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Politicians in Trouble or Disgrace

Politicians in Trouble or Disgrace: New York

in chronological order

  Jacob Leisler (c.1640-1691) — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in Bockenheim, Holy Roman Empire (now part of Frankfurt am Main, Germany), about 1640. Fur trader; tobacco business; following the English Revolution of 1688, which brought Protestant rulers William and Mary to power, he led "Leisler's Rebellion" and seized control of the colony; Colonial Governor of New York, 1689-91; provided land for a settlement of French Huguenot refugees (now the city of New Rochelle); following the arrival of a new royal governor, he was ousted. Arrested, charged with treason, tried, convicted, and sentenced to death; executed by hanging and decapitation, in New York, New York County, N.Y., May 16, 1691 (age about 51 years). Four years later, he was posthumously exonerated by an act of Parliament. Original interment at a private or family graveyard, New York County, N.Y.; subsequent interment at Dutch Church Burial Ground, Manhattan, N.Y.; reinterment to unknown location; statue at Broadview Avenue, New Rochelle, N.Y.
  Relatives: Great-grandfather of Nicholas Bayard (1736-1802).
  Political family: Livingston-Schuyler family of New York (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  David Mathews (d. 1800) — of New York, New York County, N.Y.; Nova Scotia. Lawyer; mayor of New York City, N.Y., 1776-83. In 1776, the New York Provincial Congress ordered his arrest over his involvement in a plot to poison Gen. George Washington; continued serving as mayor during British occupation of the city; in 1783, he fled to Nova Scotia with other Loyalists. Died near Sydney, Nova Scotia, 1800. Burial location unknown.
  See also Wikipedia article
  John Williams (1752-1806) — of Charlotte County (now Washington County), N.Y. Born in Barnstable, England, 1752. Colonel in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; member of New York state senate Eastern District, 1777-78, 1782-95; member of New York state assembly from Charlotte County, 1781-82; delegate to New York convention to ratify U.S. constitution from Washington and Clinton counties, 1788; member of New York council of appointment, 1789; U.S. Representative from New York 9th District, 1795-99; county judge in New York, 1800. Expelled for misconduct from the state senate in 1778. Died in Salem, Washington County, N.Y., July 22, 1806 (age about 54 years). Interment at Salem Cemetery, Salem, N.Y.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Abraham Jones — of Richmond County, N.Y. Member of New York state assembly from Richmond County, 1777-78; removed 1778. Expelled from the New York Assembly (his seat was declared vacant) on June 8, 1778, for "being with the enemy.". Died on shipboard in the North Atlantic Ocean, en route back from Canada. Buried at sea in North Atlantic Ocean.
  Isaac Low (1735-1791) — of New York. Born in Raritan Landing (now part of Piscataway), Middlesex County, N.J., April 13, 1735. Delegate to Continental Congress from New York, 1774. Was opposed to armed conflict with Great Britain; accused of treason and imprisoned; his property was confiscated through a bill of attainder in 1779; moved to England in 1783. Died in Cowes, Isle of Wight, England, July 25, 1791 (age 56 years, 103 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Brother of Nicholas Low (1739-1826); married to Margaret Cuyler (brother of Abraham Cornelius Cuyler).
  Political family: Low-Cuyler family of New York.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Ephraim Paine (1730-1785) — of New York. Born in Canterbury, Windham County, Conn., August 19, 1730. County judge in New York, 1778-81; member of New York state senate Middle District, 1779-81, 1782-85; Delegate to Continental Congress from New York, 1784. Expelled from the New York State Senate on March 15, 1781, for neglect of duty. Died in Amenia, Dutchess County, N.Y., August 10, 1785 (age 54 years, 356 days). Interment at Red Meeting House Cemetery, Near Amenia, Dutchess County, N.Y.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Samuel Swartwout (1783-1856) — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in Poughkeepsie, Dutchess County, N.Y., November 17, 1783. He was participant in Aaron Burr's "Western Conspiracy"; delivered a message from Burr to Gen. James Wilkinson in New Orleans; subsequently arrested in November 1806 for misprision of treason, but released a few months later; early promoter of railroads; openly supported the Texas Republic in its war for independence from Mexico; served in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812; U.S. Collector of Customs, 1829-38; in 1838, it was alleged that he had embezzled more than $1.2 million from the New York customs house, and fled to England; later investigation implicated a subordinate of his as having obtained most of that money; forfeited his property and returned to the U.S. in 1841. Died in New York, New York County, N.Y., November 21, 1856 (age 73 years, 4 days). Interment at Trinity Churchyard, Manhattan, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Abraham Swartwout and Maria (North) Swartwout; married 1814 to Alice Ann Cooper.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Charles Franklin Mitchell (1806-1865) — of Lockport, Niagara County, N.Y. Born in Bucks County, Pa., February 18, 1806. U.S. Representative from New York 33rd District, 1837-41. Convicted of forgery in 1841 and sentenced to Sing Sing prison in New York; pardoned due to ill health; moved to Ohio. Died in Cincinnati, Hamilton County, Ohio, September 27, 1865 (age 59 years, 221 days). Interment at Spring Grove Cemetery, Cincinnati, Ohio.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Jesse Hoyt (1792-1867) — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in New Canaan, Fairfield County, Conn., June 28, 1792. Lawyer; law partner of Martin Van Buren and Benjamin F. Butler; member of New York state assembly from New York County, 1823; U.S. Collector of Customs, 1838-41; removed from office in 1841, over allegations of embezzlement. Died March 17, 1867 (age 74 years, 262 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Goold Hoyt (1766-1826) and Sarah (Reed) Hoyt (1768-1821); sixth great-grandnephew of Thomas Welles; third cousin once removed of Daniel Chapin; third cousin twice removed of Pierpont Edwards, Harold Sheffield Van Buren, Mabel Thorp Boardman, Sheffield Phelps (1864-1902) and Asbury Elliott Kellogg; third cousin thrice removed of Josiah Cowles, Simeon Baldwin and Phelps Phelps; fourth cousin of Graham Hurd Chapin and Martin E. Weed; fourth cousin once removed of John Davenport, Aaron Burr, James Davenport, Theodore Dwight, Henry Waggaman Edwards, Hanford Nichols Lockwood, George Smith Catlin and Barzillai Bulkeley Kellogg.
  Political families: Livingston-Schuyler family of New York; Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York; Sherman family of Connecticut (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also Wikipedia article
  Michael Walsh (1810-1859) — also known as Mike Walsh — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in Youghal, County Cork, Ireland, May 4, 1810. Democrat. Convicted about 1845 for publication of a libel; member of New York state assembly, 1847-48, 1852 (New York County 1847, New York County 12th District 1848, 1852); U.S. Representative from New York 4th District, 1853-55. Died in New York, New York County, N.Y., March 17, 1859 (age 48 years, 317 days). Interment at Green-Wood Cemetery, Brooklyn, N.Y.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Ambrose Latting Jordan (1789-1865) — also known as Ambrose L. Jordan — of Cooperstown, Otsego County, N.Y.; Hudson, Columbia County, N.Y. Born in Hillsdale, Columbia County, N.Y., May 5, 1789. Whig. Lawyer; Otsego County Surrogate, 1815-18; Otsego County District Attorney, 1818-20; newspaper editor; member of New York state assembly from Columbia County, 1825; member of New York state senate 3rd District, 1826-29; resigned 1829; in September 1845, during a trial, he and the opposing counsel (New York Attorney General John Van Buren) came to blows in the courtroom; both were sentenced to 24 hours in jail; delegate to New York state constitutional convention, 1846; New York state attorney general, 1848-49. Died in New York, New York County, N.Y., July 16, 1865 (age 76 years, 72 days). Interment at Hudson City Cemetery, Hudson, N.Y.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
John Van_Buren John Van Buren (1810-1866) — also known as "Prince John" — of Albany, Albany County, N.Y. Born in Hudson, Columbia County, N.Y., February 10, 1810. Lawyer; New York state attorney general, 1845-47; appointed 1845; defeated, 1847, 1865; in September 1845, during a trial, he and opposing counsel Ambrose L. Jordan came to blows in the courtroom; both were sentenced to 24 hours solitary confinement in jail; his resignation as Attorney General was refused by the governor. Died, from exposure, on board the ship Scotia, en route from Liverpool to New York, in the North Atlantic Ocean, October 13, 1866 (age 56 years, 245 days). Interment at Albany Rural Cemetery, Menands, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Martin Van Buren and Hannah (Hoes) Van Buren; married, June 22, 1841, to Elizabeth Vanderpoel (1810-1844); nephew of James Isaac Van Alen; second cousin once removed of Barent Van Buren; second cousin thrice removed of Dirck Ten Broeck (1686-1751) and Cornelis Cuyler; third cousin once removed of Thomas Brodhead Van Buren; third cousin twice removed of Harold Sheffield Van Buren; fourth cousin once removed of James Livingston.
  Political family: Livingston-Schuyler family of New York (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also Wikipedia article
  Image source: Library of Congress
  John Louis O'Sullivan (1813-1895) — also known as John L. O'Sullivan — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Born, of American parents, in the North Atlantic Ocean off the coast of Gibraltar, November 15, 1813. Democrat. Member of New York state assembly from New York County, 1841-42; delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1844; U.S. Charge d'Affaires to Portugal, 1854; U.S. Minister to Portugal, 1854-58. Episcopalian; later Catholic. Cofounder and editor of The United States Magazine and Democratic Review, a journal that published the works of Emerson, Hawthorne and Whitman, as well as political essays on Jacksonian Democracy, 1837-46. Early advocate in 1840s for abolition of the death penalty. Invented the term "manifest destiny" to explain and justify the westward expansion of the United States. Took part in the failed expedition of Narcisco Lopez to take Cuba from Spanish rule; as a result, was charged in federal court in New York with violation of the Neutrality Act; tried and acquitted in March 1852. Died, of influenza and the effects of an earlier stroke, in a residential hotel in New York, New York County, N.Y., March 24, 1895 (age 81 years, 129 days). Interment at Moravian Cemetery, New Dorp, Staten Island, N.Y.
  See also U.S. State Dept career summary
Daniel E. Sickles Daniel Edgar Sickles (1819-1914) — also known as Daniel E. Sickles; "Devil Dan" — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in New York, New York County, N.Y., October 20, 1819. Lawyer; member of New York state assembly from New York County, 1847; member of New York state senate 3rd District, 1856-57; U.S. Representative from New York, 1857-61, 1893-95 (3rd District 1857-61, 10th District 1893-95); defeated (Democratic), 1894; general in the Union Army during the Civil War; delegate to Republican National Convention from New York, 1868; U.S. Minister to Spain, 1869-74; delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1892. Member, Grand Army of the Republic. Shot and killed Philip Barton Key, his wife's lover and the son of the author of the national anthem, at Lafayette Park, Washington, D.C, 1859; charged with murder, but with the help of his attorney Edwin M. Stanton, was acquitted after the first successful plea of temporary insanity in U.S. legal history. Received the Medal of Honor in 1897 for action at the Battle of Gettysburg, July 2, 1863; lost a leg in that battle; his amputated leg was displayed at the Army Medical Museum, where he frequently visited it in later years. Died in New York, New York County, N.Y., May 3, 1914 (age 94 years, 195 days). Interment at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Va.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — U.S. State Dept career summary
  Books about Daniel E. Sickles: Thomas M. Keneally, American Scoundrel : The Life of the Notorious Civil War General Dan Sickles
  Image source: Official NY: from Cleveland to Hughes (1911)
Isaac V. Fowler Isaac Vanderbeck Fowler (1818-1869) — also known as Isaac V. Fowler — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Born August 20, 1818. Democrat. Postmaster at New York City, N.Y., 1853-60; delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1860; charged in 1860 with embezzlement as Postmaster; fled to Mexico and Cuba. Member, Tammany Hall. Died in Chicago, Cook County, Ill., September 29, 1869 (age 51 years, 40 days). Interment at Old Town Cemetery, Newburgh, N.Y.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: Library of Congress
  Jay Gibbons — of Albany County, N.Y. Member of New York state assembly from Albany County 1st District, 1861; expelled from the Assembly, April 18, 1861. Burial location unknown.
  Alexander J. Bergen — of Suffolk County, N.Y. Member of New York state assembly from Suffolk County 2nd District, 1861. Outraged by a criticism published in the newspaper, he assaulted the editor of the Suffolk County Democrat, in 1861, and was later prosecuted and fined $25. Burial location unknown.
  Alfred Ely (1815-1892) — of Rochester, Monroe County, N.Y. Born in Lyme, New London County, Conn., February 15, 1815. Republican. U.S. Representative from New York 29th District, 1859-63. While witnessing the Battle of Bull Run in 1861, was captured by the Confederates, and imprisoned at Richmond for several months; released in exchange for Charles J. Faulkner. Died in Rochester, Monroe County, N.Y., May 18, 1892 (age 77 years, 93 days). Entombed at Mt. Hope Cemetery, Rochester, N.Y.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Gideon Searles (c.1807-1882) — of Cattaraugus County, N.Y. Born about 1807. Member of New York state assembly from Cattaraugus County, 1846; canal superintendent. Arrested in 1863, and charged with attemping to bribe Assemblyman Elias M. Bostwick by offering him $500 to vote for the Broadway Railroad bill. While walking on the Buffalo, New York & Philadelphia railroad track, was struck and killed by a train, near Franklinville, Cattaraugus County, N.Y., July 6, 1882 (age about 75 years). Burial location unknown.
  Caleb Lyon (1822-1875) — of Lyonsdale, Lewis County, N.Y. Born in Lyonsdale, Lewis County, N.Y., December 7, 1822. Member of New York state assembly from Lewis County, 1851; resigned 1851; member of New York state senate 21st District, 1851; U.S. Representative from New York 23rd District, 1853-55; Governor of Idaho Territory, 1864-66. In 1866, an audit revealed that he had embezzled $46,418 in federal funds intended for the Nez Perce Indians, but he was never convicted. Died in Staten Island, Richmond County, N.Y., September 8, 1875 (age 52 years, 275 days). Interment at Green-Wood Cemetery, Brooklyn, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Caleb Lyon (1784?-?).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
  John Winthrop Chanler (1826-1877) — also known as John W. Chanler — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in New York, New York County, N.Y., September 14, 1826. Democrat. Lawyer; member of New York state assembly from New York County 10th District, 1858-59; U.S. Representative from New York 7th District, 1863-69. On May 14, 1866, he offered a resolution defending President Andrew Johnson's veto of Reconstruction enactments, which he called "the wicked and revolutionary acts of a few malignant and mischievous men." On motion of Rep. Robert C. Schenck, he was censured for insulting the House of Representatives. Died in Barrytown, Dutchess County, N.Y., October 19, 1877 (age 51 years, 35 days). Interment at Trinity Cemetery, Manhattan, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of John White Chanler (1785-1853) and Elizabeth Sheriffe (Winthrop) Chanler (1791-1866); married, January 22, 1862, to Margaret Astor Ward (1838-1875; first cousin of William Waldorf Astor); father of William Astor Chanler and Lewis Stuyvesant Chanler (1869-1942).
  Political family: Livingston-Schuyler family of New York (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
  John Ward Hunter (1807-1900) — also known as John W. Hunter — of Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y. Born in Bedford (now part of Brooklyn), Kings County, N.Y., October 15, 1807. Democrat. U.S. Representative from New York 3rd District, 1866-67; mayor of Brooklyn, N.Y., 1874-75. Censured by the U.S. House of Representatives in 1867 for the use of unparliamentary language. Died in Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y., April 16, 1900 (age 92 years, 183 days). Interment at Green-Wood Cemetery, Brooklyn, N.Y.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Russell Sage (1816-1906) — also known as "The Sage of Troy"; "The Money King"; "Father of Puts and Calls"; "Old Straddle" — of Troy, Rensselaer County, N.Y.; New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in Verona, Oneida County, N.Y., August 4, 1816. Whig. Merchant; banker; Rensselaer County Treasurer; delegate to Whig National Convention from New York, 1848; U.S. Representative from New York 13th District, 1853-57; railroad builder; arrested in 1869 and charged with violation of New York usury laws by charging high interest rates on loans; fined and sentenced to five days in prison, which was later suspended. On December 4, 1891, Henry Norcross, a stockbroker, brought a bomb to Sage's office in New York City as part of an extortion scheme; when his demands were refused, he detonated the bomb, but Sage suffered only minor injuries. Died in Lawrence, Nassau County, Long Island, N.Y., July 22, 1906 (age 89 years, 352 days). Interment at Oakwood Cemetery, Troy, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Prudence (Risley) Sage (1778-1865) and Elisha Sage, Jr. (1779-1854); married, January 23, 1840, to Maria-Henrie Winne (died 1867); married, November 24, 1869, to Margarett Olivia Slocum (died 1918); fourth great-grandnephew of Robert Treat; second cousin once removed of Edgar Jared Doolittle; second cousin twice removed of Jonathan Brace; third cousin once removed of Thomas Kimberly Brace, Alvah Nash and Dwight May Sabin; third cousin twice removed of Josiah Cowles; fourth cousin once removed of Daniel Chapin, Orsamus Cook Merrill, Timothy Merrill (1781-1836), Daniel Upson, Greene Carrier Bronson, Daniel Kellogg, John Russell Kellogg, John Adams Taintor, John Calhoun Lewis, Millard Fillmore, Daniel Fiske Kellogg, Henry G. Taintor, Henry Gould Lewis and Daniel Frederick Webster.
  Political families: Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York; Woodruff-Hornblower-Seymour-Wadsworth family of Connecticut; Hoar-Sherman family of Massachusetts; Murphy-Merrill family of Harbor Beach, Michigan (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Abraham Oakey Hall (1826-1898) — also known as A. Oakey Hall; "Elegant Oakey" — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in Albany, Albany County, N.Y., July 26, 1826. Republican. Newspaper reporter; lawyer; delegate to Republican National Convention from New York, 1856; mayor of New York City, N.Y., 1869-72; indicted and tried in 1871-73 on charges of covering up corruption during his mayoralty; acquitted. Presbyterian; later Catholic. English, Welsh, and French ancestry. Died, of heart disease, in Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., October 7, 1898 (age 72 years, 73 days). Entombed at Trinity Cemetery, Manhattan, N.Y.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Albert Cardozo (1828-1885) — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., December 21, 1828. Lawyer; a close ally of corrupt New York City political boss William M. Tweed; Justice of New York Supreme Court 1st District, 1868-72; resigned 1872; in 1872, an effort was made to impeach him, along with Justice George G. Barnard, on charges that they abused judicial power in various ways to serve Boss Tweed, as well as "robber barons" Jay Gould and Jim Fisk; rather than go through an impeachment trial, Cardozo resigned from the bench; meanwhile, Barnard's impeachment went forward, and he was unanimously convicted. Jewish. Portugese ancestry. Died, from Bright's disease, in New York, New York County, N.Y., November 8, 1885 (age 56 years, 322 days). Interment at Cypress Hills Cemetery, Brooklyn, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Michael H. Cardozo and Ellen (Hart) Cardozo; married to Rebecca Washington Nathan; father of Benjamin Nathan Cardozo (1870-1938).
  See also Wikipedia article
  William Magear Tweed (1823-1878) — also known as William M. Tweed; William Marcy Tweed; "Boss Tweed" — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in New York, New York County, N.Y., April 3, 1823. Democrat. Chairmaker; fire fighter; U.S. Representative from New York 5th District, 1853-55; member of New York state senate 4th District, 1868-73. Scotch-Irish ancestry. Member, Odd Fellows; Freemasons. Convicted of embezzlement and sentenced to twelve years in prison; escaped; captured in Spain and brought back to New York. Died in prison, in New York, New York County, N.Y., April 12, 1878 (age 55 years, 9 days). Interment at Green-Wood Cemetery, Brooklyn, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Richard Tweed and Eliza (Magear) Tweed; married, September 18, 1844, to Mary Jane C. Skaden.
