PoliticalGraveyard.com
The Political Graveyard: A Database of American History
Clay family of Kentucky

Note: This is just one of 1,130 family groupings listed on The Political Graveyard web site. These families each have three or more politician members, all linked together by blood, marriage or adoption.

This specific family group is a subset of the much larger Three Thousand Related Politicians group. An individual may be listed with more than one subset.

These groupings — even the names of the groupings, and the areas of main activity — are the result of a computer algorithm working with the data I have, not the choices of any historian or genealogist.

George Washington George Washington (1732-1799) — also known as "Father of His Country"; "The American Fabius" — of Virginia. Born in Westmoreland County, Va., February 22, 1732. Delegate to Continental Congress from Virginia, 1774-75; general in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; member, U.S. Constitutional Convention, 1787; President of the United States, 1789-97. Episcopalian. English ancestry. Member, Freemasons; Society of the Cincinnati; American Academy of Arts and Sciences. As the leader of the Revolution, he could have been King; instead, he served as the first President and voluntarily stepped down after two terms. Elected to the Hall of Fame for Great Americans in 1900. Died, probably from acute bacterial epiglottitis, at Mt. Vernon, Fairfax County, Va., December 14, 1799 (age 67 years, 295 days). Entombed at Mt. Vernon, Mt. Vernon, Va.; memorial monument at National Mall, Washington, D.C.; statue erected 1860 at Washington Circle, Washington, D.C.; statue erected 1869 at Boston Public Garden, Boston, Mass.
  Relatives: Son of Augustine Washington (1694-1743) and Mary (Ball) Washington (c.1709-1789); married, January 6, 1759, to Martha (Dandridge) Custis (1731-1802; aunt of Burwell Bassett); uncle of Bushrod Washington; granduncle by marriage of Charles Magill Conrad; granduncle of John Thornton Augustine Washington and George Corbin Washington; first cousin six times removed of Archer Woodford; second cousin once removed of Meriwether Lewis (1774-1809); second cousin twice removed of Sulifand Sutherland Ross; second cousin five times removed of Thomas Henry Ball, Jr., William de Bruyn Kops, Horace Lee Washington, Edwin McPherson Holden, Claude C. Ball, Arthur Wesley Holden and Franklin Delano Roosevelt; third cousin thrice removed of Samuel Bullitt Churchill and Thomas Leonidas Crittenden.
  Political families: Pendleton-Lee family; Demarest-Meriwether family of New Jersey; Marshall-Harrison-Randolph-Cabell family of Virginia; Meriwether-Kellogg-Tyler family of Virginia and Connecticut; Washington family; Clay family of Kentucky (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Cross-reference: Henry Lee — Joshua Fry — Alexander Dimitry — Tobias Lear — David Mathews — Rufus Putnam
  Washington counties in Ala., Ark., Colo., Fla., Ga., Idaho, Ill., Ind., Iowa, Kan., Ky., La., Maine, Md., Minn., Miss., Mo., Neb., N.Y., N.C., Ohio, Okla., Ore., Pa., R.I., Tenn., Tex., Utah, Vt., Va. and Wis. are named for him.
  The city of Washington, D.C., is named for him.  — The state of Washington is named for him.  — Mount Washington (highest peak in the Northeast), in the White Mountains, Coos County, New Hampshire, is named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: George Washington Lent MarrGeorge Washington HeardGeorge Washington BarnettGeorge Washington DavisGeorge W. OwenGeorge W. TolandGeorge W. LayGeorge W. PattersonGeorge W. B. TownsGeorge Washington AdamsGeorge Washington HockleyGeorge W. SmythG. W. IngersollGeorge W. HopkinsGeorge Washington MontgomeryGeorge W. KittredgeGeorge W. JonesGeorge W. HarrisonGeorge Washington EwingGeorge Washington SeabrookGeorge W. MorrisonGeorge Washington WoodwardGeorge Washington WrightGeorge Washington TriplettGeorge Washington GlasscockGeorge W. SchuylerGeorge Washington HolmanGeorge W. GreeneGeorge W. WolcottGeorge W. PaschalGeorge Washington DunlapGeorge Washington WarrenGeorge Washington HillGeorge Washington LoganGeorge W. GetchellGeorge Washington WrightGeorge W. JulianGeorge Washington DyalGeorge W. LaddGeorge W. PeckGeorge Washington NesmithGeorge W. MorganGeorge Washington BrooksGeorge Washington CowlesGeorge W. GeddesGeorge Washington WhitmoreGeorge Washington BridgesGeorge W. CateGeorge W. HoukGeorge W. WebberGeorge W. BemisGeorge Washington FairbrotherGeorge Washington GlickGeorge W. JonesGeorge W. BakerGeorge W. ShellGeorge W. AndersonGeorge W. CrouseGeorge W. HulickGeorge W. AllenGeorge W. F. HarperGeorge Washington ClarkGeorge Washington McCraryGeorge W. GordonGeorge W. KingsburyGeorge W. CovingtonGeorge Washington FleegerGeorge W. SteeleGeorge W. WilsonGeorge Washington MartinGeorge W. E. DorseyGeorge W. PlunkittGeorge W. FurbushGeorge W. SuttonGeorge W. CurtinGeorge W. RayGeorge W. RooseveltGeorge W. SmithGeorge W. KippGeorge W. CampbellGeorge W. TaylorGeorge W. StoneGeorge W. BartchGeorge W. ShonkGeorge W. CookGeorge W. MurrayGeorge W. FarisGeorge W. FithianGeorge W. PrinceGeorge W. BucknerGeorge W. CromerGeorge W. DonagheyGeorge W. AldridgeGeorge Washington WagonerGeorge Washington GoethalsGeorge W. ArmstrongGeorge W. LovejoyGeorge W. OakesGeorge W. HaysGeorge W. EdmondsGeorge W. LindsayGeorge Washington JonesT. G. W. TarverGeorge W. DardenGeorge W. MeadGeorge W. GibbonsGeorge W. ListGeorge W. CalkinGeorge W. RauchGeorge W. MichellGeorge Washington JacksonGeorge W. BlanchardGeorge Washington HerzGeorge W. BristowGeorge Washington HardyGeorge W. BallardGeorge W. McKownGeorge Thomas WashingtonGeorge W. CollinsGeorge A. Washington
  Coins and currency: His portrait appears on the U.S. quarter (25 cent coin), and on the $1 bill. His portrait also appeared on various other denominations of U.S. currency, and on the Confederate States $50 note during the Civil War.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Books about George Washington: Richard Brookhiser, Founding Father: Rediscovering George Washington — James Thomas Flexner, Washington: The Indispensable Man — Willard Sterne Randall, George Washington : A Life — Richard Norton Smith, Patriarch : George Washington and the New American Nation — Henry Wiencek, An Imperfect God : George Washington, His Slaves, and the Creation of America — James MacGregor Burns, George Washington — Joseph J. Ellis, His Excellency, George Washington — Gore Vidal, Inventing A Nation: Washington, Adams, Jefferson — David Barton, The Bulletproof George Washington: An Account of God's Providential Care — Wendie C. Old, George Washington (for young readers)
  Image source: Portrait & Biographical Album of Washtenaw County (1891)
  John Walker (1744-1809) — of Albemarle County, Va. Born in Albemarle County, Va., February 13, 1744. Planter; colonel in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; lawyer; Delegate to Continental Congress from Virginia, 1780; U.S. Senator from Virginia, 1790. Died in Orange County, Va., December 2, 1809 (age 65 years, 292 days). Interment a private or family graveyard, Albemarle County, Va.
