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The Political Graveyard: A Database of American History
Politicians in Trouble or Disgrace

Politicians in Trouble: 1920 to 1929

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in approximate chronological order

  Benjamin Gitlow (c.1891-1965) — of Bronx, Bronx County, N.Y. Born about 1891. Communist. Member of New York state assembly from Bronx County 3rd District, 1918; defeated (Socialist), 1918; convicted on criminal anarchy charges, 1920; sentenced to five to ten years in prison; lost an appeal to the U.S. Supreme Court in 1925; candidate for mayor of New York City, N.Y., 1921 (Communist), 1925 (Workers); candidate for Vice President of the United States, 1924, 1928; Workers candidate for Governor of New York, 1926. Died in 1965 (age about 74 years). Burial location unknown.
  Books by Benjamin Gitlow: I Confess: The Truth About American Communism — The Whole of Their Lives: Communism in America / A Personal History and Intimate Portrayal of Its Leaders
  Samuel Orr (1890-1981) — of Bronx, Bronx County, N.Y. Born July 11, 1890. Socialist. Lawyer; member of New York state assembly from Bronx County 4th District, 1918, 1920, 1921; defeated, 1918; expelled 1920; resigned 1920; delegate to Socialist National Convention from New York, 1920; candidate for New York state senate, 1922 (22nd District), 1928 (22nd District), 1933 (21st District); candidate for U.S. Representative from New York 23rd District, 1926, 1930, 1932, 1934; New York City Magistrate, 1941-51. Jewish. Expelled from the New York State Assembly over alleged disloyalty, along with the other four Socialist members, April 1, 1920; re-elected to the same seat in a special election, but resigned in protest when three other Socialist members were expelled again. Died, in Montefiore Hospital, Bronx, Bronx County, N.Y., August 29, 1981 (age 91 years, 49 days). Burial location unknown.
  See also Wikipedia article
  Charles Solomon (1889-1963) — of Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y. Born October 29, 1889. Socialist. Newspaperman; member of New York state assembly from Kings County 23rd District, 1919-20, 1921; expelled 1920, 1920; defeated, 1927; delegate to Socialist National Convention from New York, 1920; candidate for Lieutenant Governor of New York, 1924; candidate for Justice of New York Supreme Court 2nd District, 1928, 1938; candidate for New York state senate 8th District, 1930; candidate for U.S. Senator from New York, 1932; candidate for mayor of New York City, N.Y., 1933; candidate for Governor of New York, 1934; American Labor candidate for delegate to New York state constitutional convention at-large, 1937. Jewish. Expelled from the New York State Assembly over alleged disloyalty, along with the other four Socialist members, April 1, 1920; re-elected to the same seat in a special election, and expelled again on September 21. Died December 8, 1963 (age 74 years, 40 days). Interment at Mt. Lebanon Cemetery, Glendale, Queens, N.Y.
  Epitaph: "He Gave The People of His Best."
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  August Claessens (1885-1954) — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y.; Bronx, Bronx County, N.Y.; Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y. Born in Switzerland, 1885. School teacher; candidate for U.S. Representative from New York, 1914 (Socialist, 15th District), 1924 (Socialist, 23rd District), 1928 (Socialist, 14th District), 1930 (Socialist, 18th District), 1932 (Socialist, 14th District), 1934 (Socialist, at-large), 1946 (Liberal, 10th District), 1948 (Liberal, 8th District), 1950 (Liberal, 8th District); member of New York state assembly from New York County 17th District, 1918-20, 1922; defeated, 1915 (Socialist, New York County 26th District); expelled 1920, 1920; defeated, 1920 (Socialist, New York County 17th District), 1922 (Socialist, New York County 17th District), 1923 (Socialist, New York County 17th District), 1925 (Socialist, Bronx County 4th District), 1937 (American Labor, Kings County 4th District), 1938 (American Labor, Kings County 14th District), 1954 (Liberal, Kings County 14th District); delegate to Socialist National Convention from New York, 1920; Socialist candidate for Lieutenant Governor of New York, 1926; American Labor candidate for New York state senate 11th District, 1940. Expelled from the New York State Assembly over alleged disloyalty, along with the other four Socialist members, April 1, 1920; re-elected to the same seat in a special election, and expelled again on September 21. Died, following a heart attack, at Brooklyn Jewish Hospital, Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y., December 9, 1954 (age about 69 years). Interment at Cedar Grove Cemetery, Flushing, Queens, N.Y.
  Relatives: Married 1912 to Hilda Goldstein (1890?-1932); married to Anna Glassman.
  See also Wikipedia article
Samuel A. De_Witt Samuel Aaron De Witt (1891-1963) — also known as Samuel A. De Witt; Sam De Witt — of Bronx, Bronx County, N.Y.; Queens, Queens County, N.Y. Born in 1891. Socialist. Machinery dealer; poet; playwright; member of New York state assembly from Bronx County 3rd District, 1920; expelled 1920; resigned 1920; defeated, 1920 (Bronx County 3rd District), 1924 (Bronx County 7th District), 1926 (Bronx County 7th District), 1927 (Bronx County 3rd District), 1929 (Bronx County 3rd District), 1932 (Queens County 4th District), 1933 (Queens County 4th District); candidate for borough president of Bronx, New York, 1925; candidate for U.S. Representative from New York, 1928 (22nd District), 1934 (2nd District), 1935 (2nd District), 1936 (2nd District). Expelled from the New York State Assembly over alleged disloyalty, along with the other four Socialist members, April 1, 1920; re-elected to the same seat in a special election, but resigned in protest when three other Socialist members were expelled again. Died in Yonkers, Westchester County, N.Y., January 22, 1963 (age about 71 years). Burial location unknown.
  See also Wikipedia article
  Image source: Library of Congress
  Thomas A. McWhinney (c.1863-1933) — of Lawrence, Nassau County, Long Island, N.Y.; Atlantic Beach, Nassau County, Long Island, N.Y. Born in Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y., about 1863. Republican. Served in the U.S. Army during the Spanish-American War; postmaster at Lawrence, N.Y., 1901; automobile dealer; member of New York state assembly, 1915-23 (Nassau County 1915-17, Nassau County 1st District 1918-23); indicted in 1920 on charges that he and others had tipped off gamblers to planned police raids; tried and found not guilty. Member, Elks; Royal Arcanum; United Spanish War Veterans; Foresters; Redmen; Order of Heptasophs; Order of United American Mechanics. Suffered a stroke, and died, in Atlantic Beach, Nassau County, Long Island, N.Y., November 25, 1933 (age about 70 years). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Married to Lidie Wright.
  Louis Waldman (1892-1982) — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y.; Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y. Born in Yancherudnia, Russia (now Ukraine), January 5, 1892. Socialist. Civil engineer; lawyer; member of New York state assembly from New York County 8th District, 1918, 1920; expelled 1920, 1920; defeated, 1920; candidate for New York state senate 14th District, 1922; candidate for New York state attorney general, 1924; candidate for Justice of New York Supreme Court 2nd District, 1927 (Socialist), 1937 (American Labor); candidate for Governor of New York, 1928, 1930, 1932; delegate to New York convention to ratify 21st amendment, 1933. Jewish and Ukrainian ancestry. Expelled from the New York State Assembly over alleged disloyalty, along with the other four Socialist members, April 1, 1920; re-elected to the same seat in a special election, and expelled again on September 21. Suffered a severe stroke, and died four years later, in the Jewish Home and Hospital for the Aged, Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., September 12, 1982 (age 90 years, 250 days). Burial location unknown.