  Cross-reference: Charles O'Conor — Thomas Nast — George G. Barnard — Albert Cardozo
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — NNDB dossier
  Books about William M. Tweed: Seymour J. Mandelbaum, Boss Tweed's New York — Leo Hershkowitz, Tweed's New York : another look — Kenneth D. Ackerman, Boss Tweed: The Rise and Fall of the Corrupt Pol Who Conceived the Soul of Modern New York
  George Gardner Barnard (c.1829-1879) — also known as George G. Barnard — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in Poughkeepsie, Dutchess County, N.Y., about 1829. Democrat. Lawyer; a close ally of corrupt New York City political boss William M. Tweed; Recorder, New York City, 1858-60; Justice of New York Supreme Court 1st District, 1861-72; removed 1872; impeached by the New York legislature in 1872, on charges that he abused his judicial power through the takeover of several railroads, putting them under the control of receivers who were allied with "robber barons" Jay Gould and Jim Fisk; the Union Pacific and other railroads had to relocate their headquarters away from New York City to evade the jurisdiction of Barnard and Justice Albert Cardozo; Barnard was unanimously convicted by the Court of Impeachment, and also barred from holding office of any kind. Died, from Bright's disease, in New York, New York County, N.Y., April 27, 1879 (age about 50 years). Entombed at Green-Wood Cemetery, Brooklyn, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Frederic Barnard (1780-1866) and Margaret (Allen) Barnard (1792-1869); brother of Joseph Folger Barnard (1823-1904); married, June 29, 1859, to Frances Anderson (1840-1874).
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  James Brooks (1810-1873) — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in Portland, Cumberland County, Maine, November 10, 1810. Democrat. Newspaper publisher; member of Maine state house of representatives, 1835; member of New York state assembly from New York County 16th District, 1848; U.S. Representative from New York, 1849-53, 1863-66, 1867-73 (6th District 1849-53, 8th District 1863-66, 1867-73, 6th District 1873); died in office 1873; delegate to New York state constitutional convention, 1867. Censured by the House in 1873 for his role in the Credit Mobilier bribery scandal. Died in Washington, D.C., April 30, 1873 (age 62 years, 171 days). Interment at Green-Wood Cemetery, Brooklyn, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Betsey (Folsom) Brooks (1780-1850) and James Brooks (1788-1814); married, July 10, 1841, to Mary Louisa Randolph; father of James Wilton Brooks; third cousin twice removed of Samuel Adams (1722-1803); fourth cousin once removed of Joseph Allen, Caleb Cushing and Orville Samuel Basford.
  Political families: Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York; Saltonstall-Weeks family of Massachusetts; Adams-Waite-Forshee-Cowan family of Dexter, Michigan; Pike family of Lubec, Maine; Kidder family of Connecticut; Adams-Rusling family (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
Richard Croker Richard Welsted Croker (1841-1922) — also known as Richard Croker — of New York, New York County, N.Y.; County Dublin, Ireland. Born in Clonakilty, County Cork, Ireland, November 23, 1841. Democrat. Railroad mechanic; charged with the murder of a political enemy in 1874; tried and found not guilty; delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1888, 1892. Irish ancestry. Member, Tammany Hall. Leader of Tammany Hall from 1886 until 1901. Suffered exposure during a snowstorm, was ill for months, and subsequently died, in County Dublin, Ireland, April 29, 1922 (age 80 years, 157 days). Original interment at Glencairn House Grounds, County Dublin, Ireland; reinterment in 1939 at Kilgobbin Cemetery, County Dublin, Ireland.
  Relatives: Son of Eyre Coote Croker (1800-1881) and Frances Laura (Welsted) Croker (1807-1894); married, November 1, 1873, to Elizabeth Frazer (1853-1914); married, November 26, 1914, to Bula Benton Edmonson (1884-1957).
  Cross-reference: Henry Woltman
  See also Wikipedia article
  Image source: American Monthly Review of Reviews, February 1902
  George C. Bennett — of Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y. Republican. Newspaper editor; member of New York state assembly from Kings County 8th District, 1872, 1874; candidate for U.S. Representative from New York 4th District, 1874; Brooklyn Commissioner of City Works; indicted, along with John W. Flaherty, in December 1878, for conspiracy to defraud the city of $50,000; tried in 1879 and convicted; fined $250; the conviction was reversed on appeal; delegate to Republican National Convention from New York, 1884. Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Father of Charles Goodwin Bennett (1863-1914).
  John W. Flaherty — of Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y. Democrat. Independent Democratic candidate for New York state assembly from Kings County 7th District, 1874; Brooklyn Commissioner of City Works; indicted, along with George C. Bennett, in December 1878, for conspiracy to defraud the city of $50,000; tried and convicted; fined $250; the conviction, which he claimed was the work of Mayor James Howell and the corrupt "Brooklyn Ring", was reversed on appeal; candidate for mayor of Brooklyn, N.Y., 1879. Burial location unknown.
  Theodore P. Rich (c.1848-1886) — of New York, New York County, N.Y.; Cobleskill, Schoharie County, N.Y. Born in New York, about 1848. Democrat. Candidate for New York state assembly from New York County 13th District, 1876. Pursued his estranged wife to Minnesota; killed her, and then, perhaps to avoid prosecution, killed himself, by gunshot, in the Astoria House hotel, St. Paul, Ramsey County, Minn., February 27, 1886 (age about 38 years). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Married 1876 to Fannie (Smith) Trimble (daughter of Henry Smith (1827?-?)).
  Robert Ray Hamilton (1851-1890) — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in New York, New York County, N.Y., March 18, 1851. Republican. Lawyer; member of New York state assembly from New York County 11th District, 1881, 1886-89; in July 1889, while staying in Atlantic City, he was caught in a national scandal, after his wife, Eva, stabbed a nurse; she was arrested and tried; it came out that Eva was still married to another man, that she had bought a baby for $10 and told Hamilton he was the father, to induce him to marry her; when this was publicized, Hamilton sued for divorce; as the case dragged on, he moved to Wyoming to help a friend establish a hotel. While on a hunting trip, he drowned while attempting to ford the Snake River, in Uinta County (part now in Teton County), Wyo., August 23, 1890 (age 39 years, 158 days). Original interment somewhere in Teton County, Wyo.; reinterment in 1892 at Green-Wood Cemetery, Brooklyn, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Schuyler Hamilton (1822-1903) and Cornelia (Ray) Hamilton (1829-1867); grandnephew of James Alexander Hamilton (1788-1878); great-grandson of Alexander Hamilton; great-grandnephew of Philip Jeremiah Schuyler; second great-grandson of Philip John Schuyler; second great-grandnephew of Stephen John Schuyler, Jeremiah Van Rensselaer and Robert Van Rensselaer; third great-grandson of Johannes Schuyler (1697-1746); fourth great-grandson of Stephanus Van Cortlandt, Robert Livingston the Younger and Johannes Schuyler (1668-1747); fourth great-grandnephew of Jacobus Van Cortlandt; fifth great-grandson of Pieter Schuyler (1657-1724); fifth great-grandnephew of Robert Livingston the Elder; first cousin twice removed of Philip Schuyler; first cousin thrice removed of Pieter Schuyler (1746-1792) and Jacob Rutsen Van Rensselaer; first cousin four times removed of Stephanus Bayard, Volkert Petrus Douw, Hendrick Kiliaen Van Rensselaer, James Livingston and Killian Killian Van Rensselaer; first cousin five times removed of John Livingston, Robert Livingston (1688-1775), Gilbert Livingston and Philip P. Schuyler; first cousin six times removed of David Davidse Schuyler and Myndert Davidtse Schuyler; second cousin twice removed of Henry Walter Livingston; second cousin thrice removed of Nicholas Bayard, Robert R. Livingston (1746-1813), Leonard Gansevoort, Leonard Gansevoort, Jr., Edward Livingston (1764-1836), Peter Robert Livingston (1766-1847) and Maturin Livingston; second cousin four times removed of Robert Livingston (1708-1790), Peter Van Brugh Livingston, Robert Gilbert Livingston, Philip Livingston, Robert R. Livingston (1718-1775), William Livingston, James Jay, John Jay, Frederick Jay and Peter Samuel Schuyler; second cousin five times removed of Matthew Clarkson; third cousin once removed of Edward Livingston (1796-1840), Cortlandt Schuyler Van Rensselaer and John Eliot Thayer, Jr.; third cousin twice removed of Stephen Van Rensselaer, Philip Schuyler Van Rensselaer, Peter Gansevoort, Peter Robert Livingston (1789-1859), Gerrit Smith and Elizabeth Cady Stanton; third cousin thrice removed of Peter Robert Livingston (1737-1794), Walter Livingston, Philip Peter Livingston, Henry Brockholst Livingston, Pierre Van Cortlandt, Jr., Peter Augustus Jay and William Jay; fourth cousin once removed of Henry Bell Van Rensselaer, James Adams Ekin, John Jacob Astor III, Charles Ludlow Livingston and Bronson Murray Cutting.
  Political families: Livingston-Schuyler family of New York; VanRensselaer family of Albany, New York (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Darwin James Meserole (1868-1952) — also known as Darwin J. Meserole — of Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y.; Bellport, Suffolk County, Long Island, N.Y.; Waterbury, New Haven County, Conn. Born in Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y., May 29, 1868. Socialist. Stockbroker; in June 1891, he shot and killed Theodore W. Larbig, was arrested and tried for murder, but found not guilty on ground of self-defense; lawyer; candidate for New York state assembly from Kings County 11th District, 1915; candidate for New York state attorney general, 1920; candidate for New York state senate 1st District, 1922; candidate for Justice of New York Supreme Court 2nd District, 1922, 1923, 1924, 1925, 1927, 1931; candidate for chief judge of New York Court of Appeals, 1926; candidate for Presidential Elector for New York, 1928; candidate for judge of New York Court of Appeals, 1930, 1934, 1936; president, National Unemployment League, which advocated public works programs to relieve unemployment. Died, from a heart attack, as he was about to board the Staten Island ferry, in Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., May 21, 1952 (age 83 years, 358 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Jeremiah Vanderbilt Meserole (1833-1908) and Ann Sophia (Richardson) Meserole (1839-1922); married, June 24, 1899, to Katherine Louise Maltby.
  Charles A. Binder (1857-1891) — also known as John Roth — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in New York, New York County, N.Y., November 2, 1857. Lawyer; member of New York state assembly from New York County 10th District, 1884, 1886; accused in 1891 of embezzling $20,000 from the estate of Barbara Hausman; fled and became a fugitive, traveling under the alias "John Roth". German ancestry. Wounded by self-inflicted gunshot, in his room at the Sheridan House Hotel, and died there early the next morning, in Elizabeth, Union County, N.J., May 17, 1891 (age 33 years, 196 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Margaret Binder.
  See also Wikipedia article
  Edward Richard Folsom (1874-1923) — also known as Edward R. Folsom — of Irvington, Essex County, N.J. Born in North Urbana, Steuben County, N.Y., September 18, 1874. Charged, in 1894, of forging checks, bank robbery, and arson; pleaded guilty to two charges; sentenced to ten years in prison; pardoned and released in September 1897; coal dealer; mayor of Irvington, N.J., 1923; died in office 1923. Blackmailers threatening to expose his criminal past extorted money from him until he was nearly penniless; killed himself by an overdose of sedative, in Irvington, Essex County, N.J., September 26, 1923 (age 49 years, 8 days). Interment at Clinton Cemetery, Irvington, N.J.
  Relatives: Son of Frederick Lewis Folsom (1846-1921) and Martha (Layton) Folsom; married to Sara Elizabeth Keeler (1876-1958).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Eugene F. Vacheron — of Ozone Park, Queens, Queens County, N.Y. Lawyer; member of New York state assembly, 1894-95, 1901 (Queens County 3rd District 1894-95, Queens County 2nd District 1901); resigned 1895; charged with bribery in 1895; tried and acquitted, but resigned from the Assembly; convicted of grand larceny, February 28, 1912. Burial location unknown.
  Joseph Bermel (1860-1921) — of Middle Village, Queens, Queens County, N.Y. Born in Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y., April 8, 1860. Stonecutter; Newtown town supervisor in the 1890s; charged with financial irregularities; tried and acquitted; borough president of Queens, New York, 1906-08; resigned 1908; resigned as borough president after a grand jury presented charges against him, related to fraud and bribery in connection with the city's purchase of Kissena Park in Queens. Member, Elks; Royal Arcanum; Foresters. Died in Carlsbad, Czechoslovakia (now Karlovy Vary, Czechia), July 28, 1921 (age 61 years, 111 days). Interment at St. John's Cemetery, Middle Village, Queens, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Charles Bermel and Elizabeth (Cohn) Bermel; married, October 21, 1884, to Anna Mary Timmes.
  Joseph Andrew Iasigi (1848-1917) — also known as Joseph A. Iasigi — of Boston, Suffolk County, Mass. Born in Massachusetts, January 15, 1848. Consular Agent for France in Boston, Mass., 1873-77; Consul-General for Turkey in Boston, Mass., 1889-97; he failed to account for a trust fund, refused to answer questions, and fled to New York City; arrested there in February 1897 and extradited to Boston; charged with embezzlement of about $220,000; pleaded not guilty; tried and convicted in November 1897; sentenced to 14-18 years in prison; pardoned in 1909. Armenian and French ancestry. Died in Brookline, Norfolk County, Mass., January 24, 1917 (age 69 years, 9 days). Interment at Mt. Auburn Cemetery, Cambridge, Mass.
  Relatives: Son of Joseph Iasigi (1800-1877) and Eulalie (Loir) Iasigi (1821-1883); brother of Oscar Anthony Iasigi; married 1881 to Marie P. Homer; uncle of Nora Iasigi (who married William Marshall Bullitt).
  Political family: Marshall-Harrison-Randolph-Cabell family of Virginia (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Frank P. Demarest — of Mont Moor, Rockland County, N.Y.; West Nyack, Rockland County, N.Y. Member of New York state assembly from Rockland County, 1888-89, 1891, 1900. Indicted several times on various offenses in 1891-03; tried in 1903 and acquitted; indicted on fraud charges in 1904; he had presented claims against the Town of Clarkstown for services he had not provided; tried in Rockland County and convicted on November 18, 1904. Burial location unknown.
  Robert Philo Anibal (1845-1908) — also known as Robert P. Anibal — of Northville, Fulton County, N.Y.; Johnstown, Fulton County, N.Y. Born in Benson, Hamilton County, N.Y., February 22, 1845. Democrat. School teacher; lawyer; Hamilton County Judge and Surrogate, 1872-77; delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1896; candidate for Justice of New York Supreme Court 4th District, 1901. In May 1901, the Herkimer County District Attorney accused him of offering a bribe to a witness in a criminal trial; Anibal denied this. Died in Northville, Fulton County, N.Y., December 14, 1908 (age 63 years, 296 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Philo Anibal (1817-1878) and Mary (Orcutt) Anibal; married, April 24, 1872, to Frances E. Van Arnam (1859-1929).
Thomas C. Platt Thomas Collier Platt (1833-1910) — also known as Thomas C. Platt; Tom Platt; "The Easy Boss"; "The Machiavelli of Tioga County" — of Owego, Tioga County, N.Y. Born in Owego, Tioga County, N.Y., July 15, 1833. Republican. Druggist; lumber business; Tioga County Clerk, 1859-61; banker; director and president, Southern Central Railroad; U.S. Representative from New York, 1873-77 (27th District 1873-75, 28th District 1875-77); delegate to Republican National Convention from New York, 1876, 1880, 1884, 1888, 1892, 1896, 1900, 1904, 1908; U.S. Senator from New York, 1881, 1897-1909; resigned 1881. Presbyterian. In 1903, when he was about to marry his second wife, government clerk Mae C. Wood, armed with a collection of love letters from Platt, threatened a lawsuit for breach of promise to marry; she was induced to drop the lawsuit, reportedly for $5,000. In 1905, she sued a number of Republican officials who, she claimed, had taken Platt's letters from her to stop her from publishing them. She later went on to charge the Senator with bigamy, claiming that he had secretly married her in 1901. This case was thrown out in 1908, and Miss Wood was arrested and charged with perjury. Died, from Bright's disease, in Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., March 6, 1910 (age 76 years, 234 days). Interment at Evergreen Cemetery, Owego, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of William Platt (1791-1855) and Lesbia (Hinchman) Platt (1791-1859); married, December 12, 1852, to Ellen Lucy Barstow (1833-1901); married, October 11, 1903, to Lillian (Thompson) Janeway (separated 1906).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: The Parties and The Men (1896)
  Richard J. Butler — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Saloon keeper; member of New York state assembly from New York County 9th District, 1903. Charged in March 1904 with having received stolen property in the form of three barrels of liquor found in the cellar of his saloon, but the magistrate determined that they had been delivered without his knowledge. Burial location unknown.
  Joseph J. Cahill — of Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y. Saloon keeper; member of New York state assembly, 1891-94 (Kings County 1st District 1891-92, Kings County 4th District 1893-94). Convicted of perjury, December 8, 1905, in an election fraud case. Burial location unknown.
  Albert P. Beebe (c.1843-1932) — of Parma town, Monroe County, N.Y. Born about 1843. Republican. Member of New York state assembly from Monroe County 4th District, 1905-06. Indicted on April 9, 1906 on a charge of vote-buying. Died in Parma town, Monroe County, N.Y., November 30, 1932 (age about 89 years). Burial location unknown.
  John Francis Ahearn (1853-1920) — also known as John F. Ahearn — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in New York, New York County, N.Y., April 18, 1853. Democrat. Member of New York state assembly from New York County 4th District, 1882; member of New York state senate, 1890-1902 (6th District 1890-93, 8th District 1894-95, 10th District 1896-1902); delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1896, 1912, 1916, 1920; borough president of Manhattan, New York, 1904-09; delegate to New York state constitutional convention 11th District, 1915. Irish ancestry. Member, Tammany Hall. Following an investigation, Gov. Charles Evans Hughes denounced his administration as "flagrantly inefficient and wasteful" and ordered him removed from office as Manhattan Borough President on December 9, 1907. Following a long legal battle, he finally left office in 1909. Died, of pleurisy, in Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., December 19, 1920 (age 67 years, 245 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Married to Elizabeth Atwell; father of Edward J. Ahearn and William J. Ahearn (1894?-1957).
  Political family: Ahearn family of New York City, New York.
Thomas F. Grady Thomas Francis Grady (1853-1912) — also known as Thomas F. Grady; Tom Grady; "Silver-Tongued Grady" — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in New York, New York County, N.Y., November 29, 1853. Democrat. Lawyer; member of New York state assembly from New York County 2nd District, 1877-79; member of New York state senate, 1882-83, 1889, 1896-1912 (6th District 1882-83, 1889, 14th District 1896-1912); died in office 1912; Independent Democratic candidate for U.S. Representative from New York 8th District, 1886; delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1896, 1904. Member, Tammany Hall. In 1883, then-Gov. Grover Cleveland wrote to Tammany leader John Kelly to request that Grady not be renominated to the State Senate; Kelly complied with the Governor's request. In 1908, a police raid on a poolroom revealed betting slips showing that Grady had bet on a horse named Azelina; this detail became a running joke in political cartoons about Mr. Grady. Died in 1912 (age about 58 years). Burial location unknown.
  Image source: New York Red Book 1907
  Louis Francis Haffen (1854-1935) — also known as Louis F. Haffen; "Father of the Bronx" — of Melrose, Westchester County (now part of Bronx, Bronx County), N.Y.; Bronx, Bronx County, N.Y. Born in Melrose, Westchester County (now part of Bronx, Bronx County), N.Y., November 6, 1854. Democrat. Civil engineer; engineer, New York City Department of Parks, 1883-93; commissioner of street improvement in Annexed Territory (Bronx), 1893-98; borough president of Bronx, New York, 1898-1909; removed 1909; removed from office by Gov. Charles Evans Hughes over maladministration charges, 1909; delegate to New York state constitutional convention 22nd District, 1915; member of New York Democratic State Committee, 1930. Catholic. German and Irish ancestry. Member, Royal Arcanum; Tammany Hall. Died, from arteriosclerosis, in Bronx, Bronx County, N.Y., December 25, 1935 (age 81 years, 49 days). Interment at Woodlawn Cemetery, Bronx, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Mathias Haffen and Catharine (Hayes) Haffen; married 1886 to Caroline Kurz.