  Relatives: Son of Thomas Walker (1715-1794) and Mildred (Thornton) Walker (1721-1778); brother of Francis Walker; married 1764 to Elizabeth Moore (1746-1809); uncle of Mildred Gilmer (1772-1799; who married William Wirt); granduncle of Thomas Walker Gilmer; first cousin once removed of Meriwether Lewis; first cousin four times removed of Hubbard T. Smith; first cousin five times removed of Archer Woodford; second cousin of Aylett Hawes; second cousin once removed of Robert Brooke, George Madison, Richard Aylett Buckner, Richard Hawes and Albert Gallatin Hawes; second cousin twice removed of Zachary Taylor, Aylette Buckner and Aylett Hawes Buckner; second cousin thrice removed of John Strother Pendleton, Albert Gallatin Pendleton and Harry Bartow Hawes; second cousin four times removed of James Francis Buckner (1849-1923), Key Pittman and Vail Montgomery Pittman; second cousin five times removed of Sidney Fletcher Taliaferro and Max Rogers Strother.
  Political families: Pendleton-Lee family; Blackburn-Slaughter-Buckner-Madison family of Kentucky; Meriwether-Kellogg-Tyler family of Virginia and Connecticut (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Matthew Clay (1754-1815) — of Halifax, Halifax County, Va. Born in Halifax County, Va., March 25, 1754. Democrat. Served in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; member of Virginia state house of delegates, 1790-94; U.S. Representative from Virginia, 1797-1813, 1815 (at-large 1797-1807, 14th District 1807-13, 15th District 1815); died in office 1815. Died suddenly while making a speech at Halifax Court House, Halifax County, Va., May 27, 1815 (age 61 years, 63 days). Interment a private or family graveyard, Pittsylvania County, Va.
  Relatives: Son of Charles Clay (1716-1789) and Martha 'Patsy' (Green) Clay (1719-1793); brother of Green Clay; father of Matthew Clay; uncle of Brutus Junius Clay (1808-1878) and Cassius Marcellus Clay; granduncle of Thomas Clay McCreery and Brutus Junius Clay (1847-1932); first cousin by marriage of John Williams and Lewis Williams; first cousin once removed of Henry Clay (1777-1852) and Porter Clay; first cousin twice removed of Thomas Hart Clay, Henry Clay, Jr. and James Brown Clay; first cousin thrice removed of Henry Clay (1849-1884); first cousin four times removed of Oliver Carroll Clay; first cousin five times removed of Archer Woodford; second cousin by marriage of Archibald Henderson, Leonard Henderson (1772-1833), Robert Overton Williams and Marmaduke Williams; second cousin once removed of Clement Comer Clay; second cousin twice removed of Clement Claiborne Clay, Jr..
  Political families: Williams family of North Carolina; Clay family of Kentucky (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Green Clay (1757-1826) — Born in Powhatan County, Va., August 14, 1757. Served in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War; surveyor; member of Virginia state house of delegates, 1788-89; member of Kentucky state house of representatives, 1793-94; member of Kentucky state senate, 1795-98, 1807; delegate to Kentucky state constitutional convention, 1799; general in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812. Member, Freemasons. Died in White Hall, Madison County, Ky., October 31, 1826 (age 69 years, 78 days). Interment at White Hall Family Cemetery, Richmond, Ky.
  Relatives: Son of Charles Clay (1716-1789) and Martha 'Patsy' (Green) Clay (1719-1793); brother of Matthew Clay (1754-1815); married, March 14, 1795, to Sally Lewis (1776-1867); father of Brutus Junius Clay (1808-1878) and Cassius Marcellus Clay; uncle of Matthew Clay (1795?-1827); grandfather of Green Clay Smith and Brutus Junius Clay (1847-1932); granduncle of Thomas Clay McCreery; first cousin once removed of Henry Clay (1777-1852) and Porter Clay; first cousin twice removed of Thomas Hart Clay, Henry Clay, Jr. and James Brown Clay; first cousin thrice removed of Henry Clay (1849-1884); first cousin four times removed of Oliver Carroll Clay; first cousin five times removed of Archer Woodford; second cousin once removed of Clement Comer Clay; second cousin twice removed of Clement Claiborne Clay, Jr..
  Political family: Clay family of Kentucky (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Clay County, Ky. is named for him.
  Bushrod Washington (1762-1829) — of Alexandria, Va.; Richmond, Va. Born in Westmoreland County, Va., June 5, 1762. Lawyer; member of Virginia state legislature, 1787; delegate to Virginia convention to ratify U.S. constitution from Westmoreland County, 1788; Associate Justice of U.S. Supreme Court, 1798-1829; died in office 1829. Episcopalian. Member, Phi Beta Kappa. Died in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., November 26, 1829 (age 67 years, 174 days). Entombed at Mt. Vernon, Mt. Vernon, Va.
  Relatives: Son of John Augustine Washington and Hannah (Bushrod) Washington; nephew of George Washington; first cousin once removed of John Thornton Augustine Washington (1783-1841); second cousin five times removed of Archer Woodford; third cousin of Meriwether Lewis; third cousin once removed of Sulifand Sutherland Ross.
  Political families: Meriwether-Kellogg-Tyler family of Virginia and Connecticut; Washington family (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also federal judicial profile — Wikipedia article — Ballotpedia article — NNDB dossier
  Francis Walker (1764-1806) — of Virginia. Born in Albemarle County, Va., June 22, 1764. Member of Virginia state house of delegates, 1788-91, 1797-1801; U.S. Representative from Virginia 14th District, 1793-95. Died in Albemarle County, Va., March, 1806 (age 41 years, 0 days). Interment a private or family graveyard, Albemarle County, Va.
  Relatives: Son of Thomas Walker (1715-1794) and Mildred (Thornton) Walker (1721-1778); brother of John Walker; married to Jane Byrd Nelson (1775-1808); uncle of Mildred Gilmer (1772-1799; who married William Wirt); granduncle of Thomas Walker Gilmer; first cousin once removed of Meriwether Lewis; first cousin four times removed of Hubbard T. Smith; first cousin five times removed of Archer Woodford; second cousin of Aylett Hawes; second cousin once removed of Robert Brooke, George Madison, Richard Aylett Buckner, Richard Hawes and Albert Gallatin Hawes; second cousin twice removed of Zachary Taylor, Aylette Buckner and Aylett Hawes Buckner; second cousin thrice removed of John Strother Pendleton, Albert Gallatin Pendleton and Harry Bartow Hawes; second cousin four times removed of James Francis Buckner (1849-1923), Key Pittman and Vail Montgomery Pittman; second cousin five times removed of Sidney Fletcher Taliaferro and Max Rogers Strother.
