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Politicians in Trouble or Disgrace

Politicians in Trouble: C

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  Joseph J. Cahill — of Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y. Saloon keeper; member of New York state assembly, 1891-94 (Kings County 1st District 1891-92, Kings County 4th District 1893-94). Convicted of perjury, December 8, 1905, in an election fraud case. Burial location unknown.
  Róger Calero (b. 1969) — of Bronx, Bronx County, N.Y. Born in Nicaragua, 1969. Socialist. Not U.S. citizen; meat packer; journalist; convicted of sale of marijuana, 1988; arrested in 2002, at the Houston airport, while returning from Cuba, and jailed, while deportation proceedings were started, but released in 2003; Socialist Workers candidate for President of the United States, 2004, 2008; Socialist Workers candidate for U.S. Senator from New York, 2006; Socialist Workers candidate for U.S. Representative from New York 15th District, 2010. Nicaraguan ancestry. Still living as of 2010.
  See also Wikipedia article — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Miles M. Callaghan (1868-1944) — of Reed City, Osceola County, Mich. Born in Portland, Ionia County, Mich., October 7, 1868. Republican. Hardware dealer; fruit farmer; member of Michigan state house of representatives from Osceola District, 1929-36, 1943-44; resigned 1944; member of Michigan state senate 28th District, 1937-40; defeated in primary, 1940; charged on January 22, 1944 (along with 19 other current and former state legislators) with accepting bribes; pleaded guilty and testified against others. Suffered a stroke, and died, in Reed City, Osceola County, Mich., August 22, 1944 (age 75 years, 320 days). Burial location unknown.
  Tunis George Campbell (1812-1891) — also known as Tunis G. Campbell — of McIntosh County, Ga. Born in Middlebrook (unknown county), N.J., April 1, 1812. Minister; abolitionist; delegate to Georgia state constitutional convention, 1867; member of Georgia state senate, 1868, 1869-72; expelled 1868; defeated, 1872; expelled from the Georgia State Senate in 1868 based on the claim that only whites could serve; charged with falsely imprisoning white men as Justice of of the Peace, and served a year of hard labor in Georgia's brutal leased labor system. Methodist. African ancestry. Died in Boston, Suffolk County, Mass., December 4, 1891 (age 79 years, 247 days). Burial location unknown.
  James N. Canham — of Detroit, Wayne County, Mich. Lawyer; circuit judge in Michigan 3rd Circuit, 1961-77; appointed 1961. Acted as a go-between between Michigan Court of Appeals Judge S. Jerome Bronson and an attorney from whom a bribe was solicited. Arrested in November 1986; in return for immunity from prosecution, he helped to implicate Judge Bronson, who killed himself the same day he was arrested. Because he aided and abetted bribery, Canham's license to practice law was subsequently revoked. Still living as of 1986.
  George Quayle Cannon (1827-1901) — also known as George Q. Cannon — of Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Utah. Born in Liverpool, England, January 11, 1827. Democrat. Went to California for the 1849 Gold Rush; member Utah territorial council, 1865-66, 1869-72; Delegate to U.S. Congress from Utah Territory, 1873-81; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Utah Territory, 1880 (not seated). Mormon. Had five wives and 32 children; spent six months in federal penitentiary for cohabitation. Died in Monterey, Monterey County, Calif., April 12, 1901 (age 74 years, 91 days). Interment at Salt Lake City Cemetery, Salt Lake City, Utah.
  Relatives: Son of George Cannon (1794-1844) and Ann (Quayle) Cannon (1798-1842); brother of Angus Munn Cannon (1834-1915; who married Martha Maria Hughes); father of Frank Jenne Cannon; third great-granduncle of David Nelson; relative *** of Donald James Cannon (1919-1998).
  Political family: Cannon family of Salt Lake City, Utah.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
James P. Cannon James Patrick Cannon (1890-1974) — also known as James P. Cannon — of New York. Born in Rosedale (now part of Kansas City), Wyandotte County, Kan., 1890. Socialist. Candidate for U.S. Representative from New York, 1922 (Workers, 10th District), 1928 (20th District); Workers candidate for Governor of New York, 1924; Trotskyist Anti-War candidate for mayor of New York City, N.Y., 1941. Irish ancestry. Became an open supporter of Leon Trotsky's opposition to Stalin about 1928, and was expelled from the Communist Party; became a major Trotskyist leader and theoretician, and one of the founders of the Socialist Workers Party. Arrested in 1941 and charged under the Smith Act; convicted in 1943, and served sixteen months in federal prison. Died in 1974 (age about 84 years). Burial location unknown.
  Books about James P. Cannon: Bryan D. Palmer, James P. Cannon and the Origins of the American Revolutionary Left, 1890-1928
  Image source: The Militant, July 2, 1956
  Albert Cardozo (1828-1885) — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., December 21, 1828. Lawyer; a close ally of corrupt New York City political boss William M. Tweed; Justice of New York Supreme Court 1st District, 1868-72; resigned 1872; in 1872, an effort was made to impeach him, along with Justice George G. Barnard, on charges that they abused judicial power in various ways to serve Boss Tweed, as well as "robber barons" Jay Gould and Jim Fisk; rather than go through an impeachment trial, Cardozo resigned from the bench; meanwhile, Barnard's impeachment went forward, and he was unanimously convicted. Jewish. Portugese ancestry. Died, from Bright's disease, in New York, New York County, N.Y., November 8, 1885 (age 56 years, 322 days). Interment at Cypress Hills Cemetery, Brooklyn, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Michael H. Cardozo and Ellen (Hart) Cardozo; married to Rebecca Washington Nathan; father of Benjamin Nathan Cardozo (1870-1938).
  See also Wikipedia article
  Archibald James Carey (1868-1931) — also known as Archibald J. Carey — of Jacksonville, Duval County, Fla.; Chicago, Cook County, Ill. Born in slavery, in Georgia, August 25, 1868. Republican. School teacher and principal; president, Edward Waters College, Jacksonville, Fla., 1895; minister; bishop; delegate to Illinois state constitutional convention 3rd District, 1920-22; alternate delegate to Republican National Convention from Illinois, 1924; member, Chicago Civil Service Commission, 1927-29; indicted in 1929 on charges of accepting bribes from job applicants; the case never came to trial. African Methodist Episcopal. African ancestry. Died, from heart disease, in Billings Memorial Hospital, Chicago, Cook County, Ill., March 23, 1931 (age 62 years, 210 days). Interment at Lincoln Cemetery, Blue Island, Ill.
  Relatives: Son of Ann Carey (1845-1879) and Jefferson Alexander Carey (1849-1919); married to Elizabeth D. Davis (1867-1936); father of Archibald James Carey, Jr. (1908-1981).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Mary Carey (b. 1981) — also known as Mary Ellen Cook — of California. Born in Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, Ohio, June 15, 1981. Actress in pornographic movies; Independent candidate for Governor of California, 2003; arrested in April 2005 during a raid on a strip club in Lakewood, Wash.; charged with touching herself while dancing; pleaded guilty and received a suspended sentence. Female. Still living as of 2013.
  See also Wikipedia article — Internet Movie Database profile
  Peter B. Carey (1886-1943) — of Chicago, Cook County, Ill. Born in Chicago, Cook County, Ill., November 3, 1886. Democrat. President, Chicago Board of Trade, 1932-35; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Illinois, 1932, 1936, 1940; delegate to Illinois convention to ratify 21st amendment, 1933; Cook County Sheriff, 1942-43. Died, amidst a scandal in his department, from a heart ailment, in Sacred Heart Sanitarium, Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, Wis., November 1, 1943 (age 56 years, 363 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Married to Mary Frances Angsten.
  Tito Carinci (1928-2006) — of Newport, Campbell County, Ky.; Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, Calif. Born December 15, 1928. President and manager of the Glenn Hotel and the Tropicana bar and casino; arrested in 1961 on obstruction of justice charges; candidate in primary for mayor of Newport, Ky., 1963. Died November 12, 2006 (age 77 years, 332 days). Burial location unknown.
