingdale, Suffolk County, Long Island, N.Y. Born in New Jersey, April 3, 1898. Republican. Deputy treasurer of Suffolk County, 1942-54; member of New York state assembly from Suffolk County 3rd District, 1955-56; called to testify in 1956 during an investigation of his handling of tax-foreclosed properties as deputy county treasurer (known as the "land grab" scandal), he took the Fifth Amendment right against self-incrimination to refuse to answer questions; indicted on bribery and conspiracy charges for channeling properties to favored speculators and receiving part of the profits; tried in 1958 and convicted; sentenced to five to ten years in prison and fined $27,000; released pending appeal; also convicted in a related case in 1959; in 1960, his prison sentence was reduced to one to two years. German ancestry. Died in October, 1968 (age 70 years, 0 days). Interment at Sacred Heart Cemetery, Southampton, Long Island, N.Y.
  Relatives: Married to Edna Burns (1907-1979).
  Cross-reference: Cadman H. Frederick
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  David A. Brock (b. 1936) — of Hopkinton, Merrimack County, N.H. Born in 1936. U.S. Attorney for New Hampshire, 1969-72; superior court judge in New Hampshire, 1976-78; justice of New Hampshire state supreme court, 1978-86; chief justice of New Hampshire state supreme court, 1986-. Impeached in 2000 by the New Hampshire House of Representatives on several charges including improperly influencing a lower court judge and lying to a legislative committee; acquitted by the New Hampshire Senate. Still living as of 2000.
  Cross-reference: W. Stephen Thayer III — Sherman D. Horton, Jr. — John T. Broderick, Jr.
  John T. Broderick, Jr. (b. 1947) — of Manchester, Hillsborough County, N.H. Born in 1947. Justice of New Hampshire state supreme court, 1995-. Investigated in 2000 by the Judiciary Committee of the New Hampshire House of Representatives in connection with the charges against Chief Justice David A. Brock and Justice W. Stephen Thayer III, but articles of impeachment against him were rejected by the House. Arrested in October 2000 for assault against his 30-year-old son. but charges were dropped. Still living as of 2001.
  Samuel Jerome Bronson (1930-1986) — also known as S. Jerome Bronson — of Franklin, Oakland County, Mich. Born in Detroit, Wayne County, Mich., March 21, 1930. Democrat. Lawyer; candidate for Michigan state senate 12th District, 1960; Oakland County Prosecuting Attorney, 1965-68; candidate for circuit judge in Michigan 6th Circuit, 1966; Judge, Michigan Court of Appeals 2nd District, 1969-86; died in office 1986. Jewish. Member, American Bar Association. Arrested and charged with soliciting and accepting a bribe of $20,000 for his vote on a pending case; he killed himself by gunshot the same day, in Franklin, Oakland County, Mich., November 14, 1986 (age 56 years, 238 days). Interment at Beth El Memorial Park, Livonia, Mich.
  Cross-reference: James N. Canham
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  James Brooks (1810-1873) — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in Portland, Cumberland County, Maine, November 10, 1810. Democrat. Newspaper publisher; member of Maine state house of representatives, 1835; member of New York state assembly from New York County 16th District, 1848; U.S. Representative from New York, 1849-53, 1863-66, 1867-73 (6th District 1849-53, 8th District 1863-66, 1867-73, 6th District 1873); died in office 1873; delegate to New York state constitutional convention, 1867. Censured by the House in 1873 for his role in the Credit Mobilier bribery scandal. Died in Washington, D.C., April 30, 1873 (age 62 years, 171 days). Interment at Green-Wood Cemetery, Brooklyn, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Betsey (Folsom) Brooks (1780-1850) and James Brooks (1788-1814); married, July 10, 1841, to Mary Louisa Randolph; father of James Wilton Brooks; third cousin twice removed of Samuel Adams (1722-1803); fourth cousin once removed of Joseph Allen, Caleb Cushing and Orville Samuel Basford.