  Haffen Park, Bronx, New York, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article
  George N. Rigby — of Yonkers, Westchester County, N.Y.; Ormond Beach, Volusia County, Fla. Republican. Member of New York state assembly from Westchester County 1st District, 1904-05; member of condemnation commission for appraising property for site of proposed Hill View Reservoir in Westchester County; censured by the New York Supreme Court in 1910 for unnecessary delay, such as holding 65 hearings o one parcel; removed from the position in 1915 because he had moved to Florida; mayor of Ormond Beach, Fla., 1924-26. Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Married to Maud Lawrence (c.1882-1924; suicide).
Jotham P. Allds Jotham Powers Allds (1865-1923) — also known as Jotham P. Allds — of Norwich, Chenango County, N.Y. Born in Claremont, Sullivan County, N.H., February 1, 1865. Republican. Lawyer; member of New York state assembly from Chenango County, 1896-1902; member of New York state senate, 1903-10 (26th District 1903-06, 27th District 1907-08, 37th District 1909-10); resigned 1910; alternate delegate to Republican National Convention from New York, 1908. Accused by Sen. Benn Conger, in 1910, of accepting bribes from bridge companies nine years earlier; following an investigation, the State Senate found him guilty by a vote of 40 to 9, and he resigned to avoid expulsion. Died, of liver disease, at Norwich Memorial Hospital, Norwich, Chenango County, N.Y., September 11, 1923 (age 58 years, 222 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Jotham Gillis Allds (1797-1866) and Lucy Charlotte (Powers) Allds (1820-1918).
  See also Wikipedia article
  Image source: New York Red Book 1907
  Benn Conger (1856-1922) — of Groton, Tompkins County, N.Y. Born in Groton, Tompkins County, N.Y., October 29, 1856. President, Corona Typewriter Co.; member of New York state assembly from Tompkins County, 1900-01; member of New York state senate 41st District, 1909-10; resigned 1910. In 1910, he accused Sen. Jotham P. Allds, the majority leader, of accepting a bribe from bridge companies; Allds was investigated and ultimately resigned. Conger, who had also taken part in the bribery scheme, was criticized for not coming forward sooner; facing a likely attempt to expel him, he resigned a few days later. Died in Groton, Tompkins County, N.Y., February 28, 1922 (age 65 years, 122 days). Interment at Groton Rural Cemetery, Groton, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Corydon Wilson Conger (1826-1901) and Mary Jane (Brown) Conger (1830-1915); married 1880 to Florence C. Buck (1860-1945); third cousin twice removed of Hugh Conger; fourth cousin once removed of James Lockwood Conger, Anson Griffith Conger, Harmon Sweatland Conger, Omar Dwight Conger (1818-1898), Moore Conger, Frederick Ward Conger, Chauncey Stewart Conger and Charles Franklin Conger.
  Political families: Conger family of New York; Conger-Hungerford family (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  James Kellogg Apgar (1862-1940) — also known as James K. Apgar — of Peekskill, Westchester County, N.Y. Born in Peekskill, Westchester County, N.Y., November 8, 1862. Republican. Private secretary and clerk to Assembly Speaker James W. Husted, 1884-87 and 1890; clerk to Assembly Speaker Fremont Cole, 1888-89; clerk to Lt. Gov. Charles T. Saxton, 1894-96; private secretary to Rep. William L. Ward, 1896-97; member of New York state assembly from Westchester County 3rd District, 1899-1907; defeated, 1897; alternate delegate to Republican National Convention from New York, 1900; member of condemnation commission for appraising property for site of proposed Hill View Reservoir in Westchester County; censured by the New York Supreme Court in 1910 for unnecessary delay, such as holding 65 hearings on one parcel; Westchester County Register, 1919-24; village president of Peekskill, New York, 1925-27. Member, Freemasons; Royal Arch Masons; Elks. Died in Peekskill, Westchester County, N.Y., September 21, 1940 (age 77 years, 318 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Joseph A. Apgar and Eleanor (Herbert) Apgar; married, June 21, 1892, to Cecilia Annie Bellefeuille.
  William Berri (1848-1917) — of Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y. Born in Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y., September 12, 1848. Republican. Carpet merchant; printing business; newspaper publisher; officer or director of banks, electric utilities, and the New York Telephone Company; delegate to Republican National Convention from New York, 1904, 1908, 1912, 1916; delegate to New York state constitutional convention at-large, 1915; member, New York State Board of Regents, 1916-17. Congregationalist. Member, Union League. In 1911, he was arraigned on a charge of criminal libel over an article he published in his newspaper, brought by three candidates for Supreme Court, Herbert T. Ketcham, Patrick E. Callahan, and William Willett, Jr.; the case was withdrawn a few days later when the other two candidates discovered that Willett had indeed (as Berri charged) paid bribes for his nomination. Died in Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y., April 19, 1917 (age 68 years, 219 days). Interment at Green-Wood Cemetery, Brooklyn, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of William Berri ; married 1869 to Frances Williams Morris (died c.1910).
  Lawrence Gresser (1851-1935) — also known as Lorenz Gresser; "Honest Larry" — of Queens, Queens County, N.Y. Born in Bavaria, Germany, January 1, 1851. Shoe manufacturer; borough president of Queens, New York, 1908-11; removed 1911; removed from office as borough president by Gov. John A. Dix, for neglect of duty in failing to prevent corruption among his subordinates. Died, in the rectory of the Church of the Holy Family, Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y., January 30, 1935 (age 84 years, 29 days). Interment at St. John's Cemetery, Middle Village, Queens, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Johann Gresser (1821-1874) and Phillipina (Bingert) Gresser (1827-1882); married 1869 to Margaret Beck (died 1901); married 1904 to Kathryn Beechinor; father of Lawrence Thomas Gresser; grandfather of Lawrence T. Gresser, Jr. (1912?-?).
  Political family: Gresser family of New York.
Edward M. Grout Edward Marshall Grout (1861-1931) — also known as Edward M. Grout — of Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y.; Greens Farms, Westport, Fairfield County, Conn. Born in New York, New York County, N.Y., October 27, 1861. Democrat. Lawyer; law partner of William J. Gaynor, later New York City mayor; candidate for mayor of Brooklyn, N.Y., 1895; borough president of Brooklyn, New York, 1898-1901; New York City Controller, 1902-05; delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1904; president of Union Bank in Brooklyn; after the bank closed in 1911, he was indicted for perjury, based on the sworn report he had made of the bank's condition to the New York Banking Department; tried in 1915 and convicted; sentenced to prison; in 1916 the conviction was overturned, and he was not retried. Died in Greens Farms, Westport, Fairfield County, Conn., November 9, 1931 (age 70 years, 13 days). Interment at Green-Wood Cemetery, Brooklyn, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Edward Grout and Fanny (Marshall) Grout; married, June 4, 1889, to Ida L. Loeschigk (died 1929); descendant *** of Jonathan Grout (1737-1807).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Image source: American Monthly Review of Reviews, November 1901
  William Forte Willett, Jr. (1869-1938) — also known as William Willett, Jr. — of Far Rockaway, Queens, Queens County, N.Y.; Woodmere, Nassau County, Long Island, N.Y. Born in Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y., November 27, 1869. Democrat. Lawyer; U.S. Representative from New York 14th District, 1907-11; defeated, 1904; candidate for Justice of New York Supreme Court 2nd District, 1911; indicted in 1912 on charges that he bought the nomination for Supreme Court justice; tried and convicted in 1914, sentenced to one year in prison and fined $1,000; released on parole in 1916. Member, Freemasons; Odd Fellows; Elks. Died, from a heart attack, in his room at the Hotel McAlpin, Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., February 12, 1938 (age 68 years, 77 days). Interment at The Evergreens Cemetery, Brooklyn, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of William Willett and Marion Willett; married 1895 to Marie Rebecca Van Tassel (1872-1950).
  Cross-reference: William Berri — Joseph Cassidy
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Joseph Cassidy (c.1866-1920) — also known as "Curley Joe"; "The King of Queens" — of Long Island City (now part of Queens), Queens County, N.Y.; Far Rockaway, Queens, Queens County, N.Y. Born about 1866. Democrat. Borough president of Queens, New York, 1902-05; defeated, 1905, 1909; delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1904; leader of Queens County Democratic Party, 1910-11; indicted in 1912 for selling a nomination for for Supreme Court Justice to William Willett; convicted in 1914, and sentenced to one year to eighteen months in prison; released in 1916. Suffered a stroke of apoplexy, and died soon after, in Far Rockaway, Queens, Queens County, N.Y., November 21, 1920 (age about 54 years). Burial location unknown.
Frank S. Sidway Frank St. John Sidway (1869-1938) — also known as Frank S. Sidway — of Buffalo, Erie County, N.Y. Born December 15, 1869. Republican. Served in the U.S. Army during the Spanish-American War; lawyer; chair of Erie County Republican Party, 1910; in 1912, he was found guilty of civil contempt in connection with his brother's divorce case, and fined $900; later, an appellate court reversed this decision; candidate in primary for Lieutenant Governor of New York, 1914. Died, from a heart attack, in Buffalo, Erie County, N.Y., January 17, 1938 (age 68 years, 33 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Franklin Sidway and Charlotte (Spalding) Sidway; married to Amelia Roberts (died 1972).
  See also Wikipedia article
  Image source: Library of Congress
  David Dows (1885-1966) — also known as "Big Dave" — of Locust Valley, Nassau County, Long Island, N.Y.; Bradley, Greenwood County, S.C. Born in Irvington, Westchester County, N.Y., August 12, 1885. Republican. Served in the U.S. Army during World War I; worked in iron and steel mills; supervised construction of steel mills overseas; studied foreign industries as representative of a steamship line; horse breeder; bank director; Nassau County Sheriff, 1932-34; delegate to Republican National Convention from New York, 1944; member, New York State Racing Commission, 1944-49; delegate to Republican National Convention from South Carolina, 1956; South Carolina Republican state chair, 1956-58; candidate for Presidential Elector for South Carolina, 1956. Convicted of assault in 1913, over his treatment of a New York Times reporter who was attempting to interview him. Died in Hot Springs, Bath County, Va., August 13, 1966 (age 81 years, 1 days). Interment at Sleepy Hollow Cemetery, Sleepy Hollow, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of David Dows (1857-1899) and Jane (Strahan) Dows (1859-1945); married, December 12, 1911, to Mary Gwendolyn Townsend Burden; married, May 19, 1937, to Emily Schweizer; father of Evelyn Byrd Dows (1912-1997; daughter-in-law of Cornelius Newton Bliss, Jr. (1874-1949)).
  Political families: Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York; Dows-Burden family of New York City, New York (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
William Sulzer William Sulzer (1863-1941) — also known as "Plain Bill" — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born in Elizabeth, Union County, N.J., March 18, 1863. Lawyer; member of New York state assembly, 1890-94, 1914 (New York County 14th District 1890-92, New York County 10th District 1893-94, New York County 6th District 1914); Speaker of the New York State Assembly, 1893; U.S. Representative from New York, 1895-1912 (11th District 1895-1903, 10th District 1903-12); delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1896, 1900, 1912 (speaker); Governor of New York, 1913; removed 1913; defeated, 1914, 1914. Presbyterian. German and Scotch-Irish ancestry. Member, Freemasons. Impeached and removed from office as governor, 1913. Died in New York City (unknown county), N.Y., November 6, 1941 (age 78 years, 233 days). Interment at Evergreen Cemetery, Hillside, N.J.
  Relatives: Son of Thomas Sulzer and Lydia Sulzer; brother of Charles August Sulzer (1879-1919); married, January 7, 1908, to Clara Rodelheim.
  Cross-reference: Alexander S. Bacon
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Image source: Men of Mark in America (1906)
J. Edward Addicks John Edward Charles O'Sullivan Addicks (1841-1919) — also known as J. Edward Addicks; "Gas Addicks"; "Napoleon of Gas"; "Frenzied Financier" — of Claymont, New Castle County, Del. Born in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., November 21, 1841. Republican. Flour merchant; built and controlled the illuminating gas industry in Boston and other cities; tried for years without success to win a seat in the U.S. Senate; member of Republican National Committee from Delaware, 1904; delegate to Republican National Convention from Delaware, 1904; arrested in New York, 1913, over his refusal to acknowledge money judgements against him by creditors, and released on bond; jailed in 1915 for contempt of court. Died in Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., August 7, 1919 (age 77 years, 259 days). Interment at Laurel Hill Cemetery, Philadelphia, Pa.
  Relatives: Son of John E. C. O'Sullivan Addicks and Margaretta McLeod (Turner) Addicks; married 1864 to Laura Wattson Butcher; married to Rosalie Butcher; married, December 14, 1898, to Ida (Carr) Wilson.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: Library of Congress
  Stephen J. Stilwell (1866-1942) — of Bronx, Bronx County, N.Y.; Mamaroneck, Westchester County, N.Y. Born in New York, May 10, 1866. Democrat. Lawyer; member of New York state senate 21st District, 1909-13; removed 1913; charged in 1913 with extorting a bribe of $3,500 from George H. Kendall, president of the New York Bank Note company, over a bill that Kendall supported; tried in the State Senate and found not guilty on April 15 by a vote of 28 to 21; indicted on May 12 by a grand jury for soliciting a bribe; tried soon after, and convicted on May 24; this removed him from office; sentenced to four to eight years in prison; after his release, he moved to Mamaroneck and entered the real estate business; indicted in 1934 on charges that he defrauded his former stenographer of $9,000 when she came to him seeking a Naval Academy appointment for her son, but the case did not go to trial; arrested in March 1941 and indicted in April on charges that he attempted to bribe a Mamaroneck village trustee $1,000 to obtain a police job for an associate; pleaded guilty, but never sentenced; while incarcerated, his legs were amputated. Died, while a prisoner awaiting sentence, in Grasslands Hospital, Valhalla, Westchester County, N.Y., April 20, 1942 (age 75 years, 345 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Mary Delia (Archer) Stilwell (1833-1925) and William Jewitt Stilwell; married, February 14, 1887, to Celia A. Blanck.
  Upton Beall Sinclair (1878-1968) — also known as Upton Sinclair — of California. Born in Baltimore, Md., September 20, 1878. Novelist and social crusader; author of The Jungle, about the meat-packing industry in Chicago; arrested in 1914 for picketing in front of the Standard Oil Building in New York; Socialist candidate for U.S. Representative from California 10th District, 1920; Socialist candidate for U.S. Senator from California, 1922; candidate for Governor of California, 1926 (Socialist), 1930 (Socialist), 1934 (Democratic); Socialist candidate for Presidential Elector for California, 1928, 1932; received the Pulitzer Prize for fiction in 1943 for the novel Dragon's Teeth. Member, United World Federalists; League for Industrial Democracy; American Civil Liberties Union. Died in Bound Brook, Somerset County, N.J., November 25, 1968 (age 90 years, 66 days). Interment at Rock Creek Cemetery, Washington, D.C.
  Cross-reference: Harry W. Laidler
  Campaign slogan (1934): "End Poverty in California."
  See also NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile
  Books by Upton Sinclair: I, Candidate for Governor and How I Got Licked (1934)
  Fiction by Upton Sinclair: The Jungle — Oil! A Novel — The Moneychangers — Dragons Teeth — Wide is the Gate
  Books about Upton Sinclair: Lauren Coodley, ed., Land of Orange Groves and Jails: Upton Sinclair's California — Greg Mitchell, The Campaign of the Century: Upton Sinclair's E.P.I.C. Race for Governor of California and the Birth of Media Politics — Kevin Mattson, Upton Sinclair and the Other American Century — Anthony Arthur, Radical Innocent: Upton Sinclair
  Miles R. Frisbie — of Schenectady, Schenectady County, N.Y. Member of New York state assembly from Schenectady County, 1907-08; charged with grand larceny and forgery, for obtaining $2,500 on fraudulent bonds and mortgages; tried on one charge of obtaining $1,000 from a woman in exchange for a fraudulent mortgage; pleaded insanity; convicted on June 12, 1914; sentenced to 5-10 years in prison. Burial location unknown.
  Thomas Mott Osborne (1859-1926) — also known as Thomas M. Osborne; "Tom Brown" — of Auburn, Cayuga County, N.Y. Born in Auburn, Cayuga County, N.Y., September 23, 1859. Delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1896, 1924; Independent candidate for Lieutenant Governor of New York, 1898; mayor of Auburn, N.Y., 1903-05. Son of the founder of International Harvester; prison reformer; New York State Public Service Commissioner; New York State Fish and Game Commissioner, 1911; warden of Sing Sing Prison, Ossining, N.Y., 1914-16; indicted by a grand jury in 1915 for alleged perjury and neglect of duty; tried, but the charges were dismissed; commander of naval prison, Portsmouth, N.H., 1917-20. Died in Auburn, Cayuga County, N.Y., October 20, 1926 (age 67 years, 27 days). Interment at Fort Hill Cemetery, Auburn, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of David Munson Osborne and Eliza Lidy (Wright) Osborne (1830-1911); married 1886 to Agnes Devens (1865-1896); father of Charles Devens Osborne and Lithgow Osborne; first cousin six times removed of Benjamin Franklin; second cousin once removed of Charles Taylor Sherman, Barzillai Bulkeley Kellogg, William Tecumseh Sherman, Lampson Parker Sherman and John Sherman; third cousin once removed of Wharton Barker; third cousin thrice removed of Ira Yale; fourth cousin of Dwight Arthur Silliman; fourth cousin once removed of Howkin Bulkley Beardslee, Henry Jarvis Raymond, Edwin Olmstead Keeler (1846-1923) and Asbury Elliott Kellogg.
  Political families: Sherman family of Connecticut; Keeler-Floyd-Sherman-Bangs family of New York; Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
Edward E. McCall Edward Everett McCall (1863-1924) — also known as Edward E. McCall — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born in Albany, Albany County, N.Y., January 6, 1863. Democrat. Lawyer; Justice of New York Supreme Court 1st District, 1903-13; resigned 1913; candidate for mayor of New York City, N.Y., 1913; chair, New York State Public Service Commission, 1913-15; removed from office in November, 1915, because he owned stock in a company under commission jurisdiction; president, New Jersey Life Insurance Company, 1916. Died, of pneumonia, in Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., March 12, 1924 (age 61 years, 66 days). Burial location unknown.
  Presumably named for: Edward Everett
  Relatives: Son of John McCall and Katherine McCall; brother of John A. McCall (president, New York Life Insurance Company); married 1886 to Ella Frances Gaynor.
  Image source: Library of Congress
  Hudson Snowden Marshall (1870-1931) — also known as H. Snowden Marshall — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born in Baltimore, Md., January 15, 1870. Lawyer; law partner of Bartow S. Weeks, George Gordon Battle, and James A. O'Gorman; U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York, 1913-17; in 1915-16, U.S. Rep. Frank Buchanan (who was at the time being indicted by a federal grand jury) introduced impeachment resolutions against Marshall; the charges, including malfeasance in the handling of past cases, were investigated by a House Judiciary subcommittee, which held hearings in New York, and inquired into the proceedings of the grand jury which had indicted Rep. Buchanan; Marshall wrote a critical letter to the subcommittee, impugning its motives; based on this letter, the full House voted to find him in contempt of Congress, and ordered his arrest; on appeal, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that the authority of the House to punish for contempt extended only to actions which directly interfered with its proceedings. Member, American Bar Association. Died in Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., May 29, 1931 (age 61 years, 134 days). Interment at Kensico Cemetery, Valhalla, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Charles Marshall and Rebecca (Snowden) Marshall; brother of Emily Rosalie Snowden Marshall (1858-1940; who married Somerville Pinkney Tuck); married 1900 to Isabel C. Stiles; uncle of Somerville Pinkney Tuck, Jr. (1891-1967); great-grandnephew of John Marshall.
