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Politician members in Tennessee

  Alfred Armstrong Adams (b. 1865) — also known as A. A. Adams — of Lebanon, Wilson County, Tenn. Born in Mt. Juliet, Wilson County, Tenn., April 9, 1865. Democrat. Lawyer; banker; member of Tennessee state house of representatives, 1901-02, 1929-30; member of Tennessee state senate, 1903-05, 1911-13; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Tennessee, 1916 (member, Committee on Rules and Order of Business). Presbyterian. Member, Freemasons; Scottish Rite Masons; Knights Templar; Shriners; Odd Fellows; Rotary. Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Alfred Armstrong Adams and Margaret Jarman (Gleaves) Adams; married, August 29, 1889, to Mary Dove Albright.
  Jesse Corcoran Adkins (1879-1955) — of Chevy Chase, Montgomery County, Md.; Washington, D.C. Born in Knoxville, Knox County, Tenn., April 13, 1879. Republican. Lawyer; law professor; justice of District of Columbia supreme court, 1930-36; U.S. District Judge for the District of Columbia, 1936-46; took senior status 1946. Disciples of Christ. Member, American Bar Association; Freemasons; Phi Alpha Delta. Died in Washington, D.C., March 29, 1955 (age 75 years, 350 days). Interment at Rock Creek Cemetery, Washington, D.C.
  Relatives: Son of Milton T. Adkins and Sarah Elizabeth (Walker) Adkins; married, July 14, 1903, to Bertha McNaught.
  See also federal judicial profile — Wikipedia article
  Thomas Hughlon Akin (1904-1943) — also known as Hughlon Akin — of Jackson, Madison County, Tenn. Born in Trezevant, Carroll County, Tenn., May 8, 1904. Democrat. Linotype operator; lawyer; member of Tennessee state senate, 1937-39. Christian. Member, Freemasons; Shriners; Elks. Died in Jackson, Madison County, Tenn., August 16, 1943 (age 39 years, 100 days). Interment at Hollywood Cemetery, Jackson, Tenn.
  Relatives: Son of Luther Adolphus Akin and Caroline Lucinda (Jones) Akin; married, July 12, 1937, to Dell Fisackerly.
  Linville H. Allred (1876-1965) — of Smithfield, Johnston County, N.C. Born in Charlotte, Mecklenburg County, N.C., June 14, 1876. Democrat. Lawyer; member of North Carolina state house of representatives from Johnston County, 1911-14. Member, Odd Fellows; Junior Order; Freemasons; Shriners. Died November 25, 1965 (age 89 years, 164 days). Interment at Evergreen Cemetery, Erwin, Tenn.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Harry Bennett Anderson (1879-1935) — of Memphis, Shelby County, Tenn. Born in Van Buren County, Mich., November 5, 1879. Lawyer; member of Tennessee Republican State Executive Committee, 1904-10; Progressive candidate for Presidential Elector for Tennessee, 1912; colonel in the U.S. Army during World War I; U.S. District Judge for the Western District of Tennessee, 1926-35; died in office 1935. Member, Elks; Freemasons; Odd Fellows; American Legion. Died, from a heart ailment and pneumonia, in Crook Sanitarium, Jackson, Madison County, Tenn., April 9, 1935 (age 55 years, 155 days). Interment at Forest Hill Cemetery Midtown, Memphis, Tenn.
  Relatives: Son of Seneca Benjamin Anderson and Achsah Adelaide (Bennett) Anderson; married, October 8, 1908, to Patty Crook.
  See also federal judicial profile — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Hugh Crump Anderson (1851-1915) — also known as Hu C. Anderson — of Jackson, Madison County, Tenn. Born in McNairy County, Tenn., February 2, 1851. Democrat. Lawyer; member of Tennessee state house of representatives, 1879-81, 1881-83; mayor of Jackson, Tenn., 1884-1908; president, Peoples Savings Bank, 1889-1915; member of Tennessee state senate, 1915; died in office 1915; Speaker of the Tennessee State Senate, 1915; died in office 1915. Presbyterian. Member, Freemasons; Elks; Knights of Pythias. Died in Nashville, Davidson County, Tenn., March 1, 1915 (age 64 years, 27 days). Interment at Riverside Cemetery, Jackson, Tenn.
  Relatives: Son of William Taylor Anderson and Mahala (Wisdom) Anderson; married to Helen Bond (1855-1878), Emma Burdette (1863-1899) and Ellen Bond (1854-1918); father of Hugh Carmack Anderson (1890-1953).
  William Franklin Anderson (1860-1944) — also known as William F. Anderson — of Chattanooga, Hamilton County, Tenn.; Cincinnati, Hamilton County, Ohio; Boston, Suffolk County, Mass.; Winter Park, Orange County, Fla. Born near Morgantown, Monongalia County, Va. (now W.Va.), April 22, 1860. Republican. Minister; Methodist bishop of Chattanooga, Tenn., 1908-12, Cincinnati, Ohio, 1912-24, and Boston, Mass., 1924-32; offered prayer, Republican National Convention, 1924 ; acting president, Boston University, 1925-26. Methodist. Member, Delta Tau Delta; Phi Beta Kappa; Freemasons. Died in Buzzards Bay, Bourne, Barnstable County, Mass., July 22, 1944 (age 84 years, 91 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of William Anderson and Elizabeth (Coombs) Anderson; married, June 9, 1887, to Jennie Lulah Ketcham.
  See also Wikipedia article
  Maurice Neil Andrews (1894-1967) — also known as M. Neil Andrews — of Atlanta, Fulton County, Ga. Born in LaFayette, Walker County, Ga., December 24, 1894. Democrat. Lawyer; served in the U.S. Army during World War I; Solicitor General, Rome Circuit, 1929-32; U.S. Attorney for the Northern District of Georgia, 1942-46; U.S. District Judge for the Northern District of Georgia, 1949-50; resigned 1950. Methodist. Member, American Bar Association; American Legion; Forty and Eight; Freemasons. Died in Chattanooga, Hamilton County, Tenn., August 31, 1967 (age 72 years, 250 days). Interment at LaFayette Cemetery, LaFayette, Ga.
  Relatives: Son of Oty Payne Andrews and Ada (Frazier) Andrews; married, December 23, 1921, to Foy Rhyne.
  See also federal judicial profile — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Eugene Rufus Attkisson (1873-1939) — also known as Eugene Attkisson — of Louisville, Jefferson County, Ky. Born in Lavinia, Carroll County, Tenn., October 31, 1873. Democrat. College teacher; lawyer; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Kentucky, 1932. Methodist. Member, Freemasons; American Bar Association; Elks; Lions. Died in 1939 (age about 65 years). Interment at Cave Hill Cemetery, Louisville, Ky.
  Relatives: Son of Dr. John Rufus Attkisson and Elizabeth Moss (Lanier) Attkisson; married, June 6, 1900, to Grace Crawford Dorney.
  Howard Henry Baker (1902-1964) — also known as Howard H. Baker — of Huntsville, Scott County, Tenn. Born in Somerset, Pulaski County, Ky., January 12, 1902. Republican. Lawyer; newspaper publisher; member of Tennessee state house of representatives, 1929-30; candidate for Governor of Tennessee, 1938; delegate to Republican National Convention from Tennessee, 1940, 1948, 1952, 1956, 1960 (delegation chair); candidate for U.S. Senator from Tennessee, 1940; board chairman, First National Bank of Oneida; U.S. Representative from Tennessee 2nd District, 1951-64; died in office 1964. Presbyterian. Member, American Bar Association; Order of the Coif; Sigma Nu; Phi Alpha Delta; Phi Kappa Phi; Freemasons; Shriners; Elks. Died, following a heart attack, at Fort Sanders Presbyterian Hospital, Knoxville, Knox County, Tenn., January 7, 1964 (age 61 years, 360 days). Interment at Sherwood Memorial Gardens, Alcoa, Tenn.
  Relatives: Son of James Frances Baker and Helen (Keen) Baker; married, September 15, 1935, to Edith Irene Bailey (1901-1994); father of Howard Henry Baker, Jr..
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Samuel Taylor Beare (1901-1971) — of Jackson, Madison County, Tenn.; Memphis, Shelby County, Tenn. Born in Humboldt, Gibson County, Tenn., October 18, 1901. Lawyer; coal and ice dealer; member of Tennessee state house of representatives, 1935-37. Episcopalian. Member, American Bar Association; Freemasons; American Legion; Sigma Nu. Died in September, 1971 (age 69 years, 0 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Samuel Taylor Beare and Evelyn Nelson (Hunt) Beare; married 1925 to Evelyn Weatherby; married, October 16, 1942, to Betty Carl Booth.
  John Bell (1797-1869) — also known as "The Great Apostate" — of Nashville, Davidson County, Tenn. Born near Nashville, Davidson County, Tenn., February 15, 1797. Lawyer; member of Tennessee state senate, 1817; U.S. Representative from Tennessee 7th District, 1827-41; Speaker of the U.S. House, 1834-35; U.S. Secretary of War, 1841; member of Tennessee state house of representatives, 1847; U.S. Senator from Tennessee, 1847-59; Constitutional Union candidate for President of the United States, 1860. Member, Freemasons. Died near Cumberland Furnace, Dickson County, Tenn., September 10, 1869 (age 72 years, 207 days). Interment at Mt. Olivet Cemetery, Nashville, Tenn.
  Relatives: Son of Samuel Bell and Margaret (Edmiston) Bell; married to Sally Dickinson and Jane Yeatman; father-in-law of Edwin Augustus Keeble (1807-1868).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  George Leonard Berry (1882-1948) — also known as George L. Berry — of Rogersville, Hawkins County, Tenn. Born in Lee Valley, Hawkins County, Tenn., September 12, 1882. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army during the Spanish-American War; alternate delegate to Democratic National Convention from Tennessee, 1916; major in the U.S. Army during World War I; president, International Pressmen and Assistants Union; candidate for Democratic nomination for Vice President, 1924; U.S. Senator from Tennessee, 1937-38. Baptist. Member, American Legion; Freemasons; Knights Templar; Shriners; Elks; Moose; Eagles; Odd Fellows; Rotary. Died December 4, 1948 (age 66 years, 83 days). Interment at Pressmen's Home Cemetery, Pressmen's Home, Tenn.
  Relatives: Son of Thomas Jefferson Berry and Cornelia (Trent) Berry; married, August 7, 1907, to Marie Gehrs.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Tyler Berry (b. 1882) — of Franklin, Williamson County, Tenn. Born in Franklin, Williamson County, Tenn., September 16, 1882. Democrat. Lawyer; member of Tennessee state senate, 1915-17; Presidential Elector for Tennessee, 1916. Presbyterian. Member, Knights of Pythias; Freemasons; Kiwanis. Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Cabell Rives Berry and Mary McKendree (Oden) Berry; married, March 31, 1911, to Elizabeth Avalyn Fleming.
  James Thomas Blair (1871-1944) — also known as James T. Blair — of Maysville, DeKalb County, Mo.; St. Louis, Mo. Born in Loudon, Loudon County, Tenn., November 11, 1871. Democrat. College professor; president, Obion College, 1895-96; lawyer; member of Missouri state house of representatives from DeKalb County, 1899-1902; justice of Missouri state supreme court, 1915-24; defeated, 1924; chief justice of Missouri state supreme court, 1921-22. Presbyterian. Member, American Bar Association; Freemasons; Knights of Pythias; Sigma Alpha Epsilon. Died in Springfield, Greene County, Mo., April 12, 1944 (age 72 years, 153 days). Interment at Riverview Cemetery, Jefferson City, Mo.
  Relatives: Son of Dr. Samuel Tate Blair (1838-1917; Confederate cavalryman) and Louisa Matlock (Osborne) Blair (1847-1921); married, June 19, 1901, to Grace Emma Ray (1882-1977); father of James Thomas Blair, Jr. (1902-1962).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  John Blair (1790-1863) — of Jonesborough, Washington County, Tenn. Born near Jonesborough, Washington County, Tenn., August 13, 1790. Democrat. Lawyer; member of Tennessee state senate, 1819-23; U.S. Representative from Tennessee, 1823-35 (at-large 1823-25, 1st District 1825-29, 8th District 1829-31, 1st District 1831-35); member of Tennessee state house of representatives, 1849-51. Member, Freemasons. Died in Jonesborough, Washington County, Tenn., July 9, 1863 (age 72 years, 330 days). Interment at Old Cemetery, Jonesborough, Tenn.
  Relatives: Son of John Blair, Jr. (1758-1818).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Leonard Ray Blanton (1930-1996) — also known as Ray Blanton — of Adamsville, McNairy County, Tenn. Born in Hardin County, Tenn., April 10, 1930. Democrat. Member of Tennessee state house of representatives, 1964-66; U.S. Representative from Tennessee 7th District, 1967-73; defeated in primary, 1988; candidate for U.S. Senator from Tennessee, 1972; Governor of Tennessee, 1975-79. Methodist. Member, Lions; Moose; Shriners; Freemasons. Ousted as Governor amid charges of selling pardons; later convicted of conspiracy to sell liquor licenses and served 23 months in prison. Died, of kidney disease, at Jackson-Madison County Hospital, Jackson, Madison County, Tenn., November 22, 1996 (age 66 years, 226 days). Interment at Shiloh Church Cemetery, Shiloh, Tenn.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — NNDB dossier
  Horace Julian Bond (1940-2015) — also known as Julian Bond — of Georgia. Born in Hubbard Hospital, Nashville, Davidson County, Tenn., January 14, 1940. Democrat. A leader of the civil rights movement in the 1960s and 1970s; one of the founders of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) in 1960, and the Southern Povery Law Center in 1971; member of Georgia state house of representatives, 1967-74; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Georgia, 1968; speaker, 1984; candidate for Democratic nomination for Vice President, 1968; member of Georgia state senate 39th District, 1975-87; candidate in primary for U.S. Representative from Georgia, 1986; chairman, NAACP, 1998-2010. African ancestry. Member, Freemasons; NAACP. He received the Spingarn Medal in 2009. Died in Fort Walton Beach, Okaloosa County, Fla., August 15, 2015 (age 75 years, 213 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Horace Mann Bond and Julia Agnes (Washington) Bond; married 1961 to Alice Clopton; married 1990 to Pamela Sue Horowitz.
  See also Wikipedia article
  Critical books about Julian Bond: Bernard Goldberg, 100 People Who Are Screwing Up America (And Al Franken Is #37)
  John Clyde Bowen (1888-1978) — of Washington. Born in Newbern, Dyer County, Tenn., May 12, 1888. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army during World War I; lawyer; member of Washington state senate, 1931; legal advisor to Gov. Clarence D. Martin, 1933; U.S. District Judge for the Western District of Washington, 1934-61; took senior status 1961. Baptist. Member, American Bar Association; American Legion; Freemasons; Eagles. Died April 27, 1978 (age 89 years, 350 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of William Allen Bowen and Maryette (Featherston) Bowen.
  See also federal judicial profile
  Robert W. Bowens, Jr. (1922-2014) — also known as Robert Bowens; Bob Bowens — of Pontiac, Oakland County, Mich. Born in Nashville, Davidson County, Tenn., March 21, 1922. Served in the U.S. Army during World War II; barber; delegate to Michigan state constitutional convention from Oakland County 2nd District, 1962; appointed 1962. Baptist. African ancestry. Member, Freemasons; American Legion. Died, in the VA Medical Center, Battle Creek, Calhoun County, Mich., November 18, 2014 (age 92 years, 242 days). Interment at Great Lakes National Cemetery, Holly, Mich.
  Relatives: Son of Robert Bowens, Sr. and Hattie (Hood) Bowens; married to Nellie Joyce Cooley.
John T. Bowman John Thomas Bowman (1921-2005) — also known as John T. Bowman — of Roseville, Macomb County, Mich. Born in Monterey, Putnam County, Tenn., July 19, 1921. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Navy during World War II; justice of the peace; real estate broker; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Michigan, 1952 (alternate), 1968; member of Michigan state house of representatives from Macomb County 2nd District, 1955-62; defeated in primary, 1950, 1952; member of Michigan state senate, 1963-77 (11th District 1963-64, 26th District 1965-74, 27th District 1975-77); resigned 1977; candidate in primary for U.S. Representative from Michigan 12th District, 1976. Baptist. Member, Amvets; American Legion; Freemasons; Shriners; Eagles. Died in Fairfield Glade, Cumberland County, Tenn., 2005 (age about 83 years). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Grady Melton Bowman (1893-1977) and Alice Gertrude (Norrod) Bowman (1895-1964); married 1940 to Mary Elizabeth Broderick (1922-2009).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: Michigan Manual 1957-58
  Ulysses Wilhelm Boykin (1914-1987) — also known as Ulysses W. Boykin — of Detroit, Wayne County, Mich. Born in Knoxville, Knox County, Tenn., October 17, 1914. Republican. Journalist; candidate in primary for Michigan state house of representatives from Wayne County 1st District, 1952; delegate to Republican National Convention from Michigan, 1964 (alternate), 1976; Presidential Elector for Michigan, 1980. Baptist. African ancestry. Member, Elks; Freemasons. Died in Detroit, Wayne County, Mich., September 26, 1987 (age 72 years, 344 days). Interment at Detroit Memorial Park West, Redford Township, Wayne County, Mich.
