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The Political Graveyard: A Database of American History
Politicians in Trouble or Disgrace

Politicians in Trouble: 1860 to 1869

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in approximate chronological order

Isaac V. Fowler Isaac Vanderbeck Fowler (1818-1869) — also known as Isaac V. Fowler — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Born August 20, 1818. Democrat. Postmaster at New York City, N.Y., 1853-60; delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1860; charged in 1860 with embezzlement as Postmaster; fled to Mexico and Cuba. Member, Tammany Hall. Died in Chicago, Cook County, Ill., September 29, 1869 (age 51 years, 40 days). Interment at Old Town Cemetery, Newburgh, N.Y.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Image source: Library of Congress
  John Milton Elliott (1820-1879) — also known as John M. Elliott — of Prestonsburg, Floyd County, Ky. Born in Scott County, Va., May 20, 1820. Democrat. Member of Kentucky state house of representatives, 1847, 1860-61; U.S. Representative from Kentucky 6th District, 1853-59; Delegate from Kentucky to the Confederate Provisional Congress, 1861-62; Representative from Kentucky in the Confederate Congress, 1862-65; circuit judge in Kentucky, 1868-74; Judge, Kentucky Court of Appeals, 1876-79; died in office 1879. Expelled from the Kentucky legislature in 1861 for supporting the Confederacy. Shot and killed by Col. Thomas Buford, in front of the ladies' entrance to the Capitol Hotel, in Frankfort, Franklin County, Ky., March 26, 1879 (age 58 years, 310 days). Interment at Frankfort Cemetery, Frankfort, Ky.; statue at Boyd County Courthouse Grounds, Catlettsburg, Ky.
  Relatives: Son of John Elliott and Jane Elliott.
  Elliott County, Ky. is named for him.
  Epitaph: "Assassinated, for having done his duty as a Judge."
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  George William Brown (1812-1890) — of Baltimore, Md. Born in Baltimore, Md., October 13, 1812. Mayor of Baltimore, Md., 1860-61; delegate to Maryland state constitutional convention, 1867; municipal judge in Maryland, 1872. His term as mayor was cut short on September 12, 1861, when he was arrested and imprisoned, over alleged disloyalty, by Federal authorities. Died September 8, 1890 (age 77 years, 330 days). Burial location unknown.
  James Chesnut, Jr. (1815-1885) — of Camden, Kershaw District (now Kershaw County), S.C. Born near Camden, Kershaw County, S.C., January 18, 1815. Democrat. Member of South Carolina state house of representatives, 1842; member of South Carolina state senate, 1854; U.S. Senator from South Carolina, 1858-60; delegate to South Carolina secession convention from Kershaw, 1860-62; Delegate from South Carolina to the Confederate Provisional Congress, 1861-62; candidate for Senator from South Carolina in the Confederate Congress, 1861; general in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; delegate to Democratic National Convention from South Carolina, 1868, 1872. When the Civil War began, he left Washington but did not resign his seat in the Senate; one of ten Southern senators expelled in absentia on July 11, 1861. Died in Camden, Kershaw County, S.C., February 1, 1885 (age 70 years, 14 days). Interment at Knights Hill Cemetery, Camden, S.C.
  Relatives: Son-in-law of Stephen Decatur Miller (1787-1838).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  John Hemphill (1803-1862) — of Texas. Born in Chester County, S.C., December 18, 1803. Judge of Texas Republic, 1840; justice of Texas state supreme court, 1846-58; U.S. Senator from Texas, 1859-61; Delegate from Texas to the Confederate Provisional Congress, 1861-62; died in office 1862; candidate for Senator from Texas in the Confederate Congress, 1861. When the Civil War began, he left Washington but did not resign his seat in the Senate; one of ten Southern senators expelled in absentia on July 11, 1861. Died in Richmond, Va., January 7, 1862 (age 58 years, 20 days). Interment at Texas State Cemetery, Austin, Tex.
  Relatives: Uncle of John James Hemphill; great-granduncle of Robert Witherspoon Hemphill (1915-1983).
  Political family: Hemphill family of Chester, South Carolina.
  Hemphill County, Tex. is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Robert Mercer Taliaferro Hunter (1809-1887) — also known as Robert M. T. Hunter — of Lloyds, Essex County, Va. Born near Loretto, Essex County, Va., April 21, 1809. Democrat. Lawyer; member of Virginia state house of delegates, 1834-35; member of Virginia state senate, 1835-37; U.S. Representative from Virginia, 1837-43, 1845-47 (8th District 1837-39, 12th District 1839-41, 9th District 1841-43, 8th District 1845-47); Speaker of the U.S. House, 1839-41; U.S. Senator from Virginia, 1847-61; candidate for Democratic nomination for President, 1860; Delegate from Virginia to the Confederate Provisional Congress, 1861-62; Confederate Secretary of State, 1861-62; Senator from Virginia in the Confederate Congress, 1862-65; delegate to Virginia state constitutional convention, 1867-68; Virginia state treasurer, 1874-80. When the Civil War began, he left Washington but did not resign his seat in the Senate; he was one of ten Southern senators expelled in absentia on July 11, 1861. Arrested in 1865 and imprisoned without trial by federal forces in Fort Pulaski, Tennessee, until 1866. Died in Lloyds, Essex County, Va., July 18, 1887 (age 78 years, 88 days). Interment a private or family graveyard, Essex County, Va.