  William Henry Carroll (1810-1868) — also known as William H. Carroll — of Memphis, Shelby County, Tenn. Born in Nashville, Davidson County, Tenn., 1810. Democrat. Postmaster at Memphis, Tenn., 1853-60; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Tennessee, 1860; general in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; Gen. Braxton Bragg had him arrested for drunkenness, and he resigned from the army. Died in Montreal, Quebec, May 3, 1868 (age about 57 years). Interment at Elmwood Cemetery, Memphis, Tenn.
  Relatives: Son of William Carroll and Cecilia (Bradford) Carroll (1792-1848); brother of Mary Catherine Carroll (1816-1842; who married Caleb Cushing Norvell); father of William Henry Carroll (1842-1915).
  Political family: Conway-Norvell-Johnson family.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Joseph Edward Casey (1898-1980) — also known as Joseph E. Casey — of Clinton, Worcester County, Mass. Born in Clinton, Worcester County, Mass., December 27, 1898. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army during World War I; lawyer; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Massachusetts, 1924 (alternate), 1932, 1940, 1944, 1948; U.S. Representative from Massachusetts 3rd District, 1935-43; defeated, 1926, 1928; candidate for U.S. Senator from Massachusetts, 1942. Catholic. Member, Knights of Columbus; Elks; Eagles; American Legion. In 1951-52, a U.S. Senate committee investigated transactions in which a group he led made enormous profits from the purchase and re-sale of surplus U.S. tanker ships following World War II; since federal law required that sales be made only to U.S. citizens, his group allegedly set up several dummy corporations purportedly under American ccontrol, and faked financial statements for them, to buy the tankers on behalf of shipping magnate Aristotle Onassis. A federal indictment against him, over these actions, was unsealed in February 1954, but the charges were dismissed in September. Onassis, also indicted, pleaded guilty and paid a fine. Died September 1, 1980 (age 81 years, 249 days). Interment at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Va.
  Relatives: Son of John Edward Casey and Winifred M. (Carey) Casey; married to Constance Dudley.
  Cross-reference: Julius C. Holmes — Edward R. Stettinius, Jr.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  John Logan Cashin, Jr. (1928-2011) — also known as John L. Cashin, Jr. — of Huntsville, Madison County, Ala.; Washington, D.C. Born in Huntsville, Madison County, Ala., April 16, 1928. Democrat. Dentist; candidate for mayor of Huntsville, Ala., 1964; National Democratic candidate for Governor of Alabama, 1970. African ancestry. Convicted of theft and perjury in 1982; served 17 months in federal prison. Died, of renal failure and pneumonia, in Specialty Hospital of Washington-Hadley, Washington, D.C., March 21, 2011 (age 82 years, 339 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Married 1958 to John Carpenter (died 1997); married 1998 to Louise White; grandson of Herschel Cashin (1836?-?).
  See also Wikipedia article
  Joseph Cassidy (c.1866-1920) — also known as "Curley Joe"; "The King of Queens" — of Long Island City (now part of Queens), Queens County, N.Y.; Far Rockaway, Queens, Queens County, N.Y. Born about 1866. Democrat. Borough president of Queens, New York, 1902-05; defeated, 1905, 1909; delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1904; leader of Queens County Democratic Party, 1910-11; indicted in 1912 for selling a nomination for for Supreme Court Justice to William Willett; convicted in 1914, and sentenced to one year to eighteen months in prison; released in 1916. Suffered a stroke of apoplexy, and died soon after, in Far Rockaway, Queens, Queens County, N.Y., November 21, 1920 (age about 54 years). Burial location unknown.
  William T. Casto (1824-1862) — Born January 24, 1824. Lawyer; mayor of Maysville, Ky., 1850; arrested in 1861 and imprisoned for allegedly aiding the Confederacy; released in 1862. Blamed Col. Leonidas Metcalfe (son of Gov. Thomas Metcalfe) for his imprisonment; challenged him to a duel; the weapons were Colt rifles at 60 yards; Casto was shot and killed on the first fire, in Bracken County, Ky., May 8, 1862 (age 38 years, 104 days). Interment at Maysville Cemetery, Maysville, Ky.
  Relatives: Son of Abijah Casto.
  Epitaph: "A Patriot, his Country's firm unwavering friend, he was willing to die for his Principles and as a man of Honor nobly fell a Veteran of the sacred and invincible right of personal liberty."
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Andrew L. Cetraro (born c.1976) — of Bozeman, Gallatin County, Mont. Born in Bozeman, Gallatin County, Mont., about 1976. Restaurant owner; mayor of Bozeman, Mont., 2004-05. Arrested at his home in November 2005; accused of assaulting his pregnant wife while intoxicated; arraigned on misdemeanor charges; pleaded not guilty. Still living as of 2005.
  Ralph W. Chandless — of Bergen County, N.J. Member of New Jersey state house of assembly from Bergen County, 1924-28; Speaker of the New Jersey State House of Assembly, 1926; member of New Jersey state senate from Bergen County, 1929-30. Expelled from the state senate, December 5, 1930. Burial location unknown.
  John Winthrop Chanler (1826-1877) — also known as John W. Chanler — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in New York, New York County, N.Y., September 14, 1826. Democrat. Lawyer; member of New York state assembly from New York County 10th District, 1858-59; U.S. Representative from New York 7th District, 1863-69. On May 14, 1866, he offered a resolution defending President Andrew Johnson's veto of Reconstruction enactments, which he called "the wicked and revolutionary acts of a few malignant and mischievous men." On motion of Rep. Robert C. Schenck, he was censured for insulting the House of Representatives. Died in Barrytown, Dutchess County, N.Y., October 19, 1877 (age 51 years, 35 days). Interment at Trinity Cemetery, Manhattan, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of John White Chanler (1785-1853) and Elizabeth Sheriffe (Winthrop) Chanler (1791-1866); married, January 22, 1862, to Margaret Astor Ward (1838-1875; first cousin of William Waldorf Astor); father of William Astor Chanler and Lewis Stuyvesant Chanler (1869-1942).
  Political family: Livingston-Schuyler family of New York (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Samuel Chase (1741-1811) — of Maryland. Born near Princess Anne, Somerset County, Md., April 17, 1741. Delegate to Continental Congress from Maryland, 1774-78, 1781-82, 1783-85; signer, Declaration of Independence, 1776; state court judge in Maryland, 1788; Associate Justice of U.S. Supreme Court, 1796-1811; died in office 1811. Episcopalian. Articles of impeachment were filed against him in 1804 on charges of malfeasance in office; tried by the Senate in 1805 and acquitted of all charges. Died in Washington, D.C., June 19, 1811 (age 70 years, 63 days). Interment at Old St. Paul's Cemetery, Baltimore, Md.
  Cross-reference: Luther Martin
  See also congressional biography — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Simon M. Cherivtch (1914-2001) — also known as "Uncle Simon" — of Millville, Cumberland County, N.J. Born April 16, 1914. Butcher; automobile dealer; mayor of Millville, N.J., 1948-53. Charged in 1949 with federal income tax evasion, based on his underreporting of income in 1944-45; tried, convicted, and sentenced to a year and a day in federal prison; released after five months. Died March 26, 2001 (age 86 years, 344 days). Burial location unknown.
  James Chesnut, Jr. (1815-1885) — of Camden, Kershaw District (now Kershaw County), S.C. Born near Camden, Kershaw County, S.C., January 18, 1815. Democrat. Member of South Carolina state house of representatives, 1842; member of South Carolina state senate, 1854; U.S. Senator from South Carolina, 1858-60; delegate to South Carolina secession convention from Kershaw, 1860-62; Delegate from South Carolina to the Confederate Provisional Congress, 1861-62; candidate for Senator from South Carolina in the Confederate Congress, 1861; general in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; delegate to Democratic National Convention from South Carolina, 1868, 1872. When the Civil War began, he left Washington but did not resign his seat in the Senate; one of ten Southern senators expelled in absentia on July 11, 1861. Died in Camden, Kershaw County, S.C., February 1, 1885 (age 70 years, 14 days). Interment at Knights Hill Cemetery, Camden, S.C.