  Relatives: Married 1942 to Cecil Whittaker; married, April 17, 1965, to Nancy Smith (1919-2006); father of Ulysses Boykin III.
  Morris Brandon (1862-1940) — of Atlanta, Fulton County, Ga. Born in Dover, Stewart County, Tenn., April 13, 1862. Democrat. Lawyer; general counsel, Atlanta, Birmingham and Atlantic Railway; member of Georgia state house of representatives, 1898. Member, Freemasons; Shriners; Phi Delta Theta. Died February 13, 1940 (age 77 years, 306 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Nathan Brandon and Minerva Elizabeth (Morris) Brandon; married, June 1, 1892, to Harriet Inman.
  Albert Preston Brewer (b. 1928) — also known as Albert P. Brewer — of Morgan County, Ala. Born in Bethel Springs, McNairy County, Tenn., October 26, 1928. Democrat. Lawyer; member of Alabama state house of representatives, 1955-67; Speaker of the Alabama State House of Representatives, 1963-67; Lieutenant Governor of Alabama, 1967-68; Governor of Alabama, 1968-71; defeated, 1970, 1978; Presidential Elector for Alabama, 1968. Baptist. Member, American Bar Association; Freemasons; Delta Sigma Phi. Still living as of 2014.
  See also NNDB dossier
  James Jefferson Britt (1861-1939) — also known as James J. Britt — of Asheville, Buncombe County, N.C. Born near Johnson City, Washington County, Tenn., March 4, 1861. Republican. Superintendent of schools; lawyer; delegate to Republican National Convention from North Carolina, 1904 (alternate), 1916; candidate for Presidential Elector for North Carolina, 1904; member of North Carolina state senate, 1909-11; U.S. Representative from North Carolina 10th District, 1915-17, 1919; defeated, 1906; candidate for chief justice of North Carolina state supreme court, 1926. Baptist. Member, Freemasons; Kiwanis. Died in Asheville, Buncombe County, N.C., December 26, 1939 (age 78 years, 297 days). Interment at Riverside Cemetery, Asheville, N.C.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  William West Broaddus (1901-1960) — also known as William W. Broaddus — of Denver, Colo. Born in Erin, Houston County, Tenn., September 30, 1901. Democrat. Telegrapher; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Colorado, 1948. Member, Freemasons. Died in Denver, Colo., 1960 (age about 58 years). Interment at Erin Oak Hill Cemetery, Erin, Tenn.
  Relatives: Son of Newell Edward Broaddus (1867-1959) and Mattie Lee (West) Broaddus (1877-1948); first cousin twice removed of Elbridge Jackson Broaddus; second cousin once removed of Joseph Broaddus and Bower Slack Broaddus (1888-1949).
  Political family: Broaddus family of Madison County, Kentucky.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Foster Vincent Brown (1852-1937) — also known as Foster V. Brown — of Chattanooga, Hamilton County, Tenn. Born near Sparta, White County, Tenn., December 24, 1852. Republican. Lawyer; delegate to Republican National Convention from Tennessee, 1884, 1896, 1900, 1916; U.S. Representative from Tennessee 3rd District, 1895-97; Puerto Rico attorney general, 1910-12; U.S. Attorney for Puerto Rico, 1910-11, 1912. Member, Freemasons. Died in Chattanooga, Hamilton County, Tenn., March 26, 1937 (age 84 years, 92 days). Interment at Forest Hills Cemetery, Chattanooga, Tenn.
  Relatives: Father of Joseph Edgar Brown (1880-1939).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Joseph A. Brown (1903-1963) — of Detroit, Wayne County, Mich. Born in Knoxville, Knox County, Tenn., February 10, 1903. Democrat. Lawyer; member of Michigan state senate 2nd District, 1947-48; defeated in primary, 1948; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Michigan, 1948. Baptist. African ancestry. Member, Freemasons; Elks. Died in 1963 (age about 60 years). Burial location unknown.
  Joseph Edgar Brown (1880-1939) — also known as Joe Brown — of Chattanooga, Hamilton County, Tenn. Born in Jasper, Marion County, Tenn., February 11, 1880. Republican. Lawyer; U.S. Representative from Tennessee 3rd District, 1921-23; Tennessee Republican state chair, 1922-24; delegate to Republican National Convention from Tennessee, 1924. Member, American Bar Association; Elks; Freemasons. Died in Chattanooga, Hamilton County, Tenn., June 13, 1939 (age 59 years, 122 days). Interment at Forest Hills Cemetery, Chattanooga, Tenn.
  Relatives: Son of Foster Vincent Brown (1852-1937) and Lula (Farrior) Brown; married to Hester Jefferson McClain.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Milton Brown (1804-1883) — of Jackson, Madison County, Tenn. Born in Lebanon, Warren County, Ohio, February 28, 1804. Lawyer; U.S. Representative from Tennessee, 1841-47 (12th District 1841-43, 11th District 1843-47); One of the founders of Southwestern University (later Union University), and Lambuth College, Jackson, Tenn.; president of the Mississippi Central & Tennessee Railroad, 1854-56; president of the Mobile & Ohio Railroad, 1856-71. Member, Freemasons. Died in Jackson, Madison County, Tenn., May 15, 1883 (age 79 years, 76 days). Interment at Riverside Cemetery, Jackson, Tenn.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Gordon Weaver Browning (1889-1976) — also known as Gordon Browning — of Huntingdon, Carroll County, Tenn. Born near Atwood, Carroll County, Tenn., November 22, 1889. Democrat. Lawyer; attorney and director, Bank of Huntingdon; served in the U.S. Army during World War I; U.S. Representative from Tennessee, 1923-35 (8th District 1923-33, 7th District 1933-35); defeated, 1920; Governor of Tennessee, 1937-39, 1949-53; defeated, 1938, 1952, 1954; served in the U.S. Army during World War II; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Tennessee, 1952. Methodist. Member, Freemasons. Died in Huntingdon, Carroll County, Tenn., May 23, 1976 (age 86 years, 183 days). Interment at Oak Hill Cemetery, Huntingdon, Tenn.
  Relatives: Son of James H. Browning and Malisa A. (Brooks) Browning; married, November 11, 1920, to Ida Leach.
  Cross-reference: Robert A. Everett
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — NNDB dossier
  Edward Cole Bryan (1919-1997) — also known as Edward C. Bryan; Ed Bryan — of Ewa, Island of Oahu, Honolulu County, Hawaii; Honolulu, Island of Oahu, Honolulu County, Hawaii. Born in Honolulu, Island of Oahu, Honolulu County, Hawaii, August 22, 1919. Republican. Served in the U.S. Army during World War II; surveyor; electrical engineer; business executive; delegate to Hawaii state constitutional convention, 1950, 1968; Hawaii Territory Republican Party chair, 1957-58; housing director, Ewa Sugar Company; board member, St. Francis Hospital. Member, Rotary; Freemasons; Humane Society. Died in Johnson City, Washington County, Tenn., May 27, 1997 (age 77 years, 278 days). Cremated; ashes scattered in Pacific Ocean.
  Relatives: Son of Kenneth Cole Bryan and Mary (Hayes) Bryan; married to Shada I. Pflueger (1923-1973).
  Henry Hunter Bryan (1786-1835) — of Tennessee. Born in Martin County, N.C., February 23, 1786. U.S. Representative from Tennessee at-large, 1819-21. Member, Freemasons. Died in Montgomery County, Tenn., May 7, 1835 (age 49 years, 73 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Joseph Bryan (1742-1807) and Mary (Hunter) Bryan (1744-1810); brother of Joseph Hunter Bryan; third cousin of Needham Bryan, Hardy Bryan (1753-1820) and Bryan Whitfield; third cousin once removed of Lovard Bryan, Nathan Bryan Whitfield (1799-1868) and James Bryan Whitfield (1809-1841); third cousin twice removed of Nathan Bryan Whitfield (1835-1914); third cousin thrice removed of James Bryan Whitfield (1860-1948).
  Political family: Bryan-Whitfield family of North Carolina.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
William J. Bryan William Jennings Bryan (1860-1925) — also known as William J. Bryan; "The Great Commoner"; "The Peerless Leader"; "The Silver-Tongued Orator"; "The Boy Orator of the Platte"; "The Niagaric Nebraskan" — of Jacksonville, Morgan County, Ill.; Lincoln, Lancaster County, Neb.; Miami, Dade County (now Miami-Dade County), Fla. Born in Salem, Marion County, Ill., March 19, 1860. Democrat. Lawyer; newspaper editor; U.S. Representative from Nebraska 1st District, 1891-95; candidate for President of the United States, 1896, 1900, 1908; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Nebraska, 1904, 1912 (member, Platform and Resolutions Committee; speaker), 1920; U.S. Secretary of State, 1913-15; candidate for Democratic nomination for President, 1920; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Florida, 1924 (member, Platform and Resolutions Committee). Presbyterian. Member, Freemasons; Sigma Pi; Knights of Pythias. Died in Dayton, Rhea County, Tenn., July 26, 1925 (age 65 years, 129 days). Interment at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Va.; statue at Rhea County Courthouse Grounds, Dayton, Tenn.
  Relatives: Son of Silas Lillard Bryan (1822-1880) and Mariah Elizabeth (Jennings) Bryan (1834-1896); brother of Charles Wayland Bryan and Mary Elizabeth Bryan (1873-1962; who married Thomas Stinson Allen); married, October 1, 1884, to Mary Elizabeth Baird (1860-1930); father of Ruth Bryan Owen; grandfather of Helen Rudd Brown; cousin *** of William Sherman Jennings.
  Political family: Bryan-Jennings family of Illinois.
  Cross-reference: Clarence S. Darrow — Willis J. Abbot
  Bryan County, Okla. is named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: William J. Bryan JarvisW. J. Bryan Dorn
  Campaign slogan (1896): "Sixteen to one."
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about William Jennings Bryan: Robert W. Cherny, A Righteous Cause : The Life of William Jennings Bryan — Paolo E. Coletta, William Jennings Bryan, Vol. 1: Political Evangelist, 1860-1908 — Paolo E. Coletta, William Jennings Bryan, Vol. 2: Progressive Politician and Moral Statesman, 1909-1915 — Paolo E. Coletta, William Jennings Bryan, Vol. 3: Political Puritan, 1915-1925 — Michael Kazin, A Godly Hero: The Life of William Jennings Bryan — Scott Farris, Almost President: The Men Who Lost the Race but Changed the Nation — Gerard N. Magliocca, The Tragedy of William Jennings Bryan: Constitutional Law and the Politics of Backlash
  Image source: Munsey's Magazine, October 1903
  Bristoe Bryant (1906-1986) — of Detroit, Wayne County, Mich. Born in Huntingdon, Carroll County, Tenn., February 27, 1906. Democrat. Member of Michigan state senate 2nd District, 1951-52; candidate in primary for U.S. Representative from Michigan 16th District, 1958. African Methodist Episcopal. African ancestry. Member, Elks; Freemasons; Sphinx. Died in 1986 (age about 80 years). Burial location unknown.
  Rivers Henderson Buford, Sr. (1878-1959) — also known as Rivers H. Buford — of Wewahitchka, Gulf County, Fla.; Quincy, Gadsden County, Fla.; Marianna, Jackson County, Fla.; Tallahassee, Leon County, Fla. Born in Pulaski, Giles County, Tenn., January 18, 1878. Democrat. Lawyer; member of Florida state house of representatives, 1901; Gadsden County Prosecuting Attorney, 1909-11; State's Attorney, Marianna Judicial Circuit, 1912-21; Florida state attorney general, 1921-25; resigned 1925; justice of Florida state supreme court, 1925-48; appointed 1925; chief justice of Florida state supreme court, 1931-33. Baptist. Member, Freemasons; Shriners; Woodmen. Died in 1959 (age about 81 years). Interment at Old Quincy Cemetery, Quincy, Fla.
  Relatives: Son of Albert Buford and Mattie (Rivers) Buford; married, September 14, 1904, to Mary C. Munroe (died 1924); married, January 27, 1926, to Mary Hollingsworth.
  Robert Reyburn Butler (1881-1933) — also known as Robert R. Butler — of Condon, Gilliam County, Ore.; The Dalles, Wasco County, Ore. Born in Butler, Johnson County, Tenn., September 24, 1881. Republican. Lawyer; Presidential Elector for Oregon, 1908, 1916; circuit judge in Oregon, 1909-11; member of Oregon state senate, 1913-17, 1925-28; U.S. Representative from Oregon 2nd District, 1928-33; died in office 1933. Member, Freemasons; Odd Fellows; Knights of Pythias; Elks; Sigma Alpha Epsilon. Died of heart disease and pneumonia, at Providence Hospital, Washington, D.C., January 7, 1933 (age 51 years, 105 days). Interment at Odd Fellows Cemetery, The Dalles, Ore.
  Relatives: Grandson of Roderick Randum Butler (1827-1902).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Joseph Wellington Byrns (1869-1936) — also known as Joseph W. Byrns; Jo Byrns — of Nashville, Davidson County, Tenn. Born near Cedar Hill, Robertson County, Tenn., July 20, 1869. Democrat. Lawyer; member of Tennessee state house of representatives, 1895-1901; Speaker of the Tennessee State House of Representatives, 1899-1901; member of Tennessee state senate, 1901; Presidential Elector for Tennessee, 1904; U.S. Representative from Tennessee, 1909-36 (6th District 1909-33, 5th District 1933-36); died in office 1936; Speaker of the U.S. House, 1935-36; died in office 1936. Member, Freemasons; Scottish Rite Masons; Knights Templar; Shriners; Odd Fellows; Knights of Pythias; Elks; Redmen. Died in Washington, D.C., June 4, 1936 (age 66 years, 320 days). Interment at Mt. Olivet Cemetery, Nashville, Tenn.
  Relatives: Son of James H. Byrns and Mary E. (Jackson) Byrns; married, August 23, 1898, to Julia Woodard; father of Joseph Wellington Byrns, Jr. (1903-1973).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  Books about Joseph W. Byrns: Ann B. Irish, Joseph W. Byrns of Tennessee : A Political Biography
  Joseph Wellington Byrns, Jr. (1903-1973) — also known as Joseph W. Byrns, Jr. — of Nashville, Davidson County, Tenn. Born in Nashville, Davidson County, Tenn., August 15, 1903. Democrat. U.S. Representative from Tennessee 5th District, 1939-41. Methodist. Member, Freemasons; Shriners; Exchange Club; Phi Kappa Psi. Died in Daytona Beach, Volusia County, Fla., March 8, 1973 (age 69 years, 205 days). Interment at Mt. Olivet Cemetery, Nashville, Tenn.
  Relatives: Son of Joseph Wellington Byrns (1869-1936).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Hugh Milton Caldwell (b. 1881) — also known as Hugh M. Caldwell — of Seattle, King County, Wash. Born in Knoxville, Knox County, Tenn., June 7, 1881. Republican. Lawyer; mayor of Seattle, Wash., 1920-22. Episcopalian. Member, American Bar Association; Phi Sigma Kappa; American Legion; Freemasons; Knights Templar; Shriners. Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Thomas M. Caldwell and Jane (Kearsley) Caldwell; married, October 21, 1903, to Sarah Smith Howard.
  Millard Fillmore Caldwell, Jr. (1897-1984) — also known as Millard F. Caldwell, Jr. — of Milton, Santa Rosa County, Fla.; Tallahassee, Leon County, Fla. Born in Knoxville, Knox County, Tenn., February 6, 1897. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army during World War I; lawyer; member of Florida state house of representatives, 1929-32; U.S. Representative from Florida 3rd District, 1933-41; Governor of Florida, 1945-49; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Florida, 1948, 1956; justice of Florida state supreme court, 1962-69. Protestant. Member, Sons of the American Revolution; Kappa Sigma; Phi Alpha Delta; Freemasons; Shriners; Knights of Pythias; Elks; Newcomen Society; American Legion; American Judicature Society; Alpha Kappa Psi; Blue Key. Died in Tallahassee, Leon County, Fla., October 23, 1984 (age 87 years, 260 days). Interment at Harwood Plantation Cemetery, Leon County, Fla.