  See also Wikipedia article
  G. August Gerber — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Socialist. Arrested for making seditious utterances on March 26, 1920, in Philadelphia, when police broke up a protest meeting, and charged with inciting to riot; released when the charges were dropped the next day; candidate for New York state assembly from New York County 18th District, 1921, 1922; candidate for U.S. Representative from New York, 1930 (19th District), 1932 (at-large). Burial location unknown.
  Warren Jay Terhune (1869-1920) — also known as Warren J. Terhune — of Hackensack, Bergen County, N.J. Born in Midland Park, Bergen County, N.J., May 3, 1869. Served in the U.S. Navy during the Spanish-American War; U.S. Navy commander; Governor of American Samoa; died in office 1920. Three days before he was to face an inquiry into charges against his administration, he shot himself in the heart, in a bathroom of the Executive Mansion, Utulei, American Samoa, November 3, 1920 (age 51 years, 184 days); later, the Navy exonerated him; his accuser, Lieutenant Commander Creed H. Boucher, was courtmartialed and found guilty of fomenting unrest among the Samoans. Interment at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Va.
  Relatives: Married to Josephine Lee Smith (1868-1955).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  William Bross Lloyd (1875-1946) — also known as William B. Lloyd; "The Millionaire Socialist" — of Winnetka, Cook County, Ill. Born in Chicago, Cook County, Ill., February 27, 1875. Socialist. Candidate for U.S. Senator from Illinois, 1918; arrested in downtown Chicago, 1918, for refusing to remove a red flag from his limo; co-founder of Communist Labor Party, 1919; indicted for sedition, 1920; represented at trial by Clarence Darrow; convicted, sentenced to 1-5 years in prison; his sentence was commuted in 1922. Died, of cancer, in the Ritz-Carlton Hotel, Boston, Suffolk County, Mass., June 30, 1946 (age 71 years, 123 days). Cremated; ashes scattered in North Atlantic Ocean.
  Relatives: Son of Henry Demarest Lloyd (social reformer, author) and Jessie (Bross) Lloyd; married to Lola Maverick (divorced 1916) and Madge Bird; grandson of William Bross (1825?-?).
  John Looney (1865-1942) — also known as Patrick John Looney — of Rock Island, Rock Island County, Ill. Born in Ottawa, La Salle County, Ill., October 5, 1865. Lawyer; newspaper publisher; indicted with others in 1897 over a scheme to defraud the city of Rock Island in connection with a storm drain construction project; convicted, but the verdict was overturned on appeal; candidate for Illinois state house of representatives, 1900; created and led a crime syndicate in northwest Illinois, with interests in gambling, prostitution, extortion, and eventually bootlegging and automobile theft; indicted in 1907 on 37 counts of bribery, extortion, and libel, but acquitted; shot and wounded by hidden snipers on two occasions in 1908; on February 22, 1909, he was shot and wounded in a gunfight with business rival W. W. Wilmerton; on March 22, 1912, after publishing personal attacks on Rock Island Mayor Henry M. Schriver, he was arrested, brought to the police station, and severely beaten by the mayor himself; subsequent rioting killed two men and injured nine others; resumed control of the Rock Island rackets in 1921; in 1922, he was indicted for the murder of saloon keeper William Gabel, who had provided evidence against Looney to federal agents; arrested in Belen, N.M., in 1924, and later convicted of conspiracy and murder; sentenced to 5 years in prison for conspiracy and 14 years for murder; served 8 1/2 years. Irish ancestry. Died, of tuberculosis, in a sanitarium at El Paso, El Paso County, Tex., 1942 (age about 76 years). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Patrick Looney and Margaret Looney; married 1892 to Nora O'Connor (died 1903); nephew of Maurice T. Maloney (1853?-?).
  See also Wikipedia article
  Thomas Lindsay Blanton (1872-1957) — also known as Thomas L. Blanton — of Abilene, Taylor County, Tex. Born in Houston, Harris County, Tex., October 25, 1872. Democrat. Lawyer; district judge in Texas 42nd District, 1908-16; U.S. Representative from Texas, 1917-29, 1930-37 (16th District 1917-19, 17th District 1919-29, 1930-37). Presbyterian. Member, Knights of Pythias; Freemasons; Knights Templar; Shriners; Odd Fellows; Woodmen. Censured in 1921 for inserting a letter into the Congressional Record which contained words said to be "unspeakable, vile, foul, filthy, profane, blasphemous and obscene." A motion to expel him from the House of Representatives failed by eight votes. Indicted in 1923 for criminal libel over his claim that former U.S. Rep. Oscar Callaway had urged his frends not to buy Liberty bonds during World War I. Died in Albany, Shackelford County, Tex., August 11, 1957 (age 84 years, 290 days). Interment at Albany Cemetery, Albany, Tex.
  Relatives: Son of Thomas Lindsay Blanton; brother of Annie Webb Blanton (1870-1945); married to May Louise Matthews.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  William Lloyd Harding (1877-1934) — also known as William L. Harding — of Des Moines, Polk County, Iowa. Born in Sibley, Osceola County, Iowa, October 3, 1877. Republican. Lawyer; member of Iowa state house of representatives, 1907-13; Lieutenant Governor of Iowa, 1913-17; Governor of Iowa, 1917-21. Methodist. Member, Freemasons. Censured by legislature over pardons scandal, and left office in disgrace in 1921. Died December 17, 1934 (age 57 years, 75 days). Entombed in mausoleum at Graceland Park Cemetery, Sioux City, Iowa.
  Relatives: Son of O. B. Harding and Emalyn (Moyer) Harding; married, January 7, 1907, to Carrie M. Lamoreux.
  Robert Page Walter Morris (1853-1924) — also known as R. Page W. Morris — of Duluth, St. Louis County, Minn. Born in Lynchburg, Va., June 30, 1853. Republican. College professor; lawyer; candidate for U.S. Representative from Virginia, 1884; district judge in Minnesota 11th District, 1895-96; U.S. Representative from Minnesota 6th District, 1897-1903; U.S. District Judge for Minnesota, 1903-23; took senior status 1923. Arrested in Salt Lake City, 1921, following an accident in which his car struck a pedestrian, Mrs. Elizabeth Holmes. Died in Rochester, Olmsted County, Minn., December 16, 1924 (age 71 years, 169 days). Interment at Forest Hill Cemetery, Duluth, Minn.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — federal judicial profile
Truman H. Newberry Truman Handy Newberry (1864-1945) — also known as Truman H. Newberry — of Detroit, Wayne County, Mich.; Grosse Pointe Farms, Wayne County, Mich. Born in Detroit, Wayne County, Mich., November 5, 1864. Republican. Paymaster and agent, Detroit, Bay City and Alpena Railway, 1885-87; president and treasurer, Detroit Steel and Spring Co., 1887-1901; director, Cleveland-Cliffs Iron Co.; director, Grace Hospital; alternate delegate to Republican National Convention from Michigan, 1892; served in the U.S. Navy during the Spanish-American War; U.S. Secretary of the Navy, 1908-09; U.S. Senator from Michigan, 1919-22. Presbyterian. Tried and convicted in 1921 of overspending on his campaign (federal laws at that time set an unrealistically low limit); his conviction was reversed by Supreme Court; following an investigation, the Senate declared him entitled to his seat but expressed disapproval of the sum spent on his election; resigned under pressure. Died in Grosse Pointe, Wayne County, Mich., October 3, 1945 (age 80 years, 332 days). Interment at Elmwood Cemetery, Detroit, Mich.