  Relatives: Son-in-law of Stephen Decatur Miller (1787-1838).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  W. D. Childers (born c.1934) — Born about 1934. Member of Florida state senate, 1980; Escambia County Commissioner. Convicted in 2002 of violating the Florida Sunshine Law by discussing public business in private with other other county commissioners; served 38 days in prison; convicted in 2003 of bribery; sentenced to 3.5 years in prison; free pending appeal. Still living as of 2006.
  Joshua Chilton (1818-1862) — of Shannon County, Mo. Born in Wayne County, Tenn., September 28, 1818. Democrat. Member of Missouri state house of representatives from Shannon County, 1846-55; member of Missouri state senate 24th District, 1860-61. Member, Freemasons. Arrested by Union troops as an alleged Southern sympathizer, and while a prisoner, was shot and killed, near Rolla, Phelps County, Mo., August 28, 1862 (age 43 years, 334 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Thomas Boggs Chilton (1782-1865) and Susannah (Inman) Chilton (1785-1827); married to Elizabeth Chilton (1822-1899); father of Commodore Perry Chilton; uncle of Shadrach Chilton; first cousin twice removed of John Smith (1750-1836); second cousin of Thomas Chilton and William Parish Chilton; second cousin twice removed of Horace George Chilton and Arthur Bounds Chilton.
  Political family: Chilton family of Missouri.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  William Dudley Chipley (1840-1897) — also known as W. D. Chipley — of Pensacola, Escambia County, Fla. Born in Columbus, Muscogee County, Ga., June 6, 1840. Democrat. Colonel in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; fought against Reconstruction along with other members of the Ku Klux Klan; he was among those implicated in the murder of George W. Ashburn in in 1868; tried in a military court, but Georgia's re-admission to the Union ended military jurisdiction, so he and his co-defendants were released; general manager of the Pensacola Railroad; successfully promoted the construction of the Pensacola and Atlanta Railroad in 1881-83; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Florida, 1884, 1892; mayor of Pensacola, Fla., 1887-88; member of Florida state senate, 1895-97. Died in a hospital at Washington, D.C., December 1, 1897 (age 57 years, 178 days). Interment at Linwood Cemetery, Columbus, Ga.
  Relatives: Son of Dr. William Stout Chipley (1810-1880) and Elizabeth (Fannin) Chipley (1819-1873); brother of Stephen Fannin Chipley (1838-1898); married to Ann Elizabeth Billups (1848-1910).
  The city of Chipley, Florida, is named for him.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Vincent Albert Cianci (1941-2016) — also known as Buddy Cianci — of Providence, Providence County, R.I. Born in Providence, Providence County, R.I., April 30, 1941. Republican. Lawyer; mayor of Providence, R.I., 1975-84, 1991-2002; speaker, Republican National Convention, 1976 ; candidate for Governor of Rhode Island, 1980; talk show host. Italian ancestry. Pleaded no contest in 1984 to charges that he beat his estranged wife's lover with a fireplace log. Charged with twelve federal counts of bribery, conspiracy and racketeering; convicted in June, 2002 on two counts. Died in Providence, Providence County, R.I., January 28, 2016 (age 74 years, 273 days). Interment at St. Ann's Cemetery, Cranston, R.I.
  Campaign slogan (1991): "He never stopped caring about Providence."
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books by Vincent Cianci: Politics and Pasta: How I Prosecuted Mobsters, Rebuilt a Dying City, Dined with Sinatra, Spent Five Years in a Federally Funded Gated Community, and Lived to Tell the Tale (2011)
  Books about Buddy Cianci: Mike Stanton, The Prince of Providence : The True Story of Buddy Cianci, America's Most Notorious Mayor, Some Wiseguys, and the Feds
  Henry J. Cianfrani (1923-2002) — also known as "Buddy Brown"; "The Pizza" — of Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa. Born in a hospital, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., March 19, 1923. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army during World War II; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Pennsylvania, 1956, 1960, 1964; member of Pennsylvania state house of representatives, 1963-66; member of Pennsylvania state senate 1st District, 1967-78. Catholic. Member, Veterans of Foreign Wars; American Legion; Sons of Italy. Convicted in 1977 on federal charges of racketeering and mail fraud for padding his Senate payroll; sentenced to five years in federal prison; served 27 months; released in 1980. Died, following a stroke, in Hahnemann University Hospital, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., July 3, 2002 (age 79 years, 106 days). Burial location unknown.
  Cross-reference: Robert A. Brady
  Henry Gabriel Cisneros (b. 1947) — also known as Henry G. Cisneros — of San Antonio, Bexar County, Tex. Born in San Antonio, Bexar County, Tex., June 11, 1947. Mayor of San Antonio, Tex., 1981-89; U.S. Secretary of Housing and Urban Development, 1993-97. Hispanic ancestry. In 1995, an independent counsel was appointed to investigate allegations that he had made false statements to the FBI about payments he made to his mistress; indicted in 1997 on 18 counts of conspiracy, making false statements, and obstruction of justice; pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor count of lying to the FBI, and was fined $10,000; pardoned in 2001 by President Bill Clinton. Still living as of 2014.
  Relatives: Son of George Cisneros and Elvira Cisneros; married 1969 to Mary Alice Perez (1949?-).
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile
  Books by Henry Cisneros: Mayor : An Inside View of San Antonio Politics, 1981-1995 (1997)
  Books about Henry Cisneros: Elizabeth Coonrod Martinez, Henry Cisneros : Mexican-American Leader (for young readers)
  August Claessens (1885-1954) — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y.; Bronx, Bronx County, N.Y.; Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y. Born in Switzerland, 1885. School teacher; candidate for U.S. Representative from New York, 1914 (Socialist, 15th District), 1924 (Socialist, 23rd District), 1928 (Socialist, 14th District), 1930 (Socialist, 18th District), 1932 (Socialist, 14th District), 1934 (Socialist, at-large), 1946 (Liberal, 10th District), 1948 (Liberal, 8th District), 1950 (Liberal, 8th District); member of New York state assembly from New York County 17th District, 1918-20, 1922; defeated, 1915 (Socialist, New York County 26th District); expelled 1920, 1920; defeated, 1920 (Socialist, New York County 17th District), 1922 (Socialist, New York County 17th District), 1923 (Socialist, New York County 17th District), 1925 (Socialist, Bronx County 4th District), 1937 (American Labor, Kings County 4th District), 1938 (American Labor, Kings County 14th District), 1954 (Liberal, Kings County 14th District); delegate to Socialist National Convention from New York, 1920; Socialist candidate for Lieutenant Governor of New York, 1926; American Labor candidate for New York state senate 11th District, 1940. Expelled from the New York State Assembly over alleged disloyalty, along with the other four Socialist members, April 1, 1920; re-elected to the same seat in a special election, and expelled again on September 21. Died, following a heart attack, at Brooklyn Jewish Hospital, Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y., December 9, 1954 (age about 69 years). Interment at Cedar Grove Cemetery, Flushing, Queens, N.Y.
  Relatives: Married 1912 to Hilda Goldstein (1890?-1932); married to Anna Glassman.
  See also Wikipedia article
  Harry E. Claiborne (c.1918-2004) — of Las Vegas, Clark County, Nev. Born in McRae, White County, Ark., about 1918. Democrat. Lawyer; member of Nevada state house of representatives, 1950; candidate in primary for U.S. Senator from Nevada, 1964; U.S. District Judge for Nevada, 1979-86; convicted in 1984 of tax evasion, and sentenced to two years in prison; impeached in 1986 by the U.S. House and convicted (removed from office) by the Senate. Died from a self-inflicted gunshot wound, in Las Vegas, Clark County, Nev., January 19, 2004 (age about 86 years). Burial location unknown.