  Political families: Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York; Saltonstall-Weeks family of Massachusetts; Adams-Waite-Forshee-Cowan family of Dexter, Michigan; Pike family of Lubec, Maine; Kidder family of Connecticut; Adams-Rusling family (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Preston Smith Brooks (1819-1857) — also known as Preston S. Brooks — of Ninety Six, Edgefield District (now Greenwood County), S.C. Born in Edgefield, Edgefield District (now Edgefield County), S.C., August 5, 1819. Lawyer; member of South Carolina state house of representatives, 1844; U.S. Representative from South Carolina 4th District, 1853-56, 1856-57; died in office 1857. Suffered a hip wound in a duel with Louis T. Wigfall, 1839, and could walk only with a cane for the rest of his life. In May, 1856, furious over an anti-slavery speech, he went to the Senate and beat Senator Charles Sumner with a cane, causing severe injuries; an attempt to expel him from Congress failed for lack of the necessary two-thirds vote, but he resigned; re-elected to his own vacancy. Died in Washington, D.C., January 27, 1857 (age 37 years, 175 days). Interment at Willow Brook Cemetery, Edgefield, S.C.; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery, Washington, D.C.
  Relatives: Son of Whitefield Brooks and Mary P. (Carroll) Brooks; married 1841 to Caroline Means (1820-1843); married 1843 to Martha Means; cousin *** of Milledge Luke Bonham (1813-1890).
  Political family: Bonham family of Edgefield, South Carolina.
  Cross-reference: L. M. Keitt
  Brooks County, Ga. is named for him.
  The city of Brooksville, Florida, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Aaron F. Broussard (b. 1949) — of Kenner, Jefferson Parish, La. Born in Marksville, Avoyelles Parish, La., January 6, 1949. Democrat. Mayor of Kenner, La., 1982-96; president of Jefferson Parish, La., 2003-10; pleaded guilty in September 2012 to federal charges that, as president of Jefferson Parish, he received bribes of more than $60,000, and that he embezzled hundreds of thousands of dollars by creating a no-work job in the parish government for his ex-wife; sentenced to 46 months in prison, and ordered to pay restitution. Still living as of 2012.
  See also Wikipedia article — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Earl Russel Browder (1891-1973) — also known as Earl Browder — of Yonkers, Westchester County, N.Y. Born in Wichita, Sedgwick County, Kan., May 20, 1891. Communist. As a result of his opposition to U.S. participation in World War I, he was convicted in 1917 of conspiracy against the draft laws and sentenced to sixteen months in prison; imprisoned again in 1919; pardoned in 1933; candidate for U.S. Representative from New York, 1930 (6th District), 1932 (20th District), 1940 (14th District); General Secretary of the Communist Party of the U.S., 1934-44; candidate for President of the United States, 1936, 1940; arrested in 1939 for a passport violation, convicted, and sentenced to four years in prison (sentence commuted after fourteen months); expelled from the Communist Party, 1946. Died in Princeton, Mercer County, N.J., June 27, 1973 (age 82 years, 38 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of William Browder and Martha (Hankins) Browder; married 1926 to Raissa Berkman.
  Cross-reference: George E. Powers
  See also Wikipedia article
Basil W. Brown Basil W. Brown (1927-1997) — of Detroit, Wayne County, Mich.; Highland Park, Wayne County, Mich. Born in Vandalia, Cass County, Mich., March 20, 1927. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Navy during World War II; lawyer; member of Michigan state senate, 1957-88 (3rd District 1957-64, 6th District 1965-74, 3rd District 1975-82, 2nd District 1983-88); resigned 1988; in 1985, a prostitute working for the police went to visit him several times, and exchanged sex for marijuana and cocaine; arrested November 8, 1985; pleaded guilty in 1987 and resigned from the Senate; sentenced to six months in jail, fines, and probation; his law license was also suspended; the state supreme court threw out the conviction in 1991. Episcopalian. African ancestry. Member, Kappa Alpha Psi; Elks; Veterans of Foreign Wars; Amvets; NAACP. Injured in a fire at his home, while also suffering cancer, and died two weeks later, in Harper Hospital, Detroit, Wayne County, Mich., October 28, 1997 (age 70 years, 222 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Married, June 8, 1950, to Ermajeanne Seeger.