  Political families: Pendleton-Lee family; Blackburn-Slaughter-Buckner-Madison family of Kentucky; Meriwether-Kellogg-Tyler family of Virginia and Connecticut (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Archibald Henderson (1768-1822) — of Salisbury, Rowan County, N.C. Born near Williamsboro, Vance County, N.C., August 7, 1768. Lawyer; U.S. Representative from North Carolina at-large, 1799-1803; member of North Carolina house of commons, 1807-09, 1814, 1819-20. Died in Salisbury, Rowan County, N.C., October 21, 1822 (age 54 years, 75 days). Interment at Lutheran Cemetery, Salisbury, N.C.
  Relatives: Son of Richard Henderson; brother of Leonard Henderson; nephew of Thomas Henderson; double first cousin once removed of John Williams of Montpelier (1731-1799); second cousin by marriage of Matthew Clay.
  Political family: Williams family of North Carolina (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Leonard Henderson (1772-1833) — of North Carolina. Born in Granville County, N.C., October 6, 1772. State court judge in North Carolina, 1808; justice of North Carolina state supreme court, 1818; chief justice of North Carolina state supreme court, 1829-33. Died in Williamsboro, Vance County, N.C., August 13, 1833 (age 60 years, 311 days). Interment a private or family graveyard, Vance County, N.C.
  Relatives: Son of Richard Henderson; brother of Archibald Henderson; nephew of Thomas Henderson; double first cousin once removed and nephew by marriage of John Williams of Montpelier (1731-1799); second cousin by marriage of Matthew Clay.
  Political family: Williams family of North Carolina (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Henderson County, N.C. is named for him.
  Robert Overton Williams (1773-1821) — Born in Surry County, N.C., January 12, 1773. Member of North Carolina state senate, 1792-95; U.S. Representative from North Carolina, 1797-1803 (3rd District 1797-99, at-large 1799-1803). Died in Knoxville, Knox County, Tenn., May 27, 1821 (age 48 years, 135 days). Interment at First Presbyterian Church Cemetery, Knoxville, Tenn.
  Relatives: Son-in-law of Joseph Winston; son of Joseph Williams of Shallow Ford and Rebecca (Lanier) Williams (1757-1832); brother-in-law of Louis L. Winston and Fountain Winston; brother of John Williams, Thomas Lanier Williams, Lewis Williams and Frances Lanier Williams (1796-1872; who married John Patton Erwin); uncle of Joseph Lanier Williams, Margaret McClung Williams (1817-1899; who married John Gaines Miller) and Melinda Williams (1820-1862; who married William Barclay Napton (1808-1883)); cousin *** of Marmaduke Williams; first cousin thrice removed of George Venable Allen; second cousin by marriage of Matthew Clay.
  Political family: Williams family of North Carolina (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Marmaduke Williams (1774-1850) — of North Carolina; Alabama. Born in North Carolina, 1774. Democrat. Member of North Carolina state legislature, 1800; U.S. Representative from North Carolina, 1803-09 (9th District 1803-05, at-large 1805-07, 9th District 1807-09); candidate for Governor of Alabama, 1819. Methodist. Died in 1850 (age about 76 years). Interment at Greenwood Cemetery, Tuscaloosa, Ala.
  Relatives: Cousin *** of Robert Overton Williams, John Williams and Lewis Williams (1782-1842); second cousin by marriage of Matthew Clay.
  Political families: Williams family of North Carolina; Clay family of Kentucky (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Meriwether Lewis (1774-1809) — of Missouri. Born near Ivy, Albemarle County, Va., August 18, 1774. Governor of Louisiana (Missouri) Territory, 1807-09; died in office 1809. English and Welsh ancestry. Member, Freemasons. Commanded expedition with William Clark to Oregon, 1803-04. Died from gunshot wounds under mysterious circumstances (murder or suicide?) at Grinder's Stand, an inn on the Natchez Trace near Hohenwald, Lewis County, Tenn., October 11, 1809 (age 35 years, 54 days). Interment at Meriwether Lewis Park, Near Hohenwald, Lewis County, Tenn.
  Relatives: Son of William Lewis (1733-1779) and Lucy (Meriwether) Lewis (1852-1837); first cousin once removed of John Walker, David Meriwether (1755-1822), James Meriwether (1755-1817), Francis Walker and George Rockingham Gilmer; first cousin five times removed of Arthur Sidney Demarest; second cousin of James Meriwether (1788-1852), David Meriwether (1800-1893) and James Archibald Meriwether; second cousin once removed of George Washington, Thomas Walker Gilmer and Reuben Handy Meriwether; second cousin thrice removed of Hubbard T. Smith; second cousin four times removed of Archer Woodford; third cousin of Theodorick Bland, Robert Brooke, Bushrod Washington, George Madison and Richard Aylett Buckner; third cousin once removed of John Randolph of Roanoke, Henry St. George Tucker, John Thornton Augustine Washington, Zachary Taylor and Aylette Buckner; third cousin twice removed of John Strother Pendleton, Albert Gallatin Pendleton, Aylett Hawes Buckner and Nathaniel Beverly Tucker; third cousin thrice removed of James Francis Buckner, Key Pittman and Vail Montgomery Pittman.
  Political families: Demarest-Meriwether family of New Jersey; Marshall-Harrison-Randolph-Cabell family of Virginia; Meriwether-Kellogg-Tyler family of Virginia and Connecticut (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Cross-reference: George F. Shannon
  Lewis counties in Idaho, Ky., Mo., Tenn. and Wash. are named for him; Lewis and Clark County, Mont. is named partly for him.
  Other politicians named for him: Meriwether Lewis RandolphMeriwether Lewis Walker
  Coins and currency: His portrait appeared (along with Clark's) on the $10 U.S. Note from 1898 to 1927.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Books about Meriwether Lewis: Thomas C. Danisi, Uncovering the Truth About Meriwether Lewis — Donald Barr Chidsey, Lewis and Clark: The Great Adventure
Henry Clay Henry Clay (1777-1852) — also known as "The Sage of Ashland"; "The Great Compromiser" — of Lexington, Fayette County, Ky. Born in Hanover County, Va., April 12, 1777. Member of Kentucky state house of representatives, 1803; U.S. Senator from Kentucky, 1806-07, 1810-11, 1831-42, 1849-52; died in office 1852; U.S. Representative from Kentucky, 1811-14, 1815-21, 1823-25 (5th District 1811-13, at-large 1813-14, 2nd District 1815-21, 3rd District 1823-25); Speaker of the U.S. House, 1811-14, 1815-20, 1823-25; candidate for President of the United States, 1824, 1832 (National Republican), 1844 (Whig); U.S. Secretary of State, 1825-29; candidate for Whig nomination for President, 1839. Member, Freemasons. In 1809, he fought a duel with Humphrey Marshall, in which both men were wounded. Elected to the Hall of Fame for Great Americans in 1900. Died in Washington, D.C., June 29, 1852 (age 75 years, 78 days). Interment at Lexington Cemetery, Lexington, Ky.; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery, Washington, D.C.