  Michael J. Clancy (b. 1913) — of Detroit, Wayne County, Mich. Born in County Clare, Ireland, September 9, 1913. Democrat. Member of Michigan state house of representatives from Wayne County 1st District, 1937-40; defeated in primary, 1942; charged on January 22, 1944 (along with 19 other current and former state legislators) with accepting bribes, but not tried and convicted with the others. Catholic. Irish ancestry. Presumed deceased. Burial location unknown.
  Charles Clark (1810-1877) — of Mississippi. Born February 19, 1810. Democrat. Delegate to Democratic National Convention from Mississippi, 1860; general in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; Governor of Mississippi, 1863-65. Physically removed from office by U.S. troops at the end of the Civil War, and imprisoned at Fort Pulaski, Savannah, Ga. Died in Bolivar County, Miss., December 18, 1877 (age 67 years, 302 days). Interment a private or family graveyard, Bolivar County, Miss.
  John Bullock Clark (1802-1885) — also known as John B. Clark — of Fayette, Howard County, Mo. Born in Madison County, Ky., April 17, 1802. Democrat. Lawyer; Howard County Court Clerk, 1824-34; colonel in the U.S. Army during the Black Hawk War; member of Missouri state house of representatives, 1850-51; U.S. Representative from Missouri 3rd District, 1857-61; expelled 1861; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Missouri, 1860; expelled from Congress in July 1861 for having taken up arms against the union; Delegate from Missouri to the Confederate Provisional Congress, 1861-62; Senator from Missouri in the Confederate Congress, 1862-64; Representative from Missouri in the Confederate Congress, 1864-65. Died in Fayette, Howard County, Mo., October 29, 1885 (age 83 years, 195 days). Interment at Fayette City Cemetery, Fayette, Mo.
  Relatives: Father of John Bullock Clark, Jr. (1831-1903); nephew of Christopher Henderson Clark and James Clark.
  Political family: Clark family.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
Cassius M. Clay Cassius Marcellus Clay (1810-1903) — also known as Cassius M. Clay; "The Lion of White Hall" — of Madison County, Ky. Born in Madison County, Ky., October 19, 1810. Probably the best-known Southern emancipationist; freed his own slaves in 1844 and edited the only Southern antislavery newspaper in 1845-47; member of Kentucky state house of representatives, 1835-37, 1840; delegate to Whig National Convention from Kentucky, 1839 (speaker); shot point-blank during a speech in 1843, he used a Bowie knife to cut off the attacker's ear and nose and cut out one eye; tried for mayhem and found not guilty; served in the U.S. Army during the Mexican War; candidate for Republican nomination for Vice President, 1860; U.S. Minister to Russia, 1861-62, 1863-69; general in the Union Army during the Civil War. Died, of kidney failure, in Madison County, Ky., July 22, 1903 (age 92 years, 276 days). Interment at Richmond Cemetery, Richmond, Ky.
  Relatives: Son of Green Clay and Sally (Lewis) Clay (1776-1867); brother of Brutus Junius Clay (1808-1878); married to Mary Jane Warfield; father of Brutus Junius Clay (1847-1932) and Laura Clay; nephew of Matthew Clay (1754-1815); uncle of William Cassius Goodloe (1841-1889); first cousin of Matthew Clay (1795?-1827); second cousin of Henry Clay (1777-1852) and Porter Clay; second cousin once removed of Thomas Hart Clay, Henry Clay, Jr. and James Brown Clay; second cousin twice removed of Henry Clay (1849-1884); second cousin thrice removed of Oliver Carroll Clay; second cousin four times removed of Archer Woodford; third cousin of Clement Comer Clay; third cousin once removed of Clement Claiborne Clay, Jr..
  Political families: Clay family of Kentucky; Wilson-Dunn-Goodloe family of Indiana (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Other politicians named for him: Cassius M. C. TwitchellCassius C. PillsburyCassius C. Dowell
  See also Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: The South in the Building of the Nation (1909)
  Clement Claiborne Clay, Jr. (1816-1882) — of Huntsville, Madison County, Ala. Born in Huntsville, Madison County, Ala., December 13, 1816. Democrat. Member of Alabama state house of representatives, 1842; state court judge in Alabama, 1846; U.S. Senator from Alabama, 1853-61; Senator from Alabama in the Confederate Congress, 1862-64. Suspected of conspiring with other Confederates to assassinate President Abraham Lincoln, he was imprisoned for nearly a year after the war. Died near Gurley, Madison County, Ala., January 3, 1882 (age 65 years, 21 days). Interment at Maple Hill Cemetery, Huntsville, Ala.
  Relatives: Son of Clement Comer Clay; married, February 1, 1843, to Virginia Caroline Tunstall (1825-1915; who later married David Clopton (1820-1892)); second cousin twice removed of Matthew Clay (1754-1815) and Green Clay; third cousin once removed of Henry Clay (1777-1852), Porter Clay, Matthew Clay (1795?-1827), Brutus Junius Clay (1808-1878) and Cassius Marcellus Clay; fourth cousin of Thomas Hart Clay, James Brown Clay and Brutus Junius Clay (1847-1932); fourth cousin once removed of Henry Clay (1849-1884).
  Political families: Clay family of Kentucky; Ligon-Clay-Clopton family of Montgomery and Tuskegee, Alabama (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Coins and currency: His portrait appeared on Confederate States $1 notes in 1862-64.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  Robert L. Clifford (1924-2014) — of Chester Township, Morris County, N.J. Born in Passaic, Passaic County, N.J., December 17, 1924. Served in the U.S. Navy during World War II; associate justice of New Jersey state supreme court, 1973-94; convicted of drunk driving in 1989. Member, American Bar Association; American Judicature Society. Died in Chester Township, Morris County, N.J., November 29, 2014 (age 89 years, 347 days). Burial location unknown.
  See also Wikipedia article
  Thomas Lanier Clingman (1812-1897) — also known as Thomas L. Clingman; "The Prince of Politicians" — of Asheville, Buncombe County, N.C. Born in Huntsville, Yadkin County, N.C., July 27, 1812. Democrat. Member of North Carolina state legislature, 1840; U.S. Representative from North Carolina, 1843-45, 1847-58 (1st District 1843-45, 1847-53, 8th District 1853-58); U.S. Senator from North Carolina, 1858-61; delegate to Democratic National Convention from North Carolina, 1868, 1876 (member, Resolutions Committee). When the Civil War began, he left Washington but did not resign his seat in the Senate; one of ten Southern senators expelled in absentia on July 11, 1861. Died in Morganton, Burke County, N.C., November 3, 1897 (age 85 years, 99 days). Interment at Riverside Cemetery, Asheville, N.C.
  Clingman's Dome, a mountain on the border between Sevier County, Tennessee, and Swain County, North Carolina, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  William Jefferson Clinton (b. 1946) — also known as Bill Clinton; William Jefferson Blythe IV; "Slick Willie"; "Bubba"; "Elvis"; "Eagle"; "The Big Dog" — of Arkansas; Chappaqua, Westchester County, N.Y. Born in Hope, Hempstead County, Ark., August 19, 1946. Democrat. Rhodes scholar; candidate for U.S. Representative from Arkansas 3rd District, 1974; Arkansas state attorney general, 1977-79; Governor of Arkansas, 1979-81, 1983-92; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Arkansas, 1996, 2000; speaker, 1984, 1988; President of the United States, 1993-2001; delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 2004, 2008. Baptist. Member, Trilateral Commission; Council on Foreign Relations; Phi Beta Kappa; Pi Sigma Alpha; Phi Alpha Delta; American Bar Association. On October 29, 1994, Francisco Duran fired 27 shots from the sidewalk at the White House in an apparent assassination attempt against President Clinton. Impeached by the House of Representatives in December 1998 over allegations of perjury and obstruction of justice in connection with his sexual contact with a White House intern, Monica Lewinsky, but acquitted by the Senate. Still living as of 2020.