  See also Wikipedia article
  Image source: Michigan Manual 1957-58
  Dave Brown (1948-1998) — of Montana. Born in Pompeys Pillar, Yellowstone County, Mont., November 20, 1948. Member of Montana state house of representatives, 1981-93. Pleaded guilty in 1994 to five counts of failing to file federal income tax returns. Died in University Hospital, Madison, Dane County, Wis., October 23, 1998 (age 49 years, 337 days). Interment at Mountain View Cemetery, Butte, Mont.
  Del M. Mauhrine Brown — of Hopewell, Va. Democrat. Lawyer; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Virginia, 1996; candidate in primary for Virginia state house of delegates 75th District, 1997; publicly admonished in June 2008 by the Virginia State Bar for lawyer misconduct, over failure to file a timely notice of appeal on behalf of three clients. Still living as of 2008.
  George William Brown (1812-1890) — of Baltimore, Md. Born in Baltimore, Md., October 13, 1812. Mayor of Baltimore, Md., 1860-61; delegate to Maryland state constitutional convention, 1867; municipal judge in Maryland, 1872. His term as mayor was cut short on September 12, 1861, when he was arrested and imprisoned, over alleged disloyalty, by Federal authorities. Died September 8, 1890 (age 77 years, 330 days). Burial location unknown.
  George C. Brownell — of Oregon. Republican. Lawyer; member of Oregon state senate, 1890; indicted in February 1905 on federal charges of subornation of perjury. Burial location unknown.
  Henry Bruckner (1871-1942) — of Bronx, Bronx County, N.Y. Born in Bronx, New York County (now Bronx County), N.Y., June 17, 1871. Democrat. President, Bruckner Beverages; director, Milton Realty Co.; director, American Metal Cap Co.; member of New York state assembly from New York County 35th District, 1901; New York City Commissioner of Public Works, 1902-06; delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1912 (alternate), 1924, 1932 (alternate); U.S. Representative from New York 22nd District, 1913-17; resigned 1917; borough president of Bronx, New York, 1918-33. Member, Freemasons; Rotary; Elks. In 1932, the Seabury investigating committee, looking into corruption in New York City, called him to testify about the wealth he had accumulated; at the conclusion of the investigation, the committee called for his removal as Borough President. Died, from chronic nephritis, in Bronx, Bronx County, N.Y., April 14, 1942 (age 70 years, 301 days). Interment at Woodlawn Cemetery, Bronx, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of John A. Bruckner and Katharine (Schmidt) Bruckner; married, November 17, 1904, to Helen Zobel (c.1879-1930).
  Bruckner Expressway, Bronx, New York, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  Constantine Fernow Brunn (1858-1909) — also known as Constantine F. Brunn — of Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y.; South Woodstock, Woodstock, Windham County, Conn. Born in Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y., October 24, 1858. Vice-Consul for Portugal in New York, N.Y., 1893-96. German and Irish ancestry. According to published reports, in a sudden fit of rage, perhaps angered because he wasn't able to reach his wife by telephone, he shot and killed his sister, Freda Brunn, and his brother, Dr. Armin Brunn, and then shot himself, in South Woodstock, Woodstock, Windham County, Conn., September 29, 1909 (age 50 years, 340 days). Interment a private or family graveyard, Windham County, Conn.
  Relatives: Son of Julius William Brunn (1833-1907) and Charlotte Elizabeth (Going) Brunn; brother of Armin Ernest Brunn (1860-1909).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Charles W. Bryant (born c.1830) — of Harris County, Tex. Born about 1830. Delegate to Texas state constitutional convention, 1868-69. African ancestry. Expelled from the Texas Constitutional Convention after being accused of raping an 11-year-old girl; jailed briefly, but then the charges were dropped. Burial location unknown.
  Frank Buchanan (1862-1930) — of Chicago, Cook County, Ill. Born near Madison, Jefferson County, Ind., June 14, 1862. Democrat. Ironworker; U.S. Representative from Illinois 7th District, 1911-17; in 1915, when the U.S. was still neutral in World War I, he was president of "Labor's National Peace Council," which advocated a weapons embargo against the countries then at war; the organization secretly received funding from German agents; when a grand jury investigation was announced, he retaliated by introducing resolutions to impeach U.S. Attorney H. Snowden Marshall; indicted in December 1915, along with H. Robert Fowler, Frank S. Monnett, and others, for restraint of trade over the Peace Council's attempts to foment strikes in U.S. munitions plants; stood trial in May 1917, along with (ultimately) six co-defendants; the jury convicted three, but deadlocked over the other four, including Buchanan; he was not re-tried. Died, of heart disease, in Chicago, Cook County, Ill., April 18, 1930 (age 67 years, 308 days). Interment at Irving Park Boulevard Cemetery, Chicago, Ill.