  Presumably named for: Millard Fillmore
  Relatives: Son of Millard Fillmore Caldwell and Martha Jane (Clapp) Caldwell; married, February 14, 1925, to Mary Rebecca Harwood.
  The Millard Caldwell state office building (opened 1949), in Tallahassee, Florida, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — NNDB dossier
  Robert Porter Caldwell (1821-1885) — of Trenton, Gibson County, Tenn. Born in Adair County, Ky., December 16, 1821. Democrat. Lawyer; member of Tennessee state house of representatives, 1847-48; member of Tennessee state senate, 1855-56; major in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; U.S. Representative from Tennessee 7th District, 1871-73. Member, Freemasons. Died in Trenton, Gibson County, Tenn., March 12, 1885 (age 63 years, 86 days). Interment at Oakland Cemetery, Trenton, Tenn.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Edward Ward Carmack (1858-1908) — also known as Edward W. Carmack — of Memphis, Shelby County, Tenn. Born near Castalian Springs, Sumner County, Tenn., November 5, 1858. Democrat. Lawyer; member of Tennessee state house of representatives, 1885; editor of newspapers, including the Nashville American, the Memphis Commercial, and the Nashville Tennesseean; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Tennessee, 1896, 1904; U.S. Representative from Tennessee 10th District, 1897-1901; U.S. Senator from Tennessee, 1901-07; candidate for Governor of Tennessee, 1908. Member, Freemasons. Shot and killed by Robin J. Cooper, whose father, Col. Duncan B. Cooper, had been ridiculed in the Tennesseean, in Nashville, Davidson County, Tenn., November 9, 1908 (age 50 years, 4 days). Robin and Duncan Cooper were convicted of second-degree murder and sentenced to prison, but Duncan Cooper was pardoned, and Robin Cooper's conviction was overturned on appeal; in 1919, Robin Cooper was himself murdered in an apparent robbery. Interment at Rose Hill Cemetery, Columbia, Tenn.; statue (now gone) at State Capitol Grounds, Nashville, Tenn.
  Relatives: Married 1890 to Elizabeth Cobey Dunnington.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Joe Cordell Carr (b. 1907) — of Tennessee. Born in Cookeville, Putnam County, Tenn., June 20, 1907. Secretary of state of Tennessee, 1941-44, 1945-77; served in the U.S. Army during World War II. Baptist. Member, Freemasons; Shriners; Jesters; Elks; American Legion; Forty and Eight; Exchange Club. Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Sidney Forrest Carr and Laura (Burton) Carr; married, September 12, 1934, to Mary Oliver Hart.
  William A. Carter (b. 1874) — of Portland, Multnomah County, Ore. Born in Greene County, Tenn., June 7, 1874. Republican. Member of Oregon state house of representatives, 1901; delegate to Republican National Convention from Oregon, 1924, 1928 (Convention Vice-President), 1932. Methodist. Member, Freemasons; Odd Fellows; Moose; Woodmen. Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Married to Ethel Hughes.
  Wilburn Cartwright (1891-1979) — of McAlester, Pittsburg County, Okla.; Oklahoma City, Oklahoma County, Okla. Born in Georgetown, Meigs County, Tenn., January 12, 1891. Democrat. School teacher; superintendent of schools; lawyer; member of Oklahoma state house of representatives, 1915-18; member of Oklahoma state senate, 1919-22; U.S. Representative from Oklahoma 3rd District, 1927-43; major in the U.S. Army during World War II; secretary of state of Oklahoma, 1947-51; Oklahoma state auditor, 1951-55. Baptist. Member, Odd Fellows; Freemasons; Scottish Rite Masons; Order of the Eastern Star; Shriners; Acacia; Lions; American Legion; Veterans of Foreign Wars; Disabled American Veterans; Elks; Junior Order. Died in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma County, Okla., March 14, 1979 (age 88 years, 61 days). Interment at Odd Fellows Cemetery, Norman, Okla.
  Relatives: Son of J. R. Cartwright and Emma (Baker) Cartwright; married 1920 to Carrie Staggs.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  John Catron (1786-1865) — of Tennessee. Born in Virginia, January 7, 1786. Served in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812; lawyer; justice of Tennessee state supreme court, 1824-34; Associate Justice of U.S. Supreme Court, 1837-65; died in office 1865. Presbyterian. Member, Freemasons. Died May 30, 1865 (age 79 years, 143 days). Interment at Mt. Olivet Cemetery, Nashville, Tenn.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Alexander Wilds Chambliss (1864-1947) — also known as Alexander W. Chambliss — of Chattanooga, Hamilton County, Tenn. Born September 10, 1864. Mayor of Chattanooga, Tenn., 1919-23; chief justice of Tennessee state supreme court, 1920. Member, Freemasons. Died September 30, 1947 (age 83 years, 20 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Father of Lillian Nelson Chambliss (who married Samuel Estill Whitaker (1886-1967)).
  See also Wikipedia article
  Walter Chandler (1887-1967) — also known as Clift Chandler — of Memphis, Shelby County, Tenn. Born in Jackson, Madison County, Tenn., October 5, 1887. Democrat. Member of Tennessee state house of representatives, 1917; served in the U.S. Army during World War I; member of Tennessee state senate, 1921-23; U.S. Representative from Tennessee 9th District, 1935-40; resigned 1940; mayor of Memphis, Tenn., 1940-46, 1955; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Tennessee, 1940, 1944 (member, Credentials Committee). Episcopalian. Member, American Bar Association; Phi Kappa Phi; Sigma Alpha Epsilon; Freemasons. Died in Memphis, Shelby County, Tenn., October 1, 1967 (age 79 years, 361 days). Interment at Forest Hill Cemetery Midtown, Memphis, Tenn.
  Relatives: Son of William Henry Chandler and Knoxie (Clift) Chandler; married, October 10, 1925, to Dorothy Wyeth.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Robert Lucas Childress (1809-1885) — also known as Robert L. Childress — of Marshfield, Webster County, Mo.; Hazlewood, Webster County, Mo. Born in Knox County, Tenn., August 7, 1809. Republican. Farmer; delegate to Missouri state constitutional convention 19th District, 1865; member of Missouri state house of representatives, 1867-68; postmaster. Member, Freemasons. Died in Webster County, Mo., January 30, 1885 (age 75 years, 176 days). Interment at Childress Cemetery, Diggins, Mo.
  Relatives: Son of Polly (Lucas) Childress (1780-1811) and Robert Lindsay Childress (1785-1869); married to Hannah Lacey (1812-1862).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Joshua Chilton (1818-1862) — of Shannon County, Mo. Born in Wayne County, Tenn., September 28, 1818. Democrat. Member of Missouri state house of representatives from Shannon County, 1846-55; member of Missouri state senate 24th District, 1860-61. Member, Freemasons. Arrested by Union troops as an alleged Southern sympathizer, and while a prisoner, was shot and killed, near Rolla, Phelps County, Mo., August 28, 1862 (age 43 years, 334 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Thomas Boggs Chilton (1782-1865) and Susannah (Inman) Chilton (1785-1827); married to Elizabeth Chilton (1822-1899); father of Commodore Perry Chilton; uncle of Shadrach Chilton; first cousin twice removed of John Smith (1750-1836); second cousin of Thomas Chilton and William Parish Chilton; second cousin twice removed of Horace George Chilton and Arthur Bounds Chilton.
  Political family: Chilton family of Missouri.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Robert Keaton Christenberry (1899-1973) — also known as Robert K. Christenberry — of Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, Ohio; Detroit, Wayne County, Mich.; Peoria, Peoria County, Ill.; Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, Pa.; Manhattan, New York County, N.Y.; Fort Lauderdale, Broward County, Fla. Born in Huntingdon, Carroll County, Tenn., January 27, 1899. Republican. Served in the U.S. Marine Corps during World War I; lost his right hand and wrist in a grenade explosion; U.S. Vice Consul in Vladivostok, as of 1919; hotel manager and executive; candidate for mayor of New York City, N.Y., 1957; postmaster at New York City, N.Y., 1958-66 (acting, 1958-59). Presbyterian. Member, Disabled American Veterans; American Legion; Veterans of Foreign Wars; Freemasons; Shriners; Jesters. Suffered a stroke, and died two months later, in Methodist Hospital, Memphis, Shelby County, Tenn., April 13, 1973 (age 74 years, 76 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of William Calvin Christenberry and Rebecca Arminta (Keaton) Christenberry; married, August 14, 1929, to Edna Joan LeRoy.
  Thomas Claiborne (1780-1856) — of Tennessee. Born in Brunswick County, Va., May 17, 1780. Democrat. Lawyer; member of Tennessee state house of representatives, 1811-15, 1831-33; Speaker of the Tennessee State House of Representatives, 1813-15; U.S. Representative from Tennessee at-large, 1817-19. Member, Freemasons. Died in Nashville, Davidson County, Tenn., January 7, 1856 (age 75 years, 235 days). Interment at Nashville City Cemetery, Nashville, Tenn.
  Relatives: Son of Thomas Claiborne and Mary (Clayton) Claiborne (1755-1802); brother of John Claiborne; married to Sarah Martin Lewis (1786-1871); second cousin of Ferdinand Leigh Claiborne, William Charles Cole Claiborne and Nathaniel Herbert Claiborne; second cousin once removed of John Francis Hamtramck Claiborne; second cousin four times removed of Herbert Claiborne Pell, Jr. (1884-1961) and Corinne Claiborne Boggs; second cousin five times removed of Claiborne de Borda Pell, Barbara Boggs Sigmund and Thomas Hale Boggs, Jr.; third cousin thrice removed of Andrew Fuller Fox.
  Political family: Claiborne-Dallas family of Virginia and Louisiana (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
  William Charles Cole Claiborne (1775-1817) — also known as William C. C. Claiborne — of New Orleans, Orleans Parish, La. Born in Sussex County, Va., 1775. Lawyer; delegate to Tennessee state constitutional convention, 1796; state court judge in Tennessee, 1796; U.S. Representative from Tennessee at-large, 1797-1801; Governor of Mississippi Territory, 1801-04; Governor of Orleans Territory, 1804-12; Governor of Louisiana, 1812-16; U.S. Senator from Louisiana, 1817; died in office 1817. Episcopalian. Member, Freemasons. Fought a duel with Daniel Clark on June 8, 1807; he was wounded in the thigh. Died of a liver ailment, in New Orleans, Orleans Parish, La., November 23, 1817 (age about 42 years). Originally entombed at St. Louis Cemetery No. 1, New Orleans, La.; re-entombed in 1872 at Metairie Cemetery, New Orleans, La.
  Relatives: Son of William Charles Cole Claiborne (1748-1809) and Mary (Leigh) Claiborne (1750-1782); brother of Ferdinand Leigh Claiborne and Nathaniel Herbert Claiborne; married to Clarissa Duralde (1776-1809), Suzette Bosque and Elizabeth Lewis; uncle of John Francis Hamtramck Claiborne; second great-granduncle of Herbert Claiborne Pell, Jr. (1884-1961) and Corinne Claiborne Boggs; third great-granduncle of Claiborne de Borda Pell, Barbara Boggs Sigmund and Thomas Hale Boggs, Jr.; first cousin once removed of Thomas Claiborne (1749-1812); second cousin of John Claiborne and Thomas Claiborne (1780-1856); third cousin thrice removed of Andrew Fuller Fox.
  Political family: Claiborne-Dallas family of Virginia and Louisiana (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Claiborne counties in La., Miss. and Tenn. are named for him.
  Epitaph: "Cara patria, carior libertas; ubi est libertas, ibi mea patria." [Dear my country, dearer liberty; where liberty is, there is my country.]
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  James Waddey Clark (b. 1877) — also known as J. W. Clark — of Atoka, Atoka County, Okla. Born in Allisona, Williamson County, Tenn., December 8, 1877. Democrat. Lawyer; member of Oklahoma state house of representatives, 1911; Atoka County Attorney, 1913-16; member of Oklahoma Democratic State Central Committee, 1922-25; justice of Oklahoma state supreme court, 1925-33. Methodist. Member, Freemasons. Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Joseph P. Clark and Cora Belle (Waddey) Clark; married, May 1, 1917, to Anna Paullin.
  Frank Goad Clement (1920-1969) — also known as Frank G. Clement — of Dickson, Dickson County, Tenn.; Brentwood, Williamson County, Tenn. Born in Dickson, Dickson County, Tenn., June 2, 1920. Democrat. Lawyer; served in the U.S. Army during World War II; alternate delegate to Democratic National Convention from Tennessee, 1948; Governor of Tennessee, 1953-59, 1963-67; candidate for U.S. Senator from Tennessee, 1966. Methodist. Member, American Legion; Jaycees; Freemasons; Shriners; Kiwanis; Sigma Alpha Epsilon; Phi Delta Phi. Died in an automobile accident, November 4, 1969 (age 49 years, 155 days). Interment at Dickson Memorial Gardens, Dickson, Tenn.
  Relatives: Son of Robert Samuel Clement and Maybelle (Goad) Clement; married, January 6, 1940, to Lucille Christianson.
  See also NNDB dossier
  John Story Coke (b. 1867) — also known as John S. Coke — of Portland, Multnomah County, Ore. Born in Morristown, Hamblen County, Tenn., August 21, 1867. Lawyer; circuit judge in Oregon 2nd District, 1909-23; U.S. Attorney for Oregon, 1923-25. Episcopalian. Member, Freemasons; Shriners; Knights of Pythias; Elks. Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Married, May 27, 1903, to Annie Laurie Anderson.
  James Collinsworth (1806-1838) — Born in Tennessee, 1806. U.S. Attorney for the Western District of Tennessee, 1829-35; served in the Texas Army during the Texas War of Independence; delegate to Texas Republic Republic constitutional convention from District of Brazoria, 1836; signer, Texas Declaration of Independence, 1836; Texas Republic Secretary of State, 1836; Attorney General of the Texas Republic, 1836; member of Texas Republic Senate from District of Brazoria, 1836; justice of Texas Republic supreme court, 1837. Member, Freemasons. While a candidate for the presidency of the Texas Republic, jumped off a boat and drowned in Galveston Bay, 1838 (age about 32 years). Interment at Founders Memorial Park, Houston, Tex.
  Collingsworth County, Tex. is named for him.
  George Whitney Cooke (b. 1856) — of Bowman's Creek, Wyoming County, Pa.; Johnson City, Washington County, Tenn. Born in Wyoming County, Pa., October 3, 1856. Engineer; surveyor; member of Pennsylvania state house of representatives, 1891. English ancestry. Member, Freemasons. Died in Washington, D.C. Interment at Cedar Hill Cemetery, Suitland, Md.
  Relatives: Married to Emma Florence Clark.
  Jere Cooper (1893-1957) — of Dyersburg, Dyer County, Tenn. Born near Dyersburg, Dyer County, Tenn., July 20, 1893. Democrat. Lawyer; served in the U.S. Army during World War I; U.S. Representative from Tennessee, 1929-57 (9th District 1929-33, 8th District 1933-43, 9th District 1943-53, 8th District 1953-57); died in office 1957. Presbyterian. Member, American Legion; Freemasons; Knights Templar; Shriners; Kappa Sigma; Maccabees. Died in Bethesda, Montgomery County, Md., December 18, 1957 (age 64 years, 151 days). Interment at Fairview Cemetery, Dyersburg, Tenn.
  Relatives: Son of Joseph W. Cooper and Viola May (Cooper) Cooper.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  William Wirt Courtney (1889-1961) — also known as W. Wirt Courtney — of Franklin, Williamson County, Tenn. Born in Franklin, Williamson County, Tenn., September 7, 1889. Democrat. Lawyer; city judge in Tennessee, 1915-17; served in the U.S. Army during World War I; Adjutant General of Tennessee, 1932; circuit judge in Tennessee, 1933-39; U.S. Representative from Tennessee, 1939-49 (6th District 1939-43, 7th District 1943-49). Episcopalian. Member, Freemasons; Shriners; Elks; Sigma Chi. Died in Franklin, Williamson County, Tenn., April 6, 1961 (age 71 years, 211 days). Interment at Mt. Hope Cemetery, Franklin, Tenn.
  Presumably named for: William Wirt
  Relatives: Son of Wirt Courtney and Anne (Neely) Courtney; married 1919 to Currey Taylor.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  David Crockett (1786-1836) — also known as Davy Crockett; "King of the Wild Frontier" — of Tennessee. Born in Greene County, Tenn., August 17, 1786. Democrat. Member of Tennessee state house of representatives, 1821; U.S. Representative from Tennessee, 1827-31, 1833-35 (9th District 1827-31, 12th District 1833-35); served in the Texas Army during the Texas War of Independence. Member, Freemasons. Killed while defending the Alamo, in San Antonio, Bexar County, Tex., March 6, 1836 (age 49 years, 202 days). Cremated; ashes interred at San Fernando Cathedral, San Antonio, Tex.