  Relatives: Son of John Stoughton Newberry (1826-1887) and Helen Parmelee (Handy) Newberry; married, February 7, 1888, to Harriet Josephine Barnes (died 1943); father of Carol Newberry Brooks.
  Political family: Newberry family of Detroit, Michigan.
  Cross-reference: Paul H. King
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — NNDB dossier
  Image source: American Review of Reviews, March 1922
  Clark Daniel Stearns (b. 1870) — of Miami, Dade County (now Miami-Dade County), Fla. Born in 1870. U.S. Navy officer; Governor of American Samoa; in 1921, he was relieved of duty as commander of the U.S. Navy ship Michigan, for allowing the men under his command to organize committees; in 1923, he was chief of emergency relief work following an earthquake in Japan, and received a medal from the Japanese Red Cross; after the Pearl Harbor attack in 1941, he sent the medal back to Japan. Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Married to Edith S. Stearns (1878?-1958).
  Rose Pastor Stokes — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Communist. Indicted in 1918 for sedition over a speech she made in Kansas City, and released on bail; arrested in Stamford, Conn., in September, 1921, to prevent her from giving a speech there; candidate for borough president of Manhattan, New York, 1921. Female. Burial location unknown.
  Robert V. Mundy (b. 1854) — of Bay City, Bay County, Mich. Born in New Jersey, 1854. Hardware business; mayor of Bay City, Mich., 1917-21. In March, 1921, a grand jury charged him with misfeasance in office and neglect of duty, in his tolerance of vice such as illegal liquor sales, prostitution, and gambling in Bay City, and called for the common council to remove him from office. Mundy disputed the grand jury's authority to make this kind of report, and on his motion, it was stricken from the court record. Nonetheless, his organization was defeated in the election shortly afterward. Burial location unknown.
  Mary Winsor (b. 1873) — of Lower Merion Township, Montgomery County, Pa. Born in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., March 28, 1873. Socialist. Suffragette; participant in the first U.S. birth control conference, New York City, November 1921; on November 13, police arrived to forcibly shut down the event, and she was arrested, along with Margaret Sanger, for attempting to speak; charged with disorderly conduct, but released soon after; candidate for Pennsylvania secretary of internal affairs, 1922; candidate for Lieutenant Governor of Pennsylvania, 1930; candidate for U.S. Representative from Pennsylvania 17th District, 1932. Female. Member, Women's International League for Peace and Freedom; American Civil Liberties Union. Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Daughter of James Davis Winsor and Rebecca (Chapman) Winsor; second cousin five times removed of Simeon Baldwin; third cousin twice removed of George Bailey Loring; fourth cousin once removed of Charles Grenfill Washburn (1857-1928).
  Political families: Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York; Adams-Baldwin-Otis family of Boston, Massachusetts (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Thomas B. Roush (born c.1861) — of Athens, Athens County, Ohio. Born in Ohio, about 1861. Mayor of Athens, Ohio, 1920-22; resigned 1922. Resigned as mayor after his son, the police chief, was caught soliciting and accepting a bribe. Burial location unknown.
  Harry Benjamin Wolf (1880-1944) — also known as Harry B. Wolf — of Baltimore, Md. Born in Baltimore, Md., June 16, 1880. Democrat. U.S. Representative from Maryland 3rd District, 1907-09. Jewish. Disbarred, 1922; reinstated, 1940. Died in Baltimore, Md., February 17, 1944 (age 63 years, 246 days). Interment at Hebrew Friendship Cemetery, Baltimore, Md.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Harmon Mortimore Kephart (b. 1865) — also known as Harmon M. Kephart — of Connellsville, Fayette County, Pa. Born in Frankstown, Blair County, Pa., July 17, 1865. Republican. Railroad work; hotel owner; member of Pennsylvania state house of representatives from Fayette County, 1895-96; delegate to Republican National Convention from Pennsylvania, 1908; chief clerk, Pennsylvania State Senate, 1909; Pennsylvania state treasurer, 1917-21. Member, Elks. Charged in 1922 with failure to keep correct accounts and to make required reports while he was state treasurer; investigators found money missing for various periods, costing the state some $11,000 in interest income; pleaded no contest in 1923 and fined $3,425 and costs. Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Samuel A. Kephart (c.1835-1875) and Henrietta B. (Wolfe) Kephart.
  Harry M. Schriver — of Rock Island, Rock Island County, Ill. Mayor of Rock Island, Ill., 1911-15, 1919-23; on March 22, 1912, angry over personal attacks published by newspaper publisher and crime syndicate boss John Looney, he had Looney brought to the Rock Island police station and gave him a severe beating; during a riot on March 27, a sniper shot at the mayor in his office; convicted in 1923 on vice protection conspiracy charges. Burial location unknown.
  Ernest Bamberger (1877-1958) — of Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Utah. Born in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Utah, August 11, 1877. Republican. Mining executive; member of Republican National Committee from Utah, 1920-24, 1935; candidate for U.S. Senator from Utah, 1922, 1928. Jewish. Member, Chi Psi. Arrested in 1923, along with three friends, for smoking cigars in the Vienna Cafe, Salt Lake City; however, on March 9, Utah's ban on public smoking was repealed. Died in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Utah, January 11, 1958 (age 80 years, 153 days). Interment at Mt. Olivet Cemetery, Salt Lake City, Utah.
  Relatives: Son of Jacob Emanuel Bamberger (1852-1928) and Bertha (Greenwald) Bamberger (1858-1939); nephew of Simon Bamberger; first cousin of Julian Maas Bamberger (1889-1967).
  Political family: Bamberger family of Salt Lake City, Utah.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
John C. Walton John Calloway Walton (1881-1949) — also known as Jack C. Walton; "Rarin' Jack" — of Oklahoma City, Oklahoma County, Okla. Born near Indianapolis, Marion County, Ind., March 6, 1881. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army during the Spanish-American War; engineer; mayor of Oklahoma City, Okla., 1919-23; Governor of Oklahoma, 1923; impeached and removed from office as Governor, 1923; candidate for U.S. Senator from Oklahoma, 1924. Died in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma County, Okla., November 25, 1949 (age 68 years, 264 days). Interment at Rose Hill Burial Park, Oklahoma City, Okla.
  Relatives: Son of Lewis W. Walton (1850-1939) and Emma Sarah (Calloway) Walton (1850-1934); married, February 3, 1905, to Madeline Cecile Orrick (1883-1947).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: City of Oklahoma City
  Hillyer Rudisill (1875-1923) — of Macon, Bibb County, Ga. Born in Forsyth, Monroe County, Ga., April 26, 1875. Republican. Postmaster at Macon, Ga., 1922-23 (acting, 1922). Died from a self-inflicted gunshot, in the post office at Macon, Bibb County, Ga., February 16, 1923 (age 47 years, 296 days). A shortage of about $86,000 was discovered after his death. Interment at Forsyth Cemetery, Forsyth, Ga.