  Political family: Marshall-Harrison-Randolph-Cabell family of Virginia (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  William H. Reynolds (1868-1931) — of Long Beach, Nassau County, Long Island, N.Y. Born in Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y., February 29, 1868. Republican. Builder; real estate developer; member of New York state senate 3rd District, 1894-95; indicted by a grand jury in August 1917 for perjury, over his 1912 expert testimony on the value of land sought by the city for a park; the grand jury alleged that he falsely denied any personal interest in the realty company which owned the property; also indicted in October 1917, with three others, for conspiracy defraud the city of $500,000 by inflating the appraisal; the indictments were dismissed in May 1920 over the prosecutor's delay of the trial; village president of Long Beach, New York, 1921-22; mayor of Long Beach, N.Y., 1922-24; removed 1924; defeated, 1925; indicted on May 1, 1924, along with the Long Beach city treasurer, for misappropriating city funds in connection with a bond issue; tried in June 1924, convicted, sentenced to six months in the county jail, and automatically removed from office as mayor; released pending appeal; the Appellate Division reversed the conviction in June 1925 and ordered a new trial; the indictment was dismissed in June 1927. English and Scotch-Irish ancestry. Member, Elks; Freemasons. Died, from heart disease, in Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., October 13, 1931 (age 63 years, 0 days). Interment at Green-Wood Cemetery, Brooklyn, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of William Reynolds and Margaret (McChesney) Reynolds; married to Elise Guerrier.
  Adolph Germer (1881-1966) — of Belleville, St. Clair County, Ill.; Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born in Wehlau, East Prussia (now Znamensk, Kaliningrad Oblast), January 15, 1881. Socialist. Miner; union official in various capacities for the United Mine Workers of America, 1906-16; member of Socialist National Committee from Illinois, 1911; candidate for Illinois state house of representatives, 1912; candidate for U.S. Senator from Illinois, 1914; National Executive Secretary, Socialist Party of America, 1916-19; indicted in Chicago, 1918, along with former U.S. Rep. Victor L. Berger, and three others, for making speeches that encouraged disloyalty and obstructed military recruitment; tried and convicted; sentenced to twenty years in prison; the conviction was later overturned; candidate for New York state assembly from New York County 16th District, 1921. Member, United Mine Workers. Died in Rockford, Winnebago County, Ill., May, 1966 (age 85 years, 0 days). Burial location unknown.
  See also Wikipedia article
  Benjamin Gitlow (c.1891-1965) — of Bronx, Bronx County, N.Y. Born about 1891. Communist. Member of New York state assembly from Bronx County 3rd District, 1918; defeated (Socialist), 1918; convicted on criminal anarchy charges, 1920; sentenced to five to ten years in prison; lost an appeal to the U.S. Supreme Court in 1925; candidate for mayor of New York City, N.Y., 1921 (Communist), 1925 (Workers); candidate for Vice President of the United States, 1924, 1928; Workers candidate for Governor of New York, 1926. Died in 1965 (age about 74 years). Burial location unknown.
  Books by Benjamin Gitlow: I Confess: The Truth About American Communism — The Whole of Their Lives: Communism in America / A Personal History and Intimate Portrayal of Its Leaders
  August Claessens (1885-1954) — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y.; Bronx, Bronx County, N.Y.; Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y. Born in Switzerland, 1885. School teacher; candidate for U.S. Representative from New York, 1914 (Socialist, 15th District), 1924 (Socialist, 23rd District), 1928 (Socialist, 14th District), 1930 (Socialist, 18th District), 1932 (Socialist, 14th District), 1934 (Socialist, at-large), 1946 (Liberal, 10th District), 1948 (Liberal, 8th District), 1950 (Liberal, 8th District); member of New York state assembly from New York County 17th District, 1918-20, 1922; defeated, 1915 (Socialist, New York County 26th District); expelled 1920, 1920; defeated, 1920 (Socialist, New York County 17th District), 1922 (Socialist, New York County 17th District), 1923 (Socialist, New York County 17th District), 1925 (Socialist, Bronx County 4th District), 1937 (American Labor, Kings County 4th District), 1938 (American Labor, Kings County 14th District), 1954 (Liberal, Kings County 14th District); delegate to Socialist National Convention from New York, 1920; Socialist candidate for Lieutenant Governor of New York, 1926; American Labor candidate for New York state senate 11th District, 1940. Expelled from the New York State Assembly over alleged disloyalty, along with the other four Socialist members, April 1, 1920; re-elected to the same seat in a special election, and expelled again on September 21. Died, following a heart attack, at Brooklyn Jewish Hospital, Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y., December 9, 1954 (age about 69 years). Interment at Cedar Grove Cemetery, Flushing, Queens, N.Y.
  Relatives: Married 1912 to Hilda Goldstein (1890?-1932); married to Anna Glassman.
  See also Wikipedia article
  G. August Gerber — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Socialist. Arrested for making seditious utterances on March 26, 1920, in Philadelphia, when police broke up a protest meeting, and charged with inciting to riot; released when the charges were dropped the next day; candidate for New York state assembly from New York County 18th District, 1921, 1922; candidate for U.S. Representative from New York, 1930 (19th District), 1932 (at-large). Burial location unknown.
  Samuel Orr (1890-1981) — of Bronx, Bronx County, N.Y. Born July 11, 1890. Socialist. Lawyer; member of New York state assembly from Bronx County 4th District, 1918, 1920, 1921; defeated, 1918; expelled 1920; resigned 1920; delegate to Socialist National Convention from New York, 1920; candidate for New York state senate, 1922 (22nd District), 1928 (22nd District), 1933 (21st District); candidate for U.S. Representative from New York 23rd District, 1926, 1930, 1932, 1934; New York City Magistrate, 1941-51. Jewish. Expelled from the New York State Assembly over alleged disloyalty, along with the other four Socialist members, April 1, 1920; re-elected to the same seat in a special election, but resigned in protest when three other Socialist members were expelled again. Died, in Montefiore Hospital, Bronx, Bronx County, N.Y., August 29, 1981 (age 91 years, 49 days). Burial location unknown.
  See also Wikipedia article
Samuel A. De_Witt Samuel Aaron De Witt (1891-1963) — also known as Samuel A. De Witt; Sam De Witt — of Bronx, Bronx County, N.Y.; Queens, Queens County, N.Y. Born in 1891. Socialist. Machinery dealer; poet; playwright; member of New York state assembly from Bronx County 3rd District, 1920; expelled 1920; resigned 1920; defeated, 1920 (Bronx County 3rd District), 1924 (Bronx County 7th District), 1926 (Bronx County 7th District), 1927 (Bronx County 3rd District), 1929 (Bronx County 3rd District), 1932 (Queens County 4th District), 1933 (Queens County 4th District); candidate for borough president of Bronx, New York, 1925; candidate for U.S. Representative from New York, 1928 (22nd District), 1934 (2nd District), 1935 (2nd District), 1936 (2nd District). Expelled from the New York State Assembly over alleged disloyalty, along with the other four Socialist members, April 1, 1920; re-elected to the same seat in a special election, but resigned in protest when three other Socialist members were expelled again. Died in Yonkers, Westchester County, N.Y., January 22, 1963 (age about 71 years). Burial location unknown.
  See also Wikipedia article
  Image source: Library of Congress
  Louis Waldman (1892-1982) — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y.; Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y. Born in Yancherudnia, Russia (now Ukraine), January 5, 1892. Socialist. Civil engineer; lawyer; member of New York state assembly from New York County 8th District, 1918, 1920; expelled 1920, 1920; defeated, 1920; candidate for New York state senate 14th District, 1922; candidate for New York state attorney general, 1924; candidate for Justice of New York Supreme Court 2nd District, 1927 (Socialist), 1937 (American Labor); candidate for Governor of New York, 1928, 1930, 1932; delegate to New York convention to ratify 21st amendment, 1933. Jewish and Ukrainian ancestry. Expelled from the New York State Assembly over alleged disloyalty, along with the other four Socialist members, April 1, 1920; re-elected to the same seat in a special election, and expelled again on September 21. Suffered a severe stroke, and died four years later, in the Jewish Home and Hospital for the Aged, Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., September 12, 1982 (age 90 years, 250 days). Burial location unknown.
  See also Wikipedia article
  Charles Solomon (1889-1963) — of Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y. Born October 29, 1889. Socialist. Newspaperman; member of New York state assembly from Kings County 23rd District, 1919-20, 1921; expelled 1920, 1920; defeated, 1927; delegate to Socialist National Convention from New York, 1920; candidate for Lieutenant Governor of New York, 1924; candidate for Justice of New York Supreme Court 2nd District, 1928, 1938; candidate for New York state senate 8th District, 1930; candidate for U.S. Senator from New York, 1932; candidate for mayor of New York City, N.Y., 1933; candidate for Governor of New York, 1934; American Labor candidate for delegate to New York state constitutional convention at-large, 1937. Jewish. Expelled from the New York State Assembly over alleged disloyalty, along with the other four Socialist members, April 1, 1920; re-elected to the same seat in a special election, and expelled again on September 21. Died December 8, 1963 (age 74 years, 40 days). Interment at Mt. Lebanon Cemetery, Glendale, Queens, N.Y.
  Epitaph: "He Gave The People of His Best."
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Thomas A. McWhinney (c.1863-1933) — of Lawrence, Nassau County, Long Island, N.Y.; Atlantic Beach, Nassau County, Long Island, N.Y. Born in Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y., about 1863. Republican. Served in the U.S. Army during the Spanish-American War; postmaster at Lawrence, N.Y., 1901; automobile dealer; member of New York state assembly, 1915-23 (Nassau County 1915-17, Nassau County 1st District 1918-23); indicted in 1920 on charges that he and others had tipped off gamblers to planned police raids; tried and found not guilty. Member, Elks; Royal Arcanum; United Spanish War Veterans; Foresters; Redmen; Order of Heptasophs; Order of United American Mechanics. Suffered a stroke, and died, in Atlantic Beach, Nassau County, Long Island, N.Y., November 25, 1933 (age about 70 years). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Married to Lidie Wright.
  Rose Pastor Stokes — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Communist. Indicted in 1918 for sedition over a speech she made in Kansas City, and released on bail; arrested in Stamford, Conn., in September, 1921, to prevent her from giving a speech there; candidate for borough president of Manhattan, New York, 1921. Female. Burial location unknown.
  Mary Winsor (b. 1873) — of Lower Merion Township, Montgomery County, Pa. Born in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., March 28, 1873. Socialist. Suffragette; participant in the first U.S. birth control conference, New York City, November 1921; on November 13, police arrived to forcibly shut down the event, and she was arrested, along with Margaret Sanger, for attempting to speak; charged with disorderly conduct, but released soon after; candidate for Pennsylvania secretary of internal affairs, 1922; candidate for Lieutenant Governor of Pennsylvania, 1930; candidate for U.S. Representative from Pennsylvania 17th District, 1932. Female. Member, Women's International League for Peace and Freedom; American Civil Liberties Union. Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Daughter of James Davis Winsor and Rebecca (Chapman) Winsor; second cousin five times removed of Simeon Baldwin; third cousin twice removed of George Bailey Loring; fourth cousin once removed of Charles Grenfill Washburn (1857-1928).
  Political families: Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York; Adams-Baldwin-Otis family of Boston, Massachusetts (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also OurCampaigns candidate detail
  William Joseph Fallon (1886-1927) — also known as William J. Fallon; "The Great Mouthpiece"; "Broadway's Cicero" — of Mamaroneck, Westchester County, N.Y. Born in New York, New York County, N.Y., 1886. Republican. Lawyer; member of New York state assembly from Westchester County 2nd District, 1918; charged in 1924 with bribing a juror; tried and acquitted. Died, of heart disease, in the Hotel Oxford, Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., April 29, 1927 (age about 40 years). Interment at Calvary Cemetery, Woodside, Queens, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Joseph M. Fallon; married to Agnes Rafter.
  Books about William J. Fallon: Gene Fowler, The Great Mouthpiece : A Life Story of William J. Fallon
  Frank Frankel (1886-1975) — of Long Beach, Nassau County, Long Island, N.Y.; Houston, Harris County, Tex.; Beverly Hills, Los Angeles County, Calif. Born October 2, 1886. Mayor of Long Beach, N.Y., 1924, 1930-33; defeated, 1925 (Democratic primary), 1925 (Republican), 1929 (Democratic primary); founder of Long Beach Memorial Hospital indicted in September 1927 on charges of maintaining a gambling place; the charges were later dropped; in December 1929, his right to take office as mayor was unsuccessfully challenged by the Long Beach police chief, based on vote fraud (for which many had been arrested and prosecuted) and the expectation that Frankel would tolerate gambling in the city; indicted in January 1933 for fraud over his transfer of $90,000 in city funds to the Long Beach Trust Company, which subsequently closed; the indictment was dismissed in February; indicted again in May 1933, along with two city council members, over the diversion of $750,000 of state and county tax revenue to city projects; pleaded not guilty; no trial was held; the indictment was dismissed in 1937; oil producer. Died, in a hospital at Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, Calif., June 12, 1975 (age 88 years, 253 days). Interment somewhere in Houston, Tex.
  Florence Elizabeth Smith Knapp (1875-1949) — also known as Florence E. S. Knapp; Florence Elizabeth Smith — of Syracuse, Onondaga County, N.Y. Born in Syracuse, Onondaga County, N.Y., March 25, 1875. Republican. School teacher; superintendent of schools; dean, College of Home Economics, Syracuse University; delegate to Republican National Convention from New York, 1920, 1924 (alternate); secretary of state of New York, 1925-27; in 1927, an investigation discovered her maladministration of the 1925 state census; she had paid salaries to relatives and others who did no census work, forged indorsements on checks, received money she was not entitled to, and burned state records to conceal evidence of these things; resigned her position at Syracuse University; indicted on various charges in 1928, tried twice and eventually convicted of grand larceny; sentenced to 30 days in jail. Female. Episcopalian. Member, Grange. Died, following a heart attack, in Marcy State Hospital (insane asylum), Marcy, Oneida County, N.Y., October 26, 1949 (age 74 years, 215 days). Interment at Oakwood Cemetery, Syracuse, N.Y.
  Relatives: Daughter of James E. Smith and Mary (Hancock) Smith; married to Philip Schuyler Knapp (1849-1913).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Maurice E. Connolly (1881-1935) — of Corona, Queens, Queens County, N.Y.; Forest Hills Gardens, Queens, Queens County, N.Y. Born in Corona, Queens, Queens County, N.Y., 1881. Democrat. Lawyer; borough president of Queens, New York, 1911-28; resigned 1928; delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1912, 1916, 1924; candidate for Justice of New York Supreme Court 2nd District, 1918; resigned as borough president in April, 1928 during an investigation of a sewer graft scandal; convicted in October 1928 of conspiracy to defraud the city; sentenced to one year in prison and fined $500; following an unsuccessful appeal, he served the prison sentence in 1930-31. Irish ancestry. Died, from a cerebral hemorrhage, in Forest Hills Gardens, Queens, Queens County, N.Y., November 24, 1935 (age about 54 years). Interment at Mount St. Mary Cemetery, Flushing, Queens, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Maurice Connolly and Mary Jane Connolly; married to Helen M. Connell; father of Helen F. Connolly (daughter-in-law of Leander Bernard Faber (1867-1950)).
  Cross-reference: Clarence J. Shearn
  Max Schachtman (1904-1972) — of Floral Park, Nassau County, Long Island, N.Y. Born in Warsaw, Poland, September 10, 1904. Naturalized U.S. citizen; arrested during a demonstration on Wall Street in New York City, July 3, 1928, but charges against him were dismissed; became an open supporter of Leon Trotsky's opposition to Stalin about 1928, and was expelled from the Communist Party; became a major Trotskyist leader and theoretician, and one of the founders of the Socialist Workers Party; editor of The Militant newspaper; Workers candidate for U.S. Representative from New York, 1940 (23rd District), 1946 (15th District); Workers candidate for mayor of New York City, N.Y., 1941; broke with Trotskyism in 1948, and became more conservative in later life. Jewish ancestry. Member, League for Industrial Democracy. Died, in Long Island Jewish Hospital, New Hyde Park, Nassau County, Long Island, N.Y., November 4, 1972 (age 68 years, 55 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Benjamin Schachtman and Sarah Schachtman; married to Billie Ramloff, Edith Harvey and Yetta Barsh (1925-1996).
  See also Wikipedia article
  Paris Montrose (c.1895-1961) — of Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y. Born about 1895. Republican. Lawyer; candidate for New York state assembly from Kings County 22nd District, 1927, 1928. In 1929, he was one of several Brooklyn lawyers who were disciplined for ambulance chasing activities and paying insurance company adjusters for favorable settlement of claims; his license to practice law was suspended for two years. Died, of cancer, in the Memorial Center for Cancer and Allied Diseases of the Sloan-Kettering Cancer Institute, Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., February 14, 1961 (age about 66 years). Burial location unknown.
  James P. Kohler — of Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y. Lawyer; secretary to New York City Mayor William J. Gaynor; candidate for Justice of New York Supreme Court 2nd District, 1920. In 1929, he was one of several Brooklyn lawyers who were disciplined for ambulance chasing activities; his license to practice law was suspended for 30 days. Burial location unknown.
  Mortimer J. Wohl (1888-1931) — of Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y. Born in Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y., March 20, 1888. Republican. Lawyer; served in the U.S. Army during World War I; candidate for New York state assembly from Kings County 18th District, 1921. Member, American Legion. In 1929, he was one of several Brooklyn lawyers who were charged with ambulance chasing activities; he disputed the charges. Died, from septicemia, in Jewish Hospital, Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y., October 14, 1931 (age 43 years, 208 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Samuel Wohl and Fannie Whol; married, November 11, 1923, to Adelaide Finkelstein.
  William Zebulon Foster (1881-1961) — also known as William Z. Foster; William Edward Foster — of Bronx, Bronx County, N.Y. Born in Taunton, Bristol County, Mass., February 25, 1881. Communist. Labor organizer; helped lead steelworkers strike in 1919; candidate for President of the United States, 1924, 1928, 1932; candidate for Governor of New York, 1930; arrested after a demonstration in 1930, and jailed for six months; indicted on July 20, 1948 under the Smith Act, and charged with conspiring to advocate the overthrow of the government; never tried due to illness. Irish ancestry. Died, in a sanatorium at Moscow, Russia, September 1, 1961 (age 80 years, 188 days). Cremated; ashes interred at Kremlin Wall Necropolis, Moscow, Russia; cenotaph at Forest Home Cemetery, Forest Park, Ill.
  Relatives: Son of James Foster; married to Ester Abramovitch.
  Epitaph: "Working Class Leader. Tireless Fighter for Socialism."
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Jacob P. Nathanson (1901-1986) — of Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y.; Lake Worth, Palm Beach County, Fla. Born in Russia, February 21, 1901. Democrat. Lawyer; member of New York state assembly from Kings County 14th District, 1927-33; defeated in primary, 1933. Jewish. Charged in 1930 with professional misconduct by the Brooklyn Bar Association, over his handling of a client's $500 bail payment; suspended from the practice of law in 1931, and ordered to pay restitution. Indicted in October and November 1938 on charges of forgery, grand larceny, and subornation of perjury, over his involvement in fraudulent bail bonds; pleaded guilty to subornation of perjury, and testified against other conspirators; disbarred in 1939. Died in Palm Beach County, Fla., March 2, 1986 (age 85 years, 9 days). Interment somewhere in Palm Beach County, Fla.
  Sammie A. Abbott (1908-1990) — of New York; Takoma Park, Montgomery County, Md. Born April 25, 1908. Communist. Activist and labor organizer; arrested about 50 times in connection with demonstrations and strikes; candidate for U.S. Representative from New York 37th District, 1934; mayor of Takoma Park, Md., 1980-85; defeated, 1985. Died December 15, 1990 (age 82 years, 234 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Married 1938 to Ruth Gracie Yalsic (1920-2009).
  Grover M. Moscowitz (1886-1947) — of Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y. Born in Hot Springs, Garland County, Ark., August 31, 1886. Lawyer; U.S. District Judge for the Eastern District of New York, 1925-47; died in office 1947; his practice of giving lucrative bankruptcy receiverships to members of his former partner's law firm was condemned as unethical by the U.S. House on April 8, 1930. Jewish. Member, Freemasons. Died in Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y., March 31, 1947 (age 60 years, 212 days). Cremated.
  Relatives: Son of Morris Moscowitz and Bertha (Less) Moscowitz; married 1911 to Miriam H. Greenebaum; father of Grover M. Moscowitz, Jr. (1916-1998).
  Cross-reference: William T. Cowin
  See also federal judicial profile — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Jesse Silbermann (1877-1947) — of Bronx, Bronx County, N.Y. Born in Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y., June 30, 1877. Lawyer; member of New York state assembly from New York County 32nd District, 1908-09; New York City Magistrate, 1920-31; removed from office in July 1931 by the Appellate Division, for being improperly influenced by a party leader in the sentencing of a defendant. Member, Elks; Freemasons. Died, in Mount Sinai Hospital, Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., May 17, 1947 (age 69 years, 321 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Joseph Silbermann and Caroline Silbermann; married to Mabel Saunders.