  Relatives: Son of John Crockett and Rebecca (Hawkins) Crockett; married, August 16, 1806, to Mary 'Polly' Finley; married 1815 to Elizabeth Patton; father of John Wesley Crockett; first cousin twice removed of Charles Carroll Walcutt (1838-1898).
  Political family: Crockett-Walcutt family of Tennessee.
  Crockett counties in Tenn. and Tex. are named for him.
  The Davy Crockett National Forest (established 1936), in Houston and Trinity counties, Texas, is named for him.
  Personal motto: "Be sure you're right, then go ahead."
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books by David Crockett: A Narrative of the Life of David Crockett of the State of Tennessee
  Books about David Crockett: William C. Davis, Three Roads to the Alamo: The Lives and Fortunes of David Crockett, James Bowie, and William Barret Travis — Constance Rourke, Davy Crockett — Elaine Alphin, Davy Crockett (for young readers)
  Thomas Lee Cummings (b. 1891) — of Nashville, Davidson County, Tenn. Born in McMinnville, Warren County, Tenn., May 1, 1891. Lawyer; mayor of Nashville, Tenn., 1938-47. Christian. Member, Freemasons; Order of the Eastern Star; Eagles; Junior Order; Civitan. Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of William Martin Cummings and Mary Josephine (Brewer) Cummings; married, November 17, 1915, to Ella Connell.
  Clifford Davis (1897-1970) — of Memphis, Shelby County, Tenn. Born in Hazlehurst, Copiah County, Miss., November 18, 1897. Democrat. Lawyer; city judge in Tennessee, 1923-27; U.S. Representative from Tennessee, 1940-65 (9th District 1940-43, 10th District 1943-53, 9th District 1953-65). Baptist. Member, Freemasons; Shriners; Sigma Alpha Epsilon; Moose; Elks; Order of Ahepa. Died in Washington, D.C., June 8, 1970 (age 72 years, 202 days). Interment at Forest Hill Cemetery Midtown, Memphis, Tenn.
  Relatives: Son of Odom A. Davis and Jessie Davis; married to Carolyn Leigh.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Ewin Lamar Davis (1876-1949) — also known as Ewin L. Davis — of Tullahoma, Coffee County, Tenn. Born in Bedford County, Tenn., February 5, 1876. Democrat. Lawyer; Presidential Elector for Tennessee, 1904; circuit judge in Tennessee, 1910-18; U.S. Representative from Tennessee 5th District, 1919-33; defeated, 1932; member, Federal Trade Commission, 1933-49; died in office 1949; chair, Federal Trade Commission, 1935, 1940, 1945. Baptist. Member, American Bar Association; Federal Bar Association; Alpha Tau Omega; Phi Delta Phi; Freemasons. Died in Washington, D.C., October 23, 1949 (age 73 years, 260 days). Interment at Oakwood Cemetery, Tullahoma, Tenn.
  Relatives: Son of McLin H. Davis and Christina Lee (Shoffner) Davis; brother of Norman Hezekiah Davis (1878-1944); married, December 28, 1898, to Carolyn Windsor.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  John D. Defrees (1810-1882) — of Indianapolis, Marion County, Ind. Born in Sparta, White County, Tenn., November 8, 1810. Republican. Member of Indiana state house of representatives, 1840-42; member of Indiana state senate, 1842-45; Indiana Republican state chair, 1856-60; delegate to Republican National Convention from Indiana, 1856 (member, Platform Committee); member of Republican National Committee from Indiana, 1866-68. Congregationalist. Member, Freemasons. Died in Berkeley Springs, Morgan County, W.Va., October 19, 1882 (age 71 years, 345 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Brother of Joseph Hutton Defrees; uncle of William Defrees Frazer (1849-?).
  Political family: Baker-Defrees family of Indiana.
  Joseph Hutton Defrees (1812-1885) — also known as Joseph H. Defrees — of Goshen, Elkhart County, Ind. Born in Sparta, White County, Tenn., May 13, 1812. Republican. Member of Indiana state house of representatives, 1849-50, 1871; member of Indiana state senate, 1850-52; U.S. Representative from Indiana 10th District, 1865-67. Methodist. Member, Freemasons. Died in Goshen, Elkhart County, Ind., December 21, 1885 (age 73 years, 222 days). Interment at Oakridge Cemetery, Goshen, Ind.
  Relatives: Son of James Start Defrees (1779-1847); brother of John D. Defrees; married to Mary Ann McKinney (1814-1864) and Margaret Pearce McNaughton (1816-1907); father of Harriet E. Defrees (1839-1920; who married Francis Elisha Baker); uncle of William Defrees Frazer (1849-?).
  Political family: Baker-Defrees family of Indiana.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  William Henry DeWitt (1827-1896) — of Tennessee. Born in Smith County, Tenn., October 24, 1827. Member of Tennessee state legislature, 1855-57; Delegate from Tennessee to the Confederate Provisional Congress, 1861-62; state court judge in Tennessee, 1872. Member, Freemasons. Died in Chattanooga, Hamilton County, Tenn., April 11, 1896 (age 68 years, 170 days). Interment at Forest Hills Cemetery, Chattanooga, Tenn.
  William Dickson (1770-1816) — of Tennessee. Born in Duplin County, N.C., May 5, 1770. Member of Tennessee state house of representatives, 1799-1803; Speaker of the Tennessee State House of Representatives, 1799-1803; U.S. Representative from Tennessee at-large, 1801-07. Member, Freemasons. Died in Nashville, Davidson County, Tenn., February 21, 1816 (age 45 years, 292 days). Interment somewhere in Davidson County, Tenn.
  Relatives: Cousin *** of Molton Dickson (1775?-1835).
  Dickson County, Tenn. is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Paul Rand Dixon (1913-1996) — also known as Paul R. Dixon — of Washington, D.C.; Brentwood, Williamson County, Tenn. Born in Nashville, Davidson County, Tenn., September 29, 1913. Democrat. Lawyer; served in the U.S. Navy during World War II; member, Federal Trade Commission, 1961-81; chair, Federal Trade Commission, 1961-69, 1976. Methodist. Member, Phi Delta Phi; Alpha Tau Omega; American Bar Association; Freemasons. Died May 2, 1996 (age 82 years, 216 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of James David Dixon and Sarah (Munn) Dixon; married, October 11, 1939, to Dores Busby.
  See also Wikipedia article
  Lee Douglas (1885-1959) — of Nashville, Davidson County, Tenn.; Belle Meade, Davidson County, Tenn. Born in Nashville, Davidson County, Tenn., May 23, 1885. Democrat. Lawyer; U.S. Attorney for the Middle District of Tennessee, 1914-22; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Tennessee, 1924 (member, Committee on Rules and Order of Business), 1940 (alternate); president, Nashville and Decatur Railroad. Presbyterian. Member, American Bar Association; Phi Delta Theta; Phi Delta Phi; Newcomen Society; Freemasons; Shriners. Died August 17, 1959 (age 74 years, 86 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Byrd Douglas and Adelaide (Gaines) Douglas; married, January 30, 1929, to Elizabeth (Keith) Caldwell (died 1932).
  Wall Doxey (1892-1962) — of Holly Springs, Marshall County, Miss. Born in Holly Springs, Marshall County, Miss., August 8, 1892. Democrat. Lawyer; Marshall County Prosecuting Attorney, 1915-23; District Attorney 3rd District, 1923-29; U.S. Representative from Mississippi 2nd District, 1929-41; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Mississippi, 1936, 1940; U.S. Senator from Mississippi, 1941-43. Methodist. Member, Phi Delta Phi; Omicron Delta Kappa; Freemasons; Shriners; Elks; Rotary. Died in Memphis, Shelby County, Tenn., March 2, 1962 (age 69 years, 206 days). Interment at Hillcrest Cemetery, Holly Springs, Miss.
  Relatives: Son of John Sanford Doxey and Sarah (Jones) Doxey; married, October 9, 1916, to Myrtle Johnson.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Harold Henderson Earthman (1900-1987) — also known as Harold H. Earthman — of Murfreesboro, Rutherford County, Tenn. Born in Murfreesboro, Rutherford County, Tenn., April 13, 1900. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army during World War I; lawyer; member of Tennessee state house of representatives, 1931-32; Rutherford County Judge, 1942-45; U.S. Representative from Tennessee 5th District, 1945-47; defeated, 1946. Presbyterian. Member, Farm Bureau; Grange; American Legion; Sigma Chi; Freemasons; Elks; Kiwanis; Modern Woodmen of America. Died in Murfreesboro, Rutherford County, Tenn., February 26, 1987 (age 86 years, 319 days). Interment at Evergreen Cemetery, Murfreesboro, Tenn.
  Relatives: Son of Vernon King Earthman (1872-1944) and Virginia M. (Henderson) Earthman (1877-1928); married to Mary Wilson Moore (1901-1997).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  John Henry Eaton (1790-1856) — also known as John H. Eaton — of Nashville, Davidson County, Tenn. Born near Scotland Neck, Halifax County, N.C., June 18, 1790. Democrat. Lawyer; served in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812; member of Tennessee state house of representatives, 1815-16; U.S. Senator from Tennessee, 1818-21, 1821-29; U.S. Secretary of War, 1829-31; Governor of Florida Territory, 1834-36; U.S. Minister to Spain, 1836-40. Member, Freemasons. Resigned from Cabinet in 1831 during the scandal (called the "Petticoat Affair") over past infedelities of his second wife, Peggy Eaton. Died in Washington, D.C., November 17, 1856 (age 66 years, 152 days). Interment at Oak Hill Cemetery, Washington, D.C.
  Eaton County, Mich. is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary
  Earl Buford Ellington (1907-1972) — also known as Buford Ellington — of Nashville, Davidson County, Tenn. Born in Holmes County, Miss., June 27, 1907. Democrat. Governor of Tennessee, 1959-63, 1967-71. Methodist. Member, Farm Bureau; Freemasons; Shriners. Died April 3, 1972 (age 64 years, 281 days). Interment at Lone Oak Cemetery, Lewisburg, Tenn.
  Relatives: Son of Abner E. Ellington and Cora (Grantham) Ellington; married to Catherine Cheek.
  See also NNDB dossier
  Thomas Allison Embrey (1861-1931) — also known as Thomas A. Embrey — of Winchester, Franklin County, Tenn. Born in Winchester, Franklin County, Tenn., February 27, 1861. Democrat. Lawyer; banker; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Tennessee, 1904, 1924 (alternate). Methodist. Member, Freemasons. Died, from a stroke, in Florida State Hospital for the Insane, Chattahoochee, Gadsden County, Fla., April 11, 1931 (age 70 years, 43 days). Interment at Florida State Hospital Cemetery, Chattahoochee, Fla.
  Relatives: Son of Alexander Simmons Embrey (1833-1884) and Louisa Summers (Cain) Embrey (1835-1883); married, October 19, 1883, to Fannie Lindsay (died 1916).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Joseph Landon Evins (1910-1984) — also known as Joe L. Evins — of Smithville, DeKalb County, Tenn. Born in DeKalb County, Tenn., October 24, 1910. Democrat. Lawyer; served in the U.S. Army during World War II; U.S. Representative from Tennessee, 1947-77 (5th District 1947-53, 4th District 1953-77); delegate to Democratic National Convention from Tennessee, 1948, 1956, 1960, 1964, 1968. Church of Christ. Member, American Bar Association; American Legion; Forty and Eight; Veterans of Foreign Wars; Amvets; Phi Kappa Sigma; Phi Delta Phi; Freemasons; Shriners; Lions; Elks. Died in Nashville, Davidson County, Tenn., March 31, 1984 (age 73 years, 159 days). Entombed at Smithville Town Cemetery, Smithville, Tenn.
  Relatives: Son of Myrtie (Goodson) Evins and James Edgar Evins (1885?-?); married to Ann Smartt.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  John W. Farley (1878-1942) — of Memphis, Shelby County, Tenn. Born March 4, 1878. Republican. Lawyer; candidate for U.S. Representative from Tennessee, 1916; delegate to Republican National Convention from Tennessee, 1916 (alternate), 1924. Member, Kappa Alpha Order; Freemasons. Led drive to establish the West Tennessee Normal School (now University of Memphis) in 1912. Died, of pneumonia and severe arthritis, November, 1942 (age 64 years, 0 days). Interment at Elmwood Cemetery, Memphis, Tenn.
  Thomas Clyde Ferguson (1898-1969) — also known as Thomas C. Ferguson — of Henderson, Henderson County, Ky. Born in Jasper, Marion County, Tenn., January 7, 1898. Republican. Served in the U.S. Navy during World War I; delegate to Republican National Convention from Kentucky, 1944 (alternate), 1948. Presbyterian. Member, Rotary; Freemasons; American Legion. Died in 1969 (age about 71 years). Burial location unknown.
  William L. Fitzgerald (b. 1872) — of Baltimore, Md. Born in Jonesborough, Washington County, Tenn., January 14, 1872. Republican. Lawyer; delegate to Republican National Convention from Maryland, 1924. African Methodist Episcopal. African ancestry. Member, Freemasons; Knights of Pythias; Odd Fellows; Elks; Alpha Phi Alpha. Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Joseph M. Fitzgerald and Mary A. (Ford) Fitzgerald; married, November 26, 1913, to Lucille Wilson.
  Richard Harmon Fulton (1927-2018) — also known as Richard H. Fulton — of Nashville, Davidson County, Tenn. Born in Nashville, Davidson County, Tenn., January 27, 1927. Democrat. Real estate broker; member of Tennessee state senate, 1959-60; U.S. Representative from Tennessee 5th District, 1963-75; mayor of Nashville, Tenn., 1975-87; candidate for Governor of Tennessee, 1978, 1986; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Tennessee, 1980. Methodist. Member, Freemasons; Shriners. Died in Nashville, Davidson County, Tenn., November 28, 2018 (age 91 years, 305 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Lyle Houston Fulton and Labina (Plummer) Fulton; married, December 23, 1945, to Jewel Simpson.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Elmer Everett Gabbard (1890-1960) — also known as Elmer E. Gabbard — of Knoxville, Knox County, Tenn.; Chattanooga, Hamilton County, Tenn.; Buckhorn, Perry County, Ky. Born in Ricetown, Owsley County, Ky., October 9, 1890. Republican. Pastor; president, Witherspoon College, Buckhorn, Ky., 1935-56; candidate for U.S. Representative from Kentucky 7th District, 1942, 1944; alternate delegate to Republican National Convention from Kentucky, 1944, 1948. Presbyterian. Member, Rotary; Freemasons. Died July 17, 1960 (age 69 years, 282 days). Interment at Berea Cemetery, Berea, Ky.
  Relatives: Son of John L. Gabbard and Jaley (Reynolds) Gabbard; married, June 30, 1910, to Myrtle Ward.
  John Alexander Greer (1802-1855) — of Texas. Born in Shelbyville, Bedford County, Tenn., July 18, 1802. Member of Texas Republic Senate from District of San Augustine, 1838-45; Texas Republic Secretary of the Treasury, 1845-46; Lieutenant Governor of Texas, 1847-51. Member, Freemasons. Died while campaigning for the governorship, July 4, 1855 (age 52 years, 351 days). Original interment in private or family graveyard; reinterment in 1929 at Texas State Cemetery, Austin, Tex.
  Greer County, Okla. is named for him.
  Felix Grundy (1777-1840) — of Nashville, Davidson County, Tenn. Born in Berkeley County, Va. (now W.Va.), September 11, 1777. Delegate to Kentucky state constitutional convention, 1799; member of Kentucky state house of representatives, 1800; justice of Kentucky state supreme court, 1806; U.S. Representative from Tennessee at-large, 1811-14; member of Tennessee state house of representatives, 1815; U.S. Senator from Tennessee, 1829-38, 1839-40; died in office 1840; U.S. Attorney General, 1838-39. Member, Freemasons. Died in Nashville, Davidson County, Tenn., December 19, 1840 (age 63 years, 99 days). Interment at Mt. Olivet Cemetery, Nashville, Tenn.
  Grundy counties in Ill., Iowa, Mo. and Tenn. are named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  George W. Guess (c.1829-1868) — of Dallas, Dallas County, Tex. Born in North Carolina, about 1829. Lawyer; colonel in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; mayor of Dallas, Tex., 1866-68. Member, Freemasons. Died of sunstroke, aboard a steamboat on the Mississippi River, at a wharf in Memphis, Shelby County, Tenn., July 18, 1868 (age about 39 years). Interment at Elmwood Cemetery, Memphis, Tenn.