  Relatives: Son of Benjamin Franklin Rudisill (1834-1901) and Antoinette Vashti (Smith) Rudisill (1847-1891); married, November 9, 1899, to Frances Lane (1878-1903).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Fred William Yoos (1879-1940) — also known as Fred W. Yoos — of Akron, Summit County, Ohio. Born in Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, Ohio, January 20, 1879. Served in the U.S. Army during the Spanish-American War; railroad flagman; police officer; rubber tire worker; after serving as an organizer for the Ku Klux Klan, he resigned, or was expelled, and announced in January 1923 that he would expose corruption and "un-American prejudice" in the local Klan organization; on January 18, police received an anonymous "tip off" that Yoos was illegally carrying a concealed weapon; he was searched, and no weapon was found on his person, but a companion had a gun, and Yoos was arrested and held in jail for days until released; he continued to express opposition to the Ku Klux Klan, but did not make the disclosures he promised; Independent candidate for mayor of Akron, Ohio, 1923. German ancestry. Member, Ku Klux Klan; Freemasons. Died in Akron, Summit County, Ohio, May 31, 1940 (age 61 years, 132 days). Interment at Rose Hill Burial Park, Fairlawn, Ohio.
  Relatives: Son of Fred B. Yoos and Katie (Hurst) Yoos; married, October 24, 1900, to Hedwig 'Hattie' Wojahn.
Harold Knutson Harold Knutson (1880-1953) — of St. Cloud, Stearns County, Minn. Born in Skein, Norway, October 20, 1880. Republican. Newspaper editor and publisher; U.S. Representative from Minnesota, 1917-49 (6th District 1917-33, at-large 1933-35, 6th District 1935-49); delegate to Republican National Convention from Minnesota, 1940. Lutheran. Norwegian ancestry. Member, Freemasons; Odd Fellows; Elks. On March 9, 1924, he and Leroy M. Hull, a 29-year-old clerk for the Labor Department, sitting in his parked car alongside a rural road near Arlington National Cemetery, were arrested by officers of the Arlington County vice squad; he vainly offered a $100 bribe, but was charged, apparently with sodomy (press reports avoided mentioning the specific crime, only that it was a "grave moral offense"), and jailed overnight; tried before a jury, and found not guilty. Died, following a series of heart attacks, in Wesley Memorial Hospital, Wadena, Wadena County, Minn., August 21, 1953 (age 72 years, 305 days). Interment at North Star Cemetery, St. Cloud, Minn.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  Image source: Minnesota Legislative Manual 1917
  Harry Micajah Daugherty (1860-1941) — also known as Harry M. Daugherty — of Washington Court House, Fayette County, Ohio; Columbus, Franklin County, Ohio. Born in Washington Court House, Fayette County, Ohio, January 26, 1860. Republican. Lawyer; Fayette County Prosecuting Attorney; member of Ohio state house of representatives, 1890-94; delegate to Republican National Convention from Ohio, 1904, 1908, 1912, 1924; U.S. Attorney General, 1921-24. Methodist. Scotch-Irish ancestry. Subject of a Senate investigation of his conduct as Attorney General; resigned under fire; indicted on charges of conspiracy to defraud the U.S. government, but acquitted in 1927. Died in Columbus, Franklin County, Ohio, October 12, 1941 (age 81 years, 259 days). Interment at Washington Cemetery, Washington Court House, Ohio.
  Relatives: Son of John H. Daugherty and Jane A. (Draper) Daugherty; married, September 3, 1884, to Lucie Walker.
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Books by Harry M. Daugherty: Inside Story of the Harding Tragedy (1932)
  Edward Laurence Doheny (1856-1935) — also known as Edward L. Doheny — of Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, Calif. Born in Fond du Lac, Fond du Lac County, Wis., August 10, 1856. Democrat. Delegate to Democratic National Convention from California, 1920; candidate for Democratic nomination for Vice President, 1920. Indicted in 1924 on federal bribery and conspiracy charges; he had given $100,000 to Secretary of the Interior Albert B. Fall, and soon after received a valuable contract to develop the Elk Hills Naval Petroleum Reserve in California. Though Fall was convicted of taking a bribe, Doheny was found not guilty. Died September 8, 1935 (age 79 years, 29 days). Entombed in mausoleum at Calvary Cemetery, Los Angeles, Calif.
  Cross-reference: Frank J. Hogan
  William Joseph Fallon (1886-1927) — also known as William J. Fallon; "The Great Mouthpiece"; "Broadway's Cicero" — of Mamaroneck, Westchester County, N.Y. Born in New York, New York County, N.Y., 1886. Republican. Lawyer; member of New York state assembly from Westchester County 2nd District, 1918; charged in 1924 with bribing a juror; tried and acquitted. Died, of heart disease, in the Hotel Oxford, Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., April 29, 1927 (age about 40 years). Interment at Calvary Cemetery, Woodside, Queens, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Joseph M. Fallon; married to Agnes Rafter.
  Books about William J. Fallon: Gene Fowler, The Great Mouthpiece : A Life Story of William J. Fallon
  Lee Maurice Russell (1875-1943) — also known as Lee M. Russell — of Oxford, Lafayette County, Miss. Born in Dallas, Lafayette County, Miss., November 16, 1875. Democrat. Alternate delegate to Democratic National Convention from Mississippi, 1912; Governor of Mississippi, 1920-24. Charged by a former stenographer with breach of promise and seduction; tried in federal court, where a jury found in his favor. Died May 16, 1943 (age 67 years, 181 days). Interment at Lakewood Memorial Park, Jackson, Miss.
  John Wesley Langley (1868-1932) — also known as John W. Langley — of Prestonsburg, Floyd County, Ky.; Pikeville, Pike County, Ky. Born in Floyd County, Ky., January 14, 1868. Republican. Member of Kentucky state house of representatives, 1886-90; delegate to Republican National Convention from Kentucky, 1888, 1900, 1916; U.S. Representative from Kentucky 10th District, 1907-26; defeated, 1896; resigned 1926. Convicted in 1924 of conspiracy to transport and sell liquor re-elected while his appeal was pending, but resigned from Congress in 1926; sentenced to a term in federal prison. Granted clemency by President Calvin Coolidge. Died, of pneumonia, in Pikeville, Pike County, Ky., January 17, 1932 (age 64 years, 3 days). Interment at Langley Cemetery, Middle Creek, Ky.
  Presumably named for: John Wesley
  Relatives: Married to Katherine Gudger (1888-1948) (daughter of James Madison Gudger, Jr.).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  William H. Reynolds (1868-1931) — of Long Beach, Nassau County, Long Island, N.Y. Born in Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y., February 29, 1868. Republican. Builder; real estate developer; member of New York state senate 3rd District, 1894-95; indicted by a grand jury in August 1917 for perjury, over his 1912 expert testimony on the value of land sought by the city for a park; the grand jury alleged that he falsely denied any personal interest in the realty company which owned the property; also indicted in October 1917, with three others, for conspiracy defraud the city of $500,000 by inflating the appraisal; the indictments were dismissed in May 1920 over the prosecutor's delay of the trial; village president of Long Beach, New York, 1921-22; mayor of Long Beach, N.Y., 1922-24; removed 1924; defeated, 1925; indicted on May 1, 1924, along with the Long Beach city treasurer, for misappropriating city funds in connection with a bond issue; tried in June 1924, convicted, sentenced to six months in the county jail, and automatically removed from office as mayor; released pending appeal; the Appellate Division reversed the conviction in June 1925 and ordered a new trial; the indictment was dismissed in June 1927. English and Scotch-Irish ancestry. Member, Elks; Freemasons. Died, from heart disease, in Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., October 13, 1931 (age 63 years, 0 days). Interment at Green-Wood Cemetery, Brooklyn, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of William Reynolds and Margaret (McChesney) Reynolds; married to Elise Guerrier.