  Henry Bruckner (1871-1942) — of Bronx, Bronx County, N.Y. Born in Bronx, New York County (now Bronx County), N.Y., June 17, 1871. Democrat. President, Bruckner Beverages; director, Milton Realty Co.; director, American Metal Cap Co.; member of New York state assembly from New York County 35th District, 1901; New York City Commissioner of Public Works, 1902-06; delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1912 (alternate), 1924, 1932 (alternate); U.S. Representative from New York 22nd District, 1913-17; resigned 1917; borough president of Bronx, New York, 1918-33. Member, Freemasons; Rotary; Elks. In 1932, the Seabury investigating committee, looking into corruption in New York City, called him to testify about the wealth he had accumulated; at the conclusion of the investigation, the committee called for his removal as Borough President. Died, from chronic nephritis, in Bronx, Bronx County, N.Y., April 14, 1942 (age 70 years, 301 days). Interment at Woodlawn Cemetery, Bronx, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of John A. Bruckner and Katharine (Schmidt) Bruckner; married, November 17, 1904, to Helen Zobel (c.1879-1930).
  Bruckner Expressway, Bronx, New York, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  James John Joseph Walker (1881-1946) — also known as James J. Walker; Jimmy Walker; "Beau James"; "The Night Mayor" — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born in New York, New York County, N.Y., June 19, 1881. Democrat. Lawyer; songwriter; member of New York state assembly from New York County 5th District, 1910-14; member of New York state senate, 1915-25 (13th District 1915-18, 12th District 1919-25); resigned 1925; delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1924, 1928 (member, Committee on Rules and Order of Business), 1932; mayor of New York City, N.Y., 1926-32; resigned 1932. Catholic. Irish ancestry. Member, Elks. Resigned as mayor during an investigation of corruption in his administration. Died in New York, New York County, N.Y., November 18, 1946 (age 65 years, 152 days). Interment at Gate of Heaven Cemetery, Hawthorne, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of William H. Walker (1852?-?); married to Janet Allen (divorced 1933); married, April 18, 1933, to Betty Compton (actress; divorced 1941).
  See also Wikipedia article — Internet Movie Database profile
  Books about Jimmy Walker: Gerald Leinwand, Mackerels in the Moonlight : Four Corrupt American Mayors
  George Edward Powers (b. 1892) — also known as George E. Powers — of Watertown, Middlesex County, Mass.; Astoria, Queens, Queens County, N.Y.; Detroit, Wayne County, Mich. Born in Boston, Suffolk County, Mass., February 15, 1892. Sheet metal worker; candidate for borough president of Queens, New York, 1929 (Workers), 1933 (Communist); Workers candidate for U.S. Senator from Michigan, 1930; in April 1932, he was arrested at City Hall Park, during a demonstration which was characaterized as "riot"; convicted of unlawful assembly, but the sentence was suspended; also in 1932, he was publicly accused of taking part in an alleged Communist conspiracy to cause bank failures in Chicago by spreading rumors (in a "whispering campaign" of "anti-bank propaganda"); he denied this; Communist candidate for chief judge of New York Court of Appeals, 1932; vice-president, International Workers Order; following the Hitler-Stalin pact in 1939, he resigned from the Communist Party, took part in anti-Communist organizations; at Earl Browder's trial for passport fraud in 1940, he testified for the prosecution; Liberal candidate for New York state senate 7th District, 1948, 1950. Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of George E. Powers and Sarah Powers.
Williana J. Burroughs Williana Jones Burroughs (1882-1945) — also known as Williana J. Burroughs; Williana Jones; Mary Adams — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y.; Moscow, Russia. Born in Petersburg, Va., December 26, 1882. Communist. School teacher; joined the Communist party in 1926; used the pseudonym "Mary Adams"; in 1933, she led a demonstration to the New York City Board of Education, and as a result, she was fired from her teaching job; candidate for Lieutenant Governor of New York, 1934; announcer and editor for the English-language broadcasts of Radio Moscow, 1937-45. African ancestry. Died, from a heart ailment, in the Staten Island Area Hospital, Staten Island, Richmond County, N.Y., December 24, 1945 (age 62 years, 363 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Married 1909 to Charles Burroughs.
  See also Wikipedia article
  Image source: The Daily Worker, October 1933
Corliss Lamont Corliss Lamont (1902-1995) — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born in Englewood, Bergen County, N.J., March 28, 1902. Socialist. Author; lecturer; arrested on June 27, 1934, while picketing in support of a labor union at a furniture plant in Jersey City, N.J.; president, National Council of American-Soviet Friendship; this organization and its leaders were investigated for subversion by the U.S. House Committee on Un-American Activities; charged in 1946 with contempt of Congress for his refusal to provide records demanded by the committee; in 1951, the U.S. State Department denied a passport to him, based on his membership in what were deemed "Communist-front organizations"; on August 17, 1954, the U.S. Senate cited him with contempt of Congress for refusing to testify before Sen. Joseph R. McCarthy's subcommittee; subsequently indicted; pleaded not guilty; the indictment was dismissed in 1955; the Court of Appeals upheld the dismissal in 1956; candidate for U.S. Senator from New York, 1952 (American Labor), 1958 (Independent Socialist). Member, American Civil Liberties Union; NAACP; Phi Beta Kappa; American Academy of Political and Social Science. Died, of heart failure, in Ossining, Westchester County, N.Y., April 26, 1995 (age 93 years, 29 days). Interment at Brookside Cemetery, Englewood, N.J.
  Relatives: Son of Thomas William Lamont (1870-1948) and Florence Haskell (Corliss) Lamont (died 1952); married, June 8, 1928, to Margaret Hayes Irish (c.1905-1977); married 1962 to Helen Lamb (died 1975); married 1986 to Beth Keehner; granduncle of Ned Lamont (1966?-).
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: The Militant, November 3, 1958
Abdul Hamid Sufi Abdul Hamid (1903-1938) — also known as Abdul Hamid; Eugene Brown; "The Black Hitler"; "The Harlem Hitler"; "Bishop Amiru-Al-Mu-Minim Sufi Abdul Hamid" — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born in Lowell, Middlesex County, Mass., January 6, 1903. Self-styled cleric; labor leader; claimed to be from Egypt or Sudan; wore a turban and a green velvet cloak with gold braid; led picketing of stores in Harlem whose proprietors refused to hire African-American employees; conducted street rallies in Harlem where he denounced Jews; said he was "the only one fit to carry on the war against the Jews"; Americo-Spanish candidate for New York state assembly from New York County 17th District, 1933; arrested in october 1934; tried and found guilty on misdemeanor charges of making a public speech without a permit, and selling books without a license, and sentenced to ten days in jail; later suspected of inciting the 1935 riot in Harlem, which led to injunctions against his activities; in January 1938, his estranged wife, Stephanie St. Clair, ambushed him outside his house, and shot at him five times, but he was not seriously hurt; founded the Buddhist Universal Holy Temple of Tranquility. Buddhist or Muslim. African ancestry. Killed, along with his pilot, when his Cessna J-5 airplane ran out of fuel and crashed near Wantagh, Nassau County, Long Island, N.Y., July 30, 1938 (age 35 years, 205 days). Burial location unknown.
  See also Wikipedia article — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Image source: New York Times, August 1, 1938
  Edward J. Dowling (b. 1875) — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born in New York, New York County, N.Y., December 8, 1875. Democrat. Lawyer; delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1916; member of New York state senate 19th District, 1917-20; defeated, 1920. Pleaded guilty in 1934 for embezzling $20,000 in Liberty bonds from an estate he represented as attorney; made restitution, resigned his law license, and received a suspended sentence. Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Married, June 27, 1906, to Anna McCooey (1878-1918; sister of John Henry McCooey (1864-1934)); married, February 7, 1924, to Clara Brady.
  Political family: McCooey-Ambro family of Brooklyn, New York.
  See also Wikipedia article
  Michael Joseph Hogan (1871-1940) — also known as Michael J. Hogan — of Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y.; Rockville Centre, Nassau County, Long Island, N.Y. Born in New York, New York County, N.Y., April 22, 1871. Republican. U.S. Representative from New York 7th District, 1921-23; defeated, 1922 (7th District), 1932 (at-large); trucking business; indicted in 1934 for accepting money from applicants for New York City plumbing licenses; convicted on federal charges in 1935 of accepting bribes from illegal immigrants and helping them file false affidavits, and sentenced to a year and a day in federal prison; testified in 1936 that he had assisted in a jury tampering conspiracy. Died in Rockville Centre, Nassau County, Long Island, N.Y., May 7, 1940 (age 69 years, 15 days). Interment at Green-Wood Cemetery, Brooklyn, N.Y.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  John L. Lotsch (1881-1967) — of Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y.; Scranton, Lackawanna County, Pa. Born February 15, 1881. Republican. Lawyer; candidate for U.S. Representative from New York 6th District, 1928. Arrested and indicted in 1935 on federal charges of taking bribes while serving as a special master overseeing a patent case; the case was dismissed in 1936, but he was immediately reindicted on an extortion charge; that indictment was thrown out by the Court of Appeals. Charged in 1938, with other officials of a defunct Brooklyn bank, with conspiracy to violate federal banking laws by accepting fees for granting loans; tried and convicted on three counts; sentenced to serve one year in jail; also disbarred. Pleaded guilty in 1939 to charges that he bribed federal judge Martin T. Manton, and testified at the judge's bribery trial. Died in 1967 (age about 86 years). Burial location unknown.
  Washington Irving Vanderpoel (born c.1880) — also known as W. Irving Vanderpoel — of Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y.; Freeport, Nassau County, Long Island, N.Y. Born in New York, about 1880. Democrat. Newspaper reporter; insurance broker; village president of Freeport, New York, 1925-26; candidate for U.S. Representative from New York 1st District, 1926. Dutch ancestry. Indicted in December 1936, along with his brother Edwin and others, by a federal grand jury, over his involvement in a stock swindle; found not guilty, but his brother was convicted. Burial location unknown.
  Presumably named for: Washington Irving
  Relatives: Son of Edwin Colburn Vanderpoel (1851-1932).
  Samuel Dickstein (1885-1954) — also known as "Crook" — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born near Vilna, Lithuania, February 5, 1885. Democrat. Lawyer; member of New York state assembly from New York County 4th District, 1919-22; U.S. Representative from New York, 1923-45 (12th District 1923-45, 19th District 1945); Justice of New York Supreme Court 1st District, 1945-53. Jewish. Member, Freemasons; Shriners; B'nai B'rith; Knights of Pythias; Elks; American Bar Association; Veterans of Foreign Wars. According to old Russian records found in the mid-1990s, he was a paid agent of the Soviet intelligence service while in Congress, and received some $12,000 in 1937-40 under the Soviet code-name "Crook". Died, in Beth Israel Hospital, Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., April 22, 1954 (age 69 years, 76 days). Interment at Union Field Cemetery, Ridgewood, Queens, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Rabbi Israel Dickstein and Slata B. (Gordon) Dickstein.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  Anthony J. Argondizza (c.1899-1958) — of Maspeth, Queens, Queens County, N.Y. Born in New York, about 1899. Republican. Served in the U.S. Army during World War I; lawyer; candidate for New York state senate 3rd District, 1924; arraigned in January 1937, and pleaded not guilty on a charge of making a false oath as a bankruptcy trustee; apparently the case never proceeded to trial; alternate delegate to Republican National Convention from New York, 1948. Italian ancestry. Member, American Legion; Knights of Columbus. Died in Maspeth, Queens, Queens County, N.Y., June 21, 1958 (age about 59 years). Burial location unknown.
Edward S. Moran, Jr. Edward S. Moran, Jr. (b. 1901) — of Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y. Born in Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y., November 19, 1901. Democrat. Lawyer; member of New York state assembly from Kings County 12th District, 1927-38. Arrested in June 1938 and charged with accepting $36,000 in bribes from two taxicab companies; released on bail; again arrested in April 1939 and charged with state income tax evasion; again released; tried on the bribery charges in June 1939 and convicted; sentenced to two and a half to five years in prison; released pending appeal, which was unsuccessful; disbarred; started prison term in January 1941; released on parole in September 1942. Burial location unknown.
  Image source: New York Red Book 1936
Julius S. Berg Julius S. Berg (1895-1938) — of Bronx, Bronx County, N.Y. Born in New York, New York County, N.Y., July 15, 1895. Democrat. Lawyer; served in the U.S. Army during World War I; injured in combat and lost a leg; member of New York state assembly from Bronx County 3rd District, 1923-30; member of New York state senate 22nd District, 1931-38; died in office 1938. Jewish. Member, American Legion; Jewish War Veterans; Veterans of Foreign Wars; Disabled American Veterans; Freemasons; Elks; Knights of Pythias. Indicted on charges of receiving money for his aid in procuring liquor licenses and arranging for concessions at the New York World's Fair; that same day, he killed himself by gunshot, in his law office, Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., July 20, 1938 (age 43 years, 5 days). Interment at Mt. Ararat Cemetery, East Farmingdale, Long Island, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Morris Berg and Celia (Weinstein) Berg; married, June 20, 1920, to Rose Schram.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: New York Red Book 1936
  Sol Ullman (c.1893-1941) — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born in New York, New York County, N.Y., about 1893. Republican. Lawyer; member of New York state assembly from New York County 6th District, 1919-23; defeated, 1923; indicted by a Federal grand jury in 1921 on charges of conspiring to create a falsified income tax return for a manufacturing company; a trial resulted in a directed verdict of acquittal due to insufficient evidence; alternate delegate to Republican National Convention from New York, 1928; candidate for U.S. Representative from New York 14th District, 1928. Jewish. Member, American Bar Association; Freemasons. Arrested and indicted in 1939 on charges of protecting a physician who performed illegal abortions; in 1941, a dentist was convicted as Ullman's agent in soliciting protection money from physicians, and during the pendency of the criminal charges, disbarment proceedings were brought against him. However, he was never tried, and his obituary states that he was "exonerated". Died, in Lenox Hill Hospital, Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., July 6, 1941 (age about 48 years). Entombed at Union Field Cemetery, Ridgewood, Queens, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Samuel Ullman and Kate Ullman; married to Esther or Estelle Blau.
  Martin Thomas Manton (1880-1946) — also known as Martin T. Manton — of Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y.; Islip, Suffolk County, Long Island, N.Y. Born in Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y., August 2, 1880. Lawyer; U.S. District Judge for the Southern District of New York, 1916-18; Judge of U.S. Court of Appeals for the 2nd Circuit, 1918-39; resigned 1939. Catholic. Irish ancestry. U.S. District Attorney Thomas E. Dewey charged in 1939 that Judge Manton had received more than $400,000 from litigants; Dewey sent six specific instances the U.S. House Judiciary Committee for consideration of impeachment. Following the judge's resignation, he was indicted on bribery charges; tried and convicted; sentenced to two years in prison and fined $10,000; released in 1941. Died in Fayetteville, Onondaga County, N.Y., November 17, 1946 (age 66 years, 107 days). Interment at Immaculate Conception Cemetery, Fayetteville, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Michael Manton and Catherine (Mullen) Manton; married, July 3, 1907, to Eva M. Morier.
  Cross-reference: John L. Lotsch — Edwin Stark Thomas — Matthew T. Abruzzo
  See also federal judicial profile — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Nathan Lieberman (c.1888-1939) — also known as Leonard Madden — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born about 1888. Republican. Lawyer; alternate delegate to Republican National Convention from New York, 1912; member of New York state assembly from New York County 17th District, 1921; in March 1939, he was charged, along with two others, over a stock fraud scheme; he pleaded not guilty and was released on bail; meanwhile, in a separate case, he was indicted in Broome County. Member, Freemasons; Elks. Died, apparently of pneumonia, while attempting to kill himself with poison, in his room at the Tudor Hotel (where he had registered under the assumed name "Leonard Madden"), Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., March 12, 1939 (age about 51 years). Burial location unknown.
Edgar J. Lauer Edgar J. Lauer (1871-1948) — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born in New York, New York County, N.Y., November 10, 1871. Republican. Lawyer; Judge, New York City Municipal Court, 1906-33; Justice of New York Supreme Court 1st District, 1934-39; resigned 1939. In 1938, his wife pleaded guilty in Federal Court to charges that she smuggled expensive clothing and diamonds from Europe to the U.S.; she was fined and sentenced to three months in prison and fined. In 1939, the state legislature moved to investigate whether Judge Lauer had knowledge of his wife's smuggling activities; he denied this, but immediately resigned his seat. Died, in Mount Sinai Hospital, Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., November 9, 1948 (age 76 years, 365 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of William Emanuel Lauer and Cecilia (Hornthal) Lauer; married to Elma M. Kramer.
  Image source: Empire State Notables (1914)
  John J. Condon (1898-1971) — of Yonkers, Westchester County, N.Y. Born in Yonkers, Westchester County, N.Y., November 19, 1898. Republican. Auditor for the New York Central Railroad; mayor of Yonkers, N.Y., 1940-41; defeated, 1935; in December 1940, he was named as a conspirator in the indictment of Patrick Fitzgerald, who was charged with seeking a $3,000 bribe from pinball operators. Catholic. Irish ancestry. Member, Knights of Columbus. Died January 27, 1971 (age 72 years, 69 days). Interment at St. Mary's Cemetery, Yonkers, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of John J. Condon and Ellen Condon (c.1872-1941); first cousin of William F. Condon (1897-1972); first cousin once removed of William F. Condon, Jr..
  Political family: Condon family of Yonkers, New York.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Lawrence J. Murray, Jr. (1910-2000) — of Haverstraw, Rockland County, N.Y.; Pearl River, Rockland County, N.Y.; Nyack, Rockland County, N.Y. Born in New York, June 20, 1910. Democrat. Lawyer; member of New York state assembly from Rockland County, 1938-40; removed 1940; charged, in January 1940, with embezzling $49,102 from Miss May Dunnigan, his mentally incompetent law client (also sister-in-law to U.S. Postmaster General James A. Farley); the money was lost in gambling on horse races; tried, convicted on all counts, and hence automatically disbarred and removed from office; sentenced to five to ten years in prison; his sentence was commuted in 1942; arrested in 1952, along with other bookmakers, for illegally taking bets. Irish ancestry. Died March 15, 2000 (age 89 years, 269 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Lawrence J. Murray (born 1874) and Emma (Brennan) Murray.
  Joseph Ellsberry McWilliams (1904-1996) — also known as Joe McWilliams — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born in Hitchcock, Blaine County, Okla., 1904. Gave street-corner speeches in New York City, in which he denounced Jews and praised Adolf Hitler; arrested in 1940 when one of his speeches caused a riot; charged with sedition in 1944, as part of an alleged Nazi conspiracy; tried along with many others, but after seven months, a mistrial was declared; candidate in Republican primary for U.S. Representative from New York 18th District, 1940. Died in 1996 (age about 92 years). Burial location unknown.
  See also Wikipedia article
  Edward Elwell Spafford (1878-1941) — also known as Edward E. Spafford — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y.; Brewster, Putnam County, N.Y. Born in Springfield, Windsor County, Vt., March 12, 1878. Republican. Served in the U.S. Navy during World War I; lawyer; National Commander, American Legion, 1927-28; candidate for U.S. Representative from New York 14th District, 1930. Member, American Legion. In 1941, during divorce proceedings, he was accused of conspiring with German agents in America; in an interview published in 1943 by journalist John Roy Carlson, he espoused strongly antisemitic and pro-Hitler views. Died, in the Naval Academy Hospital, Annapolis, Anne Arundel County, Md., November 13, 1941 (age 63 years, 246 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Hiram Duncan Spafford (1841-1912) and Georgia F. Spafford; married, May 22, 1912, to Lucille M. Stevens (died 1914); married 1922 to Lillian Mercer Pierce.