  Relatives: Son of John Clay and Elizabeth (Hudson) Clay (1750-1829); brother of Porter Clay; married, April 11, 1799, to Lucretia (Hart) Erwin (1781-1864); father of Thomas Hart Clay, Henry Clay, Jr. and James Brown Clay; grandfather of Henry Clay; granduncle of Ellen Hart Ross (who married James Reily (1811-1863)); first cousin once removed of Matthew Clay (1754-1815) and Green Clay; second cousin of Matthew Clay (1795?-1827), Brutus Junius Clay (1808-1878) and Cassius Marcellus Clay; second cousin once removed of Brutus Junius Clay (1847-1932); second cousin thrice removed of Oliver Carroll Clay; second cousin four times removed of Archer Woodford; third cousin of Clement Comer Clay; third cousin once removed of Clement Claiborne Clay, Jr..
  Political family: Clay family of Kentucky (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Clay counties in Ala., Fla., Ga., Ill., Ind., Kan., Minn., Miss., Mo., Neb., N.C., S.Dak., Tenn., Tex. and W.Va. are named for him.
  Mount Clay (also called Mount Reagan), in the White Mountains, Coos County, New Hampshire, is named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: Henry Clay LongneckerHenry Clay DeanH. Clay DickinsonHenry C. BrockmeyerH. Clay CockerillHenry Clay EwingHenry Clay CaldwellHenry Clay HallHenry Clay GoodingHenry Clay NaillHenry C. MyersHenry C. ColeH. Clay HarrisHenry C. MinerHenry C. WarmothHenry Clay ClevelandH. Clay EvansHenry C. PayneHenry C. BatesH. Clay FosterHenry C. McCormickHenry C. IdeHenry Clay WilliamsHenry C. SimmsHenry Clay FergusonHenry C. GloverH. Clay ParkHenry C. HansbroughHenry C. SnodgrassH. Clay MaydwellHenry C. GleasonHenry C. LoudenslagerH. Clay Van VoorhisHenry C. ClippingerH. Clay CrawfordH. Clay BascomH. Clay MichieH. Clay ChisolmH. Clay HowardHenry C. HallHenry Clay McDowellH. Clay JonesH. Clay DayHenry Clay HinesH. Clay HeatherHenry Clay MeachamHenry Clay CallowayH. Clay SuterH. Clay WarthHenry Clay ElwoodH. Clay KennedyH. Clay DavisH. Clay NeedhamHenry Clay EthertonH. Clay MaceH. Clay ArmstrongH. Clay BaldwinH. Clay HaynesH. Clay BurkholderMrs. H. Clay KauffmanH. Clay BentleyHenry C. GreenbergH. Clay Gardenhire, Jr.Henry Clay CoxH. Clay Myers, Jr.H. Clay Johnson
  Coins and currency: His portrait appeared on some U.S. currency issued in the 19th and early 20th centuries.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Books about Henry Clay: Robert Vincent Remini, Henry Clay: Statesman for the Union — Maurice G. Baxter, Henry Clay the Lawyer — Richard B. Cheney & Lynne V. Cheney, Kings Of The Hill : How Nine Powerful Men Changed The Course of American History — Merrill D. Peterson, The Great Triumvirate: Webster, Clay, and Calhoun — Scott Farris, Almost President: The Men Who Lost the Race but Changed the Nation — David S. Heidler & Jeanne T. Heidler, Henry Clay: The Essential American — Fergus M. Bordewich, America's Great Debate: Henry Clay, Stephen A. Douglas, and the Compromise That Preserved the Union
  Image source: James Smith Noel Collection, Louisiana State University in Shreveport
  John Williams (1778-1837) — of Knoxville, Knox County, Tenn. Born in Surry County, N.C., January 29, 1778. Served in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812; U.S. Senator from Tennessee, 1815-23; U.S. Charge d'Affaires to Central America, 1825-26; member of Tennessee state senate, 1827-28. Died near Knoxville, Knox County, Tenn., August 10, 1837 (age 59 years, 193 days). Interment at First Presbyterian Church Cemetery, Knoxville, Tenn.
  Relatives: Son of Joseph Williams of Shallow Ford and Rebecca (Lanier) Williams (1757-1832); brother of Robert Overton Williams, Thomas Lanier Williams, Lewis Williams and Frances Lanier Williams (1796-1872; who married John Patton Erwin); married to Melinda White (1789-1838); father of Joseph Lanier Williams; uncle of Margaret McClung Williams (1817-1899; who married John Gaines Miller) and Melinda Williams (1820-1862; who married William Barclay Napton (1808-1883)); cousin *** of Marmaduke Williams; first cousin by marriage of Matthew Clay; first cousin thrice removed of George Venable Allen.
  Political family: Williams family of North Carolina (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — U.S. State Dept career summary — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Porter Clay (1779-1850) — of Kentucky. Born in Hanover County, Va., 1779. Minister; Kentucky auditor of public accounts, 1810. Died in Camden, Ouachita County, Ark., February 16, 1850 (age about 70 years). Interment at Oakland Cemetery, Camden, Ark.
  Relatives: Son of John Clay (1741-1781) and Elizabeth (Hudson) Clay (1750-1829); brother of Henry Clay (1777-1852); married, April 11, 1804, to Sophia Grosch (died 1829); married to Elizabeth Logan (1784-1863); uncle of Thomas Hart Clay, Henry Clay, Jr. and James Brown Clay; granduncle of Henry Clay (1849-1884); first cousin once removed of Matthew Clay (1754-1815) and Green Clay; second cousin of Matthew Clay (1795?-1827), Brutus Junius Clay (1808-1878) and Cassius Marcellus Clay (1810-1903); second cousin once removed of Brutus Junius Clay (1847-1932); second cousin thrice removed of Oliver Carroll Clay; second cousin four times removed of Archer Woodford; third cousin of Clement Comer Clay; third cousin once removed of Clement Claiborne Clay, Jr..
  Political families: Clay family of Kentucky; Wilson-Dunn-Goodloe family of Indiana (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Lewis Williams (1782-1842) — of Panther Creek, Surry County, N.C. Born in Surry County, N.C., February 1, 1782. Member of North Carolina house of commons, 1813-14; U.S. Representative from North Carolina 13th District, 1815-42; died in office 1842. Died in Washington, D.C., February 23, 1842 (age 60 years, 22 days). Interment at Panther Creek Cemetery, Surry County, N.C.; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery, Washington, D.C.
  Relatives: Son of Joseph Williams of Shallow Ford and Rebecca (Lanier) Williams (1757-1832); brother of Robert Overton Williams, John Williams and Frances Lanier Williams (1796-1872; who married John Patton Erwin); uncle of Joseph Lanier Williams, Margaret McClung Williams (1817-1899; who married John Gaines Miller) and Melinda Williams (1820-1862; who married William Barclay Napton (1808-1883)); cousin *** of Marmaduke Williams; first cousin by marriage of Matthew Clay; first cousin thrice removed of George Venable Allen; twin brother of Thomas Lanier Williams.