  David C. Kerr — U.S. Vice Consul in Birmingham, as of 1917; arrested in Washington, D.C. in May 1924, and charged with accepting bribes while vice consul at Vancouver, to issue visas to Chinese, so they could enter the U.S. illegally. Burial location unknown.
  John C. Butterworth (1870-1952) — of Paterson, Passaic County, N.J. Born in Macclesfield, Cheshire, England, 1870. Socialist. Naturalized U.S. citizen; silk weaver; Socialist Labor candidate for Governor of New Jersey, 1913, 1916, 1919, 1925, 1928, 1931, 1937, 1940, 1943, 1949; on October 6, 1924, during a strike at the silk mills in Paterson, N.J., while the city was under martial law, he and other strikers and supporters were arrested and convicted of unlawful assembly; the convictions were later overturned by the New Jersey Supreme Court; Socialist Labor candidate for U.S. Senator from New Jersey, 1924, 1932, 1934, 1938, 1942, 1944, 1946; Socialist Labor candidate for Presidential Elector for New Jersey, 1940, 1948, 1952. English ancestry. Member, Freemasons; Industrial Workers of the World. Died in Paterson, Passaic County, N.J., October 17, 1952 (age about 82 years). Burial location unknown.
  Jonathan McMillan Davis (1871-1943) — also known as Jonathan M. Davis — of Bronson, Bourbon County, Kan. Born in Bronson, Bourbon County, Kan., April 27, 1871. Democrat. Farmer; member of Kansas state house of representatives, 1905-13; member of Kansas state senate, 1913-17; Governor of Kansas, 1923-25; defeated, 1920, 1924, 1926, 1936 (primary), 1938 (Independent); delegate to Democratic National Convention from Kansas, 1924 (member, Committee on Permanent Organization); candidate for Democratic nomination for President, 1924; candidate for U.S. Senator from Kansas, 1930. Methodist. Member, Freemasons; Odd Fellows; Knights of Pythias; Eagles; Moose; Elks; Kiwanis. Arrested the day after his gubernatorial term expired; indicted twice for bribery; tried and acquitted both times. Died June 27, 1943 (age 72 years, 61 days). Interment at Bronson Cemetery, Bronson, Kan.
  Relatives: Son of Jonathan McMillan Davis and Eve (Holeman) Davis; married, September 26, 1894, to Mollie Purdom (died 1926); married, December 16, 1931, to Mary E. (Winston) Raymond.
  William Warring Gordon (1874-1963) — also known as William W. Gordon — of Kansas City, Wyandotte County, Kan. Born in Owen County, Ky., June 13, 1874. Member of Kansas state legislature, 1910; mayor of Kansas City, Kan., 1923-26; removed 1926. Member, Freemasons; Odd Fellows. Charged in September 1926 with 25 counts of official misconduct, and removed from office as mayor. Died May 26, 1963 (age 88 years, 347 days). Interment at Memorial Park Cemetery, Kansas City, Kan.
  Peter C. Jezewski — of Hamtramck, Wayne County, Mich. Mayor of Hamtramck, Mich., 1922-26, 1932-34; defeated, 1926. Convicted of bootlegging and other vice crimes about 1926, and spent a year in Leavenworth federal prison. Burial location unknown.
  Frank Leslie Smith (1867-1950) — also known as Frank L. Smith — of Dwight, Livingston County, Ill. Born in Dwight, Livingston County, Ill., November 24, 1867. Republican. Candidate for Lieutenant Governor of Illinois, 1904; delegate to Republican National Convention from Illinois, 1908, 1920, 1924, 1932, 1936, 1940 (member, Committee to Notify Vice-Presidential Nominee), 1944, 1948; U.S. Collector of Internal Revenue for the 8th Illinois District, 1909; member of Illinois Republican State Central Committee, 1910-25; U.S. Representative from Illinois 17th District, 1919-21; defeated, 1930; Illinois Republican state chair, 1919-25; U.S. Senator from Illinois, 1926-28; defeated, 1920; member of Republican National Committee from Illinois, 1932. Not seated as a U.S. Senator in 1927 due to charges of 'fraud and corruption' in his campaign. Died in Dwight, Livingston County, Ill., August 30, 1950 (age 82 years, 279 days). Interment at Oak Lawn Cemetery, Dwight, Ill.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  John L. Duvall (1874-1962) — of Indianapolis, Marion County, Ind. Born in Tazewell County, Ill., November 29, 1874. Republican. Mayor of Indianapolis, Ind., 1926-27; resigned 1927. Convicted in 1927 of violating the state corrupt practices act by taking bribes from Ku Klux Klan leader D. C. Stephenson; sentenced to 30 days in jail, fined $1,000, and forced to resign as mayor. Died February 25, 1962 (age 87 years, 88 days). Interment at Crown Hill Cemetery, Indianapolis, Ind.
  See also NNDB dossier
  Claude E. Negley — of Indianapolis, Marion County, Ind. Born in Marion County, Ind. Republican. Mayor of Indianapolis, Ind., 1927. Pleaded guilty in 1927 to bribery charges and fined. Interment at Crown Hill Cemetery, Indianapolis, Ind.
  Frank Frankel (1886-1975) — of Long Beach, Nassau County, Long Island, N.Y.; Houston, Harris County, Tex.; Beverly Hills, Los Angeles County, Calif. Born October 2, 1886. Mayor of Long Beach, N.Y., 1924, 1930-33; defeated, 1925 (Democratic primary), 1925 (Republican), 1929 (Democratic primary); founder of Long Beach Memorial Hospital indicted in September 1927 on charges of maintaining a gambling place; the charges were later dropped; in December 1929, his right to take office as mayor was unsuccessfully challenged by the Long Beach police chief, based on vote fraud (for which many had been arrested and prosecuted) and the expectation that Frankel would tolerate gambling in the city; indicted in January 1933 for fraud over his transfer of $90,000 in city funds to the Long Beach Trust Company, which subsequently closed; the indictment was dismissed in February; indicted again in May 1933, along with two city council members, over the diversion of $750,000 of state and county tax revenue to city projects; pleaded not guilty; no trial was held; the indictment was dismissed in 1937; oil producer. Died, in a hospital at Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, Calif., June 12, 1975 (age 88 years, 253 days). Interment somewhere in Houston, Tex.
  Henry Ford (1863-1947) — of Dearborn, Wayne County, Mich. Born in Greenfield Township (now part of Detroit), Wayne County, Mich., July 30, 1863. Engineer; inventor; founder, Ford Motor Company, 1903; candidate for Republican nomination for President, 1916; Democratic candidate for U.S. Senator from Michigan, 1918; candidate for Democratic nomination for President, 1924. Episcopalian. Scotch-Irish and Belgian ancestry. Member, Freemasons; Scottish Rite Masons; Sigma Alpha Epsilon. Publisher, in 1919-27, of the Dearborn Independent newspaper, which promoted anti-Semitic ideas through articles such as "The International Jew: The World's Problem," which were reprinted as pamphlets and books. In 1927, a libel lawsuit against Ford over these writings led him to shut down the paper and publicly recant its contents. Died, from a stroke, in Dearborn, Wayne County, Mich., April 7, 1947 (age 83 years, 251 days). Interment at Ford Cemetery, Detroit, Mich.
  Relatives: Son of William Ford (1826-1905) and Mary (Litogot) Ford (c.1839-1876); married, April 11, 1888, to Clara Jane Bryant (1866-1950); uncle of Clarence M. Ford (1895?-?).