  Relatives: Step-son of Roger Clinton; son of William Jefferson Blythe II and Virginia (Cassidy) Clinton (1923-1994); married, October 11, 1975, to Hillary Diane Rodham (sister of Hugh Edwin Rodham); father of Chelsea Clinton (daughter-in-law of Edward Maurice Mezvinsky and Marjorie Margolies-Mezvinsky); third cousin twice removed of James Alexander Lockhart (1850-1905).
  Political families: Clinton family of Wadesboro, North Carolina; Ashe-Polk family of North Carolina (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Cross-reference: Abraham J. Hirschfeld — Kenneth W. Starr — Rahm Emanuel — Henry G. Cisneros — Maria Echaveste — Thurgood Marshall, Jr. — Walter S. Orlinsky — Charles F. C. Ruff — Sean Patrick Maloney — Lanny J. Davis
  The William Jefferson Clinton Federal Building (built 1934; renamed for Clinton 2012) in Washington, D.C., is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Books by Bill Clinton: Between Hope and History : Meeting America's Challenges for the 21st Century (1996) — My Life (2004)
  Books about Bill Clinton: David Maraniss, First in His Class : The Biography of Bill Clinton — Joe Conason, The Hunting of the President : The Ten-Year Campaign to Destroy Bill and Hillary Clinton — Gene Lyons, Fools for Scandal : How the Media Invented Whitewater — Sidney Blumenthal, The Clinton Wars — Dewayne Wickham, Bill Clinton and Black America — Joe Klein, The Natural : The Misunderstood Presidency of Bill Clinton — Nigel Hamilton, Bill Clinton: An American Journey — Bob Woodward, The Agenda: Inside the Clinton White House — George Stephanopolous, All Too Human — John F. Harris, The Survivor : Bill Clinton in the White House — Mark Katz, Clinton & Me: A Real Life Political Comedy — Michael Takiff, A Complicated Man: The Life of Bill Clinton as Told by Those Who Know Him — Tim O'Shei, Bill Clinton (for young readers)
  Critical books about Bill Clinton: Barbara Olson, The Final Days : The Last, Desperate Abuses of Power by the Clinton White House — Meredith L. Oakley, On the Make : The Rise of Bill Clinton — Robert Patterson, Dereliction of Duty: The Eyewitness Account of How Bill Clinton Endangered America's Long-Term National Security — Ambrose Evans-Pritchard, The Secret Life of Bill Clinton: The Unreported Stories — Ann Coulter, High Crimes and Misdemeanors: The Case Against Bill Clinton — Dick Morris & Eileen McGann, Because He Could — Jack Cashill, Ron Brown's Body : How One Man's Death Saved the Clinton Presidency and Hillary's Future — Christopher Hitchens, No One Left To Lie To: The Values of the Worst Family — Rich Lowry, Legacy: Paying the Price for the Clinton Years — Richard Miniter, Losing Bin Laden : How Bill Clinton's Failures Unleashed Global Terror
  David Keith Cobb (b. 1962) — also known as David Cobb — Born in San Leon, Galveston County, Tex., December 24, 1962. Green. Lawyer; candidate for Texas state attorney general, 2002; candidate for President of the United States, 2004. Arrested, in St. Louis, Mo., on October 8, 2004, along with Libertarian Party presidential nominee Michael Bednarik, while protesting their exclusion from presidential debates. Still living as of 2004.
  See also Wikipedia article — Internet Movie Database profile — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Helen Cobb (c.1922-1999) — of San Diego, San Diego County, Calif. Born in Wichita, Sedgwick County, Kan., about 1922. Candidate in primary for mayor of San Diego, Calif., 1963. Female. Member, League of Women Voters. Indicted in 1970 on bribery conspiracy charges in connection with the "Yellow Cab Scandal"; acquitted. Died, from complications of emphysema and diabetes, at Chase Medical Center, El Cajon, San Diego County, Calif., March 8, 1999 (age about 77 years). Burial location unknown.
  Beryl W. Cohen (born c.1935) — of Brookline, Norfolk County, Mass. Born about 1935. Democrat. Lawyer; alternate delegate to Democratic National Convention from Massachusetts, 1964; member of Massachusetts state senate, 1965-70; won fame for his representation of long-term residents of a Massachusetts institution for the mentally retarded; censured in 1983 and disciplined in 1988 for attorney misconduct, over neglect of probate matters. Still living as of 2007.
  Henry Clay Cole (1838-1881) — also known as Henry C. Cole — of Kokomo, Howard County, Ind. Born in Ripley County, Ind., 1838. Physician; mayor of Kokomo, Ind., 1881; died in office 1881. Shot and killed by a sheriff's posse, allegedly while he was attempting to rob and burn a grist mill, in Kokomo, Howard County, Ind., September 19, 1881 (age about 43 years). The shooters were personal enemies of his, so some suspected a conspiracy. Four members of the posse were indicted for manslaughter by a grand jury, but the charges were later dismissed. Interment at Crown Point Cemetery, Kokomo, Ind.
  Presumably named for: Henry Clay
  Relatives: Son of Jesse Cole and Elizabeth (Roberts) Cole.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
David G. Colson David Grant Colson (1861-1904) — also known as David G. Colson — of Pineville, Bell County, Ky.; Middlesboro, Bell County, Ky. Born in Yellow Creek, Knox County (now Middlesboro, Bell County), Ky., April 1, 1861. Republican. Member of Kentucky state house of representatives, 1887-88; alternate delegate to Republican National Convention from Kentucky, 1888; candidate for Kentucky state treasurer, 1889; mayor of Middlesboro, Ky., 1893; U.S. Representative from Kentucky 11th District, 1895-99; served in the U.S. Army during the Spanish-American War; in January, 1900, he shot and killed a political rival, Ethelbert Scott, and two bystanders, in the lobby of the Capitol Hotel, Frankfort, Ky.; indicted for murder, and tried in April 1900; the jury returned a verdict of "not guilty" in 18 minutes. Died in Middlesboro, Bell County, Ky., September 27, 1904 (age 43 years, 179 days). Interment at Colson Cemetery, Middlesboro, Ky.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Image source: Detroit Free Press, January 18, 1900
  John J. Condon (1898-1971) — of Yonkers, Westchester County, N.Y. Born in Yonkers, Westchester County, N.Y., November 19, 1898. Republican. Auditor for the New York Central Railroad; mayor of Yonkers, N.Y., 1940-41; defeated, 1935; in December 1940, he was named as a conspirator in the indictment of Patrick Fitzgerald, who was charged with seeking a $3,000 bribe from pinball operators. Catholic. Irish ancestry. Member, Knights of Columbus. Died January 27, 1971 (age 72 years, 69 days). Interment at St. Mary's Cemetery, Yonkers, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of John J. Condon and Ellen Condon (c.1872-1941); first cousin of William F. Condon (1897-1972); first cousin once removed of William F. Condon, Jr..
  Political family: Condon family of Yonkers, New York.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Benn Conger (1856-1922) — of Groton, Tompkins County, N.Y. Born in Groton, Tompkins County, N.Y., October 29, 1856. President, Corona Typewriter Co.; member of New York state assembly from Tompkins County, 1900-01; member of New York state senate 41st District, 1909-10; resigned 1910. In 1910, he accused Sen. Jotham P. Allds, the majority leader, of accepting a bribe from bridge companies; Allds was investigated and ultimately resigned. Conger, who had also taken part in the bribery scheme, was criticized for not coming forward sooner; facing a likely attempt to expel him, he resigned a few days later. Died in Groton, Tompkins County, N.Y., February 28, 1922 (age 65 years, 122 days). Interment at Groton Rural Cemetery, Groton, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Corydon Wilson Conger (1826-1901) and Mary Jane (Brown) Conger (1830-1915); married 1880 to Florence C. Buck (1860-1945); third cousin twice removed of Hugh Conger; fourth cousin once removed of James Lockwood Conger, Anson Griffith Conger, Harmon Sweatland Conger, Omar Dwight Conger (1818-1898), Moore Conger, Frederick Ward Conger, Chauncey Stewart Conger and Charles Franklin Conger.