  Relatives: Son of Joseph Buchanan and Emeline (Connor) Buchanan; married, March 17, 1898, to Minnie Murphy.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Charles Anthony Buckley, Jr. (born c.1926) — also known as Charles A. Buckley, Jr. — of Bronx, Bronx County, N.Y.; Hartsdale, Westchester County, N.Y. Born about 1926. Democrat. Lawyer; candidate for Presidential Elector for New York, 1956; charged in 1965 with drunken driving following an automobile accident in Hartsdale, N.Y. Still living as of 1965.
  Relatives: Son of Charles Anthony Buckley (1890-1967).
  William Gibbs Buckley (b. 1907) — also known as William G. Buckley — of Detroit, Wayne County, Mich. Born in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., August 19, 1907. Democrat. Member of Michigan state house of representatives from Wayne County 1st District, 1933-34, 1937-44; defeated in primary, 1944; removed 1944; Charged on January 22, 1944 (along with 19 other current and former state legislators) with accepting bribes; tried, convicted, and sentenced to 3-5 years in prison; charged on December 6, 1944 (along with four other legislators) with accepting bribes from naturopathic physicians; tried in 1945, but the jury was unable to reach a verdict; retried and convicted; charged on July 20, 1946 (along with 18 other legislators) with accepting bribes to vote against a banking bill, but the last set of charges were dismissed when he agreed to testify. Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Married 1933 to Kathryn O'Dowd.
  Cuthbert Bullitt (1740-1791) — Born in Fauquier County, Va., 1740. Lawyer; planter; shot and killed John Baylis in a duel on September 24, 1765; later tried for the killing and acquitted; delegate to Virginia state constitutional convention, 1776. Anglican; later Episcopalian. Died in Prince William County, Va., August 27, 1791 (age about 51 years). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Benjamin Bullitt (1692-1766) and Sarah Elizabeth (Harrison) Bullitt (1700-1746); married, August 27, 1761, to Helen Scott; father of Alexander Scott Bullitt (1761-1816); second great-grandfather of William Christian Bullitt (1856-1914), William Marshall Bullitt and Alexander Scott Bullitt (1877-1932); second great-granduncle of Hugh Kennedy Bullitt; third great-grandfather of William Christian Bullitt (1891-1967).
  Political families: Lee-Randolph family of Maryland and Virginia; Marshall-Harrison-Randolph-Cabell family of Virginia; Bullitt-Fry-Henry family (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Barbara A. Bullock (born c.1939) — also known as Barbara Bullock — of Washington, D.C. Born about 1939. Democrat. Delegate to Democratic National Convention from District of Columbia, 1996, 2000. Female. President of the Washington Teachers Union, 1994-2002; pleaded guilty in 2003 to federal charges of embezzlement from a labor union, over her use of a union credit card to purchase costly costly luxury items including jewelry, furs and clothing; she and two co-conspirators also wrote union checks to themselves and to intermediaries who shared the proceeds, amounting to millions of dollars. Her chauffeur pleaded guilty to money laundering on her behalf. Sentenced to nine years in prison; the sentence was later reduced to six and a half years. Still living as of 2007.
  See also Wikipedia article
  Robert Bullock (1929-1999) — also known as Bob Bullock — of Texas. Born in Hillsboro, Hill County, Tex., July 10, 1929. Democrat. Member of Texas state house of representatives; elected 1956, 1958; secretary of state of Texas, 1971-72; Texas state comptroller, 1975-90; Lieutenant Governor of Texas, 1991-99. Investigated by a grand jury in 1978, but no indictment resulted. Died in Austin, Travis County, Tex., June 18, 1999 (age 69 years, 343 days). Interment at Texas State Cemetery, Austin, Tex.