  Cross-reference: James Couzens — Herman Bernstein — Alfred J. Murphy — Martin C. Ansorge
  Personal motto: "Efficiency."
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile
  Books about Henry Ford: Douglas Brinkley, Wheels for the World : Henry Ford, His Company, and a Century of Progress, 1903-2003 — William A. Levinson, Henry Ford's Lean Vision — Pat McCarthy, Henry Ford : Building Cars for Everyone (for young readers) — David Weitzman, Model T : How Henry Ford Built a Legend (for young readers)
  Critical books about Henry Ford: Max Wallace, The American Axis : Henry Ford, Charles Lindbergh, and the Rise of the Third Reich — Neil Baldwin, Henry Ford and the Jews : The Mass Production of Hate
  Motley H. Flint (1864-1930) — of Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, Calif. Born in Somerville, Middlesex County, Mass., February 19, 1864. Republican. Postmaster at Los Angeles, Calif., 1904-10; banker; provided critical support for the Warner Brothers Movie studio in its early years; one of the promoters of Julian Petroleum Corporation, a Ponzi scheme which collapsed in 1927; about 40,000 investors lost their money; tainted by the scandal, he moved to Europe for a time. Member, Freemasons. Called as a witness in a civil suit involving David O. Selznick; after his testimony, as he returned to the audience section of the courtroom, in Los Angeles City Hall, he was shot and killed by Frank Keaton, in Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, Calif., July 14, 1930 (age 66 years, 145 days). Keaton, who had lost his money in Julian Petroleum, was immediately arrested, and subsequently tried, convicted, and hanged. Entombed in mausoleum at Forest Lawn Memorial Park, Glendale, Calif.
  Relatives: Son of Francis Eaton Flint (1823-1887) and Althea Louise (Hewes) Flint (1841-1930); brother of Frank Putnam Flint; fourth cousin once removed of Benjamin Dexter Sprague (1827-1893).
  Political families: Bache-Dallas family of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Flint-Bache family (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Florence Elizabeth Smith Knapp (1875-1949) — also known as Florence E. S. Knapp; Florence Elizabeth Smith — of Syracuse, Onondaga County, N.Y. Born in Syracuse, Onondaga County, N.Y., March 25, 1875. Republican. School teacher; superintendent of schools; dean, College of Home Economics, Syracuse University; delegate to Republican National Convention from New York, 1920, 1924 (alternate); secretary of state of New York, 1925-27; in 1927, an investigation discovered her maladministration of the 1925 state census; she had paid salaries to relatives and others who did no census work, forged indorsements on checks, received money she was not entitled to, and burned state records to conceal evidence of these things; resigned her position at Syracuse University; indicted on various charges in 1928, tried twice and eventually convicted of grand larceny; sentenced to 30 days in jail. Female. Episcopalian. Member, Grange. Died, following a heart attack, in Marcy State Hospital (insane asylum), Marcy, Oneida County, N.Y., October 26, 1949 (age 74 years, 215 days). Interment at Oakwood Cemetery, Syracuse, N.Y.
  Relatives: Daughter of James E. Smith and Mary (Hancock) Smith; married to Philip Schuyler Knapp (1849-1913).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Albert Edward Bogdon (1891-1927) — also known as Albert E. Bogdon — of Denver, Colo. Born in Mahanoy City, Schuylkill County, Pa., 1891. Republican. Lawyer; member of Colorado state senate 1st District, 1925-27; died in office 1927. While visiting his mistress, (scandalous behavior at the time), he was shot and killed by her estranged husband, Joseph S. Minter, in Denver, Colo., June 10, 1927 (age about 35 years). Entombed in mausoleum at Crown Hill Cemetery, Wheat Ridge, Colo.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Harvey Parnell (1880-1936) — of Dermott, Chicot County, Ark. Born near Orlando, Cleveland County, Ark., February 28, 1880. Democrat. Member of Arkansas state house of representatives, 1919-22; member of Arkansas state senate, 1923-26; Lieutenant Governor of Arkansas, 1927-28; Governor of Arkansas, 1928-33. Southern Methodist. Member, Freemasons. In 1928, he was charged with violating the Corrupt Practices Act (early campaign finance law) by spending more than $5,000 on his campaign; the charges were later dropped. Died, following two heart attacks, in St. Vincent's Infirmary, Little Rock, Pulaski County, Ark., January 16, 1936 (age 55 years, 322 days). Interment at Roselawn Memorial Park, Little Rock, Ark.
  Cross-reference: Lamar Williamson
  See also Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  James Kemp Doughton, Sr. (1884-1973) — of Sparta, Alleghany County, N.C. Born in Alleghany County, N.C., May 18, 1884. Banker; farmer; member of North Carolina state house of representatives, 1948-57; Speaker of the North Carolina State House of Representatives, 1951-57. Methodist. Indicted for bank fraud in 1928; tried and acquitted. Died, of pneumonia, in a hospital at Sparta, Alleghany County, N.C., March 17, 1973 (age 88 years, 303 days). Interment at Shiloh Methodist Church Cemetery, Sparta, N.C.
  Relatives: Son of Rufus A. Doughton; nephew of Robert Lee Doughton (1863-1954).
  Political family: Doughton family of Sparta, North Carolina.
  Magne Alfred Michaelson (1878-1949) — also known as M. Alfred Michaelson; M. A. Michaelson — of Chicago, Cook County, Ill. Born in Kristiansand, Norway, September 7, 1878. Republican. Delegate to Illinois state constitutional convention 25th District, 1920-22; U.S. Representative from Illinois 7th District, 1921-31; defeated, 1918, 1932. Indicted in 1928 on charges of violating the National Prohibition Act. Died in Chicago, Cook County, Ill., October 26, 1949 (age 71 years, 49 days). Interment at Mt. Olivet Cemetery, Chicago, Ill.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Maurice E. Connolly (1881-1935) — of Corona, Queens, Queens County, N.Y.; Forest Hills Gardens, Queens, Queens County, N.Y. Born in Corona, Queens, Queens County, N.Y., 1881. Democrat. Lawyer; borough president of Queens, New York, 1911-28; resigned 1928; delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1912, 1916, 1924; candidate for Justice of New York Supreme Court 2nd District, 1918; resigned as borough president in April, 1928 during an investigation of a sewer graft scandal; convicted in October 1928 of conspiracy to defraud the city; sentenced to one year in prison and fined $500; following an unsuccessful appeal, he served the prison sentence in 1930-31. Irish ancestry. Died, from a cerebral hemorrhage, in Forest Hills Gardens, Queens, Queens County, N.Y., November 24, 1935 (age about 54 years). Interment at Mount St. Mary Cemetery, Flushing, Queens, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Maurice Connolly and Mary Jane Connolly; married to Helen M. Connell; father of Helen F. Connolly (daughter-in-law of Leander Bernard Faber (1867-1950)).
  Cross-reference: Clarence J. Shearn
  Max Schachtman (1904-1972) — of Floral Park, Nassau County, Long Island, N.Y. Born in Warsaw, Poland, September 10, 1904. Naturalized U.S. citizen; arrested during a demonstration on Wall Street in New York City, July 3, 1928, but charges against him were dismissed; became an open supporter of Leon Trotsky's opposition to Stalin about 1928, and was expelled from the Communist Party; became a major Trotskyist leader and theoretician, and one of the founders of the Socialist Workers Party; editor of The Militant newspaper; Workers candidate for U.S. Representative from New York, 1940 (23rd District), 1946 (15th District); Workers candidate for mayor of New York City, N.Y., 1941; broke with Trotskyism in 1948, and became more conservative in later life. Jewish ancestry. Member, League for Industrial Democracy. Died, in Long Island Jewish Hospital, New Hyde Park, Nassau County, Long Island, N.Y., November 4, 1972 (age 68 years, 55 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Benjamin Schachtman and Sarah Schachtman; married to Billie Ramloff, Edith Harvey and Yetta Barsh (1925-1996).