  Clint Wood Hager (1890-1944) — also known as Clint W. Hager — of Atlanta, Fulton County, Ga. Born in Bristol, Sullivan County, Tenn., June 19, 1890. Republican. Lawyer; U.S. Attorney for the Northern District of Georgia, 1921-34; delegate to Republican National Convention from Georgia, 1924, 1928, 1932, 1940; Georgia Republican state chair, 1937-41. Presbyterian. Member, Freemasons; Elks. Died in Fulton County, Ga., December 11, 1944 (age 54 years, 175 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of John Jackson Hager and Maud Livingston (Caldwell) Hager; married, February 4, 1918, to Mary Kelley.
  Harvey H. Hannah (b. 1868) — of Nashville, Davidson County, Tenn.; Oliver Springs, Roane County, Tenn. Born in Louisville, Jefferson County, Ky., August 30, 1868. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army during the Spanish-American War; Adjutant General of Tennessee, 1900-06; lawyer; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Tennessee, 1928. Presbyterian. Member, Freemasons; Knights Templar; United Spanish War Veterans; Veterans of Foreign Wars; Sigma Nu. Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of John H. Hannah and Lillie L. (Gerding) Hannah; married, August 23, 1910, to Gertrude Taylor.
  Thomas Jones Hardeman (1788-1854) — of Texas. Born near Nashville, Davidson County, Tenn., January 31, 1788. Served in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812; member of Texas Republic House of Representatives, 1837-39; judge of Texas Republic, 1843; member of Texas state legislature, 1847-51. Episcopalian. Member, Freemasons. Died in Bastrop County, Tex., January 15, 1854 (age 65 years, 349 days). Original interment in private or family graveyard; reinterment in 1937 at Texas State Cemetery, Austin, Tex.
  Relatives: Son of Thomas Hardeman (1750-1833) and Mary (Perkins) Hardeman (1754-1798); brother of Bailey Hardeman (1795-1836); married 1814 to Mary Ophelia Polk (1785-1835; aunt of James Knox Polk and William Hawkins Polk); married, October 26, 1836, to Eliza DeWitt (1809-1863); fourth cousin of John Wayles Eppes and John Randolph of Roanoke; fourth cousin once removed of Benjamin William Sheridan Cabell, Francis Wayles Eppes, Benjamin Franklin Randolph, Meriwether Lewis Randolph and George Wythe Randolph.
  Political family: Marshall-Harrison-Randolph-Cabell family of Virginia (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Hardeman County, Tenn. is named for him; Hardeman County, Tex. is named partly for him.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Nathaniel Edwin Harris (1846-1929) — also known as Nat E. Harris — of Macon, Bibb County, Ga.; Hampton, Carter County, Tenn. Born in Jonesborough, Washington County, Tenn., January 21, 1846. Democrat. Served in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; lawyer; member of Georgia state house of representatives, 1882-86; member of Georgia state senate, 1894-96; superior court judge in Georgia, 1912; Governor of Georgia, 1915-17. Methodist. Member, Chi Phi; Freemasons; Knights Templar; Shriners; United Confederate Veterans. Died September 21, 1929 (age 83 years, 243 days). Interment at Rose Hill Cemetery, Macon, Ga.
  Relatives: Son of Alexander Nelson Harris and Edna (Haynes) Harris; married, January 12, 1873, to Fannie Burke; married, July 6, 1899, to Hattie G. Jobe; nephew of Landon Carter Haynes (1816-1875); first cousin of Alfred Alexander Taylor and Robert Love Taylor.
  Political family: Taylor family of Tennessee.
  William Henry Hastie (1904-1976) — also known as William H. Hastie — of Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa. Born in Knoxville, Knox County, Tenn., November 17, 1904. Lawyer; law professor; U.S. District Judge for Virgin Islands, 1937-39; dean, Howard University law school, 1939-46; Governor of U.S. Virgin Islands, 1946-49; Judge of U.S. Court of Appeals for the 3rd Circuit, 1949-71; took senior status 1971. African ancestry. Member, Phi Beta Kappa; Omega Psi Phi; Freemasons; American Civil Liberties Union; Americans for Democratic Action. Received Spingarn Medal in 1943. Died, at Suburban General Hospital, East Norriton, Montgomery County, Pa., April 14, 1976 (age 71 years, 149 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of William Henry Hastie and Roberta (Child) Hastie; married, December 25, 1943, to Beryl Lockhart.
  See also Wikipedia article
  Thomas J. Haynes (1824-1877) — of Corsicana, Navarro County, Tex. Born in Williamson County, Tenn., July 22, 1824. Served in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; mayor of Corsicana, Tex., 1872-75. Member, Freemasons. Died September 25, 1877 (age 53 years, 65 days). Interment at Oakwood Cemetery, Corsicana, Tex.
  John Thilman Hendrick (b. 1876) — of Washington, D.C. Born in Clarksville, Montgomery County, Tenn., November 12, 1876. Democrat. Member District of Columbia board of commissioners, 1920-21; President of the District of Columbia Board of Commissioners, 1920-21. Presbyterian. Member, Knights of Pythias; Freemasons; Chi Phi; Phi Delta Phi. Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of David Stewart Hendrick and Pattie (Warfield) Hendrick; married, March 18, 1918, to Elizabeth Graff.
  John Thomas Hicks, Sr. (1925-2000) — also known as John T. Hicks — of Tennessee. Born in Davidson County, Tenn., August 5, 1925. Served in the U.S. Navy during World War II; member of Tennessee state house of representatives 60th District, 1967-77; member of Tennessee state senate 20th District, 1977-93. Methodist. Member, Freemasons; Shriners; Lions; American Legion; Veterans of Foreign Wars. Died, of a heart attack, in Nashville, Davidson County, Tenn., March 19, 2000 (age 74 years, 227 days). Interment at Hermitage Memorial Gardens, Nashville, Tenn.
  John Waighstill Hodges (b. 1866) — also known as John W. Hodges — of Boone, Watauga County, N.C. Born in Grainger County, Tenn., April 2, 1866. Republican. Member of North Carolina state house of representatives from Watauga County, 1913-14. Baptist. Member, Freemasons. Burial location unknown.
  Philip Holland (b. 1877) — of Jackson, Madison County, Tenn. Born in Murray, Calloway County, Ky., August 26, 1877. Democrat. Lawyer; U.S. Consul in Puerto Plata, 1910-11; Saltillo, 1911-13; Basel, 1913-23; Guatemala City, 1923-24; U.S. Consul General in Guatemala City, 1924-27; Liverpool, as of 1929-38. Methodist. Member, Freemasons. Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Philip A. Holland and Sarah (Williams) Holland; married, May 10, 1904, to Corabelle Anderson.
  Benjamin Lawson Hooks (1925-2010) — also known as Benjamin L. Hooks — of Memphis, Shelby County, Tenn. Born in Memphis, Shelby County, Tenn., January 31, 1925. Democrat. Lawyer; pastor; state court judge in Tennessee, 1965; member, Federal Communications Commission, 1972-77; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Tennessee, 1996, 2000; speaker, 1988; Presidential Elector for Tennessee, 1996. Baptist. African ancestry. Member, Freemasons. Civil rights leader; friend and confidant of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.; recipient of the Spingarn Medal in 1986. Died April 15, 2010 (age 85 years, 74 days). Burial location unknown.
  See also NNDB dossier
Sam Houston Samuel Houston (1793-1863) — also known as Sam Houston — of Nashville, Davidson County, Tenn.; Huntsville, Walker County, Tex. Born near Lexington, Rockbridge County, Va., March 2, 1793. Democrat. U.S. Representative from Tennessee, 1823-27 (at-large 1823-25, 7th District 1825-27); Governor of Tennessee, 1827-29; delegate to Texas Convention of 1833 from District of Nacogdoches, 1833; delegate to Texas Consultation of 1835 from District of San Augustine, 1835; delegate to Texas Republic Republic constitutional convention from District of Refugio, 1836; signer, Texas Declaration of Independence, 1836; President of the Texas Republic, 1836-38, 1841-44; member of Texas Republic House of Representatives, 1838; U.S. Senator from Texas, 1846-59; Governor of Texas, 1859-61. Member, Freemasons. Died of pneumonia, in Huntsville, Walker County, Tex., July 26, 1863 (age 70 years, 146 days). Interment at Oakwood Cemetery, Huntsville, Tex.; statue erected 1925 at Herman Park, Houston, Tex.
  Relatives: Father of Andrew Jackson Houston (1854-1941); second great-grandfather of Jean Houston Baldwin (who married Marion Price Daniel); third great-grandfather of Marion Price Daniel, Jr.; cousin *** of David Hubbard.
  Political family: Daniel-Houston family of Texas.
  Houston counties in Minn., Tenn. and Tex. are named for him.
  The city of Houston, Texas, is named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ships SS Sam Houston (built 1941, lost 1942), and SS Sam Houston II (built 1943, scrapped 1959), were named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: Houston JusticeSam H. JonesSam Houston Clinton, Jr.Sam H. Melton, Jr.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — NNDB dossier
  Books about Sam Houston: James L. Haley, Sam Houston — Marquis James, The Raven : A Biography of Sam Houston — Randolph B. Campbell, Sam Houston and the American Southwest — Jean Fritz, Make Way for Sam Houston (for young readers)
  Image source: Library of Congress
  George Huddleston (1869-1960) — of Birmingham, Jefferson County, Ala. Born near Lebanon, Wilson County, Tenn., November 11, 1869. Democrat. Lawyer; served in the U.S. Army during the Spanish-American War; U.S. Representative from Alabama 9th District, 1915-37. Methodist. Member, Freemasons; Odd Fellows; United Spanish War Veterans; Knights of Pythias; Redmen. Died February 29, 1960 (age 90 years, 110 days). Interment at Elmwood Cemetery, Birmingham, Ala.
  Relatives: Son of Joseph Franklin Huddleston and Nancy (Sherrill) Huddleston; married 1917 to Bertha L. Baxley; father of George Huddleston, Jr. (1920-1971).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  J. LeRoy Huffman (1878-1962) — also known as Roy Huffman — of Raleigh County, W.Va. Born in Washington College, Washington County, Tenn., August 30, 1878. Democrat. Lumber dealer; member of West Virginia state house of delegates from Raleigh County, 1939-42. Methodist. Member, Freemasons; Knights Templar; Shriners; Kiwanis. Died in 1962 (age about 83 years). Entombed in mausoleum at Sunset Memorial Park, Beckley, W.Va.
  Relatives: Son of H. B. Huffman and Martha Ellen (Ball) Huffman; married, May 1, 1940, to Cleo M. McConnell.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Adam Huntsman (1786-1849) — of Tennessee. Born in Charlotte County, Va., February 11, 1786. U.S. Representative from Tennessee 12th District, 1835-37; defeated, 1836. Member, Freemasons. Died August 23, 1849 (age 63 years, 193 days). Interment at Old Salem Cemetery, Near Jackson, Madison County, Tenn.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
Andrew Jackson Andrew Jackson (1767-1845) — also known as "Old Hickory"; "The Farmer of Tennessee"; "King Andrew the First" — of Nashville, Davidson County, Tenn. Born, in a log cabin, in The Waxhaws, Lancaster County, S.C., March 15, 1767. Democrat. Lawyer; U.S. Attorney for Tennessee, 1790-97; U.S. Representative from Tennessee at-large, 1796-97; U.S. Senator from Tennessee, 1797-98, 1823-25; justice of Tennessee state supreme court, 1798; general in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812; Governor of Florida Territory, 1821; President of the United States, 1829-37; censured by the U.S. Senate in 1834 over his removal of federal deposits from the Bank of the United States; on January 30, 1835, while attending funeral services at the Capitol Building for Rep. Warren R. Davis of South Carolina, he was shot at with two guns -- which both misfired -- by Richard Lawrence, a house painter (later found not guilty by reason of insanity). Presbyterian. Scotch-Irish ancestry. Member, Freemasons. Killed Charles Dickinson in a pistol duel, May 30, 1806; also dueled with Thomas Hart Benton and Waightstill Avery. Elected in 1910 to the Hall of Fame for Great Americans. Died, of dropsy (congestive heart failure), in Nashville, Davidson County, Tenn., June 8, 1845 (age 78 years, 85 days). Interment at The Hermitage, Nashville, Tenn.; statue erected 1853 at Lafayette Park, Washington, D.C.; statue erected 1856 at Jackson Square, New Orleans, La.
  Relatives: Son of Andrew Jackson (1730-1767) and Elizabeth (Hutchinson) Jackson (1737-1781); married, January 17, 1794, to Rachel (Donelson) Robards (1767-1828; aunt of Andrew Jackson Donelson (1799-1871)).
  Political families: Marshall-Harrison-Randolph-Cabell family of Virginia; Caffery family of Louisiana (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Cross-reference: Francis P. Blair
  Jackson counties in Ala., Ark., Colo., Fla., Ill., Ind., Iowa, Kan., Ky., La., Mich., Miss., Mo., N.C., Ohio, Okla., Ore., Tenn., Tex., W.Va. and Wis., and Hickory County, Mo., are named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: Andrew J. DonelsonAndrew Jackson MillerAndrew J. FaulkAndrew Jackson TitusAndrew Jackson IsacksAndrew Jackson HamiltonAndrew J. HarlanAndrew J. KuykendallAndrew J. ThayerElam A. J. GreeleyAndrew Jackson IngleAndrew J. OgleAndrew Jackson CarrAndrew J. WatermanAndrew J. BentleyAndrew J. RogersWilliam A. J. SparksAndrew Jackson PoppletonAndrew J. HunterAndrew Jackson BryantAndrew J. BealeA. J. ClementsAndrew Jackson BakerAndrew J. FeltA. J. KingAndrew J. SawyerAndrew Jackson GreenfieldAndrew Jackson CaldwellAndrew Jackson GahaganAndrew Jackson BishipAndrew Jackson HoustonAndrew J. CobbAndrew J. MontagueAndrew J. BarchfeldAndrew J. BallietAndrew J. KirkAndrew J. LivingstonA. J. SherwoodAndrew Jackson StewartAndrew J. MayAndrew J. McConnicoAndrew J. SawyerAndrew J. BrewerAndrew BettwyAndrew J. TransueAndrew Jackson GravesAndrew Jackson GilbertAndrew J. GoodwinAndrew J. HinshawAndy YoungAndrew Jackson Kupper
  Coins and currency: His portrait appears on the U.S. $20 bill; from the 1860s until 1927, his portrait appeared on on U.S. notes and certificates of various denominations from $5 to $10,000. In 1861, his portrait appeared on Confederate States $1,000 notes.
  Campaign slogan: "Let the people rule."
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial — Tennessee Encyclopedia
  Books about Andrew Jackson: Robert Vincent Remini, The Life of Andrew Jackson — Robert Vincent Remini, Andrew Jackson : The Course of American Freedom, 1822-1832 — Robert Vincent Remini, Andrew Jackson : The Course of American Democracy, 1833-1845 — Robert Vincent Remini, Andrew Jackson : The Course of American Empire, 1767-1821 — Andrew Burstein, The Passions of Andrew Jackson — David S. Heidler & Jeanne T. Heidler, Old Hickory's War: Andrew Jackson and the Quest for Empire — Donald B. Cole, The Presidency of Andrew Jackson — H. W. Brands, Andrew Jackson : His Life and Times — Jon Meacham, American Lion: Andrew Jackson in the White House — Donald Barr Chidsey, Andrew Jackson, Hero
  Image source: Portrait & Biographical Album of Washtenaw County (1891)
Andrew Johnson Andrew Johnson (1808-1875) — of Carthage, Moore County, N.C.; Greeneville, Greene County, Tenn. Born in Raleigh, Wake County, N.C., December 29, 1808. Mayor of Greeneville, Tenn., 1830; member of Tennessee state house of representatives, 1835; member of Tennessee state senate, 1841; U.S. Representative from Tennessee 1st District, 1843-53; Governor of Tennessee, 1853-57, 1862-65; U.S. Senator from Tennessee, 1857-62, 1875; died in office 1875; Vice President of the United States, 1865; President of the United States, 1865-69; candidate for Democratic nomination for President, 1868. Member, Freemasons; Knights Templar. In 1868, was impeached by the House of Representatives; tried and acquitted by the Senate, which voted 35 to 19 (short of the required two-thirds) on three of the eleven articles of impeachment. Died, after a series of strokes, at his daughter's home in Carter County, Tenn., July 31, 1875 (age 66 years, 214 days). Interment at Andrew Johnson National Cemetery, Greeneville, Tenn.
  Relatives: Married, May 17, 1827, to Eliza McCardle; father of Martha Johnson (who married David Trotter Patterson (1818-1891)).