  Political family: Williams family of North Carolina (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Clement Comer Clay (1789-1866) — also known as Clement C. Clay — of Huntsville, Madison County, Ala. Born in Halifax County, Va., December 17, 1789. Democrat. Lawyer; served in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812; member Alabama territorial council, 1817-18; state court judge in Alabama, 1819-23; member of Alabama state house of representatives, 1827-28; U.S. Representative from Alabama 1st District, 1829-35; Governor of Alabama, 1835-37; U.S. Senator from Alabama, 1837-41; associate justice of Alabama state supreme court, 1843. Fought a duel in 1823 with Dr. Waddy Tate. Died in Huntsville, Madison County, Ala., September 7, 1866 (age 76 years, 264 days). Interment at Maple Hill Cemetery, Huntsville, Ala.
  Relatives: Father of Clement Claiborne Clay, Jr. (1816-1882); second cousin once removed of Matthew Clay (1754-1815) and Green Clay; third cousin of Henry Clay (1777-1852), Porter Clay, Matthew Clay (1795?-1827), Brutus Junius Clay (1808-1878) and Cassius Marcellus Clay; third cousin once removed of Thomas Hart Clay, James Brown Clay and Brutus Junius Clay (1847-1932); third cousin twice removed of Henry Clay (1849-1884).
  Political families: Clay family of Kentucky; Ligon-Clay-Clopton family of Montgomery and Tuskegee, Alabama (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  The Clement C. Clay Bridge (built 1931; second span built 1965; first span replaced 2006), which carries U.S. 231 over the Tennessee River, between Madison and Morgan counties, Alabama, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  John Speed Smith (1792-1854) — of Kentucky. Born in Kentucky, 1792. Democrat. Member of Kentucky state legislature, 1820; U.S. Representative from Kentucky 7th District, 1821-23. Died in 1854 (age about 62 years). Interment at Richmond Cemetery, Richmond, Ky.
  Relatives: Father of Green Clay Smith (1826-1895).
  Political family: Clay family of Kentucky (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Matthew Clay (c.1795-1827) — of Alabama. Born about 1795. Member of Alabama state house of representatives, 1820-22; member of Alabama state senate, 1825-27; died in office 1827. Died, of pneumonia, February, 1827 (age about 32 years). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Matthew Clay; nephew of Green Clay; first cousin of Brutus Junius Clay (1808-1878) and Cassius Marcellus Clay; first cousin once removed of Brutus Junius Clay (1847-1932); second cousin of Henry Clay (1777-1852) and Porter Clay; second cousin once removed of Thomas Hart Clay and James Brown Clay; second cousin twice removed of Henry Clay (1849-1884); third cousin of Clement Comer Clay; third cousin once removed of Clement Claiborne Clay, Jr..
  Political family: Clay family of Kentucky (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Thomas Walker Gilmer (1802-1844) — of Virginia. Born in Gilmerton, Albemarle County, Va., April 6, 1802. Lawyer; member of Virginia state house of delegates, 1829-36, 1838-39; Speaker of the Virginia State House of Delegates, 1838-39; Governor of Virginia, 1840-41; U.S. Representative from Virginia, 1841-44 (12th District 1841-43, 5th District 1843-44); U.S. Secretary of the Navy, 1844; died in office 1844. Among those killed in the explosion when a cannon accidentally burst on board the U.S.S. Princeton, on the Potomac River near Fort Washington, Prince George's County, Md., February 28, 1844 (age 41 years, 328 days). Originally entombed at Congressional Cemetery, Washington, D.C.; reinterment at a private or family graveyard, Albemarle County, Va.
  Relatives: Son of George Gilmer (1778-1836) and Elizabeth Anderson (Hudson) Gilmer (1784-1820); married to Anne Elizabeth Baker (1809-1874); nephew of Mildred Gilmer (1772-1799; who married William Wirt); grandnephew of John Walker and Francis Walker; second cousin once removed of Meriwether Lewis (1774-1809); second cousin twice removed of Aylett Hawes; third cousin once removed of Robert Brooke, George Madison, Richard Aylett Buckner, Richard Hawes and Albert Gallatin Hawes; third cousin twice removed of Hubbard T. Smith; third cousin thrice removed of Archer Woodford; fourth cousin of Zachary Taylor, Aylette Buckner and Aylett Hawes Buckner; fourth cousin once removed of John Strother Pendleton, Albert Gallatin Pendleton and Harry Bartow Hawes.
  Political families: Pendleton-Lee family; Demarest-Meriwether family of New Jersey; Marshall-Harrison-Randolph-Cabell family of Virginia; Meriwether-Kellogg-Tyler family of Virginia and Connecticut; Washington family; Clay family of Kentucky (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Gilmer County, W.Va. is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Thomas Hart Clay (1803-1871) — also known as Thomas H. Clay — of Kentucky. Born in Fayette County, Ky., September 22, 1803. Farmer; U.S. Minister to Nicaragua, 1863; Honduras, 1863. Died near Lexington, Fayette County, Ky., March 18, 1871 (age 67 years, 177 days). Interment at Lexington Cemetery, Lexington, Ky.
  Relatives: Son of Henry Clay (1777-1852) and Lucretia (Hart) Clay (1781-1864); brother of Henry Clay, Jr. and James Brown Clay; married, October 5, 1837, to Maria Russell Mentelle (1806-1891); father of Lucretia Clay (1839-1860; who married William Campbell Preston Breckinridge); nephew of Porter Clay; uncle of Henry Clay (1849-1884); first cousin twice removed of Matthew Clay (1754-1815) and Green Clay; second cousin once removed of Matthew Clay (1795?-1827), Brutus Junius Clay (1808-1878) and Cassius Marcellus Clay; third cousin of Brutus Junius Clay (1847-1932); third cousin once removed of Clement Comer Clay; third cousin twice removed of Oliver Carroll Clay; third cousin thrice removed of Archer Woodford; fourth cousin of Clement Claiborne Clay, Jr..
  Political family: Clay family of Kentucky (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also U.S. State Dept career summary — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Brutus Junius Clay (1808-1878) — of Kentucky. Born in Richmond, Madison County, Ky., July 1, 1808. Member of Kentucky state house of representatives, 1840, 1860; U.S. Representative from Kentucky 7th District, 1863-65. Died near Paris, Bourbon County, Ky., October 11, 1878 (age 70 years, 102 days). Interment at Auvergne Cemetery, Paris, Ky.
  Relatives: Son of Green Clay; brother of Cassius Marcellus Clay; nephew of Matthew Clay (1754-1815); uncle of Brutus Junius Clay; first cousin of Matthew Clay (1795?-1827); second cousin of Henry Clay (1777-1852) and Porter Clay; second cousin once removed of Thomas Hart Clay and James Brown Clay; second cousin twice removed of Henry Clay (1849-1884); third cousin of Clement Comer Clay; third cousin once removed of Clement Claiborne Clay, Jr..