  Ivison C. Burgess — of Russellville, Pope County, Ark. Member of Arkansas state senate 4th District, 1915-17; expelled 1917. In January, 1917, after he introduced legislation to regulate trading stamps and coupons, he accepted a bribe to kill the bills, from a detective posing as a lobbyist for Eastern trading-stamp interests; arrested, charged with bribery, and later convicted; expelled from the Senate on a vote of 25 to 8. Burial location unknown.
  J. Herbert Burke (1913-1993) — of Hollywood, Broward County, Fla.; Fort Lauderdale, Broward County, Fla. Born in Chicago, Cook County, Ill., January 14, 1913. Republican. Lawyer; served in the U.S. Army during World War II; U.S. Representative from Florida, 1967-79 (10th District 1967-73, 12th District 1973-79); defeated, 1955 (6th District), 1978 (12th District); delegate to Republican National Convention from Florida, 1972. Catholic. Member, American Legion; Eagles; Forty and Eight; Veterans of Foreign Wars; Disabled American Veterans; Elks; Moose; Kiwanis. Arrested in 1978 for being drunk and disruptive in the parking lot of a strip club; pleaded guilty to public drunkenness, disorderly conduct and witness tampering. Died in Fern Park, Seminole County, Fla., June 16, 1993 (age 80 years, 153 days). Interment at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Va.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
  James A. Burns (1899-1963) — of Detroit, Wayne County, Mich. Born in 1899. Purchasing agent; member of Michigan state house of representatives from Wayne County 1st District, 1923-24; defeated in Republican primary, 1926, 1928, 1930; member of Michigan state senate 4th District, 1937-38, 1941-42; defeated, 1924 (Republican primary, 2nd District), 1938 (Democratic primary, 4th District), 1942 (Democratic, 4th District), 1944 (Democratic primary, 4th District); charged on July 20, 1946 (along with 18 other legislators) with accepting bribes to vote against a banking bill, but the entire case collapsed when the star prosecution witness, Charles F. Hemans, refused to testify; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Michigan, 1948. Died in 1963 (age about 64 years). Burial location unknown.
  Aaron Burr (1756-1836) — also known as Aaron Edwards — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in Newark, Essex County, N.J., February 6, 1756. Democrat. Colonel in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; lawyer; member of New York state assembly, 1784-85, 1797-99, 1800-01 (New York County 1784-85, 1797-99, Orange County 1800-01); New York state attorney general, 1789-91; appointed 1789; U.S. Senator from New York, 1791-97; Vice President of the United States, 1801-05. Presbyterian. Killed Alexander Hamilton in a duel, July 11, 1804. Tried for treason in 1807 and acquitted. Died, after several strokes, at the Winants or Port Richmond Hotel, Port Richmond, Staten Island, Richmond County, N.Y., September 14, 1836 (age 80 years, 221 days). Interment at Princeton Cemetery, Princeton, N.J.
  Relatives: Son of Aaron Burr (1716-1757) and Esther (Edwards) Burr (1732-1758); brother of Sarah Burr (1754-1797; who married Tapping Reeve); married, July 2, 1782, to Theodosia (Bartow) Prevost (1746-1794; first cousin twice removed of Francis Stebbins Bartow); married 1833 to Eliza (Bowen) Jumel (1775-1865); father of Theodosia Burr (1783-1813; who married Joseph Alston); nephew of Pierpont Edwards; third great-grandson of Thomas Willett; ancestor of Karla Ballard; first cousin of Theodore Dwight and Henry Waggaman Edwards; first cousin four times removed of Anson Foster Keeler (1887-1943); second cousin of John Davenport and James Davenport; second cousin once removed of Theodore Davenport; second cousin twice removed of Charles Robert Sherman; second cousin thrice removed of Charles Taylor Sherman, William Tecumseh Sherman, Lampson Parker Sherman, John Sherman and Evert Harris Kittell; second cousin four times removed of Chauncey Mitchell Depew, Ezekiel Gilbert Stoddard, Stillman Stephen Light and Blanche M. Woodward; second cousin five times removed of Alfred Walstein Bangs, John Clarence Keeler, Louis Ezekiel Stoddard, John Cecil Purcell and Arthur Callen Kittell, Jr.; third cousin of Benjamin Tallmadge; third cousin once removed of Frederick Augustus Tallmadge; third cousin twice removed of Eli Thacher Hoyt, George Smith Catlin, John Appleton, Howkin Bulkley Beardslee, Joseph Pomeroy Root and Edward Williams Hooker; third cousin thrice removed of Greene Carrier Bronson, Abijah Catlin, David Munson Osborne, George Landon Ingraham, Dwight Arthur Silliman and Charles Dunsmore Millard; fourth cousin of Noah Phelps and Hezekiah Case; fourth cousin once removed of Parmenio Adams, Elisha Phelps, Ambrose Tuttle, Jesse Hoyt, Abiel Case, Henry Fisk Janes, Jairus Case, George Washington Wolcott, William Dean Kellogg and Almon Case.