  Cross-reference: Edmund G. Ross — George T. Brown — Christopher G. Memminger — Thomas Overton Moore — John W. Chanler
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Books about Andrew Johnson: Hans L. Trefousse, Andrew Johnson: A Biography — Howard Means, The Avenger Takes His Place: Andrew Johnson and the 45 Days That Changed the Nation — Paul H. Bergeron, Andrew Johnson's Civil War and Reconstruction — Mary Malone, Andrew Johnson (for young readers)
  Critical books about Andrew Johnson: Nathan Miller, Star-Spangled Men : America's Ten Worst Presidents
  Image source: James G. Blaine, Twenty Years of Congress, vol. 2 (1886)
  John T. Johnson (b. 1856) — of Texas; Lawton, Comanche County, Okla.; Oklahoma City, Oklahoma County, Okla. Born in Livingston, Overton County, Tenn., January 9, 1856. Democrat. County judge in Texas, 1890; district judge in Oklahoma, 1907-15; justice of Oklahoma state supreme court, 1919-25; chief justice of Oklahoma state supreme court, 1923-25. Disciples of Christ. Member, Freemasons; Odd Fellows; Woodmen. Burial location unknown.
  Oscar Goodbar Johnston (b. 1880) — also known as Oscar G. Johnston — of Clarksdale, Coahoma County, Miss.; Memphis, Shelby County, Tenn.; Scott, Bolivar County, Miss. Born in Jackson, Hinds County, Miss., January 27, 1880. Democrat. Member of Mississippi state house of representatives, 1908-18; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Mississippi, 1912, 1916 (member, Committee on Rules and Order of Business), 1936, 1940, 1944 (speaker), 1948 (alternate); member of Democratic National Committee from Mississippi, 1920-24. Methodist. Member, Delta Kappa Epsilon; Freemasons; Elks; Rotary. Burial location unknown.
  Books about Oscar G. Johnston: Lawrence J. Nelson, King Cotton's Advocate: Oscar G. Johnston and the New Deal
  Calvin Jones (b. 1810) — of Somerville, Fayette County, Tenn. Born in Person County, N.C., July 8, 1810. Democrat. University professor; lawyer; Chancellor, Western Division of Tennessee, 1847-54. Presbyterian. Member, Freemasons. Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Wilson Jones and Rebecca (McKissack) Jones; brother of Thomas McKissick Jones; married, October 15, 1835, to Mildred Williamson (half-sister of John Gustavus Adolphus Williamson (1793-1840)).
  Political family: Jones-Williamson family of Person County, North Carolina.
  Thomas McKissick Jones (1816-1892) — also known as Thomas M. Jones — of Pulaski, Giles County, Tenn. Born in Person County, N.C., December 16, 1816. Democrat. Member of Tennessee state house of representatives, 1840; member of Tennessee state senate, 1840; Delegate from Tennessee to the Confederate Provisional Congress, 1861-62; in 1865, the Ku Klux Klan was organized in his law office; delegate to Tennessee state constitutional convention, 1870; state court judge in Tennessee, 1872-73; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Tennessee, 1880 (member, Credentials Committee). Member, Freemasons; Knights Templar. Died in Pulaski, Giles County, Tenn., March 13, 1892 (age 75 years, 88 days). Interment at Maplewood Cemetery, Pulaski, Tenn.
  Relatives: Brother of Calvin Jones (1810-?).
  Political family: Jones-Williamson family of Person County, North Carolina.
  Carey Estes Kefauver (1903-1963) — also known as Estes Kefauver — of Chattanooga, Hamilton County, Tenn. Born near Madisonville, Monroe County, Tenn., July 26, 1903. Democrat. Lawyer; U.S. Representative from Tennessee 3rd District, 1939-49; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Tennessee, 1944 (alternate; speaker), 1952; U.S. Senator from Tennessee, 1949-63; died in office 1963; candidate for Democratic nomination for President, 1952, 1956; candidate for Vice President of the United States, 1956. Baptist. Member, Freemasons; Lions; American Bar Association; Rotary; Americans for Democratic Action; American Political Science Association; Kappa Sigma; Phi Delta Phi. Died, from a ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm, at Bethesda Naval Hospital, Bethesda, Montgomery County, Md., August 10, 1963 (age 60 years, 15 days). Interment a private or family graveyard, Monroe County, Tenn.
  Relatives: Son of Robert Cooke Kefauver (1870-1958) and Phredonia Bradford (Estes) Kefauver (1873-1948); married, August 8, 1935, to Nancy Patterson Pigott (1911-1967); first cousin once removed of Joseph Wingate Folk (1869-1923); second cousin thrice removed of Montgomery Blair and Francis Preston Blair, Jr.; third cousin twice removed of James Lawrence Blair, Francis Preston Blair Lee and Gist Blair; fourth cousin once removed of Edward Brooke Lee.
  Political family: Lee-Randolph family of Maryland and Virginia (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  The Kefauver Federal Building, in Nashville, Tennessee, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about Estes Kefauver: Hugh Brogan, All Honorable Men : Huey Long, Robert Moses, Estes Kefauver, Richard J. Daley — Joseph Bruce Gorman, Kefauver: A Political Biography
  Chambers Kellar (b. 1867) — of Lead, Lawrence County, S.Dak. Born in Memphis, Shelby County, Tenn., March 4, 1867. Republican. Lawyer; delegate to Republican National Convention from South Dakota, 1920 (member, Resolutions Committee), 1932. Episcopalian. Member, Phi Delta Theta; Freemasons; Elks; Sons of the American Revolution. Burial location unknown.
  Wesley Travis Kennerly (1877-1944) — also known as Wesley T. Kennerly — of Knoxville, Knox County, Tenn. Born in Henry County, Tenn., August 29, 1877. Democrat. Lawyer; U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of Tennessee, 1917-21; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Tennessee, 1940. Southern Methodist. Member, American Bar Association; Phi Delta Phi; Knights of Pythias; Freemasons; Knights Templar; Shriners; Sons of Confederate Veterans; Sons of the Revolution; United Spanish War Veterans. Died January 29, 1944 (age 66 years, 153 days). Interment at Berry Highland Memorial Cemetery, Knoxville, Tenn.
  Relatives: Son of Charles M. Kennerly and Sarah (Travis) Kennerly; married, March 15, 1906, to Ola Dell Robertson (1877-1934).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Thomas Erby Kilby (1865-1943) — also known as Thomas E. Kilby — of Anniston, Calhoun County, Ala. Born in Lebanon, Wilson County, Tenn., July 9, 1865. Democrat. Manufacturer; mayor of Anniston, Ala., 1905-09; member of Alabama state senate, 1911-15; Lieutenant Governor of Alabama, 1915-19; Governor of Alabama, 1919-23; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Alabama, 1924. Episcopalian. Member, Freemasons; Shriners; Knights of Pythias. Died October 22, 1943 (age 78 years, 105 days). Interment at Highland Cemetery Annex, Anniston, Ala.
  Relatives: Son of Peyton Phillips Kilby and Sarah Ann (Marchant) Kilby; married to Mary Elizabeth Clark.
  Barton S. Kyle (1824-1862) — of Troy, Miami County, Ohio. Born in Miami County, Ohio, 1824. Republican. Delegate to Republican National Convention from Ohio, 1856; served in the Union Army during the Civil War. Member, Freemasons. Killed at the battle of Shiloh, Hardin County, Tenn., April 6, 1862 (age about 37 years). Interment at Rose Hill Cemetery, Troy, Ohio.
  Relatives: Uncle of Thomas Barton Kyle (1856-1915).
  Powless William Lanier (b. 1885) — also known as Powless W. Lanier — of Covington, Tipton County, Tenn.; Jamestown, Stutsman County, N.Dak. Born in Fulton, Lauderdale County, Tenn., March 7, 1885. Democrat. Lawyer; member of Tennessee state house of representatives, 1911-12; juvenile court judge in Tennessee, 1913-15; delegate to Democratic National Convention from North Dakota, 1928, 1932; candidate for U.S. Senator from North Dakota, 1932; U.S. Attorney for North Dakota, 1933-54. Methodist. Member, Freemasons; Kappa Sigma. Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Isaac Hill Lanier and Ellen (Cooper) Lanier; married, December 28, 1910, to Mary Louise Roberts.
  Dick Latta Lansden (1869-1924) — also known as Dick Lansden — of Sparta, White County, Tenn.; Cookeville, Putnam County, Tenn. Born in Bakers Crossroads, White County, Tenn., May 15, 1869. Democrat. School teacher; superintendent of schools; lawyer; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Tennessee, 1904; justice of Tennessee state supreme court, 1910-16. Presbyterian. Member, Freemasons; Odd Fellows; Knights of Pythias. Died in Montgomery, Montgomery County, Ala., August 10, 1924 (age 55 years, 87 days). Interment at Cookeville City Cemetery, Cookeville, Tenn.
  Relatives: Son of Hugh Hill Lansden (1837-1902) and Lee Ann (McGee) Lansden (1840-1934); married, November 16, 1895, to Helen Jane Snodgrass (1875-1962); father of Dick Latta Lansden, Jr. (1909-1999).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  John Davis Larkins, Jr. (1909-1990) — also known as John D. Larkins, Jr. — of Trenton, Jones County, N.C. Born in Morristown, Hamblen County, Tenn., June 8, 1909. Democrat. Lawyer; member of North Carolina state senate 7th District, 1936-44, 1948-54; delegate to Democratic National Convention from North Carolina, 1940, 1944 (member, Committee to Notify Vice-Presidential Nominee), 1948 (alternate), 1956, 1960; served in the U.S. Army during World War II; secretary of North Carolina Democratic Party, 1952-54; North Carolina Democratic state chair, 1954-58; member of Democratic National Committee from North Carolina, 1958-60; candidate for nomination for Governor of North Carolina, 1960; U.S. District Judge for the Eastern District of North Carolina, 1967. Baptist. Member, American Legion; Forty and Eight; Woodmen; American Bar Association; Phi Alpha Delta; Elks; Moose; Freemasons; Shriners. Died February 16, 1990 (age 80 years, 253 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of John D. Larkins and Emma (Cooper) Larkins; married, March 15, 1930, to Pauline Murrill.
  Albert Hamilton Latimer (c.1800-1877) — also known as Albert H. Latimer — of Texas. Born in Huntingdon, Carroll County, Tenn., about 1800. Republican. Lawyer; planter; delegate to Texas Republic Republic constitutional convention from District of Red River, 1836; signer, Texas Declaration of Independence, 1836; member of Texas Republic House of Representatives, 1840-42; delegate to Texas state constitutional convention, 1845; member of Texas state senate, 1849-51; Texas state comptroller, 1865-66; delegate to Texas state constitutional convention, 1866; justice of Texas state supreme court, 1869; candidate for Lieutenant Governor of Texas, 1869; district judge in Texas 8th District, 1870-72. Presbyterian. Member, Freemasons. Died in Clarksville, Red River County, Tex., January 27, 1877 (age about 77 years). Interment at Clarksville Cemetery, Clarksville, Tex.
  Relatives: Son of James L. Latimer and Jane (Hamilton) Latimer; married 1828 to Elritta Smith; married 1833 to Elizabeth Richey; married 1857 to Mary Gattis.
  Luke Lea (1879-1945) — of Nashville, Davidson County, Tenn. Born in Nashville, Davidson County, Tenn., April 12, 1879. Democrat. Lawyer; newspaper editor and publisher; founder of the Nashville Tennesseean; U.S. Senator from Tennessee, 1911-17; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Tennessee, 1912 (speaker); colonel in the U.S. Army during World War I. Episcopalian. Member, Freemasons; Alpha Tau Omega; Phi Delta Phi; Elks; Knights of Pythias; Redmen. Died November 18, 1945 (age 66 years, 220 days). Interment at Mt. Olivet Cemetery, Nashville, Tenn.
  Relatives: Son of Overton Lea and Ella (Cocke) Lea; married, November 1, 1906, to Mary Louise Warner; great-grandson of Luke Lea (1783-1851).
  Political family: Lea family of Tennessee.
  Cross-reference: John D. Erwin
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Myron M. Lehman (1889-1977) — of Elgin, Kane County, Ill. Born in Elgin, Kane County, Ill., June 22, 1889. Served in the U.S. Army during World War I; mayor of Elgin, Ill., 1931-43, 1951-55; defeated, 1943. Methodist. Member, Freemasons; American Legion; Veterans of Foreign Wars. Died in Whitehaven, Shelby County, Tenn., August 7, 1977 (age 88 years, 46 days). Interment at Bluff City Cemetery, Elgin, Ill.
  Isaac Thomas Lenoir (1807-1875) — of Tennessee. Born in Wilkes County, N.C., May 16, 1807. Member of Tennessee state house of representatives, 1843-45; member of Tennessee state senate, 1845-47. Member, Freemasons. Died in Sweetwater Valley, Roane County, Tenn., December 4, 1875 (age 68 years, 202 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son-in-law of Samuel E. Hogg; son of William Ballard Lenoir (1775-1852); grandson of Waightstill Avery.
  Political families: Lenoir-Avery family of North Carolina; Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  E. F. Lester (b. 1871) — Born in Lebanon, Wilson County, Tenn., August 7, 1871. Democrat. Lawyer; district judge in Oklahoma 5th District, 1918-24; justice of Oklahoma state supreme court, 1924-31; chief justice of Oklahoma state supreme court, 1931. Disciples of Christ. Member, Freemasons; Odd Fellows. Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Preston S. Lester and Elizabeth (Crutchfield) Lester; married, April 29, 1902, to Buelah Collier.
  Meriwether Lewis (1774-1809) — of Missouri. Born near Ivy, Albemarle County, Va., August 18, 1774. Governor of Louisiana (Missouri) Territory, 1807-09; died in office 1809. English and Welsh ancestry. Member, Freemasons. Commanded expedition with William Clark to Oregon, 1803-04. Died from gunshot wounds under mysterious circumstances (murder or suicide?) at Grinder's Stand, an inn on the Natchez Trace near Hohenwald, Lewis County, Tenn., October 11, 1809 (age 35 years, 54 days). Interment at Meriwether Lewis Park, Near Hohenwald, Lewis County, Tenn.
  Relatives: Son of William Lewis (1733-1779) and Lucy (Meriwether) Lewis (1852-1837); first cousin once removed of John Walker, David Meriwether (1755-1822), James Meriwether (1755-1817), Francis Walker and George Rockingham Gilmer; first cousin five times removed of Arthur Sidney Demarest; second cousin of James Meriwether (1788-1852), David Meriwether (1800-1893) and James Archibald Meriwether; second cousin once removed of George Washington, Thomas Walker Gilmer and Reuben Handy Meriwether; second cousin thrice removed of Hubbard T. Smith; second cousin four times removed of Archer Woodford; third cousin of Theodorick Bland, Robert Brooke, Bushrod Washington, George Madison and Richard Aylett Buckner; third cousin once removed of John Randolph of Roanoke, Henry St. George Tucker, John Thornton Augustine Washington, Zachary Taylor and Aylette Buckner; third cousin twice removed of John Strother Pendleton, Albert Gallatin Pendleton, Aylett Hawes Buckner and Nathaniel Beverly Tucker; third cousin thrice removed of James Francis Buckner, Key Pittman and Vail Montgomery Pittman.
  Political families: Demarest-Meriwether family of New Jersey; Marshall-Harrison-Randolph-Cabell family of Virginia; Meriwether-Kellogg-Tyler family of Virginia and Connecticut (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Cross-reference: George F. Shannon
  Lewis counties in Idaho, Ky., Mo., Tenn. and Wash. are named for him; Lewis and Clark County, Mont. is named partly for him.
  Other politicians named for him: Meriwether Lewis RandolphMeriwether Lewis Walker
  Coins and currency: His portrait appeared (along with Clark's) on the $10 U.S. Note from 1898 to 1927.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Books about Meriwether Lewis: Thomas C. Danisi, Uncovering the Truth About Meriwether Lewis — Donald Barr Chidsey, Lewis and Clark: The Great Adventure
  Hugh Allen Locke (b. 1885) — also known as Hugh A. Locke — of Birmingham, Jefferson County, Ala. Born in Fayette County, Tenn., February 9, 1885. Lawyer; Independent candidate for Governor of Alabama, 1930. Methodist. Member, American Bar Association; Kappa Sigma; Freemasons; Knights of Pythias. Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Robert Locke and Susanna F. (Crenshaw) Locke; married, October 12, 1921, to Mabel Plosser.
James W. Loop James Whitcomb Loop (1900-1993) — also known as James W. Loop — of Charleston, Kanawha County, W.Va. Born in Morristown, Hamblen County, Tenn., March 12, 1900. Democrat. Printer; school teacher; member of West Virginia state house of delegates from Kanawha County, 1947-56, 1965-66, 1969-72; defeated, 1972. Protestant. Member, Freemasons; Knights Templar; Shriners; Kappa Delta Pi; Typographical Union. Died December 31, 1993 (age 93 years, 294 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of James Willis Loop and Dora (Noe) Loop (1878-1943); married, March 9, 1924, to Marguerite McCracken.