Irving D. Neustein Irving Daniel Neustein (1901-1979) — also known as Irving D. Neustein — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born in Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., November 30, 1901. Democrat. Lawyer; member of New York state assembly from New York County 6th District, 1931-37; member, New York Unemployment Insurance Appeal Board, 1938-41; when his political activities came under investigation by the U.S. Civil Service Commission as violating the Hatch Act, he resigned; though he was no longer a member, his ouster from the appeal board was ordered two years later. Jewish. Member, Freemasons; Tammany Hall. Died, in Jewish Home for the Aged, Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., December 7, 1979 (age 78 years, 7 days). Burial location unknown.
  Image source: New York Red Book 1936
  Nathan Pressman (1912-1993) — of Ellenville, Ulster County, N.Y. Born in Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y., June 24, 1912. Socialist. Longtime Socialist Labor Party activist; jailed briefly during World War II for draft resistance, but subsequently accepted induction into the U.S. Army; several time candidate for mayor of Ellenville, N.Y.; Socialist Labor candidate for Presidential Elector for New York, 1972; expelled from Socialist Labor Party, 1984. Died, in Ellenville Community Hospital, Ellenville, Ulster County, N.Y., September 25, 1993 (age 81 years, 93 days). Interment at Workmen's Circle Cemetery, Wawarsing town, Ulster County, N.Y.
  Bert Stand — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Democrat. Alternate delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1936, 1940, 1944, 1948, 1952; executive deputy commissioner and secretary of the New York State Athletic Commission, which regulated professional boxing; forced to resign in August 1943, following disclosure by New York County District Attorney Frank S. Hogan that Stand had helped gangster and "slot machine king" Frank Costello in obtain a Supreme Court nomination for Thomas A. Aurelio. Member, Tammany Hall. Presumed deceased. Burial location unknown.
  Thomas A. Aurelio (c.1892-1973) — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born in New York, New York County, N.Y., about 1892. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army during World War I; lawyer; magistrate; on August 28, 1943, New York County District Attorney Frank S. Hogan charged in a formal statement that Aurelio's nomination by both major parties for Supreme Court had been brought about by gangster and ex-convict Frank Costello, and released the transcript of a telephone conversation in which Aurelio thanked Costello and pledged undying loyalty; his candidacy was repudiated by both parties, but they were unable to remove his name from the ballot; disbarment proceedings were also unsuccessful; Justice of New York Supreme Court 1st District, 1944-61. Italian ancestry. Member, Tammany Hall. Died, probably from a heart attack, in Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., January 5, 1973 (age about 81 years). Interment at Calvary Cemetery, Woodside, Queens, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Ralph Aurelio; married 1931 to Aida Louise Pardi (1906-1999).
  Cross-reference: Bert Stand
  Richard Morford (c.1903-1986) — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born in Onaway, Presque Isle County, Mich., about 1903. Presbyterian minister; vice-chair of New York American Labor Party, 1945-49; director, National Council of American-Soviet Friendship, 1946-80; this organization and its leaders were investigated for subversion by the U.S. House Committee on Un-American Activities; charged in 1946 with contempt of Congress for his refusal to provide records demanded by the committee; tried in federal court in Washington; convicted in March 1948; his conviction was overturned by the Supreme Court; convicted again on re-trial; sentenced to three months in prison and fined $250. Presbyterian. Died, from pneumonia, in Madison, Dane County, Wis., September 7, 1986 (age about 83 years). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Married to Aileen Hutson (died 1984).
  James Vito Auditore (1889-1973) — also known as James V. Auditore; "The Millionaire Stevedore" — of Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y.; Great Neck, Nassau County, Long Island, N.Y.; Valley Stream, Nassau County, Long Island, N.Y. Born in Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y., July 15, 1889. Democrat. Alternate delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1920; owner of two stevedoring companies; indicted in 1947, with two other men, and charged with conspiracy to collect illegal fees on New York City piers, by getting control of the city-owned facilities and reselling access to shippers at three times the city rates; convicted on sixteen counts; sentenced to four and a half to ten years in prison. Italian ancestry. Died July 3, 1973 (age 83 years, 353 days). Burial location unknown.
  Elliott Roosevelt (1910-1990) — of Fort Worth, Tarrant County, Tex.; Buford, Rio Blanco County, Colo.; Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minn.; Miami Beach, Dade County (now Miami-Dade County), Fla.; Seattle, King County, Wash.; Palm Springs, Riverside County, Calif.; Scottsdale, Maricopa County, Ariz. Born in Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., September 23, 1910. Democrat. Delegate to Democratic National Convention from Texas, 1940; served in the U.S. Army Air Force in World War II; investigated and called to testify by a U.S. Senate subcommittee in 1947 over lavish entertainment in Hollywood and Manhattan, many paid escorts, and paid hotel bills provided to Roosevelt and others, in a successful effort to persuade them to recommend Hughes reconnaissance aircraft for purchase by the U.S. military; owned a radio station in Texas; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Colorado, 1960; mayor of Miami Beach, Fla., 1965-69; member of Democratic National Committee from Florida, 1968; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Florida, 1968. Died, of congestive heart failure, in Scottsdale, Maricopa County, Ariz., October 27, 1990 (age 80 years, 34 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Franklin Delano Roosevelt and Eleanor Roosevelt; brother of James Roosevelt and Franklin Delano Roosevelt, Jr.; married, January 16, 1932, to Elizabeth Browning Donner (divorced 1933); married, July 22, 1933, to Ruth Josephine Googins (divorced 1944); married, December 3, 1944, to Faye Margaret Emerson (divorced 1950); married, March 15, 1951, to Minnewa (Bell) Gray Burnside Ross (divorced 1960); married, November 3, 1960, to Patricia (Peabody) Whithead; grandnephew of Corinne Roosevelt Robinson and Theodore Roosevelt; great-grandnephew of Robert Barnwell Roosevelt; second great-grandnephew of James I. Roosevelt; third great-grandson of Edward Hutchinson Robbins; third great-grandnephew of William Bellinger Bulloch; fourth great-grandson of Archibald Bulloch (1730?-1777); first cousin once removed of Theodore Douglas Robinson, Alice Lee Roosevelt Longworth, Warren Delano Robbins, Corinne Robinson Alsop, Theodore Roosevelt, Jr. and William Sheffield Cowles; first cousin five times removed of Ebenezer Huntington; first cousin seven times removed of Benjamin Huntington; second cousin of Corinne A. Chubb and John deKoven Alsop; second cousin four times removed of Nicholas Roosevelt, Jr., Philip DePeyster and Jabez Williams Huntington.
  Political families: Roosevelt family of New York City, New York; Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also Wikipedia article
  Karen Morley (1909-2003) — also known as Mildred Linton — of Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y.; Santa Monica, Los Angeles County, Calif. Born in Ottumwa, Wapello County, Iowa, December 12, 1909. Actress; her career ended in 1947, when she was blacklisted as a suspected Communist; American Labor candidate for Lieutenant Governor of New York, 1954. Female. Died, from pneumonia, in Woodland Hills, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, Calif., March 8, 2003 (age 93 years, 86 days). Cremated; ashes scattered in North Pacific Ocean.
  Relatives: Married, November 5, 1932, to Charles Vidor (1900-1959; film director); married 1943 to Lloyd Gough (1907-1984; actor).
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — Find-A-Grave memorial
  James Lustig (b. 1902) — of Bronx, Bronx County, N.Y.; Newark, Essex County, N.J. Born in Budapest, Hungary, 1902. Communist. Naturalized U.S. citizen; agent, United Electrical Workers; candidate for New York state senate 22nd District, 1932; member, Joint Anti-Fascist Refugee Committee; the group was investigated for subversion by the U.S. House Committee on Un-American Activities; indicted in 1947, along with other members, for contempt of Congress over their refusal to provide records demanded by the House committee; convicted in 1947; sentenced to three months in jail, and fined $500. Hungarian ancestry. Burial location unknown.
  Carl Winter (1906-1991) — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y.; Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minn.; Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, Calif.; Michigan. Born in 1906. Communist. Candidate for New York state senate 13th District, 1932; candidate for U.S. Senator from Minnesota, 1940; convicted in 1949 under the Smith Act, for conspiring to advocate the overthrow of the government; served five years in prison. Died in 1991 (age about 85 years). Interment at Forest Home Cemetery, Forest Park, Ill.
  Relatives: Married to Helen Allison Winter (1908-2001) (daughter of Alfred Wagenknecht and Hortense Allison Wagenknecht; niece of Elmer T. Allison).
  Political family: Winter-Wagenknecht family.
  George William Crockett, Jr. (1909-1997) — also known as George W. Crockett, Jr. — of Detroit, Wayne County, Mich. Born in Jacksonville, Duval County, Fla., August 10, 1909. Democrat. Recorder's court judge in Michigan, 1966-78; U.S. Representative from Michigan 13th District, 1980-91; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Michigan, 1984, 1988; arrested during an anti-apartheid protest outside the South African Embassy in Washington, 1984. Baptist. African ancestry. Member, Kappa Alpha Psi; National Lawyers Guild. Served four months in federal prison for contempt of court in 1950, following his defense of a Communist leader on trial in New York for advocating the overthrow of the government. Among the founders of the nation's first interracial law firm. Ill with bone cancer in 1997, he suffered a stroke and died five days later, in Washington Home and Hospice, Washington, D.C., September 7, 1997 (age 88 years, 28 days). Cremated.
  Relatives: Father of George W. Crockett III (1926?-).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  Howard Melvin Fast (1914-2003) — also known as Howard Fast; "E. V. Cunningham"; "Walter Ericson" — of Teaneck, Bergen County, N.J. Born in New York City (unknown county), N.Y., November 11, 1914. Communist. Novelist; in 1950, suspected of sedition, he was called before the House Un-American Activities Committee, where he refused to name fellow members of the Communist Party; convicted of contempt of Congress and sentenced to three months in prison; awarded the Stalin Peace Prize in 1953; American Labor candidate for U.S. Representative from New York 23rd District, 1952. Jewish. Died in Old Greenwich, Greenwich, Fairfield County, Conn., March 12, 2003 (age 88 years, 121 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Barney Fast and Ida (Miller) Fast; married, June 6, 1937, to Bette Cohen; married 1999 to Mercedes O'Connor.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  William Albertson (1910-1972) — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y.; Detroit, Wayne County, Mich. Born in Odessa, Russia (now Ukraine), May 7, 1910. Communist. Candidate for New York state senate 16th District, 1932; candidate for U.S. Representative from New York 17th District, 1934; secretary-treasurer, Local 16, Hotel and Restaurant Workers Union. Indicted, along with other Communist leaders, by a federal grand jury in August, 1951; tried, in Pittsburgh, starting in November 1952, and convicted in August, 1953, under the Smith Act, of conspiring to advocate the violent overthrow of the U.S. government; sentenced to five years in prison; the U.S. Supreme Court struck down the convictions in 1956. Expelled from the Communist Party in 1964 over claims that he served as an undercover police agent; in 1976, it was revealed that the charge was founded on a phony letter planted by the F.B.I. Died, in an automobile accident, February 19, 1972 (age 61 years, 288 days). Burial location unknown.
Herman Methfessel Herman Methfessel (1900-1963) — of Staten Island, Richmond County, N.Y.; Miami, Dade County (now Miami-Dade County), Fla. Born in Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., November 23, 1900. Democrat. Newspaper reporter; lawyer; member of New York state assembly from Richmond County 2nd District, 1935-38; Richmond County District Attorney, 1948-51. In September 1951, the New York State Crime Commission, investigating rackets on the Staten Island waterfront, heard testimony from Mrs. Anna Wentworth that she had seen District Attorney Methfessel in a gambling house, which implied that he was protecting vice; in response, he ordered her arrest and charged her with perjury. At the request of the Crime Commission, citing abuse of power, Gov. Thomas E. Dewey superseded him from all cases related to the investigation; in the meantime, he was defeated for re-election. In 1952, he and a subordinate were charged with official misconduct, but found not guilty. Injured in a one-car accident, and died the next day, in North Shore Hospital, Miami, Dade County (now Miami-Dade County), Fla., July 7, 1963 (age 62 years, 226 days). Burial location unknown.
  Cross-reference: Ellsworth B. Buck
  Image source: New York Red Book 1936
  Joseph E. Venuti (born c.1915) — of Tuckahoe, Westchester County, N.Y. Born about 1915. Democrat. Plumber; candidate for U.S. Representative from New York 27th District, 1944. Italian ancestry. He and two others were indicted in July 1951, and charged with conspiring to violate gambling laws; the trial was delayed while he was hospitalized with a stomach ailment; arrested in his hospital bed and transferred to jail; the other two co-defendants were tried separately and convicted; later, the convictions were reversed, and the indictment of Mr. Venuti was dismissed. Presumed deceased. Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Joseph Venuti and Pauline Venuti.
  Cross-reference: Milton A. Gibbons
Israel Amter Israel Amter (1881-1954) — of Ohio; Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born in Denver, Colo., March 26, 1881. Communist. Musician; Workers Communist candidate for U.S. Senator from Ohio, 1928; candidate for U.S. Representative from New York, 1930 (23rd District), 1938 (at-large); candidate for Governor of New York, 1932, 1934, 1942; candidate for borough president of Manhattan, New York, 1933. Indicted in 1951 for conspiring to teach and advocate the violent overthrow of the government, but due to poor health, was never tried. Died, from Parkinson's disease, in Columbus Hospital, Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., November 24, 1954 (age 73 years, 243 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Married 1903 to Sadie Van Veen.
  Image source: Marxists Internet Archive
  Irving Charles Velson (1913-1976) — also known as Irving C. Velson; Irving Charles Shavelson; Charles Wilson; "Nick"; "Shavey" — of Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y.; San Francisco, Calif. Born in New York City (unknown county), N.Y., June 3, 1913. Machinist; boilermaker; shipfitter; president, Local 13, Shipbuilders Union; American Labor candidate for New York state senate 11th District, 1938; served in the U.S. Navy during World War II; in 1951 and 1953, he was brought to testify before Congressional committees about his Communist and Soviet activities, including efforts to infiltrate the U.S. military with Soviet spies; he repeatedly refused to answer questions, invoking his Fifth Amendment right against self-incrimination; as a result, he was "barred for life" by the Shipbuilders' union; later, served as international representative for the (West Coast) International Longshoreman's and Warehousemen's Union. Venona Project documents (decrypted Soviet messages from the World War II era), released in 1995, show that he was an agent for Soviet military intelligence under the code name "Nick". Died in San Francisco, Calif., February 18, 1976 (age 62 years, 260 days). Cremated; ashes scattered in San Francisco Bay.
  Relatives: Son of Clara Lemlich Shavelson and Joseph 'Joe' Shavelson (1889-1951); married, January 26, 1937, to Ruth Young Velson (1916-?).
  Political family: Velson-Shavelson family of Brooklyn, New York.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Milton A. Gibbons (born c.1900) — of Tuckahoe, Westchester County, N.Y. Born about 1900. Democrat. Police officer; mayor of Tuckahoe, N.Y., 1949-65; defeated (Republican), 1965; he and two others, including Joseph Venuti, were indicted in July 1951, and charged with conspiring to violate gambling laws; tried and convicted; sentenced to three months in jail, but released on bail a week later, pending appeal; in January 1953, the appellate court unanimously reversed his conviction and dismissed the indictment.; in 1962, he started a petition drive for a Constitutional amendment to allow prayer in public schools. Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Married to Elisa Cuyar (c.1903-1961).
Arthur H. Wicks Arthur H. Wicks (1887-1985) — also known as A. H. Wicks — of Kingston, Ulster County, N.Y.; Lake Katrine, Ulster County, N.Y. Born in New York, New York County, N.Y., December 24, 1887. Republican. Worked in piano manufacturing business; employed in the engineering department of the New York City Board of Water Supply, and then in construction of subways; owner and operator of steam laundry in Kingston; director, Governor Clinton Hotel; member of New York state senate, 1927-56 (29th District 1927-44, 34th District 1945-56); delegate to Republican National Convention from New York, 1940 (alternate), 1944 (alternate), 1948, 1952 (Honorary Vice-President), 1956; resigned in November 1953 as Senate Majority Leader and acting Lieutenant Governor, while under threat of ouster over his Sing Sing prison visits to convicted extortionist and labor leader Joseph S. Fay. Member, Freemasons; Junior Order; Rotary. Died in Lake Katrine, Ulster County, N.Y., February 18, 1985 (age 97 years, 56 days). Burial location unknown.
  Image source: New York Red Book 1936
  Elizabeth Gurley Flynn (1890-1964) — also known as "Rebel Girl" — of New York. Born in Concord, Merrimack County, N.H., August 7, 1890. Communist. Speaker and organizer for the Industrial Workers of the World ("Wobblies") in 1906-16; one of the founders of the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU), which later expelled her for being a Communist; candidate for U.S. Representative from New York, 1942 (Communist, at-large), 1954 (Peoples' Rights, 24th District); convicted under the anti-Communist Smith Act, and sentenced to three years in prison; released in 1957; became National Chair of the Communist Party U.S.A. in 1961. Female. Irish ancestry. Member, American Civil Liberties Union; Industrial Workers of the World. Died in Russia, September 5, 1964 (age 74 years, 29 days). Interment at Forest Home Cemetery, Forest Park, Ill.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
John T. McManus John T. McManus (1904-1961) — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y.; Montrose, Westchester County, N.Y. Born in Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., November 25, 1904. Reporter and movie critic for the New York Times; movie and radio critic for Time magazine; entertainment editor for PM (newspaper); general manager, Weekly Guardian newspaper; president, Newspaper Guild of New York, 1943-47; international vice president of the American Newspaper Guild; member, New York CIO Council; member of New York American Labor Party Executive Committee, 1945; candidate for Governor of New York, 1950 (American Labor), 1954 (American Labor), 1958 (Independent Socialist); in 1956, called before a U.S. Senate subcommittee, he took the Fifth Amendment right against self-incrimination in refusing to answer questions about the Communist Party. Died, of a heart attack, in Montrose, Westchester County, N.Y., November 22, 1961 (age 56 years, 362 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Edward J. McManus; married to Jane Bedell.
  Image source: The Militant, November 24, 1958
  John August Britting (1898-1968) — also known as John A. Britting — of East Farmingdale, Suffolk County, Long Island, N.Y. Born in New Jersey, April 3, 1898. Republican. Deputy treasurer of Suffolk County, 1942-54; member of New York state assembly from Suffolk County 3rd District, 1955-56; called to testify in 1956 during an investigation of his handling of tax-foreclosed properties as deputy county treasurer (known as the "land grab" scandal), he took the Fifth Amendment right against self-incrimination to refuse to answer questions; indicted on bribery and conspiracy charges for channeling properties to favored speculators and receiving part of the profits; tried in 1958 and convicted; sentenced to five to ten years in prison and fined $27,000; released pending appeal; also convicted in a related case in 1959; in 1960, his prison sentence was reduced to one to two years. German ancestry. Died in October, 1968 (age 70 years, 0 days). Interment at Sacred Heart Cemetery, Southampton, Long Island, N.Y.
  Relatives: Married to Edna Burns (1907-1979).
  Cross-reference: Cadman H. Frederick
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Cadman H. Frederick (b. 1880) — of Babylon, Suffolk County, Long Island, N.Y. Born, in the British West Indies, May 22, 1880. Republican. Real estate developer; one of the founders of the Suffolk Title and Guarantee Company, 1925; banker; mayor of Babylon, N.Y., 1937-38. Resigned in 1956 as president and director of the Suffolk County Federal Savings and Loan Association, in the midst of an investigation of the sale of tax-foreclosed properties by Suffolk County. He and others shared profits on the sale of these properties with Deputy County Treasurer John A. Britting. Burial location unknown.
  William Howard Melish (1910-1986) — also known as W. Howard Melish — of Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y. Born in Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y., May 11, 1910. Episcopal priest; vice-chair of New York American Labor Party, 1945-49; ousted in 1957 as rector of Holy Trinity Church in Brooklyn, over his allegedly pro-Communist activities as chairman of the National Council of Soviet-American Friendship. Episcopalian. Died in Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y., June 15, 1986 (age 76 years, 35 days). Interment at Spring Grove Cemetery, Cincinnati, Ohio.