  Political families: Williams family of North Carolina; Clay family of Kentucky (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
Cassius M. Clay Cassius Marcellus Clay (1810-1903) — also known as Cassius M. Clay; "The Lion of White Hall" — of Madison County, Ky. Born in Madison County, Ky., October 19, 1810. Probably the best-known Southern emancipationist; freed his own slaves in 1844 and edited the only Southern antislavery newspaper in 1845-47; member of Kentucky state house of representatives, 1835-37, 1840; delegate to Whig National Convention from Kentucky, 1839 (speaker); shot point-blank during a speech in 1843, he used a Bowie knife to cut off the attacker's ear and nose and cut out one eye; tried for mayhem and found not guilty; served in the U.S. Army during the Mexican War; candidate for Republican nomination for Vice President, 1860; U.S. Minister to Russia, 1861-62, 1863-69; general in the Union Army during the Civil War. Died, of kidney failure, in Madison County, Ky., July 22, 1903 (age 92 years, 276 days). Interment at Richmond Cemetery, Richmond, Ky.
  Relatives: Son of Green Clay and Sally (Lewis) Clay (1776-1867); brother of Brutus Junius Clay (1808-1878); married to Mary Jane Warfield; father of Brutus Junius Clay (1847-1932) and Laura Clay; nephew of Matthew Clay (1754-1815); uncle of William Cassius Goodloe (1841-1889); first cousin of Matthew Clay (1795?-1827); second cousin of Henry Clay (1777-1852) and Porter Clay; second cousin once removed of Thomas Hart Clay, Henry Clay, Jr. and James Brown Clay; second cousin twice removed of Henry Clay (1849-1884); second cousin thrice removed of Oliver Carroll Clay; second cousin four times removed of Archer Woodford; third cousin of Clement Comer Clay; third cousin once removed of Clement Claiborne Clay, Jr..
  Political families: Clay family of Kentucky; Wilson-Dunn-Goodloe family of Indiana (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Other politicians named for him: Cassius M. C. TwitchellCassius C. PillsburyCassius C. Dowell
  See also Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: The South in the Building of the Nation (1909)
  James Reily (1811-1863) — of Texas. Born in Hamilton, Butler County, Ohio, July 3, 1811. Lawyer; major in the Texas Army during the Texas War of Independence; member of Texas Republic House of Representatives, 1840-41; Texas Republic Minister to the United States, 1841-42; member of Texas state house of representatives, 1853-54; U.S. Consul in SAINT Petersburg, as of 1856; colonel in the Confederate Army during the Civil War. Presbyterian; later Episcopalian. Member, Freemasons. Killed in the Battle of Camp Bisland, on Bayou Teche, near Franklin, St. Mary Parish, La., April 14, 1863 (age 51 years, 285 days). Interment at Lexington Cemetery, Lexington, Ky.
  Relatives: Son of John Reily and Nancy (Hunter) Reily; married, March 4, 1834, to Ellen Hart Ross (grandniece of Henry Clay (1777-1852)).
  Political family: Clay family of Kentucky (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Henry Clay, Jr. (1811-1847) — of Kentucky. Born in Lexington, Fayette County, Ky., April 10, 1811. Lawyer; member of Kentucky state house of representatives, 1835-37; colonel in the U.S. Army during the Mexican War. Episcopalian. Killed in action at the Battle of Buena Vista, Buena Vista, Coahuila, February 23, 1847 (age 35 years, 319 days). Interment at Frankfort Cemetery, Frankfort, Ky.
  Relatives: Son of Henry Clay (1777-1852) and Lucretia (Hart) Clay (1781-1864); brother of Thomas Hart Clay and James Brown Clay; married 1832 to Julia Prather (1814-1840); nephew of Porter Clay; uncle of Henry Clay (1849-1884); first cousin twice removed of Matthew Clay and Green Clay; second cousin once removed of Cassius Marcellus Clay; third cousin twice removed of Oliver Carroll Clay; third cousin thrice removed of Archer Woodford (1899-1955).
  Political families: Clay family of Kentucky; Washington family; Meriwether-Kellogg-Tyler family of Virginia and Connecticut (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Clay County, Iowa is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Clement Claiborne Clay, Jr. (1816-1882) — of Huntsville, Madison County, Ala. Born in Huntsville, Madison County, Ala., December 13, 1816. Democrat. Member of Alabama state house of representatives, 1842; state court judge in Alabama, 1846; U.S. Senator from Alabama, 1853-61; Senator from Alabama in the Confederate Congress, 1862-64. Suspected of conspiring with other Confederates to assassinate President Abraham Lincoln, he was imprisoned for nearly a year after the war. Died near Gurley, Madison County, Ala., January 3, 1882 (age 65 years, 21 days). Interment at Maple Hill Cemetery, Huntsville, Ala.
  Relatives: Son of Clement Comer Clay; married, February 1, 1843, to Virginia Caroline Tunstall (1825-1915; who later married David Clopton (1820-1892)); second cousin twice removed of Matthew Clay (1754-1815) and Green Clay; third cousin once removed of Henry Clay (1777-1852), Porter Clay, Matthew Clay (1795?-1827), Brutus Junius Clay (1808-1878) and Cassius Marcellus Clay; fourth cousin of Thomas Hart Clay, James Brown Clay and Brutus Junius Clay (1847-1932); fourth cousin once removed of Henry Clay (1849-1884).
  Political families: Clay family of Kentucky; Ligon-Clay-Clopton family of Montgomery and Tuskegee, Alabama (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Coins and currency: His portrait appeared on Confederate States $1 notes in 1862-64.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  Thomas Clay McCreery (1816-1890) — of Owensboro, Daviess County, Ky. Born near Owensboro, Daviess County, Ky., December 12, 1816. Democrat. Delegate to Democratic National Convention from Kentucky, 1856; U.S. Senator from Kentucky, 1868-71, 1873-79. Died in Owensboro, Daviess County, Ky., July 10, 1890 (age 73 years, 210 days). Interment at Rosehill Elmwood Cemetery, Owensboro, Ky.
  Relatives: Grandnephew of Matthew Clay and Green Clay (1757-1826).
  Political family: Clay family of Kentucky (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  James Brown Clay (1817-1864) — of Kentucky. Born in Washington, D.C., November 9, 1817. Democrat. Lawyer; U.S. Charge d'Affaires to Portugal, 1849-50; U.S. Representative from Kentucky 8th District, 1857-59. Died of tuberculosis, in Montreal, Quebec, January 26, 1864 (age 46 years, 78 days). Interment at Lexington Cemetery, Lexington, Ky.
  Relatives: Son of Henry Clay (1777-1852) and Lucretia (Hart) Clay (1781-1864); brother-in-law of Charles Donald Jacob; brother of Thomas Hart Clay and Henry Clay, Jr.; married, October 12, 1843, to Susanna Maria Jacob (1823-1905); father of Henry Clay (1849-1884); nephew of Porter Clay; first cousin twice removed of Matthew Clay (1754-1815) and Green Clay; second cousin once removed of Matthew Clay (1795?-1827), Brutus Junius Clay (1808-1878) and Cassius Marcellus Clay; third cousin of Brutus Junius Clay (1847-1932); third cousin once removed of Clement Comer Clay; third cousin twice removed of Oliver Carroll Clay; third cousin thrice removed of Archer Woodford; fourth cousin of Clement Claiborne Clay, Jr..