  Image source: West Virginia Blue Book 1951
  Joseph Carlton Loser (1892-1984) — also known as J. Carlton Loser — of Nashville, Davidson County, Tenn. Born in Nashville, Davidson County, Tenn., October 1, 1892. Democrat. Lawyer; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Tennessee, 1944 (member, Committee to Notify Vice-Presidential Nominee), 1952, 1960; candidate for Presidential Elector for Tennessee, 1956; U.S. Representative from Tennessee 5th District, 1957-63. Baptist. Member, Freemasons; Knights Templar; Shriners; Sigma Alpha Epsilon; Kiwanis. Died July 31, 1984 (age 91 years, 304 days). Interment at Woodlawn Memorial Park, Nashville, Tenn.
  Relatives: Son of Henry J. Loser and Willie M. (McConnico) Loser.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
William G. McAdoo William Gibbs McAdoo (1863-1941) — also known as William G. McAdoo — of Chattanooga, Hamilton County, Tenn.; New York, New York County, N.Y.; Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, Calif.; Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara County, Calif. Born near Marietta, Cobb County, Ga., October 31, 1863. Democrat. Lawyer; law partner with William McAdoo (no relation); attorney for railroads; president, Hudson & Manhattan Railroad Co.; delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1904, 1912; candidate for U.S. Representative from New York 17th District, 1908; member of Democratic National Committee from New York, 1912; U.S. Secretary of the Treasury, 1913-18; candidate for Democratic nomination for President, 1920, 1924; delegate to Democratic National Convention from California, 1932, 1936; U.S. Senator from California, 1933-38; member of Democratic National Committee from California, 1937-39. Episcopalian. Member, Freemasons. Died in Washington, D.C., February 1, 1941 (age 77 years, 93 days). Interment at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Va.
  Relatives: Son of William Gibbs McAdoo (1820-1849) and Mary Faith (Floyd) McAdoo (1832-1913); married, November 18, 1885, to Sarah Houston Fleming (1867-1912); married, May 7, 1914, to Eleanor Randolph Wilson (1889-1967; daughter of Woodrow Wilson (1856-1924)); married, September 14, 1935, to Doris Isabel Cross (1909-2005); great-grandson of John Floyd.
  Political family: Wilson-Floyd-McAdoo family.
  Cross-reference: Byron R. Newton — Nat Rogan
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Image source: Munsey's Magazine, May 1919
  James McCallum (1806-1889) — of Tennessee. Born in Robeson County, N.C., October 3, 1806. Member of Tennessee state legislature, 1861-63; Representative from Tennessee in the Confederate Congress, 1864-65. Presbyterian. Member, Freemasons. Died in Pulaski, Giles County, Tenn., September 16, 1889 (age 82 years, 348 days). Interment at Maplewood Cemetery, Pulaski, Tenn.
  Kenneth Douglas McKellar (1869-1957) — also known as Kenneth D. McKellar — of Memphis, Shelby County, Tenn. Born in Richmond, Dallas County, Ala., January 29, 1869. Democrat. Lawyer; Presidential Elector for Tennessee, 1904; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Tennessee, 1908, 1920, 1936, 1940, 1944 (speaker); U.S. Representative from Tennessee 10th District, 1911-17; U.S. Senator from Tennessee, 1917-53. Presbyterian. Member, Freemasons; Shriners; Odd Fellows; Delta Kappa Epsilon. Died October 25, 1957 (age 88 years, 269 days). Interment at Elmwood Cemetery, Memphis, Tenn.; statue at Tri-Cities Regional Airport, Near Blountville, Sullivan County, Tenn.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Claudius B. Miller (1824-1917) — also known as "Uncle Claudius" — of Unionville, Appanoose County, Iowa. Born in Hickman County, Tenn., December 1, 1824. Farmer; served in the Union Army during the Civil War; member of Iowa state house of representatives, 1870-72. Methodist. Member, Freemasons; Grand Army of the Republic. Died in Unionville, Appanoose County, Iowa, March 14, 1917 (age 92 years, 103 days). Interment at Unionville Cemetery, Unionville, Iowa.
  John L. Miller (1821-1907) — also known as "Old Flax" — of Corsicana, Navarro County, Tex. Born in Tennessee, 1821. Postmaster at Corsicana, Tex., 1859; served in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; mayor of Corsicana, Tex., 1877-80. Member, Odd Fellows; Freemasons. Died in 1907 (age about 86 years). Interment at Oakwood Cemetery, Corsicana, Tex.
John T. Morgan John Tyler Morgan (1824-1907) — also known as John T. Morgan — of Selma, Dallas County, Ala. Born in Athens, McMinn County, Tenn., June 20, 1824. Democrat. Lawyer; Presidential Elector for Alabama, 1860, 1876; delegate to Alabama secession convention, 1861; general in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Alabama, 1876, 1900; U.S. Senator from Alabama, 1877-1907; died in office 1907. Southern Methodist. Member, Freemasons; Knights Templar. Died in Washington, D.C., June 11, 1907 (age 82 years, 356 days). Interment at Live Oak Cemetery, Selma, Ala.
  Relatives: Son of George Washington Morgan (1788-1884) and Frances (Irby) Morgan (1795-1857); brother of Mary Catherine Morgan (1814-1845; who married William Parish Chilton (1810-1871)); married, February 11, 1846, to Cornelia G. Willis (1827-1894); granduncle of Arthur Bounds Chilton.
  Political family: Chilton family of Missouri.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: Men of Mark in America (1906)
  Benjamin Duke Nabers (1812-1878) — also known as Benjamin D. Nabers — of Hickory Flat, Benton County, Miss.; Memphis, Shelby County, Tenn.; Holly Springs, Marshall County, Miss. Born in Franklin, Williamson County, Tenn., November 7, 1812. Merchant; lawyer; U.S. Representative from Mississippi 1st District, 1851-53; Presidential Elector for Tennessee, 1860. Member, Freemasons. Died in Holly Springs, Marshall County, Miss., September 6, 1878 (age 65 years, 303 days). Interment at Hillcrest Cemetery, Holly Springs, Miss.
  Relatives: Son of Franklin Neighbours and Sarah (McLaughlin) Neighbours; married, November 3, 1838, to Rebecca A. Mason.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
  John Parks Newsome (1893-1961) — also known as John P. Newsome — of Birmingham, Jefferson County, Ala. Born in Memphis, Shelby County, Tenn., February 13, 1893. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army during World War I; U.S. Representative from Alabama 9th District, 1943-45. Episcopalian. Member, Freemasons; Knights Templar; Shriners. Died in Birmingham, Jefferson County, Ala., November 10, 1961 (age 68 years, 270 days). Interment at Elmwood Cemetery, Birmingham, Ala.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  William Allen Northcott (1854-1917) — also known as William A. Northcott — of Greenville, Bond County, Ill.; Springfield, Sangamon County, Ill. Born in Murfreesboro, Rutherford County, Tenn., January 28, 1854. Republican. Lawyer; Bond County State's Attorney, 1882-92; Lieutenant Governor of Illinois, 1897-1905; alternate delegate to Republican National Convention from Illinois, 1904; U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of Illinois, 1905-14; president, Inter-Ocean Casualty Co. Episcopalian. Member, Modern Woodmen of America; Odd Fellows; Elks; Knights of Pythias; Freemasons. Died January 25, 1917 (age 62 years, 363 days). Interment at Oak Ridge Cemetery, Springfield, Ill.
  Relatives: Son-in-law of Nathaniel S. Dresser; son of Robert Saunders Northcott (Civil War general) and Mary (Cunningham) Northcott; brother of Elliott Northcott (1869-1946); married, September 11, 1882, to Ada R. Stoutzenberg.
  Political family: Northcott family of Illinois.
  Williamson Simpson Oldham (1813-1868) — Born in Franklin County, Tenn., July 19, 1813. Member of Arkansas state legislature, 1838; justice of Arkansas state supreme court, 1842; candidate for U.S. Representative from Arkansas, 1846; candidate for Texas state house of representatives, 1853; candidate for U.S. Representative from Texas, 1859; delegate to Texas secession convention, 1861; Delegate from Texas to the Confederate Provisional Congress, 1861-62; Senator from Texas in the Confederate Congress, 1862-65. Episcopalian. Member, Freemasons. Died of typhoid fever in Houston, Harris County, Tex., May 8, 1868 (age 54 years, 294 days). Original interment at Episcopal Cemetery, Houston, Tex.; reinterment in 1938 at Brookside Memorial Park, Houston, Tex.
  Oldham County, Tex. is named for him.
  S. Watkins Overton (b. 1894) — also known as Watkins Overton — of Memphis, Shelby County, Tenn. Born in Memphis, Shelby County, Tenn., June 5, 1894. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army during World War I; lawyer; member of Tennessee state house of representatives, 1925; member of Tennessee state senate, 1927; mayor of Memphis, Tenn., 1928-39, 1949-53. Presbyterian. Member, Order of the Coif; Veterans of Foreign Wars; American Legion; Freemasons; Shriners; Phi Delta Phi; Tau Kappa Epsilon; Omicron Delta Kappa. Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Watkins Overton and May (Hill) Overton; married, January 18, 1937, to Bessie Ganong.
  Herron Carney Pearson (1890-1953) — also known as Herron C. Pearson — of Jackson, Madison County, Tenn. Born in Taylor, Williamson County, Tex., July 31, 1890. Democrat. Lawyer; Presidential Elector for Tennessee, 1912; U.S. Representative from Tennessee 7th District, 1935-43. Presbyterian. Member, American Bar Association; Kappa Sigma; Freemasons; Elks; Rotary. Died in Jackson, Madison County, Tenn., April 24, 1953 (age 62 years, 267 days). Interment at Hollywood Cemetery, Jackson, Tenn.
  Relatives: Son of John Lafayette Pearson and Annie (Herron) Pearson; married, June 23, 1915, to Evelyn Pearcy (1896-1985).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Austin Peay IV (1876-1927) — also known as "The Maker of Modern Tennessee" — of Clarksville, Montgomery County, Tenn. Born in Christian County, Ky., June 1, 1876. Democrat. Lawyer; member of Tennessee state house of representatives, 1901-05; Tennessee Democratic state chair, 1905; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Tennessee, 1916 (Honorary Vice-President), 1924; Governor of Tennessee, 1923-27; died in office 1927. Baptist. Member, Freemasons; Elks; Knights of Pythias; Kappa Alpha Order. Died, of a cerebral hemorrhage, at the Governor's Residence, Nashville, Davidson County, Tenn., October 2, 1927 (age 51 years, 123 days). Interment at Greenwood Cemetery, Clarksville, Tenn.
  Relatives: Son of Austin Peay and Cornelia Frances (Leavell) Peay; married, September 19, 1895, to Sallie Hurst; father of Austin Peay V (1901-1949).
  Austin Peay State University, Clarksville, Tennessee, is named for him.
  Eugene Hermann Plumacher (1837-1910) — also known as Eugene H. Plumacher — of Nashville, Davidson County, Tenn. Born in Germany, 1837. Naturalized U.S. citizen; colonel in the Union Army during the Civil War; university professor; inventor; U.S. Consul in Maracaibo, 1883-1909. German ancestry. Member, Freemasons. Founded a leprosy hospital in Venezuela. Died in Washington, D.C., September 25, 1910 (age about 73 years). Interment at Glenwood Cemetery, Washington, D.C.
  Relatives: Married to Olga Maria Pauline Hunerwadel (1839-1895).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Richard Harding Poff (1923-2011) — of Radford, Va. Born in Radford, Va., October 19, 1923. Republican. Served in the U.S. Army Air Force in World War II; U.S. Representative from Virginia 6th District, 1953-72; delegate to Republican National Convention from Virginia, 1968; justice of Virginia state supreme court, 1972. Presbyterian. Member, Sigma Nu Phi; Jaycees; Lions; Freemasons; Moose; American Legion; Veterans of Foreign Wars. Died in Tullahoma, Coffee County, Tenn., June 28, 2011 (age 87 years, 252 days). Burial location unknown.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
James K. Polk James Knox Polk (1795-1849) — also known as James K. Polk; "Young Hickory"; "Napoleon of the Stump" — of Tennessee. Born in Pineville, Mecklenburg County, N.C., November 2, 1795. Democrat. Lawyer; member of Tennessee state house of representatives, 1823-25; U.S. Representative from Tennessee, 1825-39 (6th District 1825-33, 9th District 1833-39); Speaker of the U.S. House, 1835-39; Governor of Tennessee, 1839-41; President of the United States, 1845-49. Presbyterian or Methodist. Scotch-Irish ancestry. Member, Freemasons. Died, of cholera, in Nashville, Davidson County, Tenn., June 15, 1849 (age 53 years, 225 days). Original interment at a private or family graveyard, Davidson County, Tenn.; reinterment in 1891 at Tennessee State Capitol Grounds, Nashville, Tenn.; cenotaph at Polk Memorial Gardens, Columbia, Tenn.
  Relatives: Son of Samuel Polk (1772-1827) and Jane Gracy (Knox) Polk (1776-1852); brother of William Hawkins Polk; married, January 1, 1824, to Sarah Childress (1803-1891; daughter of Joel Childress); nephew of Mary Ophelia Polk (1785-1835; who married Thomas Jones Hardeman); uncle of Marshall Tate Polk and Tasker Polk; first cousin once removed of Edwin Fitzhugh Polk; second cousin once removed of Mary Adelaide Polk (1817-1863; who married George Davis) and Richard Tyler Polk; second cousin twice removed of Rufus King Polk and Frank Lyon Polk (1871-1943); second cousin thrice removed of Elizabeth Polk Guest; second cousin four times removed of Raymond R. Guest; third cousin once removed of Charles Polk and Augustus Caesar Dodge; fourth cousin of Trusten Polk; fourth cousin once removed of Albert Fawcett Polk.
  Political families: Ashe-Polk family of North Carolina; Polk family; Manly-Haywood-Polk family of Raleigh, North Carolina (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Cross-reference: Aaron V. Brown — John Charles Frémont
  Polk counties in Ark., Fla., Ga., Iowa, Minn., Mo., Neb., Ore., Tenn., Tex. and Wis. are named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: James Knox Polk HallJames P. LattaJames K. P. FennerJ. K. P. Marshall
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial — Tennessee Encyclopedia
  Books about James K. Polk: Sam W. Haynes, James K. Polk and the Expansionist Impulse — Paul H. Bergeron, The Presidency of James K. Polk — Thomas M. Leonard, James K. Polk : A Clear and Unquestionable Destiny — Eugene Irving McCormac, James K. Polk: A Political Biography to the Prelude to War 1795-1845 — Eugene Irving McCormac, James K. Polk: A Political Biography to the End of a Career 1845-1849 — Richard B. Cheney & Lynne V. Cheney, Kings Of The Hill : How Nine Powerful Men Changed The Course of American History — John Seigenthaler, James K. Polk: 1845 - 1849
  Image source: Portrait & Biographical Album of Washtenaw County (1891)
  James Pinckney Pope (1884-1966) — also known as James P. Pope — of Boise, Ada County, Idaho. Born near Jonesboro, Jackson Parish, La., March 31, 1884. Democrat. Lawyer; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Idaho, 1924 (member, Platform and Resolutions Committee), 1928, 1936; mayor of Boise, Idaho, 1929-33; resigned 1933; U.S. Senator from Idaho, 1933-39. Congregationalist. Member, Freemasons; Elks; Eagles. Died in Alexandria, Va., January 23, 1966 (age 81 years, 298 days). Interment at Lynnhurst Cemetery, Knoxville, Tenn.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  Alan M. Prewitt (b. 1893) — of Bolivar, Hardeman County, Tenn. Born in Grand Junction, Hardeman County, Tenn., February 1, 1893. Democrat. Lawyer; Presidential Elector for Tennessee, 1916; served in the U.S. Army during World War I; member of Tennessee Democratic State Executive Committee, 1925; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Tennessee, 1940; justice of Tennessee state supreme court, 1942-. Methodist. Member, Elks; Freemasons. Burial location unknown.