  Political families: Keeler-Floyd-Sherman-Bangs family of New York; Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Cross-reference: Jonathan Dayton — Nathaniel Pendleton — John Smith — John Tayler — Walter D. Corrigan, Sr. — Cowles Mead — Luther Martin — William P. Van Ness — Samuel Swartwout — William Wirt — Theophilus W. Smith
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about Aaron Burr: Milton Lomask, Aaron Burr: The Years from Princeton to Vice President, 1756-1805 — Milton Lomask, Aaron Burr: The Conspiracy and Years of Exile, 1805-1836 — Joseph Wheelan, Jefferson's Vendetta : The Pursuit of Aaron Burr and the Judiciary — Buckner F. Melton Jr., Aaron Burr : Conspiracy to Treason — Thomas Fleming, Duel: Alexander Hamilton, Aaron Burr, and the Future of America — Arnold A. Rogow, A Fatal Friendship: Alexander Hamilton and Aaron Burr — H. W. Brands, The Heartbreak of Aaron Burr — David O. Stewart, American Emperor: Aaron Burr's Challenge to Jefferson's America — Donald Barr Chidsey, The great conspiracy: Aaron Burr and his strange doings in the West
  Fiction about Aaron Burr: Gore Vidal, Burr
Williana J. Burroughs Williana Jones Burroughs (1882-1945) — also known as Williana J. Burroughs; Williana Jones; Mary Adams — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y.; Moscow, Russia. Born in Petersburg, Va., December 26, 1882. Communist. School teacher; joined the Communist party in 1926; used the pseudonym "Mary Adams"; in 1933, she led a demonstration to the New York City Board of Education, and as a result, she was fired from her teaching job; candidate for Lieutenant Governor of New York, 1934; announcer and editor for the English-language broadcasts of Radio Moscow, 1937-45. African ancestry. Died, from a heart ailment, in the Staten Island Area Hospital, Staten Island, Richmond County, N.Y., December 24, 1945 (age 62 years, 363 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Married 1909 to Charles Burroughs.
  See also Wikipedia article
  Image source: The Daily Worker, October 1933
  Albert Garza Bustamante (b. 1935) — also known as Albert G. Bustamante — of Laredo, Webb County, Tex. Born in Asherton, Dimmit County, Tex., April 8, 1935. Democrat. School teacher; Bexar County Commissioner, 1973-78; Bexar County Judge, 1979-84; U.S. Representative from Texas 23rd District, 1985-93; defeated, 1992. Catholic. Hispanic ancestry. Convicted in 1993 on racketeering and bribery charges, and sentenced to prison. Still living as of 2014.
  Relatives: Married to Rebecca Pounders.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — votes in Congress from the Washington Post — NNDB dossier
  David Christy Butler (1829-1891) — also known as David C. Butler — of Nebraska. Born December 15, 1829. Republican. Member of Nebraska territorial House of Representatives, 1861; member Nebraska territorial council, 1864; Governor of Nebraska, 1867-71; removed 1871; member of University of Nebraska board of regents, 1869-71; impeached on March 4, 1871, and removed from office as Governor on June 2, 1871. Member, Freemasons. Died May 25, 1891 (age 61 years, 161 days). Interment at Pawnee City Cemetery, Pawnee City, Neb.