  Relatives: Son of Marguerite (McComas) Melish (1873-1941) and John Howard Melish (1874-1969); married to Mary Jane Dietz (1913-1999).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Norman Kingsley Mailer (1923-2007) — also known as Norman Mailer — of Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y. Born in Long Branch, Monmouth County, N.J., January 31, 1923. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army during World War II; novelist, essayist, magazine editor, Hollywood screenwriter, director, and actor; among the founders of the Village Voice newspaper newspaper in New York City; in November, 1960, while drunk at a party, he stabbed and wounded his wife, Adele; he was arrested and held for psychiatric evaluation, and eventually pleaded guilty to third-degree assault; arrested and jailed in 1967 in connection with an antiwar protest; candidate in primary for mayor of New York City, N.Y., 1969. Jewish ancestry. Won the Pulitzer Prize for nonfiction in 1969 and for fiction in 1980. Died, from acute renal failure, in Mount Sinai Hospital, Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., November 10, 2007 (age 84 years, 283 days). Interment at Provincetown Cemetery, Provincetown, Mass.
  Relatives: Son of Isaac Barnett 'Barney' Mailer and Fanny (Schneider) Mailer; married 1944 to Beatrice 'Bea' Silverman (divorced 1952); married 1954 to Adele Morales (divorced 1962); married 1962 to Jeanne Campbell (divorced 1963); married 1963 to Beverly Bentley (divorced 1980); married 1980 to Carol Stevens (divorced 1980); married 1981 to Norris Church (1949-2010); father of Michael Mailer (film producer).
  See also NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Books by Norman Mailer: The Executioner's Song — The Fight
  Fiction by Norman Mailer: The Deer Park — The Naked and the Dead — An American Dream — The Gospel According to the Son
  Books about Norman Mailer: Mary V. Dearborn, Mailer : A Biography — Barry H. Leeds, The Enduring Vision of Norman Mailer — Carl Rollyson, The Lives of Norman Mailer : A Biography — Jennifer Bailey, Norman Mailer: Quick Change Artist
  Critical books about Norman Mailer: Bernard Goldberg, 100 People Who Are Screwing Up America (And Al Franken Is #37)
  Hulan Edwin Jack (1906-1986) — also known as Hulan E. Jack — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born in St. Lucia, December 29, 1906. Democrat. Paper box manufacturer; member of New York state assembly, 1941-53, 1968-72 (New York County 17th District 1941-44, New York County 14th District 1945-53, 70th District 1968-72); defeated in primary, 1972; borough president of Manhattan, New York, 1954-61; delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1956; indicted in 1960 on charges of conspiracy to obstruct justice and violation of the City Charter, over acceptance of $4,400 from a real estate developer; the indictment was dismissed, but then reinstated on appeal; a trial, in June and July 1960, resulted in a hung jury; at a second trial was convicted; his sentence was suspended, but he was automatically removed from office as Borough President; indicted in 1970 on federal charges of conspiracy and conflict of interest; tried, convicted, and sentenced to three months in prison, and fined $5,000. Catholic. African ancestry. Member, Phi Beta Sigma; Elks. Died, in St. Luke's Hospital, Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., December 19, 1986 (age 79 years, 355 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Married to Almira Wilkinson.
  Charles Anthony Buckley, Jr. (born c.1926) — also known as Charles A. Buckley, Jr. — of Bronx, Bronx County, N.Y.; Hartsdale, Westchester County, N.Y. Born about 1926. Democrat. Lawyer; candidate for Presidential Elector for New York, 1956; charged in 1965 with drunken driving following an automobile accident in Hartsdale, N.Y. Still living as of 1965.
  Relatives: Son of Charles Anthony Buckley (1890-1967).
  Hyman E. Mintz (c.1909-1966) — also known as Bucky Mintz — of South Fallsburg, Sullivan County, N.Y. Born about 1909. Republican. Lawyer; member of New York state assembly from Sullivan County, 1951-65. Jewish. Member, B'nai B'rith. Indicted in 1965 on bribery charges; convicted in February 1966, and sentenced to a year in prison. Died, following a heart attack, while serving a prison sentence, in Bellevue Hospital, Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., March 25, 1966 (age about 57 years). Burial location unknown.
  Adam Clayton Powell, Jr. (1908-1972) — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born in New Haven, New Haven County, Conn., November 29, 1908. Democrat. Baptist minister; U.S. Representative from New York, 1945-71 (22nd District 1945-53, 16th District 1953-63, 18th District 1963-71); delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1952, 1960, 1964; cited for contempt of court in 1966 for refusing to pay damages in a lawsuit against him; on February 28, 1967, he was expelled from the House of Representatives on charges of unbecoming conduct and misusing public funds; the Supreme Court overturned the expulsion in 1969. Baptist. African ancestry. Member, Alpha Phi Alpha; Elks. Died, of prostate cancer, in Jackson Memorial Hospital, Miami, Dade County (now Miami-Dade County), Fla., April 4, 1972 (age 63 years, 127 days). Cremated; ashes scattered in a private or family graveyard, Bahamas.
  Relatives: Son of Adam Clayton Powell, Sr. (1865-1953; minister) and Mattie (Fletcher) Powell; married, March 8, 1933, to Isabel Washington (divorced 1945); married, August 1, 1945, to Hazel Scott (divorced 1960); married, December 15, 1960, to Yvette Marjorie Diago (Flores) Powell; father of Adam Clayton Powell IV (1962-).
  Adam Clayton Powell Jr. Boulevard (formerly part of Seventh Avenue), in Manhattan, New York, is named for him.  — The Adam Clayton Powell State Office Building (opened 1974 as the Harlem State Office Building; renamed 1983), in Manhattan, New York, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Books by Powell,Adam Clayton,Jr.: Adam by Adam: The Autobiography of Adam Clayton Powell, Jr.
  Books about Powell,Adam Clayton,Jr.: Tisha Hamilton, Adam Clayton Powell, Jr.: The Political Biography of an American Dilemma — Wil Haygood, King of the Cats: The Life and Times of Adam Clayton Powell, Jr.
Carmine G. DeSapio Carmine G. DeSapio (1908-2004) — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born in Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., December 10, 1908. Democrat. Delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1944, 1948, 1952, 1956; leader of Tammany Hall, 1949-61; leader of New York County Democratic Party, 1955; member of Democratic National Committee from New York, 1957; convicted in 1969 on Federal bribery conspiracy charges; served two years in prison. Italian ancestry. Member, Tammany Hall. Died, in St. Vincent's Hospital, Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., July 27, 2004 (age 95 years, 230 days). Interment at Calvary Cemetery, Woodside, Queens, N.Y.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Image source: New York Public Library
  Angela Yvonne Davis (b. 1944) — also known as Angela Davis — Born in Birmingham, Jefferson County, Ala., January 26, 1944. Communist. Following a violent escape attempt at the Marin County (California) Hall of Justice, August 7, 1970, in which several people were killed, she was implicated as an accomplice and fled; later arrested in New York, tried, and acquitted in 1972; awarded the Lenin Peace Prize in 1979; candidate for Vice President of the United States, 1980, 1984; during the Communist coup against Mikhail Gorbachev in 1991, she supported Gorbachev, and subsequently left the Communist Party; university professor. Female. African ancestry. Still living as of 2014.
  Relatives: Daughter of Sallye E. Davis; brother of Ben Davis (professional football player).
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Thomas James Mackell (1914-1992) — also known as Thomas J. Mackell — of Rego Park, Queens, Queens County, N.Y.; Little Neck, Queens, Queens County, N.Y. Born in Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., July 19, 1914. Democrat. Police detective; lawyer; member of New York state senate, 1955-66 (9th District 1955-65, 14th District 1966); alternate delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1960, 1964; Queens County District Attorney, 1967-73. Catholic. Irish ancestry. Member, Elks; Lions; Knights of Columbus; American Bar Association. Resigned as District Attorney in 1973, following his indictment on charges of hindering prosecution in a get-rich-quick scheme; he was tried and convicted in 1974, but the verdict was reversed on appeal. Died, from stomach cancer, in Douglaston Manor, Queens, Queens County, N.Y., January 27, 1992 (age 77 years, 192 days). Interment at Mount St. Mary Cemetery, Flushing, Queens, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Mary Ann (Keating) Mackell (1870-1964) and Peter Francis Mackell (1878-1932); married 1939 to Dorothea R. Lang (1913-1988).
  Epitaph: "Loving Husband, Father and Poppie."
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Joseph E. Parisi (1913-1990) — of Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y.; Rye, Westchester County, N.Y. Born in Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y., May 10, 1913. Republican. Real estate broker; candidate for New York state assembly from Kings County 16th District, 1942; member of New York state senate 14th District, 1945-48; defeated, 1948, 1950; delegate to Republican National Convention from New York, 1948, 1952, 1956, 1960, 1964; Chief Clerk, Criminal Term, Brooklyn Supreme Court; indicted in 1973, along with retired Justice David L. Malbin, on federal charges of aiding and abbetting an embezzlement scheme, involving officials of the International Production, Service and Sales Employees Union; in 1975, both men were acquitted. Catholic. Italian ancestry. Member, Knights of Columbus. Died, from kidney disease, in United Hospital, Port Chester, Westchester County, N.Y., May 29, 1990 (age 77 years, 19 days). Interment at Greenwood Union Cemetery, Rye, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Pietra 'Beatrice' (Calia) Parisi (1877-1964) and Gaetano Parisi (1877-1949); brother of Thomas G. Parisi (who married Helen R. Manzi) and Leonard V. Parisi; married, July 4, 1935, to Grace Rasulo.
  Political family: Parisi family of Brooklyn, New York.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Frank James Brasco (1932-1998) — also known as Frank J. Brasco — of New York. Born in Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y., October 15, 1932. Democrat. Lawyer; U.S. Representative from New York 11th District, 1967-75. Catholic. Indicted in 1973, along with his uncle Joseph Brasco, on federal bribery conspiracy charges, over payoffs received from a Bronx trucking company which was seeking mail hauling contracts from the Post Office; the first trial led to a hung jury; retried and convicted; sentenced to five years in prison, with all but three months suspended, fined $10,000, and disbarred. Died October 19, 1998 (age 66 years, 4 days). Burial location unknown.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  John Newton Mitchell (1913-1988) — also known as John N. Mitchell — of New York; Washington, D.C. Born in Detroit, Wayne County, Mich., September 15, 1913. Lawyer; served in the U.S. Navy during World War II; U.S. Attorney General, 1969-72. Member, American Bar Association. A central figure in the Watergate scandal. Indicted in 1973, along with Maurice Stans, for perjury and obstruction over a contribution from fugitive financier Robert Vesco to President Richard M. Nixon's re-election campaign; tried and acquitted. Convicted in February 1975 of conspiracy, obstruction of justice and perjury, over his role in the Watergate break-in, and sentenced to two and a half to eight years in prison; served 19 months. Suffered a heart attack, and died later the same day, at George Washington University Hospital, Washington, D.C., November 9, 1988 (age 75 years, 55 days). Interment at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Va.
  Relatives: Son of Joseph Charles Mitchell and Margaret Agnes (McMahon) Mitchell; married to Martha Beall.
  Cross-reference: Maurice H. Stans — Harry L. Sears
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Books about John Mitchell: James Rosen, The Strong Man: John Mitchell and the Secrets of Watergate
  David L. Malbin — of Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y.; Miami, Dade County (now Miami-Dade County), Fla. Served in the U.S. Marine Corps during World War I; lawyer; Justice of New York Supreme Court, 1970; indicted in 1973, along with the Chief Clerk of of the Brooklyn criminal court, Joseph E. Parisi, on federal charges of aiding and abbetting an embezzlement scheme, involving officials of the International Production, Service and Sales Employees Union; in 1975, he was aquitted on motion soon after the trial began. Presumed deceased. Burial location unknown.
  Bertram L. Podell (1925-2005) — of Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y.; Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born in New York, 1925. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Navy during World War II; lawyer; member of New York state assembly, 1955-67 (Kings County 21st District 1955-65, 53rd District 1966, 44th District 1967); U.S. Representative from New York 13th District, 1968-75; charged in 1974 with conspiracy, the solicitation and acceptance of bribes, criminal conflict of interest, and perjury; on the tenth day of his trial, he pleaded guilty to conspiracy and conflict of interest; sentenced to six months in prison; the prosecutor was Rudolph W. Giuliani. Jewish. Died, of kidney failure, at Lenox Hill Hospital, Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., August 17, 2005 (age about 80 years). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Married to Bernice Posen.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  George Gordon Battle Liddy (b. 1930) — also known as G. Gordon Liddy — Born in Hoboken, Hudson County, N.J., November 30, 1930. Conservative. Served in the U.S. Army during the Korean conflict; FBI agent; lawyer; candidate for U.S. Representative from New York 28th District, 1968. Irish and Italian ancestry. Organized and directed the burglaries of the Democratic National Committee headquarters in the Watergate complex in May and June 1972; the resulting Watergate scandal led to President Richard Nixon's resignation in 1974; convicted on charges of burglary and wiretapping; sentenced to 20 years in prison and fined $40,000; released in 1977 after serving four and a half years; became a popular radio talk show host. Still living as of 2014.
  Relatives: Son of Sylvester J. Liddy and Maria (Abbaticchio) Liddy; married, November 9, 1957, to Frances Ann Purcell; father of Tom Liddy (1962-).
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Albert Howard Blumenthal (1928-1984) — also known as Albert H. Blumenthal — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y.; Larchmont, Westchester County, N.Y. Born in Flatbush, Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y., October 13, 1928. Liberal. Lawyer; member of New York state assembly, 1963-76 (New York County 5th District 1963-65, 73rd District 1966, 67th District 1967-72, 69th District 1973-76); candidate for mayor of New York City, N.Y., 1973. Jewish. Member, American Civil Liberties Union; American Jewish Congress; American Bar Association; Americans for Democratic Action. In December, 1975, he was indicted on perjury charges over his testimony about a 1971 meeting where he was alleged to intercede on behalf of a nursing home operator; later, bribery charges were added; in April, 1976, all the charges were ruled to be without factual basis, and dismissed. Died, presumably from cancer, in the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., July 8, 1984 (age 55 years, 269 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Bennet M. Blumenthal and Matilda Blumenthal; married, May 18, 1958, to Joel Marie Winik.
  Abraham J. Gellinoff (1902-1994) — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born November 18, 1902. Justice of New York Supreme Court 1st District, 1961-76. Jewish. Resigned during an inquiry into the appointment of his son-in-law as an arbitrator. Died in Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., January 21, 1994 (age 91 years, 64 days). Interment at Riverside Cemetery, Saddle Brook, N.J.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Irving H. Saypol (1905-1977) — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born in Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., September 3, 1905. Lawyer; U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York, 1949-51; prosecuted Ethel and Julius Rosenberg on espionage charges; Justice of New York Supreme Court 1st District, 1952-68. Jewish. Member, American Bar Association; Federal Bar Association; Knights of Pythias. Indicted in May 1976, along with Surrogate S. Samuel DiFalco, on bribery and perjury charges, in connection with an alleged scheme to obtain appraisal and auction commissions for Saypol's son; the charges were later dismissed. Died, of cancer, in Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., June 30, 1977 (age 71 years, 300 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Louis Saypol and Minnie (Michakin) Saypol; married, September 29, 1925, to Adele D. Kaplan.
  S. Samuel DiFalco (1906-1978) — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born in Italy, July 26, 1906. Democrat. Lawyer; candidate in primary for New York state assembly, 1935; Justice of New York Supreme Court 1st District, 1949-56; New York County Surrogate, 1957-76. Italian ancestry. Member, Tammany Hall. Indicted in May 1976, along with Justice Irving Saypol, on official misconduct charges, in connection with an alleged scheme to obtain appraisal and auction commissions for Saypol's son; the charges were later dismissed. Indicted in February 1978 for criminal contempt, in connection with his statements to a grand jury, but died before trial. Died, from a heart attack, while dining with friends at the Columbus Club, Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., June 28, 1978 (age 71 years, 337 days). Interment at Gate of Heaven Cemetery, Hawthorne, N.Y.
  Frederick William Richmond (b. 1923) — also known as Frederick W. Richmond; Fred Richmond — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y.; Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y. Born in Massachusetts, November 15, 1923. Democrat. Delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1964; U.S. Representative from New York 14th District, 1975-82. Jewish. Arrested in Washington, D.C., in 1978 for soliciting sex from a minor and from an undercover police officer; pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor. In 1982, charged with tax evasion, marijuana possession, and improper payments to a federal employee, he pleaded guilty and was sentenced to a year and a day in prison; served nine months. Still living as of 1998.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Samuel D. Wright (1925-1998) — of Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y.; Hilton Head Island, Beaufort County, S.C. Born in Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y., February 13, 1925. Democrat. Member of New York state assembly, 1966-73 (39th District 1966, 37th District 1967-72, 54th District 1973); candidate in primary for U.S. Representative from New York, 1976. African ancestry. Member, NAACP. Convicted in 1978 of soliciting a bribe and sentenced to jail. Died, of Parkinson's disease, in Hilton Head, Beaufort County, S.C., January 20, 1998 (age 72 years, 341 days). Burial location unknown.
  Anthony Scotto (b. 1934) — of Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y.; Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born in 1934. Democrat. Longshoreman; vice-president, International Longshoremen's Association; delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1972; member of the Gambino crime family; charged in 1979 on 44 counts of accepting payoffs, evading income taxes and racketeering; tried and convicted on 33 of the counts; sentenced to five years in prison; released in 1984. Italian ancestry. Still living as of 2007.
  Relatives: Married to Marion Anastasio.
  John Michael Murphy (1926-2015) — also known as John M. Murphy — of Staten Island, Richmond County, N.Y. Born in Staten Island, Richmond County, N.Y., August 3, 1926. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army during World War II; served in the U.S. Army during the Korean conflict; U.S. Representative from New York, 1963-81 (16th District 1963-73, 17th District 1973-81); defeated, 1960 (15th District), 1980 (17th District); delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1964; Parliamentarian, 1968. Catholic. Member, American Legion; Veterans of Foreign Wars; Knights of Columbus. Implicated in the Abscam sting, in which FBI agents impersonating Arab businessmen offered bribes to political figures; indicted June 18 and convicted December 3, 1980, of conspiracy, conflict of interest, and accepting an illegal gratuity; sentenced to three years in prison and fined $20,000; paroled in 1985. Died in Staten Island, Richmond County, N.Y., May 25, 2015 (age 88 years, 295 days). Burial location unknown.
  Cross-reference: Eric N. Vitaliano
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — NNDB dossier
  Vincent Riccio (born c.1920) — of Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y. Born about 1920. Member of New York state assembly 51st District, 1969-74; indicted on charges of taking kickbacks from holders of no-show state jobs; convicted of larceny in May 1981; sentenced to one year in jail. Presumed deceased. Burial location unknown.
  Joseph R. Pisani — of New Rochelle, Westchester County, N.Y. Member of New York state assembly, 1966-72 (100th District 1966, 91st District 1967-72); member of New York state senate 36th District, 1973-84. Indicted on federal charges of tax evasion and embezzling campaign funds; convicted in 1984 on 18 of the 39 counts; the conviction was later reversed on appeal. Still living as of 1984.
  Bernard Hugo Goetz (b. 1947) — also known as Bernard H. Goetz; Bernhard Goetz; "Subway Vigilante" — of New York City (unknown county), N.Y. Born in Queens, Queens County, N.Y., November 7, 1947. Fusion candidate for mayor of New York City, N.Y., 2001. German and Jewish ancestry. On December 22, 1984, he shot and wounded four young men who were about to rob him, and subsequently fled to New England, until he turned himself in at Concord, N.H.; arraigned on attempted murder, assault, and weapons charges; convicted only for carrying an unlicensed gun; sentenced to one year in jail; served eight months. Still living as of 2014.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile
  Joseph L. Galiber (c.1924-1995) — of Bronx, Bronx County, N.Y. Born about 1924. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army during World War II; member of New York state senate, 1969-95 (32nd District 1969-82, 31st District 1983-95); died in office 1995; alternate delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1984, 1988. African ancestry. Indicted twice on fraud charges; acquitted both times. Died at Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center, New York, New York County, N.Y., November 21, 1995 (age about 71 years). Burial location unknown.