  Political family: Clay family of Kentucky (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — U.S. State Dept career summary — Find-A-Grave memorial
  David Clopton (1820-1892) — of Tuskegee, Macon County, Ala. Born near Milledgeville, Putnam County, Ga., September 29, 1820. U.S. Representative from Alabama 3rd District, 1859-61; served in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; Representative from Alabama in the Confederate Congress 7th District, 1862-65; member of Alabama state house of representatives, 1878; associate justice of Alabama state supreme court, 1884-92; died in office 1892. Died in Montgomery, Montgomery County, Ala., February 5, 1892 (age 71 years, 129 days). Interment at Oakwood Cemetery, Montgomery, Ala.
  Relatives: Married to Martha E. Ligon (died 1867; sister of Robert Fulwood Ligon (1823-1901)) and Mary F. Chambers; married, November 29, 1887, to Virginia Clay (1825-1915; widow of Clement Claiborne Clay, Jr.).
  Political family: Ligon-Clay-Clopton family of Montgomery and Tuskegee, Alabama (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Richard Taylor Jacob (1825-1903) — of Kentucky. Born in Oldham County, Ky., 1825. Lieutenant Governor of Kentucky, 1863-64. Arrested for alleged disloyalty, removed from office, and banished from Kentucky, November 11, 1864; later allowed to return to the state under direct orders from President Abraham Lincoln. Died in 1903 (age about 78 years). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Brother of Charles Donald Jacob (1838-1898).
  Political family: Clay family of Kentucky (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Green Clay Smith (1826-1895) — also known as Green C. Smith — of Covington, Kenton County, Ky. Born in Richmond, Madison County, Ky., July 4, 1826. Served in the U.S. Army during the Mexican War; lawyer; member of Kentucky state house of representatives, 1861; general in the Union Army during the Civil War; U.S. Representative from Kentucky 6th District, 1863-66; Governor of Montana Territory, 1866-68; Prohibition candidate for President of the United States, 1876. Baptist. Died in Washington, D.C., June 29, 1895 (age 68 years, 360 days). Interment at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Va.
  Relatives: Son of John Speed Smith; grandson of Green Clay (1757-1826).
  Political family: Clay family of Kentucky (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  William Campbell Preston Breckinridge (1837-1904) — also known as William C. P. Breckinridge — of Lexington, Fayette County, Ky. Born in Baltimore, Md., August 28, 1837. Democrat. Colonel in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; lawyer; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Kentucky, 1876, 1880; U.S. Representative from Kentucky 7th District, 1885-95; defeated (Gold Democratic), 1896. Member, Freemasons; Knights Templar. In 1894, he was successfully sued for breach of promise by a former mistress; he acknowledged the affair, affair, but the scandal ended his political career. Died, of apoplexy, in Lexington, Fayette County, Ky., November 18, 1904 (age 67 years, 82 days). Interment at Lexington Cemetery, Lexington, Ky.
  Relatives: Son of Robert Jefferson Breckinridge and Ann Sophonisba (Preston) Breckinridge (1803-1844); brother of Robert Jefferson Breckinridge, Jr.; married, March 17, 1859, to Lucretia Hart Clay (1839-1860; daughter of Thomas Hart Clay); married, September 19, 1861, to Issa Desha (1843-1892; granddaughter of Joseph Desha); married to Louisa Rucks (Scott) Wing (1845-1920); father of Desha Breckinridge; nephew of Joseph Cabell Breckinridge, William Campbell Preston and John Smith Preston; uncle of Levin Irving Handy and Henry Skillman Breckinridge; grandson of John Breckinridge and Francis Smith Preston; grandnephew of James Patton Preston; granduncle of John Bayne Breckinridge; great-grandson of William Preston and William Campbell; great-grandnephew of William Cabell and Patrick Henry; first cousin of John Cabell Breckinridge and Peter Augustus Porter (1827-1864); first cousin once removed of James Douglas Breckinridge, Benjamin William Sheridan Cabell (1793-1862), James McDowell, John Buchanan Floyd, George Rogers Clark Floyd, Clifton Rodes Breckinridge and Peter Augustus Porter (1853-1925); first cousin twice removed of William Cabell, Jr. and William Henry Cabell; second cousin of Carter Henry Harrison, William Lewis Cabell and George Craighead Cabell; second cousin once removed of Valentine Wood Southall, Edward Carrington Cabell, Benjamin Earl Cabell and Carter Henry Harrison II; second cousin twice removed of Earle Cabell; third cousin of John William Leftwich and Stephen Valentine Southall.
  Political families: Marshall-Harrison-Randolph-Cabell family of Virginia; Breckinridge-Preston-Cabell-Henry family of Virginia; Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York; Walker-Bolling family of Huntsville, Alabama (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Charles Donald Jacob (1838-1898) — also known as Charles D. Jacob — of Louisville, Jefferson County, Ky. Born June 1, 1838. Democrat. Mayor of Louisville, Ky., 1873-79, 1882-84, 1888-90; U.S. Minister to Colombia, 1885-86; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Kentucky, 1888. Died December 25, 1898 (age 60 years, 207 days). Interment at Cave Hill Cemetery, Louisville, Ky.
  Relatives: Son of John J. Jacob (1778-1852); brother-in-law of James Brown Clay; brother of Richard Taylor Jacob (1825-1903); married to Adeline Marrin (died 1878).
  Political family: Clay family of Kentucky (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Epitaph: "He kept the whiteness of his soul and thus men o'er him weep."
  See also Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — Find-A-Grave memorial
  William Cassius Goodloe (1841-1889) — also known as W. Cassius Goodloe — of Lexington, Fayette County, Ky. Born in Madison County, Ky., June 27, 1841. Republican. Lawyer; newspaper publisher; delegate to Republican National Convention from Kentucky, 1868, 1872 (delegation chair), 1884, 1888; member of Kentucky state house of representatives, 1871; defeated, 1867; member of Republican National Committee from Kentucky, 1872-; member of Kentucky state senate, 1873; candidate for Kentucky state attorney general, 1875; U.S. Minister to Belgium, 1878-80. Episcopalian. Member, Loyal Legion. During a violent encounter in the lobby of the Lexington Post Office, he repeatedly stabbed and ultimately killed a political enemy, Col. Armistead Swope, who meanwhile shot and badly wounded him; before any prosecution could ensue, he died of his own wounds two days later, in the Phoenix Hotel, Lexington, Fayette County, Ky., November 8, 1889 (age 48 years, 134 days). Interment at Lexington Cemetery, Lexington, Ky.
  Relatives: Son of David Short Goodloe (1811-1881) and Sally Anne Lewis Clay (Smith) Goodloe (1818-1875); brother of Green Clay Goodloe (son-in-law of James Burnie Beck (1822-1890)); married 1865 to Mary Elizabeth Mann (1845-1920); nephew of Cassius Marcellus Clay; grandfather of William Cassius Goodloe III.