  Henry Frazier Reams (1897-1971) — also known as Frazier Reams — of Toledo, Lucas County, Ohio. Born in Franklin, Williamson County, Tenn., January 15, 1897. Served in the U.S. Army during World War I; lawyer; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Ohio, 1928 (alternate), 1940, 1944 (member, Committee on Rules and Order of Business), 1948, 1956; U.S. Representative from Ohio 9th District, 1951-55. Methodist. Member, American Bar Association; American Legion; Phi Gamma Delta; Phi Delta Phi; Freemasons; Shriners. Died in Oakland, Alameda County, Calif., September 15, 1971 (age 74 years, 243 days). Interment at Woodlawn Cemetery, Toledo, Ohio.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Brazilla Carroll Reece (1889-1961) — also known as B. Carroll Reece — of Butler, Johnson County, Tenn.; Johnson City, Washington County, Tenn. Born in a log cabin near Butler, Johnson County, Tenn., December 22, 1889. Republican. School teacher; served in the U.S. Army during World War I; lawyer; banker; U.S. Representative from Tennessee 1st District, 1921-31, 1933-47, 1951-61; died in office 1961; delegate to Republican National Convention from Tennessee, 1932, 1936, 1944, 1948 (speaker), 1956, 1960; member of Republican National Committee from Tennessee, 1939-40; Chairman of Republican National Committee, 1946-48; candidate for U.S. Senator from Tennessee, 1948; Tennessee Republican state chair, 1958. Baptist. Member, American Bar Association; American Economic Association; American Statistical Association; American Academy of Political and Social Science; Delta Sigma Pi; Freemasons; Shriners. Died, in Bethesda Naval Hospital, Bethesda, Montgomery County, Md., March 19, 1961 (age 71 years, 87 days). Interment at Monte Vista Memorial Park, Johnson City, Tenn.
  Relatives: Son of John Isaac Reece and Sarah E. (Maples) Reece; married, October 30, 1923, to Louise Goff (1898-1970) (daughter of Guy Despard Goff).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  Shelby A. Rhinehart (1927-2002) — of Spencer, Van Buren County, Tenn. Born in White County, Tenn., May 5, 1927. Pharmacist; member of Tennessee state house of representatives, 1959-60, 1971-2002. Baptist. Member, American Legion; Veterans of Foreign Wars; Freemasons. Died in Nashville, Davidson County, Tenn., September 19, 2002 (age 75 years, 137 days). Interment at Town Cemetery, Spencer, Tenn.
  James Daniel Richardson (1843-1914) — also known as James D. Richardson — of Murfreesboro, Rutherford County, Tenn. Born in Rutherford County, Tenn., March 10, 1843. Democrat. Served in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; lawyer; member of Tennessee state house of representatives, 1871-73; Speaker of the Tennessee State House of Representatives, 1871-73; member of Tennessee state senate, 1873-74; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Tennessee, 1876, 1896, 1900; U.S. Representative from Tennessee 5th District, 1885-1905. Member, Freemasons. Died in Murfreesboro, Rutherford County, Tenn., July 24, 1914 (age 71 years, 136 days). Interment at Evergreen Cemetery, Murfreesboro, Tenn.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Albert Houston Roberts (1868-1946) — also known as A. H. Roberts — of Tennessee. Born in Overton County, Tenn., July 4, 1868. Democrat. Superintendent of schools; lawyer; Governor of Tennessee, 1919-21; defeated, 1920. Southern Methodist. Member, Freemasons; Odd Fellows. Died June 25, 1946 (age 77 years, 356 days). Interment at Livingston City Cemetery, Livingston, Tenn.
  Relatives: Son of John A. Roberts and Sarah (Carlock) Roberts; married, May 16, 1889, to Nora Deane Bowden.
  William Bradford Ross (1873-1924) — also known as W. B. Ross — of Cheyenne, Laramie County, Wyo. Born in Dover, Stewart County, Tenn., December 4, 1873. Democrat. Laramie County Prosecuting Attorney, 1906-07; Governor of Wyoming, 1923-24; died in office 1924; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Wyoming, 1924 (member, Credentials Committee). Episcopalian. Member, Freemasons; Kiwanis. Died October 2, 1924 (age 50 years, 303 days). Interment at Lakeview Cemetery, Cheyenne, Wyo.
  Relatives: Son of Ambrose B. Ross and Sue (Gray) Ross; married, September 11, 1902, to Nellie Davis Tayloe (1876-1977).
  See also NNDB dossier
  William Charles Salmon (1868-1925) — of Columbia, Maury County, Tenn. Born near Paris, Henry County, Tenn., April 3, 1868. Democrat. School teacher; lawyer; served in the U.S. Army during World War I; U.S. Representative from Tennessee 7th District, 1923-25. Disciples of Christ. Member, Freemasons; Odd Fellows; Elks. Died in Washington, D.C., May 13, 1925 (age 57 years, 40 days). Interment at Rose Hill Cemetery, Columbia, Tenn.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Henry Hulme Sevier (1878-1940) — also known as Hal H. Sevier — of Corpus Christi, Nueces County, Tex. Born in Columbia, Maury County, Tenn., March 16, 1878. Democrat. Newspaper editor; member of Texas state house of representatives, 1902-06; vice-president, Corpus Christi Bank and Trust Co.; U.S. Ambassador to Chile, 1933-35. Episcopalian. Member, Freemasons; Woodmen. Died in 1940 (age about 62 years). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Theodore Francis Sevier and Mary (Douglas) Sevier; married, July 31, 1906, to Clara Driscoll.
  See also U.S. State Dept career summary
  Roy Smith (b. 1924) — of Ypsilanti Township, Washtenaw County, Mich. Born in Livingston, Overton County, Tenn., February 12, 1924. Republican. Served in the U.S. Marine Corps during World War II; analyst for Ford Motor Company; supervisor of Ypsilanti Township, Michigan, 1959-66; member of Michigan state house of representatives 52nd District, 1967-72, 1975-82; defeated, 1962 (Washtenaw County 2nd District), 1972 (22nd District); Saline city administrator, 1973-74; candidate for Michigan state senate 18th District, 1982. Baptist or Church of Christ. Member, American Legion; Freemasons. Still living as of 1982.
  Relatives: Married 1949 to Shirley Sanford.
  Kenneth N. Springer (1945-2000) — also known as Pete Springer — of Centerville, Hickman County, Tenn. Born in Lyles, Hickman County, Tenn., February 27, 1945. Democrat. School teacher; member of Tennessee state senate 25th District, 1981-82, 1991-2000; died in office 2000; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Tennessee, 1996. Church of Christ. Member, Freemasons; Knights Templar; Shriners. Died, apparently of heart disease, in Nashville, Davidson County, Tenn., April 12, 2000 (age 55 years, 45 days). Interment at Harpeth Hills Memory Gardens, Centerville, Tenn.
  Arthur Thomas Stewart (1892-1972) — also known as A. Tom Stewart — of Winchester, Franklin County, Tenn. Born in Dunlap, Sequatchie County, Tenn., January 11, 1892. Democrat. U.S. Senator from Tennessee, 1939-49; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Tennessee, 1940, 1944. Methodist. Member, Freemasons. Died in Nashville, Davidson County, Tenn., October 10, 1972 (age 80 years, 273 days). Interment at Memorial Park Cemetery, Winchester, Tenn.
  Cross-reference: Robert A. Everett
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Paul G. Summers (b. 1950) — of Tennessee. Born in Somerville, Fayette County, Tenn., March 28, 1950. Tennessee state attorney general, 1999-. Methodist. Member, Freemasons. Still living as of 2001.
  Wilkins F. Tannehill (1787-1858) — of Nashville, Davidson County, Tenn. Born in Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, Pa., March 2, 1787. Newspaper editor; author; mayor of Nashville, Tenn., 1825-26. Member, Freemasons. Died June 2, 1858 (age 71 years, 92 days). Interment at Nashville City Cemetery, Nashville, Tenn.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  John Bell Tansil (b. 1881) — also known as John B. Tansil — of Billings, Yellowstone County, Mont. Born in Dresden, Weakley County, Tenn., July 13, 1881. Democrat. Lawyer; Yellowstone County Attorney, 1923-29; U.S. Attorney for Montana, 1935-50. Episcopalian. Member, Alpha Tau Omega; Phi Beta Kappa; Freemasons; Elks. Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Egbert E. Tansil and Jackie (Bell) Tansil; married, February 12, 1908, to Lillian Summers (died 1914); married, August 12, 1931, to Helen Fletcher.
  Hugh M. Tate (1882-1938) — of Knoxville, Knox County, Tenn. Born in Morristown, Hamblen County, Tenn., September 15, 1882. Republican. Lawyer; alternate delegate to Republican National Convention from Tennessee, 1912; member, Interstate Commerce Commission, 1930-37. Member, Freemasons. Died May 29, 1938 (age 55 years, 256 days). Burial location unknown.
  Alfred Alexander Taylor (1848-1931) — also known as Alfred A. Taylor — of Johnson City, Washington County, Tenn.; Milligan College, Carter County, Tenn. Born in Happy Valley, Carter County, Tenn., August 6, 1848. Republican. Lawyer; member of Tennessee state house of representatives, 1875-76; U.S. Representative from Tennessee 1st District, 1889-95; Governor of Tennessee, 1921-23; defeated, 1886, 1922. Methodist. Member, Freemasons; Elks. Died November 25, 1931 (age 83 years, 111 days). Interment at Monte Vista Memorial Park, Johnson City, Tenn.
  Relatives: Son of Nathaniel Green Taylor and Emma (Haynes) Taylor; brother of Robert Love Taylor; married, June 22, 1881, to Jennie Anderson; first cousin of Nathaniel Edwin Harris (1846-1929).
  Political family: Taylor family of Tennessee.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  James Willis Taylor (1880-1939) — also known as J. Will Taylor — of La Follette, Campbell County, Tenn. Born in Lead Mine Bend, Union County, Tenn., August 28, 1880. Republican. Lawyer; postmaster; mayor of La Follette, Tenn., 1910-12; Tennessee Insurance Commissioner, 1913-14; Tennessee Republican state chair, 1917-18; U.S. Representative from Tennessee 2nd District, 1919-39; died in office 1939; member of Republican National Committee from Tennessee, 1924-34. Methodist. Member, Freemasons; Grotto; Shriners; Odd Fellows; Knights of Pythias; Junior Order. Died November 14, 1939 (age 59 years, 78 days). Interment at Woodlawn Cemetery, La Follette, Tenn.
  Relatives: Son of James W. Taylor and Sarah Elizabeth (Rogers) Taylor.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Luke Edward Terry (1916-1998) — also known as Luke E. Terry — of Martinsburg, Berkeley County, W.Va. Born in Oneida, Scott County, Tenn., August 21, 1916. Republican. Served in the U.S. Army Air Force in World War II; lawyer; member of West Virginia state house of delegates, 1957-58, 1971-76 (Berkeley County 1957-58, 1st District 1971-74, 35th District 1975-76); defeated, 1958. Disciples of Christ. Member, Farm Bureau; American Bar Association; Freemasons; Scottish Rite Masons; Shriners; Disabled American Veterans; American Legion; National Rifle Association; Elks; United Commercial Travelers; Junior Order; Rotary. Died in Lewes, Sussex County, Del., October 20, 1998 (age 82 years, 60 days). Interment at Rosedale Cemetery, Martinsburg, W.Va.
  Relatives: Son of Alvin C. Terry (1866-1957) and Nellie (Smith) Terry (1886-1988); married to Elizabeth Johnson (1914-1999).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  George W. Thomas (1813-1892) — of Mt. Vernon, Posey County, Ind. Born in Tennessee, March 22, 1813. Member of Indiana state house of representatives, 1849-50. Member, Freemasons. Died in Mt. Vernon, Posey County, Ind., April 26, 1892 (age 79 years, 35 days). Interment at Bellefontaine Cemetery, Mt. Vernon, Ind.
  Harlan Whitney Thomas (b. 1908) — also known as Harlan Thomas — of Bolivar, Hardeman County, Tenn. Born in Michie, McNairy County, Tenn., August 5, 1908. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army during World War II; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Tennessee, 1948. Church of Christ. Member, Rotary; Freemasons; American Legion. Burial location unknown.
  Andrew Jackson Titus (1814-1855) — of Texas. Born in Rutherford County, Tenn., March 12, 1814. Served in the U.S. Army during the Mexican War; member of Texas state legislature, 1851-52. Member, Freemasons; Knights Templar. Died April 9, 1855 (age 41 years, 28 days). Interment at Savannah Cemetery, Red River County, Tex.
  Presumably named for: Andrew Jackson
  Relatives: Son of James Titus (1775-1843).
  Titus County, Tex. is named for him.
  Herbert Sanford Walters (1891-1973) — also known as Herbert S. Walters — of Morristown, Hamblen County, Tenn. Born in Leadvale, Jefferson County, Tenn., November 17, 1891. Democrat. Engineer for railroads; general contractor; banker; member of Tennessee state house of representatives, 1933; member of Tennessee Democratic State Executive Committee, 1934-47; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Tennessee, 1936, 1940, 1944; Tennessee Democratic state chair, 1940-44, 1953-55; member of Democratic National Committee from Tennessee, 1945-47, 1956-67; U.S. Senator from Tennessee, 1963-65; appointed 1963. Baptist or Presbyterian. Member, Freemasons; Elks; Kiwanis. Died in Knoxville, Knox County, Tenn., August 17, 1973 (age 81 years, 273 days). Interment at Emma Jarnagin Cemetery, Morristown, Tenn.
  Relatives: Son of John Milo Walters and Lula (Franklin) Walters; married, July 23, 1928, to Sarah Buckman Lockridge.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Matthias Ward (1805-1861) — of Texas. Born in Elbert County, Ga., October 13, 1805. Member of Texas Republic House of Representatives, 1842-44; member of Texas state senate, 1849-50; U.S. Senator from Texas, 1858-59. Member, Freemasons. Died in Warm Springs (now Hot Springs), Madison County, N.C., October 5, 1861 (age 55 years, 357 days). Interment at Nashville City Cemetery, Nashville, Tenn.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
  John Austin Wharton (1806-1838) — of Texas. Born in Nashville, Davidson County, Tenn., 1806. Delegate to Texas Consultation of 1835 from District of Columbia, 1835; served in the Texas Army during the Texas War of Independence; Texas Republic Secretary of War, 1836; member of Texas Republic House of Representatives, 1836-37, 1838; died in office 1838. Member, Freemasons. Died in Houston, Harris County, Tex., December 17, 1838 (age about 32 years). Interment at Founders Memorial Park, Houston, Tex.
  Relatives: Brother of William Harris Wharton (1802-1839).
  Wharton County, Tex. is named partly for him.
  Newton Harris White (b. 1860) — also known as Newton H. White — of Pulaski, Giles County, Tenn. Born in Giles County, Tenn., September 2, 1860. Democrat. Farmer; member, Tennessee Railroad Commission, 1897; member of Tennessee state house of representatives, 1899; Speaker of the Tennessee State Senate, 1901-03, 1913-15; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Tennessee, 1904, 1924. Presbyterian. Member, Freemasons; Knights Templar; Shriners; Sons of the American Revolution; Junior Order. Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Newton White (1814-1891) and Courtney Sivils (Gordon) White (born 1825); married, August 3, 1883, to Halle May Gardner; grandson of Thomas K. Gordon (1792?-1880).
John Sharp Williams John Sharp Williams (1854-1932) — of Yazoo City, Yazoo County, Miss. Born in Memphis, Shelby County, Tenn., July 30, 1854. Democrat. Lawyer; cotton planter; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Mississippi, 1892, 1904, 1912 (speaker), 1916 (member, Platform and Resolutions Committee), 1920; U.S. Representative from Mississippi, 1893-1909 (5th District 1893-1903, 8th District 1903-09); U.S. Senator from Mississippi, 1911-23. Episcopalian. Member, Society of the Cincinnati; Freemasons; Elks. Died near Yazoo City, Yazoo County, Miss., September 7, 1932 (age 78 years, 39 days). Interment a private or family graveyard, Yazoo County, Miss.
  Relatives: Son of Christopher Harris Williams (Confederate Army colonel; killed in battle of Shiloh) and Annie Louise (Sharp) Williams (died 1859); married, October 2, 1877, to Elizabeth Dial 'Bettie' Webb; father of John Sharp Williams, Jr.; grandson of Christopher Harris Williams (1798-1857); second great-grandson of John Williams; cousin *** of Sydenham Benoni Alexander.
  Political family: Williams family of North Carolina (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Image source: Men of Mark in America (1906)
  George Washington Wright (1809-1877) — of Texas. Born in Carthage, Smith County, Tenn., December 11, 1809. Served in the Texas Army during the Texas War of Independence; member of Texas Republic House of Representatives, 1836-37, 1838-39; member of Texas Republic Senate, 1843-45; delegate to Texas state constitutional convention, 1845; delegate to Texas secession convention, 1861. Methodist. Member, Freemasons. Died in Paris, Lamar County, Tex., August 2, 1877 (age 67 years, 234 days). Interment at City Cemetery, Paris, Tex.
  Presumably named for: George Washington
"Enjoy the hospitable entertainment of a political graveyard."
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The Political Graveyard

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