  William C. Brennan, Jr. (1918-2000) — of Far Rockaway, Queens, Queens County, N.Y.; Elmhurst, Queens, Queens County, N.Y. Born in New York City (unknown county), N.Y., October 11, 1918. Democrat. Police officer; served in the U.S. Army Air Force in World War II; lawyer; member of New York state assembly from Queens County 2nd District, 1955-64; member of New York state senate 12th District, 1967-68; Justice of New York Supreme Court, 1970-85; resigned 1985. Member, American Legion; Disabled American Veterans; Elks. In July 1985, he was indicted in Federal court for accepting bribes in return for reducing or dismissing charges in criminal cases involving organized crime figures; also charged with extortion; pleaded not guilty and tried; did not testify in his own defense; convicted in December 1985, sentenced to five years in prison, and fined $209,000. He was released from prison in May 1988. Died May 8, 2000 (age 81 years, 210 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Married 1941 to Gloria M. Lauer.
  Donald R. Manes (1934-1986) — also known as "The King of Queens" — of Flushing, Queens, Queens County, N.Y.; Jamaica, Queens, Queens County, N.Y. Born in Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y., January 18, 1934. Democrat. Lawyer; borough president of Queens, New York, 1971-86; resigned 1986; delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1980, 1984. On January 10, 1986, he was found driving erratically and bleeding from slashes to his wrist and ankle; at first he claimed he had been abducted, but then admitted his wounds were self-inflicted; while he was hospitalized, a criminal investigation against him became public. Stabbed himself in the heart, and died soon after, at Booth Memorial Medical Center, Flushing, Queens, Queens County, N.Y., March 13, 1986 (age 52 years, 54 days). Interment at Mt. Ararat Cemetery, East Farmingdale, Long Island, N.Y.
  Relatives: Married to Marlene Warshofsky.
  See also Wikipedia article
  Robert Bernerd Anderson (1910-1989) — also known as Robert B. Anderson — of Texas. Born in Burleson, Johnson County, Tex., June 4, 1910. School teacher; lawyer; member of Texas state house of representatives, 1932; Received the Medal of Freedom in 1955; U.S. Secretary of the Treasury, 1957-61. Methodist. Member, American Bar Association; Freemasons; Shriners; Phi Delta Phi; Order of the Coif. Pleaded guilty in 1987 to charges of evading taxes by illegally operating an offshore bank; sentenced to jail, house arrest, and probation; disbarred in 1988. Died, of complications from surgery on cancer of the esophagus, in New York Hospital, Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., August 14, 1989 (age 79 years, 71 days). Interment at Rosehill Cemetery, Cleburne, Tex.
  Relatives: Son of Robert Lee Anderson and Elizabeth Haskew "Lizzie" Anderson; married, April 10, 1935, to Ollie Mae Rawlins (died 1987).
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Mario Biaggi (1917-2015) — of Bronx, Bronx County, N.Y. Born in Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., October 26, 1917. Police officer; U.S. Representative from New York, 1969-88 (24th District 1969-73, 10th District 1973-83, 19th District 1983-88); defeated, 1988 (Republican), 1992 (Democratic primary); delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1972, 1980, 1984; Conservative candidate for mayor of New York City, N.Y., 1973. Catholic. Italian ancestry. Indicted in 1987 on federal charges that he had accepted bribes from former Brooklyn political boss Meade Esposito in in return for influence on federal contracts for a Brooklyn ship-repair company; convicted on September 22, 1987 of obstructing justice and accepting illegal gratuities; sentenced to prison and fined. Tried in 1988 on federal racketeering charges in connection with the Wedtech Corporation; convicted on August 4, 1988 on 15 felony counts. Resigned from Congress following the Wedtech conviction; served more than two years in prison. Died in Bronx, Bronx County, N.Y., June 24, 2015 (age 97 years, 241 days). Interment at Gate of Heaven Cemetery, Hawthorne, N.Y.
  Relatives: Married to Marie Wassil (1918-1997).
  Campaign slogan (1973): "He wins, you win."
  Campaign slogan (1973): "He's right for what's wrong with New York."
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Stanley Simon (born c.1930) — of Bronx, Bronx County, N.Y. Born about 1930. Borough president of Bronx, New York, 1979-87; resigned 1987. In 1987, he was charged by a federal grand jury with extorting cash and benefits from Wedtech, a military contractor; tried in 1988 and convicted; sentenced to five years in prison and fined $50,000. Still living as of 1987.
  Lee Alexander (1927-1996) — of Syracuse, Onondaga County, N.Y. Born in Jersey City, Hudson County, N.J., May 18, 1927. Democrat. Candidate for U.S. Representative from New York 34th District, 1962; mayor of Syracuse, N.Y., 1970-85; candidate for U.S. Senator from New York, 1974; delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1980; member, Arrangements Committee, 1984. Was indicted in July 1987 over a $1.5 million kickback scandal, and pleaded guilty in January 1988 to racketeering and tax evasion charges; served six years in prison. Died, of cancer, in Syracuse, Onondaga County, N.Y., December 25, 1996 (age 69 years, 221 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Peter Alexander and Rita (Rouatcos) Alexander; married 1957 to Elizabeth Strates.
  See also Wikipedia article
  Raymond James Donovan (b. 1930) — Born August 31, 1930. U.S. Secretary of Labor, 1981-85. Charged with fraud on a subway construction project in the Bronx, New York City; tried in 1987 and found not guilty. Still living as of 2014.
  See also NNDB dossier
  Meade Henry Esposito (1909-1993) — also known as Meade H. Esposito; Amadeo Henry Esposito — of Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y. Born in Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y., December 28, 1909. Democrat. Delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1964; vice-president, Lafayette National Bank, 1965; insurance broker; leader of Kings County Democratic Party, 1969-83. Catholic. Italian ancestry. Member, NAACP. Indicted in 1987 on federal charges that he had given bribes to U.S. Rep. Mario Biaggi in in return for influence on federal contracts for a Brooklyn ship-repair company; convicted on September 22, 1987 of giving an illegal gratuity; fined $500,000; indicted in 1988 on bribery and tax charges, but the case was dismissed due to his age and poor health. Died, from renal failure caused by a heart attack, while suffering from lung cancer and bladder cancer, in North Shore University Hospital, Manhasset, Nassau County, Long Island, N.Y., September 3, 1993 (age 83 years, 249 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Felicia Esposito; married to Anne De Cunzo.
  Bess Myerson (1924-2014) — Born in Bronx, Bronx County, N.Y., July 16, 1924. Democrat. Miss America, 1945; first and only Jewish woman to win the pageant; musician; television personality; New York City commissioner of consumer affairs, 1969-73, and commissioner of cultural affairs, 1983-87; candidate in primary for U.S. Senator from New York, 1980; accused in 1987 of bribing Justice Hortense Gabel by giving her daughter a city job; meanwhile, the judge reduced child support payments for Carl Andrew Capasso, Myerson's married lover; the scandal was called the "Bess Mess"; she was forced to resign as city consumer affairs commissioner; indicted on federal bribery charges in 1988, along with Capasso and Gabel; tried and found not guilty. Female. Jewish. Died in Santa Monica, Los Angeles County, Calif., December 14, 2014 (age 90 years, 151 days). Interment at Woodlawn Cemetery, Santa Monica, Calif.
  Relatives: Daughter of Louis Myerson and Bella (Podell) Myerson; married 1946 to Allan Wayne; married 1962 to Arnold Grant.
  Epitaph: "You Will Always Be Our Queen."
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Hortense W. Gabel (1912-1990) — also known as Hortense Wittstein — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born in Bronx, Bronx County, N.Y., December 16, 1912. Democrat. Lawyer; New York City Rent and Rehabilitation Commissioner, 1962-65; Justice of New York Supreme Court 1st District, 1975-87; appointed 1975; resigned 1987; accused in 1987 of accepting a bribe from New York Consumer Affairs Commissioner Bess Myerson in the form of a city job for her daughter; allegedly in return, the judge reduced child support payments for Myerson's lover, Carl A. Capasso; the scandal was called "the Bess Mess"; she resigned as Justice; indicted on federal bribery charges in 1988, along with Myerson and Capasso; tried and found not guilty. Female. Jewish. Died, from a heart attack, in Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., December 7, 1990 (age 77 years, 356 days). Interment at Calverton National Cemetery, Calverton, Long Island, N.Y.
  Relatives: Daughter of Rubin J. Wittstein and Bessie Wittstein; married 1944 to Milton Gabel (1907-1990).
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Robert Garcia (1933-2017) — of Bronx, Bronx County, N.Y.; Washington, D.C. Born in Bronx, Bronx County, N.Y., January 9, 1933. Served in the U.S. Army during the Korean conflict; computer engineer; member of New York state assembly, 1966-67 (83rd District 1966, 77th District 1967); resigned 1967; member of New York state senate 30th District, 1967-78; U.S. Representative from New York, 1978-90 (21st District 1978-83, 18th District 1983-90); resigned 1990; delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1980, 1984, 1988; indicted in 1988, along with his wife, on federal bribery and extortion charges; convicted in October 1989 and sentenced to three years in prison (served 104 days); the conviction was reversed on appeal; retried and again convicted in 1991; the second conviction was also overturned, and prosecutors dropped the case. Puerto Rican ancestry. Died in San Juan, San Juan Municipio, Puerto Rico, January 25, 2017 (age 84 years, 16 days). Interment at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Va.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Robert Jerry Dryfoos (1942-2006) — also known as Robert J. Dryfoos — of Forest Hills, Queens, Queens County, N.Y.; Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born August 11, 1942. Democrat. Lawyer; delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1972, 1980, 1988; chief counsel for New York Lt. Gov. Mary Ann Krupsak, 1975; member, New York City Council, 1980-91; retired from office while under investigation over alleged campaign finance and federal tax violations, but no charges were filed; lobbyist. Jewish. Member, Americans for Democratic Action; American Jewish Committee. Died, from complications of a head injury, in New York-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center, Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., March 2, 2006 (age 63 years, 203 days). Burial location unknown.
  Sol Wachtler — of Manhasset, Nassau County, Long Island, N.Y. Judge of New York Court of Appeals, 1972; chief judge of New York Court of Appeals, 1985-93. In 1993, he was sentenced to 15 months in prison for extortion in connection with his harassment of an ex-lover. Still living as of 1993.
  Books about Sol Wachtler: John M. Caher, King of the Mountain : The Rise, Fall, and Redemption of Chief Judge Sol Wachtler
  John Westergaard (1931-2003) — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born July 2, 1931. Democrat. Candidate for New York state senate, 1960; campaign treasurer for Daniel Patrick Moynihan, 1965-94; delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1996. Norwegian ancestry. The Securities and Exchange Commission filed civil fraud charges against him in 2000; Paul J. Curran volunteered to serve as defense counsel pro bono; in 2001, the fraud charges were withdrawn, and the case was settled with no penalty. Died, of prostate cancer, at Calvary Hospice, Bronx, Bronx County, N.Y., January 31, 2003 (age 71 years, 213 days). Burial location unknown.
  Abraham Jacob Hirschfeld (1919-2005) — also known as Abraham J. Hirschfeld; Abe Hirschfeld; "Honest Abe" — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y.; Miami Beach, Dade County (now Miami-Dade County), Fla. Born in Tarnow, Poland, December 12, 1919. Real estate developer; hotel owner; candidate for U.S. Senator from New York, 1974 (Democratic primary), 1976 (Democratic primary), 2004 (Builders); candidate for U.S. Representative from New York 14th District, 1992 (Independent Fusion), 1994 (Democratic primary); Republican candidate for borough president of Manhattan, New York, 1997; Independence candidate for New York state comptroller, 1998. In 1998, offered Paula Jones $1 million to drop her sexual harassment lawsuit against President Bill Clinton; later sued by Jones when he tried to back out of the offer. Indicted in 2000 of trying to hire a hit man to kill his former business partner Stanley Stahl; also charged with tax evasion; briefly jailed for violating a court order against discussing the trial with the media; ultimately convicted, and served two years in prison. Died, from complications of cancer, in St. Barnabas Hospital, Bronx, Bronx County, N.Y., August 9, 2005 (age 85 years, 240 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Married 1943 to Zipora Teicher.
  See also Wikipedia article
  Alan G. Hevesi — of Forest Hills, Queens, Queens County, N.Y. Democrat. University professor; member of New York state assembly, 1971-93 (25th District 1971-72, 28th District 1973-93); delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1984, 1996, 2000, 2004; New York City controller, 1994-2001; candidate for mayor of New York City, N.Y., 2001 (Democratic primary), 2001 (Liberal); New York state comptroller, 2003-06; resigned 2006. Jewish. Pleaded guilty to fraud charges over his use of a state employee to chauffeur his wife, December 22, 2006, and fined $5,000. Still living as of 2006.
  Relatives: Father of Daniel Hevesi (1959?-) and Andrew Hevesi.
  Political family: Hevesi family of Queens, New York.
  See also Wikipedia article — Internet Movie Database profile
  Gerald P. Garson (born c.1932) — of Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y. Born about 1932. Democrat. Lawyer; Justice of New York Supreme Court, 1998-2003. Convicted in April 2007 on bribery and misconduct charges, and sentenced to three to ten years in prison. Still living as of 2007.
  Relatives: Married to Robin Garson (1954?-); cousin *** of Michael J. Garson.
  Political family: Garson family of Brooklyn, New York.
  Anthony Dryden Marshall (1924-2014) — also known as Anthony D. Marshall; Tony Marshall; Anthony Dryden Kuser — of Providence, Providence County, R.I.; Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born in Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., May 30, 1924. Republican. Served in the U.S. Marine Corps during World War II; U.S. Consul in Istanbul, as of 1958-59; U.S. Ambassador to Malagasy Republic, 1969-71; Trinidad and Tobago, 1972-73; Kenya, 1973-77; Seychelles, 1976-77; in 1971, he was accused in press reports of involvement in a supposed plot to overthrow the President, Philibert Tsiranana; the Malagasy government declared him persona non grata, and expelled him fron the country; theatrical producer; guardian of his ailing mother, Brooke Astor; alleged to have diverted millions of dollars to his own theatrical productions, and removed works of art from her apartment; his son Philip sued, alleging abuse and demanding his removal as guardian; an independent investigation found no evidence for abuse, but revealed financial misconduct; indicted in 2007, and tried on 16 charges in 2009; the trial lasted six months; ultimately convicted and sentenced to one to three years in prison; served eight weeks and was released on medical parole. Member, Rotary. Died, at New York Presbyterian Hospital, Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., November 30, 2014 (age 90 years, 184 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Step-son of Charles H. Marshall and Vincent Astor; son of John Dryden Kuser (1897-1964) and Brooke (Russell) Marshall (1902-2007); married, July 26, 1947, to Elizabeth Cynthia Cryan; married, December 29, 1962, to Thelma Hoegnell (divorced 1992); married 1992 to Charlene (Tyler) Gilbert; great-grandson of John Fairfield Dryden.
  Political family: Dryden-Marshall family of New York City, New York.
  See also U.S. State Dept career summary — Internet Movie Database profile — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about Anthony D. Marshall: Meryl Gordon, Mrs. Astor Regrets: The Hidden Betrayals of a Family Beyond Reproach
  Eliot Laurence Spitzer (b. 1959) — also known as Eliot Spitzer; "Steamroller"; "Client No. 9" — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born in Bronx, Bronx County, N.Y., June 10, 1959. Democrat. New York state attorney general, 1999-2006; defeated, 1994; delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 2000, 2004; Presidential Elector for New York, 2000; Governor of New York, 2007-08; resigned 2008. Jewish. Resigned as governor following disclosure that he had paid a prostitution ring for sex. Still living as of 2016.
  Relatives: Son of Bernard Spitzer and Anne (Goldhaber) Spitzer; married, October 17, 1987, to Silda Wall (divorced 2013).
  Cross-reference: Sean Patrick Maloney
  The racehorses "The Luv Guv" and "The Ninth Client" were named for him by Marylou Whitney and John Hendrickson.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Books about Eliot Spitzer: Peter Elkind, Rough Justice: The Rise and Fall of Eliot Spitzer — Lloyd Constantine, Journal of the Plague Year: An Insider's Chronicle of Eliot Spitzer's Short and Tragic Reign
  Melvyn I. Weiss (b. 1935) — of Oyster Bay Cove, Nassau County, Long Island, N.Y. Born in Bronx, Bronx County, N.Y., August 1, 1935. Democrat. Lawyer; alternate delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1996. Pleaded guilty in 2008 to federal charges of making illegal kickbacks to clients to induce them to sue; sentenced to 30 months in prison, fined $250,000, and ordered to pay restitution of $9.75 million. Still living as of 2010.
  See also Wikipedia article
  Vito John Fossella (b. 1965) — also known as Vito Fossella — of Staten Island, Richmond County, N.Y. Born in Staten Island, Richmond County, N.Y., March 9, 1965. Republican. Lawyer; member, New York City Council, 1994-97; U.S. Representative from New York 13th District, 1997-2009. Catholic. Italian and Irish ancestry. In May, 2008, he was arrested in Alexandria, Virginia, for driving while intoxicated; a week later, he admitted to an extramarital affair with Air Force Lt. Col Laura Fay, and that he was the father of her 3-year-old child; the scandal led him to retire from Congress. Still living as of 2014.
  Relatives: Married 1990 to Mary Patricia Rowan; great-grandson of James Aloysius O'Leary (1889-1944).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — votes in Congress from the Washington Post — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Eric James Joseph Massa (b. 1959) — also known as Eric J. J. Massa — of Corning, Steuben County, N.Y. Born in Charleston, Charleston County, S.C., September 16, 1959. Democrat. U.S. Representative from New York, 2009-10; defeated, 2006; resigned 2010; resigned from Congress during a pending ethics investigation into acusations of sexual misconduct toward subordinates in his congressional office. Still living as of 2012.
  See also congressional biography — Wikipedia article
Yari Osorio Yari Osorio — of New York City (unknown county), N.Y. Born in Cali, Colombia. Socialist. Emergency medical technician; anti-war and social justice activist; arrested in October, 2011, along with hundreds of others, during an Occupy Wall Street demonstration on the Brooklyn Bridge in New York City; Socialism and Liberation candidate for Vice President of the United States, 2012. Colombian ancestry. Still living as of 2012.
  Image source: Campaign web site (2012)
  Anthony David Weiner (b. 1964) — also known as Anthony D. Weiner; "Carlos Danger" — of Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y.; Forest Hills, Queens, Queens County, N.Y.; Kew Gardens, Queens, Queens County, N.Y. Born in Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y., September 4, 1964. Democrat. Staff for U.S. Rep. Charles E. Schumer, 1985-91; member, New York city council, 1992-98 (at age 27, the youngest member ever elected); U.S. Representative from New York 9th District, 1999-2011; resigned 2011; delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 2000, 2004, 2008; candidate in primary for mayor of New York City, N.Y., 2005, 2013; in 2011, a scandal developed over his Internet communications with much younger women, including sexually suggestive and sexually explicit photos and texts; after initially denying responsibility, he admitted that the photos were of him, and that he had sent them; resigned from Congress in June 2011; in July 2013, more pictures and sexting, sent under the name "Carlos Danger", were revealed, which discredited his mayoral candidacy; in September 2017, he pleaded guilty to a federal charge of transferring obscene material to a minor; sentenced to 21 months in prison. Jewish. Still living as of 2018.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — votes in Congress from the Washington Post — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Eric Tradd Schneiderman (b. 1954) — also known as Eric T. Schneiderman — Born in New York City (unknown county), N.Y., December 31, 1954. Democrat. Lawyer; member of New York state senate 31st District; elected 2002, 2004, 2006, 2008; New York state attorney general, 2011-18; resigned 2018; Presidential Elector for New York, 2012; following published reports that he had physically abused four women; at first, he initially claimed that this had been sexual role playing, but within hours, he resigned his position; following an investigation, no criminal charges were brought. Jewish ancestry. Still living as of 2019.
  Relatives: Son of Irwin Schneiderman and Abigail (Heyward) Schneiderman; married 1990 to Jennifer Cunningham.
  See also Wikipedia article — Ballotpedia article — OurCampaigns candidate detail
"Enjoy the hospitable entertainment of a political graveyard."
Henry L. Clinton, Apollo Hall, New York City, February 3, 1872
The Political Graveyard

The Political Graveyard is a web site about U.S. political history and cemeteries. Founded in 1996, it is the Internet's most comprehensive free source for American political biography, listing 312,576 politicians, living and dead.
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