  Political families: Conger family of New York; Conger-Hungerford family (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  John Bowden Connally, Jr. (1917-1993) — also known as John B. Connally — of Fort Worth, Tarrant County, Tex. Born near Floresville, Wilson County, Tex., February 27, 1917. Lawyer; served in the U.S. Navy during World War II; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Texas, 1956, 1964; Governor of Texas, 1963-69; U.S. Secretary of the Treasury, 1971-72; candidate for Republican nomination for President, 1980. Methodist. Shot and wounded in Dallas, Tex., November 22, 1963, in the same volley of gunfire that killed President John F. Kennedy. Prosecuted for bribery conspiracy in connection with milk price supports; acquitted. Died of pulmonary fibrosis, in Methodist Hospital, Houston, Harris County, Tex., June 15, 1993 (age 76 years, 108 days). Interment at Texas State Cemetery, Austin, Tex.; statue at Sam Houston Park, Houston, Tex.
  Relatives: Son of John Bowden Connally, Sr. and Lela (Wright) Connally.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Maurice E. Connolly (1881-1935) — of Corona, Queens, Queens County, N.Y.; Forest Hills Gardens, Queens, Queens County, N.Y. Born in Corona, Queens, Queens County, N.Y., 1881. Democrat. Lawyer; borough president of Queens, New York, 1911-28; resigned 1928; delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1912, 1916, 1924; candidate for Justice of New York Supreme Court 2nd District, 1918; resigned as borough president in April, 1928 during an investigation of a sewer graft scandal; convicted in October 1928 of conspiracy to defraud the city; sentenced to one year in prison and fined $500; following an unsuccessful appeal, he served the prison sentence in 1930-31. Irish ancestry. Died, from a cerebral hemorrhage, in Forest Hills Gardens, Queens, Queens County, N.Y., November 24, 1935 (age about 54 years). Interment at Mount St. Mary Cemetery, Flushing, Queens, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Maurice Connolly and Mary Jane Connolly; married to Helen M. Connell; father of Helen F. Connolly (daughter-in-law of Leander Bernard Faber (1867-1950)).
  Cross-reference: Clarence J. Shearn
  Theophilus Eugene Connor (1897-1973) — also known as Bull Connor — of Birmingham, Jefferson County, Ala. Born in Selma, Dallas County, Ala., July 11, 1897. Democrat. Sports reporter on Birmingham radio; member of Alabama state house of representatives, 1935-37; Birmingham Commissioner of Public Safety, 1936-52, 1956-63; candidate in primary for Governor of Alabama, 1940, 1954; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Alabama, 1948, 1956, 1960, 1964, 1968; arrested on December 26, 1951, on being found having a tryst in a hotel room with his secretary, Christina Brown; convicted of adultery, fined and sentenced to jail, but the conviction was overturned in 1952; member of Democratic National Committee from Alabama, 1960-63; an ardent white supremacist; his use of police dogs and fire hoses against civil rights demonstrators in 1962-63 provoked national outrage; candidate for mayor of Birmingham, Ala., 1963. Died in Birmingham, Jefferson County, Ala., March 10, 1973 (age 75 years, 242 days). Interment at Elmwood Cemetery, Birmingham, Ala.
  Relatives: Son of Hugh King Connor Connor and Molly (Godwin) Connor; married 1920 to Beara Levens.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  John James Conyers, Jr. (1929-2019) — also known as John Conyers, Jr. — of Detroit, Wayne County, Mich. Born in Highland Park, Wayne County, Mich., May 16, 1929. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army during the Korean conflict; lawyer; U.S. Representative from Michigan, 1965-2017 (1st District 1965-93, 14th District 1993-2013, 13th District 2013-17); resigned 2017; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Michigan, 1968, 1972, 1976, 1984, 1988, 1996, 2000, 2004, 2008; arrested during an anti-apartheid protest outside the South African Embassy in Washington, 1984; candidate for mayor of Detroit, Mich., 1989; in 2017, it was reported that a former member of Conyers' staff had alleged that he had sexually harassed her, and had been paid a settlement of $27,000; subsequently, the House Ethics Committee started an investigation into multiple such allegations; he subsequently resigned from Congress. Baptist. African ancestry. Member, NAACP. Recipient of the Spingarn Medal, 2007. Died in Detroit, Wayne County, Mich., October 27, 2019 (age 90 years, 164 days). Entombed at Detroit Memorial Park East, Warren, Mich.
  Relatives: Son of John James Conyers (1905-1986) and Lucille Jane (Simpson) Conyers (1909-2000); brother of Nathan G. Conyers (1932-); married 1990 to Monica Esters.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — votes in Congress from the Washington Post — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  George Bradford Cook (b. 1936) — also known as G. Bradford Cook — of Chicago, Cook County, Ill. Born in Lincoln, Lancaster County, Neb., 1936. Chair, U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, 1973; resigned under fire from the SEC, following disclosure that he had modified a commission complaint to delete references to a secret $200,000 campaign contribution to President Richard Nixon's re-election campaign from fugitive financier Robert Vesco; admitted that he testified falsely to a Senate committee and to a grand jury investigating the matter; his license to practice law in Illinois and Nebraska was suspended for three years. Still living as of 1975.
  Relatives: Son of George Brash Cook (born 1910; insurance executive); married to Jo Anne Thatcher and Laura Armour.
  Louis P. Cooke (1811-1849) — of Texas. Born in Tennessee, 1811. Colonel in the Texas Army during the Texas War of Independence; member of Texas Republic House of Representatives, 1838-39, 1841-42; Texas Republic Secretary of the Navy, 1839-41. Charged in 1843 with the murder of Captain Mark Lewis; at trial, the jury deadlocked, and he escaped before a second trial could be held. Wounded in an Indian raid on Corpus Christi in 1844 and lost an eye. Died, of cholera, in Brownsville, Cameron County, Tex., 1849 (age about 38 years). Interment somewhere in New Orleans, La.
  Jerry Cosentino (c.1932-1997) — of Palos Heights, Cook County, Ill. Born about 1932. Democrat. Illinois state treasurer, 1979-83, 1987-91; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Illinois, 1980; candidate for secretary of state of Illinois, 1982, 1990. Pleaded guilty to bank fraud in April 1992; fined $5,000, and sentenced to nine months home confinement. Died of a heart attack, in Naples, Collier County, Fla., April 3, 1997 (age about 65 years). Burial location unknown.
  Hyman Costrell (b. 1890) — also known as Jack Robbins — of New Haven, New Haven County, Conn.; New York. Born in Kurenitz, Russia (now Belarus), October 19, 1890. Communist. Arrested in 1905 in Russia and jailed three months for demonstrating and distributing circulars against the Czarist government; naturalized U.S. citizen; plumber; candidate for U.S. Representative from New York 8th District, 1934. Jewish. Burial location unknown.
  Charles Tyrone Courtney (b. 1952) — also known as Ty Courtney — of Spartanburg, Spartanburg County, S.C. Born in Spartanburg, Spartanburg County, S.C., January 4, 1952. Lawyer; municipal judge in South Carolina, 1981-82; member of South Carolina state senate, 1991-2000. Member, Freemasons; Shriners; Jaycees; Lions. Tried and convicted in June 2000 on federal charges of bank fraud, mail fraud, and making false statements in a loan application. Still living as of 2000.
  John Cowdery (b. 1930) — of Anchorage, Alaska. Born in Adrian, Bates County, Mo., February 11, 1930. Republican. Contractor; member of Alaska state house of representatives, 1983-84, 1997-2000; member of Alaska state senate, 2000-09 (District I 2000-03, District O 2003-09); indicted in July 2008 and charged with accepting bribes from VECO Corporation; convicted in March 2009; sentenced to six months house arrest and fined $25,000. Still living as of 2009.