  Butler County, Neb. is named for him.
  Richard J. Butler — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Saloon keeper; member of New York state assembly from New York County 9th District, 1903. Charged in March 1904 with having received stolen property in the form of three barrels of liquor found in the cellar of his saloon, but the magistrate determined that they had been delivered without his knowledge. Burial location unknown.
  Smedley Darlington Butler (1881-1940) — also known as Smedley Butler; "The Fighting Quaker"; "Old Gimlet Eye" — of Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa. Born in West Chester, Chester County, Pa., July 30, 1881. Republican. Major general in U.S. Marine Corps; received a Medal of Honor for the capture of Veracruz, Mexico, 1914; received another for the capture of Fort Riviere, Haiti, 1915; Philadelphia police commissioner, 1924-25; arrested and court-martialed in 1931 over his unauthorized disclosure of an incident unflattering to Italian dictator Italian Benito Mussolini; retired from the service rather than apologize to Mussolini; candidate in primary for U.S. Senator from Pennsylvania, 1932. Quaker. Died in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., June 21, 1940 (age 58 years, 327 days). Interment at Oaklands Cemetery, West Chester, Pa.
  Relatives: Son of Thomas Stalker Butler and Maud Mary (Darlington) Butler; married, June 30, 1905, to Ethel Conway Peters (1879-1962); grandson of Smedley Darlington and Samuel Butler; second great-grandnephew of Edward Darlington (1755-1825); first cousin thrice removed of Isaac Darlington, William Darlington (1782-1863), Esther Darlington (1793-1877; who married James B. Roberts), Edward Darlington (1795-1884) and William Darlington (1804-1879); second cousin twice removed of Edward C. Darlington; fourth cousin of Darlington Hoopes (1896-1989).
  Political family: Darlington-Butler family of West Chester, Pennsylvania.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  John C. Butterworth (1870-1952) — of Paterson, Passaic County, N.J. Born in Macclesfield, Cheshire, England, 1870. Socialist. Naturalized U.S. citizen; silk weaver; Socialist Labor candidate for Governor of New Jersey, 1913, 1916, 1919, 1925, 1928, 1931, 1937, 1940, 1943, 1949; on October 6, 1924, during a strike at the silk mills in Paterson, N.J., while the city was under martial law, he and other strikers and supporters were arrested and convicted of unlawful assembly; the convictions were later overturned by the New Jersey Supreme Court; Socialist Labor candidate for U.S. Senator from New Jersey, 1924, 1932, 1934, 1938, 1942, 1944, 1946; Socialist Labor candidate for Presidential Elector for New Jersey, 1940, 1948, 1952. English ancestry. Member, Freemasons; Industrial Workers of the World. Died in Paterson, Passaic County, N.J., October 17, 1952 (age about 82 years). Burial location unknown.
Earl L. Butz Earl Lauer Butz (1909-2008) — also known as Earl L. Butz — of West Lafayette, Tippecanoe County, Ind. Born in Albion, Noble County, Ind., July 3, 1909. Economist; university professor; U.S. Secretary of Agriculture, 1971-76. Member, Alpha Gamma Rho; Sigma Xi; Sigma Delta Chi; Tau Kappa Alpha; Alpha Zeta; Kiwanis. Resigned in 1976 following a furor over a racist joke. In 1981, he pleaded guilty to income tax evasion; sentenced to five years in prison (served 30 days) and fined $10,000. Died in Kensington, Montgomery County, Md., February 2, 2008 (age 98 years, 214 days). Interment at Tippecanoe Memory Gardens, West Lafayette, Ind.
  Relatives: Son of Herman Lee Butz and Ada Tillie (Lower) Butz; married, December 22, 1937, to Mary Emma Powell; uncle of Dave Butz (professional football player).
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: Nixon Presidential Library and Museum
"Enjoy the hospitable entertainment of a political graveyard."
Henry L. Clinton, Apollo Hall, New York City, February 3, 1872
The Political Graveyard

The Political Graveyard is a web site about U.S. political history and cemeteries. Founded in 1996, it is the Internet's most comprehensive free source for American political biography, listing 312,576 politicians, living and dead.
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