  See also Wikipedia article
Huey P. Long Huey Pierce Long (1893-1935) — also known as Huey P. Long; Hugh Pierce Long; "The Kingfish" — of Shreveport, Caddo Parish, La.; New Orleans, Orleans Parish, La. Born near Winnfield, Winn Parish, La., August 30, 1893. Democrat. Lawyer; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Louisiana, 1928; Governor of Louisiana, 1928-32; member of Democratic National Committee from Louisiana, 1928; impeached by the Louisiana House in 1929 over multiple charges including his attempt to impose an oil tax and his unauthorized demolition of the governor's mansion, but not convicted by the Senate; U.S. Senator from Louisiana, 1932-35; died in office 1935. Baptist. Member, Elks. Shot and mortally wounded by Dr. Carl Weiss (who was immediately killed at the scene), in the Louisiana State Capitol Building, September 8, 1935, and died two days later at Our Lady of the Lake Hospital, Baton Rouge, East Baton Rouge Parish, La., September 10, 1935 (age 42 years, 11 days). Interment at State Capitol Grounds, Baton Rouge, La.
  Relatives: Son of Hugh Pierce Long (1852-1937) and Caledonia Palestine (Tison) Long (1860-1913); brother of George Shannon Long and Earl Kemp Long (1895-1960) (who married Blanche B. Revere); married, April 12, 1913, to Rose McConnell; father of Russell Billiu Long; second cousin once removed of Gillis William Long and Speedy Oteria Long.
  Political family: Long family of Louisiana.
  Cross-reference: Cecil Morgan — John H. Overton — Harvey G. Fields — Gerald L. K. Smith
  The Huey P. Long - O.K. Allen Bridge (opened 1940), which carries U.S. Highway 190 and a rail line over the Mississippi River, between East Baton Rouge Parish and West Baton Rouge Parish, Louisiana, is partly named for him.  — Senador Huey Pierce Long, a street in Asunsion, Paraguay, is named for him.
  Campaign slogan: "Every Man a King."
  Campaign slogan: "Share Our Wealth."
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Internet Movie Database profile
  Books by Huey P. Long: Every Man a King : The Autobiography of Huey P. Long
  Books about Huey P. Long: T. Harry Williams, Huey Long — Harnett T. Kane, Huey Long's Louisiana Hayride: The American Rehearsal for Dictatorship 1928-1940 — Richard D. White, Kingfish: The Reign of Huey P. Long — David R. Collins, Huey P. Long : Talker and Doer (for young readers)
  Image source: KnowLA Encyclopedia of Louisiana
  Edward L. Jackson (1873-1954) — also known as Ed Jackson — of New Castle, Henry County, Ind.; Indianapolis, Marion County, Ind.; Orleans, Orange County, Ind. Born in Howard County, Ind., December 27, 1873. Republican. Lawyer; Henry County Prosecuting Attorney, 1903-05; circuit judge in Indiana, 1909-14; secretary of state of Indiana, 1917, 1921-25; defeated, 1914; served in the U.S. Army during World War I; Governor of Indiana, 1925-29; delegate to Republican National Convention from Indiana, 1928. Christian. Member, Freemasons; Knights of Pythias; American Legion. Charged with bribery; tried and found not guilty. Died November 18, 1954 (age 80 years, 326 days). Interment at Green Hill Cemetery, Orleans, Ind.
  Relatives: Son of Presley E. Jackson and Elizabeth (Howell) Jackson; married to Rosa Wilkinson and Lida Beatty.
  See also NNDB dossier
  Hiram Bingham (1875-1956) — of New Haven, New Haven County, Conn.; Salem, New London County, Conn. Born in Honolulu, Island of Oahu, Honolulu County, Hawaii, November 19, 1875. Republican. Explorer; delegate to Republican National Convention from Connecticut, 1916 (alternate), 1920 (alternate), 1924, 1928 (member, Resolutions Committee), 1932, 1936 (vice-chair, Resolutions Committee); Presidential Elector for Connecticut, 1916; colonel in the U.S. Army during World War I; Lieutenant Governor of Connecticut, 1923-25; Governor of Connecticut, 1925; U.S. Senator from Connecticut, 1924-33; defeated, 1932; censured by the U.S. Senate on November 4, 1929, for employing a paid lobbyist as his chief clerk. Member, Freemasons. Died in Washington, D.C., June 6, 1956 (age 80 years, 200 days). Interment at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Va.
  Relatives: Son of Rev. Hiram Bingham (1831-1908) and Clara Minerva (Brewster) Bingham (1834-1903); married, November 20, 1900, to Alfreda Mitchell; married, June 28, 1937, to Suzanne Carroll Hill; father of Hiram Bingham, Jr., Alfred Mitchell Bingham and Jonathan Brewster Bingham; second cousin five times removed of Benjamin Huntington; third cousin once removed of Bela Edgerton and Heman Ticknor; third cousin thrice removed of Matthew Griswold (1714-1799), Jonathan Brace, Joshua Coit, Augustus Seymour Porter, Samuel Lathrop and Peter Buell Porter; fourth cousin of Alfred Peck Edgerton and Joseph Ketchum Edgerton; fourth cousin once removed of Elijah Abel, William Woodbridge, Henry Meigs, Isaac Backus, Samuel George Andrews, Martin Olds, Harrison Blodget and Henry Titus Backus.
  Political families: Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York; Waterman-Huntington family of Connecticut and New York; Wolcott-Wadsworth family of Connecticut and Maryland; Wolcott-Packwood-Griswold family of Connecticut; Hosmer-Griswold-Parsons family of Middletown, Connecticut (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Albert Bacon Fall (1861-1944) — also known as Albert B. Fall — of Three Rivers, Otero County, N.M. Born in Frankfort, Franklin County, Ky., November 26, 1861. Republican. Lawyer; farmer; member of New Mexico territorial House of Representatives, 1891-92; justice of New Mexico territorial supreme court, 1893; New Mexico territory attorney general, 1897; served in the U.S. Army during the Spanish-American War; U.S. Senator from New Mexico, 1912-21; delegate to Republican National Convention from New Mexico, 1916; U.S. Secretary of the Interior, 1921-23. Convicted of bribery in 1929 for his role in the Teapot Dome oil lease scandal; served one year in prison. Died in El Paso, El Paso County, Tex., November 30, 1944 (age 83 years, 4 days). Interment at Evergreen Alameda Cemetery, El Paso, Tex.
  Relatives: Son of William R. Fall and Edmonia (Taylor) Fall; married, May 7, 1883, to Emma Garland Morgan (daughter of Simpson Harris Morgan (1821?-1864)).