  See also Wikipedia article
  George B. Cox — of Cincinnati, Hamilton County, Ohio. Republican. Delegate to Republican National Convention from Ohio, 1900, 1904, 1908. Political boss of Cincinnati at the turn of the century. Indicted on corruption charges in 1906, but never convicted. Burial location unknown.
  Major B. Coxson (c.1929-1973) — of Camden, Camden County, N.J. Born about 1929. Convicted 10 times on fraud and larceny charges, most related to automobile theft; served 22 months in federal prison; candidate for mayor of Camden, N.J., 1973. African ancestry. Admitted four men to his house, who bound and gagged him and his family, and shot each one, killing him and wounding the others, in Cherry Hill, Camden County, N.J., June 9, 1973 (age about 44 years). Burial location unknown.
  Brian J. Coyle (1944-1991) — of Moorhead, Clay County, Minn.; Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minn. Born in Great Falls, Cascade County, Mont., June 25, 1944. College instructor; in 1968, he was indicted and tried for his refusal to comply with the military draft, but was acquitted as a conscientious objector; Independent candidate for U.S. Senator from Minnesota, 1978; candidate for mayor of Minneapolis, Minn., 1979; president, Minneapolis city council. Gay. One of Minnesota's first openly-gay politicians. Died, from AIDS-related complications, August 23, 1991 (age 47 years, 59 days). Burial location unknown.
  Larry Edwin Craig (b. 1945) — also known as Larry Craig — of Midvale, Washington County, Idaho; Payette, Payette County, Idaho. Born in Council, Adams County, Idaho, July 20, 1945. Republican. Member of Idaho state senate, 1975-81; U.S. Representative from Idaho 1st District, 1981-91; U.S. Senator from Idaho, 1991-2009. Methodist. Member, National Rifle Association. Arrested for soliciting sex in a men's bathroom at the Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport, June 11, 2007; charged with disorderly conduct; pleaded guilty, and was fined. Still living as of 2014.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — votes in Congress from the Washington Post — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile
  Daniel Bever Crane (b. 1936) — also known as Dan Crane — of Illinois. Born in Chicago, Cook County, Ill., January 10, 1936. Republican. U.S. Representative from Illinois, 1979-85 (22nd District 1979-83, 19th District 1983-85). Censured by the House of Representatives in 1983 for having sexual relations with a teenage House page in 1980. Still living as of 2014.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — NNDB dossier
  Alan MacGregor Cranston (1914-2000) — also known as Alan Cranston — of Los Altos Hills, Santa Clara County, Calif.; Sacramento, Sacramento County, Calif.; Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, Calif. Born in Palo Alto, Santa Clara County, Calif., June 19, 1914. Democrat. Journalist; served in the U.S. Army during World War II; real estate business; delegate to Democratic National Convention from California, 1956, 1960, 1964, 1968, 1972, 1988 (speaker); California state controller, 1959-67; U.S. Senator from California, 1969-93; defeated in primary, 1964; candidate for Democratic nomination for President, 1984. Protestant. Member, United World Federalists. Sued by Adolf Hitler over his unexpurgated translation into English of Mein Kampf. Reprimanded by the Senate in 1991 over his dealings with Lincoln Savings and Loan president Charles Keating. Died in Los Altos, Santa Clara County, Calif., December 31, 2000 (age 86 years, 195 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of William Cranston and Carol (Dixon) Cranston; married, November 6, 1940, to Geneva McMath (divorced 1951); married 1978 to Norma Weintraub.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — votes in Congress from the Washington Post — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile
  John H. Crary — of Waterbury, New Haven County, Conn. Democrat. Member of Connecticut Democratic State Central Committee, 1922-30; alternate delegate to Democratic National Convention from Connecticut, 1928, 1932; Waterbury city assessor. Charged in May, 1938, along with Mayor T. Frank Hayes and 25 others, with conspiracy to cheat and defraud the city of Waterbury of more than a million dollars; tried in 1938-39 and convicted; sentenced to two months in jail and fined $500. Burial location unknown.
  Shirley M. Crawford (1872-1917) — of Louisville, Jefferson County, Ky.; Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, Calif.; San Francisco, Calif. Born in Louisville, Jefferson County, Ky., August 5, 1872. Republican. Actor; newspaper writer; served in the U.S. Army during the Spanish-American War; lawyer; law partner of Augustus E. Willson; Honorary Consul for Guatemala in Louisville, Ky., 1901-07; in February 1905, amidst a controversy over the appointment of a new Colonel, a military court of inquiry was convened to investigate the officers of the First Kentucky regiment, including a Major and six Captains, for willful disobedience; all were releived of duty, but Capt. Crawford was singled out as "an agitator and fomenter of strife, disloyal and insubordinate to his superior officers," and ordered court-martialed; secretary-treasurer and director, Kentucky-Arizona Copper Company (engaged in mining and smelting). Hit by a car while crossing a street, suffered a fractured leg and pneumonia, and died two weeks later, in German Hospital, San Francisco, Calif., September 6, 1917 (age 45 years, 32 days). Cremated; ashes interred at San Francisco National Cemetery, San Francisco, Calif.
  Relatives: Married, September 20, 1902, to Reina Melcher (divorced 1906).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Bobby E. Crittendon — of Dayton, Campbell County, Ky. Mayor of Dayton, Ky., 1991-2000; appointed 1991; removed 2000; Impeached and removed from office, by unanimous vote of the city council, over misconduct including his attempts to intimidate the police chief on behalf of his son-in-law. Still living as of 2000.
  George William Crockett, Jr. (1909-1997) — also known as George W. Crockett, Jr. — of Detroit, Wayne County, Mich. Born in Jacksonville, Duval County, Fla., August 10, 1909. Democrat. Recorder's court judge in Michigan, 1966-78; U.S. Representative from Michigan 13th District, 1980-91; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Michigan, 1984, 1988; arrested during an anti-apartheid protest outside the South African Embassy in Washington, 1984. Baptist. African ancestry. Member, Kappa Alpha Psi; National Lawyers Guild. Served four months in federal prison for contempt of court in 1950, following his defense of a Communist leader on trial in New York for advocating the overthrow of the government. Among the founders of the nation's first interracial law firm. Ill with bone cancer in 1997, he suffered a stroke and died five days later, in Washington Home and Hospice, Washington, D.C., September 7, 1997 (age 88 years, 28 days). Cremated.
  Relatives: Father of George W. Crockett III (1926?-).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
Richard Croker Richard Welsted Croker (1841-1922) — also known as Richard Croker — of New York, New York County, N.Y.; County Dublin, Ireland. Born in Clonakilty, County Cork, Ireland, November 23, 1841. Democrat. Railroad mechanic; charged with the murder of a political enemy in 1874; tried and found not guilty; delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1888, 1892. Irish ancestry. Member, Tammany Hall. Leader of Tammany Hall from 1886 until 1901. Suffered exposure during a snowstorm, was ill for months, and subsequently died, in County Dublin, Ireland, April 29, 1922 (age 80 years, 157 days). Original interment at Glencairn House Grounds, County Dublin, Ireland; reinterment in 1939 at Kilgobbin Cemetery, County Dublin, Ireland.
  Relatives: Son of Eyre Coote Croker (1800-1881) and Frances Laura (Welsted) Croker (1807-1894); married, November 1, 1873, to Elizabeth Frazer (1853-1914); married, November 26, 1914, to Bula Benton Edmonson (1884-1957).