  Political family: Wilson-Dunn-Goodloe family of Indiana (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also U.S. State Dept career summary — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Brutus Junius Clay (1847-1932) — also known as Brutus J. Clay — of Richmond, Madison County, Ky. Born in Madison County, Ky., February 20, 1847. Republican. Grocer; cotton planter; delegate to Republican National Convention from Kentucky, 1904; U.S. Minister to Switzerland, 1905-10. Presbyterian. Died June 2, 1932 (age 85 years, 103 days). Interment at Richmond Cemetery, Richmond, Ky.
  Relatives: Son of Cassius Marcellus Clay and Mary Jane (Warfield) Clay; married, February 20, 1872, to Pattie Amelia Field; married, January 15, 1895, to Lalla R. Fish Marsteller; nephew of Brutus Junius Clay; grandson of Green Clay; grandnephew of Matthew Clay (1754-1815); first cousin once removed of Matthew Clay (1795?-1827); second cousin once removed of Henry Clay (1777-1852) and Porter Clay; third cousin of Thomas Hart Clay and James Brown Clay; third cousin once removed of Clement Comer Clay and Henry Clay (1849-1884); fourth cousin of Clement Claiborne Clay, Jr..
  Political families: Williams family of North Carolina; Clay family of Kentucky (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also U.S. State Dept career summary — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Henry Clay (1849-1884) — also known as Harry Clay — of Kentucky. Born in Lisbon, Portugal, November 17, 1849. Candidate for Kentucky state house of representatives, 1883. Died in Louisville, Jefferson County, Ky., September 22, 1884 (age 34 years, 310 days). Interment at Lexington Cemetery, Lexington, Ky.
  Relatives: Son of James Brown Clay and Susanna Maria (Jacob) Clay (1823-1905); nephew of Thomas Hart Clay and Henry Clay, Jr.; grandson of Henry Clay; grandnephew of Porter Clay (1779-1850); first cousin thrice removed of Matthew Clay (1754-1815) and Green Clay; second cousin twice removed of Matthew Clay (1795?-1827), Brutus Junius Clay (1808-1878) and Cassius Marcellus Clay; third cousin once removed of Brutus Junius Clay (1847-1932); third cousin twice removed of Clement Comer Clay; fourth cousin once removed of Clement Claiborne Clay, Jr. and Oliver Carroll Clay.
  Political family: Clay family of Kentucky (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Laura Clay (b. 1849) — of Lexington, Fayette County, Ky. Born in Madison County, Ky., February 9, 1849. Democrat. President, Kentucky Equal Rights Association, advocating votes for women, 1899-1912; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Kentucky, 1920; delegate to Kentucky convention to ratify 21st amendment, 1933. Female. Episcopalian. Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Daughter of Cassius Marcellus Clay (1810-1903) and Mary Jane (Warfield) Clay.
  Political families: Clay family of Kentucky; Wilson-Dunn-Goodloe family of Indiana (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Oliver Carroll Clay (1849-1929) — also known as Oliver C. Clay — of Canton, Lewis County, Mo. Born in St. Louis, Mo., May 27, 1849. Democrat. School teacher; lawyer; farmer; member of Missouri state house of representatives from Lewis County, 1919-22. Died, from pneumonia, in Canton, Lewis County, Mo., March 5, 1929 (age 79 years, 282 days). Interment at Forest Grove Cemetery, Canton, Mo.
  Relatives: Son of Littleberry B. Clay (1820-1890) and Barbara (Davidson) Clay; married, June 25, 1877, to Charlotte Biggs (1856-1935); first cousin four times removed of Matthew Clay and Green Clay; second cousin thrice removed of Henry Clay (1777-1852), Porter Clay and Cassius Marcellus Clay; third cousin of Bainbridge Colby; third cousin once removed of Archer Woodford; third cousin twice removed of Thomas Hart Clay, Henry Clay, Jr. (1811-1847) and James Brown Clay; fourth cousin once removed of Henry Clay (1849-1884).
  Political family: Clay family of Kentucky (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
Bainbridge Colby Bainbridge Colby (1869-1950) — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y.; Washington, D.C. Born in St. Louis, Mo., December 22, 1869. Lawyer; attorney for author Samuel L. Clemens ("Mark Twain"); member of New York state assembly from New York County 29th District, 1902; among the founders of the Progressive ("Bull Moose") Party in 1912; Progressive candidate for U.S. Senator from New York, 1914, 1916; delegate to Democratic National Convention from District of Columbia, 1920; U.S. Secretary of State, 1920-21; law partner of Woodrow Wilson 1921-23; delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1924. Member, American Bar Association; Phi Beta Kappa. Died in Bemus Point, Chautauqua County, N.Y., April 11, 1950 (age 80 years, 110 days). Interment at Bemus Point Cemetery, Bemus Point, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of John Peck Colby and Frances (Bainbridge) Colby; married 1929 to Ann (Ahlstrand) Ely (1889-1963); third cousin of Oliver Carroll Clay (1849-1929); third cousin twice removed of John P. Colby; fourth cousin once removed of Frederick Myron Colby.
  Political families: Clay family of Kentucky; Colby family of Warner, New Hampshire (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Epitaph: "Faithful Public Servant."
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: Library of Congress
  Archer Woodford (1899-1955) — of Kentucky. Born in Paris, Bourbon County, Ky., June 11, 1899. U.S. Vice Consul in Sao Paulo, as of 1924; Rio de Janeiro, as of 1927; Puerto Cortes, as of 1929; Berlin, as of 1932; U.S. Consul in Berlin, as of 1935; Maracaibo, 1936-39; Hamburg, 1940-41; Luanda, as of 1943-44. Died September 10, 1955 (age 56 years, 91 days). Interment at Paris Cemetery, Paris, Ky.
  Relatives: Son of Benjamin Walker Woodford (1858-1940) and Alice (Brooks) Woodford (1858-1925); married, July 29, 1936, to Edith M. Pauli; first cousin five times removed of John Walker, Matthew Clay, Green Clay and Francis Walker; first cousin six times removed of George Washington; second cousin four times removed of Meriwether Lewis (1774-1809), Henry Clay, Porter Clay and Cassius Marcellus Clay; second cousin five times removed of Bushrod Washington; third cousin once removed of Oliver Carroll Clay; third cousin thrice removed of Thomas Walker Gilmer, Thomas Hart Clay, Henry Clay, Jr. and James Brown Clay.
  Political families: Pendleton-Lee family; Demarest-Meriwether family of New Jersey; Marshall-Harrison-Randolph-Cabell family of Virginia; Meriwether-Kellogg-Tyler family of Virginia and Connecticut; Washington family; Clay family of Kentucky (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
"Enjoy the hospitable entertainment of a political graveyard."
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The Political Graveyard

The Political Graveyard is a web site about U.S. political history and cemeteries. Founded in 1996, it is the Internet's most comprehensive free source for American political biography, listing 312,576 politicians, living and dead.
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