  Cross-reference: Edward L. Doheny — Frank J. Hogan
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about Albert B. Fall: David H. Stratton, Tempest over Teapot Dome : The Story of Albert B. Fall — Herman B. Weisner, The Politics of Justice: A.B. Fall and the Teapot Dome Scandal
  Henry Simpson Johnston (1867-1965) — also known as Henry S. Johnston — of Perry, Noble County, Okla. Born near Evansville, Vanderburgh County, Ind., December 30, 1867. Democrat. Delegate to Democratic National Convention from Oklahoma, 1912; Governor of Oklahoma, 1927-29. Impeached and removed from office as Governor in 1929. Died in Perry, Noble County, Okla., January 7, 1965 (age 97 years, 8 days). Interment somewhere in Perry, Okla.
  Eugene Dennis (1905-1961) — also known as Francis Xavier Waldron; Tim Ryan — Born in Seattle, King County, Wash., August 10, 1905. Communist. Union organizer; fled to the Soviet Union in 1929 to avoid prosecution; returned to the U.S. in 1935; General Secretary, Communist Party, 1946-59, and Chairman, 1959-61; arrested in 1948, along with other party leaders, and charged with advocating the violent overthrow of the United States; convicted in 1949, and sentenced to five years in prison. Died, from cancer, in Mount Sinai Hospital, Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., January 31, 1961 (age 55 years, 174 days). Interment at Forest Home Cemetery, Forest Park, Ill.
  See also Wikipedia article
  James P. Kohler — of Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y. Lawyer; secretary to New York City Mayor William J. Gaynor; candidate for Justice of New York Supreme Court 2nd District, 1920. In 1929, he was one of several Brooklyn lawyers who were disciplined for ambulance chasing activities; his license to practice law was suspended for 30 days. Burial location unknown.
  Paris Montrose (c.1895-1961) — of Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y. Born about 1895. Republican. Lawyer; candidate for New York state assembly from Kings County 22nd District, 1927, 1928. In 1929, he was one of several Brooklyn lawyers who were disciplined for ambulance chasing activities and paying insurance company adjusters for favorable settlement of claims; his license to practice law was suspended for two years. Died, of cancer, in the Memorial Center for Cancer and Allied Diseases of the Sloan-Kettering Cancer Institute, Manhattan, New York County, N.Y., February 14, 1961 (age about 66 years). Burial location unknown.
  Mortimer J. Wohl (1888-1931) — of Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y. Born in Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y., March 20, 1888. Republican. Lawyer; served in the U.S. Army during World War I; candidate for New York state assembly from Kings County 18th District, 1921. Member, American Legion. In 1929, he was one of several Brooklyn lawyers who were charged with ambulance chasing activities; he disputed the charges. Died, from septicemia, in Jewish Hospital, Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y., October 14, 1931 (age 43 years, 208 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Samuel Wohl and Fannie Whol; married, November 11, 1923, to Adelaide Finkelstein.
  Edward James Dennis (c.1876-1930) — also known as E. J. Dennis — of Berkeley County, S.C. Born about 1876. Member of South Carolina state senate from Berkeley County, 1911-14, 1927-30; died in office 1930. Tried and acquitted in 1929 for conspiracy to violate the alcohol prohibition law. Shot and mortally wounded by W. L. Thornley, on the street in front of the post office in Moncks Corner, S.C., and died the next day in a hospital at Charleston, Charleston County, S.C., July 25, 1930 (age about 54 years). Burial location unknown.
  William Scott Vare (1867-1934) — also known as William S. Vare — of Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa. Born in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., December 24, 1867. Republican. Delegate to Republican National Convention from Pennsylvania, 1908, 1912, 1916, 1920, 1924, 1928 (member, Credentials Committee; speaker), 1932; candidate for mayor of Philadelphia, Pa., 1911; U.S. Representative from Pennsylvania 1st District, 1912-23, 1923-27; member of Pennsylvania state senate 1st District, 1923; U.S. Senator from Pennsylvania, 1927-29. Political boss of Philadelphia in the 1920's; unseated as U.S. Senator in 1929 over charges of corruption and fraud in his election. Died in Atlantic City, Atlantic County, N.J., August 7, 1934 (age 66 years, 226 days). Interment at West Laurel Hill Cemetery, Bala Cynwyd, Pa.
  Relatives: Son of Augustus Vare and Abigail (Stites) Vare; brother of George Augustus Vare (1859-1908) and Edwin H. Vare; married, July 29, 1897, to Ida Morris; fourth cousin of Fletcher Wilbur Stites; fourth cousin once removed of Christopher Smith Hand.
  Political family: Vare-Stites family of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  J. O. Stricklin (1872-1930) — of Yazoo City, Yazoo County, Miss. Born July 9, 1872. Mayor of Yazoo City, Miss., 1929-30; died in office 1930. Indicted by a Yazoo County grand jury in 1929 for stealing a cow; details of the case were printed in the Yazoo Sentinel newspaper, leading to a feud between Stricklin and the Sentinel's editor, Frank R. Birdsall; a year later, on Main Street in front of the Sentinel office, Stricklin was talking with Dr. R. E. Hawkins, his opponent in the last election, when Birdsall approached; Stricklin pulled out a pistol, shot Birdsall three times (he died the next day), and shot at, but missed, Dr. Hawkins; he then went to his son's funeral parlor, where he died by a self-inflicted gunshot, in Yazoo City, Yazoo County, Miss., April 1, 1930 (age 57 years, 266 days). Interment at Glenwood Cemetery, Yazoo City, Miss.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Archibald James Carey (1868-1931) — also known as Archibald J. Carey — of Jacksonville, Duval County, Fla.; Chicago, Cook County, Ill. Born in slavery, in Georgia, August 25, 1868. Republican. School teacher and principal; president, Edward Waters College, Jacksonville, Fla., 1895; minister; bishop; delegate to Illinois state constitutional convention 3rd District, 1920-22; alternate delegate to Republican National Convention from Illinois, 1924; member, Chicago Civil Service Commission, 1927-29; indicted in 1929 on charges of accepting bribes from job applicants; the case never came to trial. African Methodist Episcopal. African ancestry. Died, from heart disease, in Billings Memorial Hospital, Chicago, Cook County, Ill., March 23, 1931 (age 62 years, 210 days). Interment at Lincoln Cemetery, Blue Island, Ill.
  Relatives: Son of Ann Carey (1845-1879) and Jefferson Alexander Carey (1849-1919); married to Elizabeth D. Davis (1867-1936); father of Archibald James Carey, Jr. (1908-1981).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Raleigh P. Hale (1883-1931) — of East Chicago, Lake County, Ind. Born in Columbia, Boone County, Mo., June 6, 1883. Republican. Served in the U.S. Army during World War I; physician; mayor of East Chicago, Ind., 1926-30; resigned 1930; in 1929, accused of protecting vice as mayor, he and 18 others, including the East Chicago police chief and the reputed business agent for gangster Al Capone were charged in federal court with conspiracy to violate liquor prohibition laws; convicted in January 1930, and sentenced to two years in prison; on appeal, a new trial was ordered. Member, American Legion. Died suddenly, from dilated cardiomyopathy, in East Chicago, Lake County, Ind., December 1, 1931 (age 48 years, 178 days). Interment at Oak Hill Cemetery, Hammond, Ind.
  Relatives: Married, September 9, 1913, to Harriet Phillips.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
"Enjoy the hospitable entertainment of a political graveyard."
Henry L. Clinton, Apollo Hall, New York City, February 3, 1872
The Political Graveyard

The Political Graveyard is a web site about U.S. political history and cemeteries. Founded in 1996, it is the Internet's most comprehensive free source for American political biography, listing 312,576 politicians, living and dead.
  The listings are incomplete; development of the database is a continually ongoing project.  
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