  Cross-reference: Henry Woltman
  See also Wikipedia article
  Image source: American Monthly Review of Reviews, February 1902
  Hugh W. Cross (b. 1896) — of Jerseyville, Jersey County, Ill. Born in Jerseyville, Jersey County, Ill., August 24, 1896. Republican. Member of Illinois state house of representatives 38th District, 1933-40; Speaker of the Illinois State House of Representatives, 1939-40; Lieutenant Governor of Illinois, 1941-49; delegate to Republican National Convention from Illinois, 1944, 1948; member, Interstate Commerce Commission, 1949-55; resigned under fire from the Interstate Commerce Commission in 1955, following a unanimous vote of the Senate Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations to open an inquiry into the propriety of his actions influencing the award of a Chicago transportation contract; the committee later reported that he had "made a mistake and acted indiscreetly". Member, American Legion; Freemasons; Shriners; Jesters; Elks; Alpha Tau Omega; Phi Delta Phi. Burial location unknown.
  Robert Green Crow (1883-1942) — also known as Robert G. Crow; Bob Crow — of Caruthersville, Pemiscot County, Mo. Born in Scott County, Mo., December 24, 1883. Republican. Insurance agent; postmaster at Caruthersville, Mo., 1909-14; indicted in October 1915 on federal charges of revealing information from the federal civil service examination, to help his half-brother, James L. Crow; pleaded guilty in April 1916, and was fined $500. Member, Elks; Eagles; Modern Woodmen. On December 21, 1914, he mysteriously disappeared from the Pontiac Hotel, St. Louis, Mo., leaving behind all of his clothes, and the room disordered as if a scuffle had taken place; he was thought to have been kidnapped and murdered by a gang, but a few months later, he was found to be serving in the U.S. Army. Died in Harlingen, Cameron County, Tex., September 16, 1942 (age 58 years, 266 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of James Levi Eugene Elijah Crow (1846-1896) and Mahulda Paralee (Rodden) Crow (1860-1884); half-brother of Charles Augustus Crow (1873-1938); married, September 16, 1904, to Ella Pauline Brown (1884-1922).
  Gentry Crowell (1932-1989) — of Tennessee. Born in Chestnut Mound, Smith County, Tenn., December 10, 1932. Democrat. Member of Tennessee state house of representatives, 1969-77; secretary of state of Tennessee, 1977-89; died in office 1989. His office was a target of the federal "Operation Rocky Top" investigation into fraudulent charity bingo games; his administrative assistant admitted to longtime embezzlement. Suffered a self-inflicted gunshot wound on December 12, 1989, and died eight days later in Vanderbilt Hospital, Nashville, Davidson County, Tenn., December 20, 1989 (age 57 years, 10 days). Interment at Cedar Grove Cemetery, Lebanon, Tenn.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Edward Hull Crump (1874-1954) — also known as Edward H. Crump; Ed Crump; "Boss Crump" — of Memphis, Shelby County, Tenn. Born near Holly Springs, Marshall County, Miss., October 2, 1874. Democrat. Head, E. H. Crump Buggy Manufacturing Co.; president, E. H. Crump & Co. (involved in banking, real estate, and insurance); mayor of Memphis, Tenn., 1910-16, 1940; resigned 1916; proceedings were brought for his ouster as mayor in 1915-16, based on charges that he failed to enforce state liquor laws; when the ouster suit was upheld by the state supreme court, he resigned; Shelby County Treasurer, 1917-23; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Tennessee, 1924, 1928, 1932, 1936, 1940, 1944; U.S. Representative from Tennessee, 1931-35 (10th District 1931-33, 9th District 1933-35); member of Democratic National Committee from Tennessee, 1936-45. Died in Memphis, Shelby County, Tenn., October 16, 1954 (age 80 years, 14 days). Interment at Elmwood Cemetery, Memphis, Tenn.
  Relatives: Married to Bessie Byrd McLean.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Books about Edward Hull Crump: William D. Miller, Mr. Crump of Memphis
  Randall Cunningham (b. 1941) — also known as Randy Cunningham; "Duke" — of Del Mar, San Diego County, Calif. Born in Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, Calif., December 8, 1941. Republican. Served in the U.S. Navy during the Vietnam War; U.S. Representative from California, 1991-2005 (44th District 1991-93, 51st District 1993-2003, 50th District 2003-05); resigned 2005; pleaded guilty on Federal conspiracy and tax evasion charges, November 28, 2005; subsequently resigned from Congress. Christian. Still living as of 2014.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — votes in Congress from the Washington Post — NNDB dossier
  Critical books about Randy Cunningham: Marcus Stern et al, The Wrong Stuff: The Extraordinary Saga of Randy "Duke" Cunningham, the Most Corrupt Congressman Ever Caught — Seth Hettena, Feasting on the Spoils : The Life and Times of Randy 'Duke' Cunningham, History's Most Corrupt Congressman
  James Michael Curley (1874-1958) — also known as James M. Curley; "The Rascal King" — of Jamaica Plain, Boston, Suffolk County, Mass. Born in Boston, Suffolk County, Mass., November 20, 1874. Democrat. Real estate and insurance business; president, Hibernia Savings Bank; member of Massachusetts state house of representatives, 1902-03; U.S. Representative from Massachusetts, 1911-14, 1943-47 (10th District 1911-13, 12th District 1913-14, 11th District 1943-47); resigned 1914; mayor of Boston, Mass., 1914-18, 1922-26, 1930-34, 1946-50; defeated, 1917, 1937, 1941, 1949, 1951, 1955; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Massachusetts, 1928, 1936, 1940, 1944, 1948, 1952, 1956; Governor of Massachusetts, 1935-37; defeated, 1924, 1938; candidate for U.S. Senator from Massachusetts, 1936; member of Democratic National Committee from Massachusetts, 1940-54; indicted in federal court in 1943, with Donald W. Smith and others, over his participation in Engineers Group, Inc., which fraudulently obtained war contracts; re-indicted in 1944; tried in 1945-46 and convicted; sentenced to six to eighteen months in prison and fined $1,000; released in November 1947 when his sentence was commuted by President Harry Truman. Catholic. Irish ancestry. Member, Eagles; Moose; Elks; Knights of Columbus; Ancient Order of Hibernians. Died in Boston, Suffolk County, Mass., November 12, 1958 (age 83 years, 357 days). Interment at Mt. Calvary Cemetery, Roslindale, Boston, Mass.
  Relatives: Son of Michael Curley (1850-1884) and Sarah (Clancy) Curley (1850-1921); brother of John J. Curley (1873?-1944); married, June 27, 1906, to Mary Emelda Herlihy (1883-1930); married, January 7, 1937, to Gertrude Marion (Casey) Dennis (1892-1980).
  Cross-reference: Joseph Santosuosso
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about James M. Curley: Jack Beatty, The Rascal King: The Life and Times of James Michael Curley — Gerald Leinwand, Mackerels in the Moonlight : Four Corrupt American Mayors — William M. Bulger & Robert J. Allison, James Michael Curley
  Frank E. Curran — of San Diego, San Diego County, Calif. Mayor of San Diego, Calif., 1963-71. Indicted in 1970 on bribery and conspiracy charges in connection with the "Yellow Cab Scandal". Still living as of 1971.
  Richard Cutts (1771-1845) — of Pepperell, Middlesex County, Mass. Born in Saco, York County, Maine, June 28, 1771. Democrat. Member of Massachusetts state legislature, 1790; U.S. Representative from Massachusetts, 1801-13 (at-large 1801-05, 14th District 1805-13); imprisoned for debt, 1828. Died in Washington, D.C., April 7, 1845 (age 73 years, 283 days). Original interment at St. John's Church Cemetery, Lafayette Square, Washington, D.C.; reinterment in 1857 at Oak Hill Cemetery, Washington, D.C.
  Relatives: Married, March 31, 1804, to Anna Payne (1779-1832; sister-in-law of James Madison and John George Jackson (1777-1825)).
  Political families: Jackson-Lee family of Virginia; Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York; Pendleton-Lee family (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
"Enjoy the hospitable entertainment of a political graveyard."
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The Political Graveyard

The Political Graveyard is a web site about U.S. political history and cemeteries. Founded in 1996, it is the Internet's most comprehensive free source for American political biography, listing 312,576 politicians, living and dead.
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