  Relatives: Uncle of Muscoe Russell Hunter Garnett (1821-1864).
  Political family: Garnett family of Virginia.
  Coins and currency: His portrait appeared on Confederate States $10 notes in 1861-64.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  Louis Trezevant Wigfall (1816-1874) — also known as Louis T. Wigfall — of Texas. Born near Edgefield, Edgefield County, S.C., April 21, 1816. Democrat. Killed Thomas Bird in a duel around 1840; wounded Rep. Preston S. Brooks in another duel; member of Texas state house of representatives, 1849; member of Texas state senate, 1857; U.S. Senator from Texas, 1859-61; when the Civil War began, he left Washington but did not resign his seat in the Senate; one of ten Southern senators expelled in absentia on July 11, 1861; general in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; Delegate from Texas to the Confederate Provisional Congress, 1861-62; Senator from Texas in the Confederate Congress, 1862-65. Died in Galveston, Galveston County, Tex., February 18, 1874 (age 57 years, 303 days). Interment at Trinity Episcopal Cemetery, Galveston, Tex.
  Relatives: Son of Levi Durand Wigfall (1777-1817) and Eliza (Thomson) Wigfall; married, August 22, 1844, to Charlotte Cross (1820-1893); second cousin twice removed of Francis Irenee du Pont (1873-1942).
  Political families: DuPont family of Wilmington, Delaware; Livingston-Schuyler family of New York (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
  John Cabell Breckinridge (1821-1875) — also known as John C. Breckinridge — of Lexington, Fayette County, Ky. Born near Lexington, Fayette County, Ky., January 16, 1821. Democrat. Lawyer; major in the U.S. Army during the Mexican War; member of Kentucky state house of representatives, 1849-51; U.S. Representative from Kentucky 8th District, 1851-55; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Kentucky, 1856; Vice President of the United States, 1857-61; Southern Democratic candidate for President of the United States, 1860; U.S. Senator from Kentucky, 1861; general in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; Confederate Secretary of War, 1865. Presbyterian. Member, Freemasons. Expelled from the U.S. Senate on December 4, 1861 for his participation in the Confederate military. Fled to Cuba at the end of the war, and lived in England and Canada until 1869. Died, from lung disease and liver cirrhosis, in Lexington, Fayette County, Ky., May 17, 1875 (age 54 years, 121 days). Interment at Lexington Cemetery, Lexington, Ky.
  Relatives: Son of Mary Clay (Smith) Breckinridge (1787-1864) and Joseph Cabell Breckinridge; married 1840 to Elizabeth Lucas (1825-1889); married, December 12, 1843, to Mary Cyrene Burch (1826-1907); father of Clifton Rodes Breckinridge; nephew of Robert Jefferson Breckinridge; grandson of John Breckinridge; great-grandson of John Witherspoon; great-grandnephew of William Preston and William Cabell; first cousin of Peter Augustus Porter (1827-1864), Robert Jefferson Breckinridge, Jr. and William Campbell Preston Breckinridge; first cousin once removed of James Douglas Breckinridge, Benjamin William Sheridan Cabell (1793-1862), Peter Augustus Porter (1853-1925), Levin Irving Handy, Desha Breckinridge and Henry Skillman Breckinridge; first cousin twice removed of William Cabell, Jr., Francis Smith Preston, William Henry Cabell and James Patton Preston; second cousin of Carter Henry Harrison, William Lewis Cabell and George Craighead Cabell; second cousin once removed of William Campbell Preston, James McDowell, John Buchanan Floyd, John Smith Preston, George Rogers Clark Floyd, Edward Carrington Cabell, Benjamin Earl Cabell and Carter Henry Harrison II; second cousin twice removed of Earle Cabell; third cousin of John William Leftwich.
  Political families: Marshall-Harrison-Randolph-Cabell family of Virginia; Breckinridge-Preston-Cabell-Henry family of Virginia; Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York; Walker-Bolling family of Huntsville, Alabama (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  The city of Breckenridge, Missouri, is named for him.  — The city of Breckenridge, Colorado, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial — BillionGraves burial record
  Books about John C. Breckinridge: William C. Davis, An Honorable Defeat: The Last Days of the Confederate Government — Frank Hopkins Heck, Proud Kentuckian, John C. Breckinridge, 1821-1875 — William C. Davis, Breckinridge : Statesman, Soldier, Symbol
  Thomas Bragg (1810-1872) — of Northampton County, N.C.; Raleigh, Wake County, N.C. Born in Warrenton, Warren County, N.C., November 9, 1810. Democrat. Lawyer; member of North Carolina house of commons, 1842; Governor of North Carolina, 1855-59; U.S. Senator from North Carolina, 1859-61; Confederate Attorney General, 1861-62. Presbyterian. When the Civil War began, he left Washington but did not resign his seat in the Senate; one of ten Southern senators expelled in absentia on July 11, 1861. Died in Raleigh, Wake County, N.C., January 21, 1872 (age 61 years, 73 days). Interment at Oakwood Cemetery, Raleigh, N.C.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Alfred Osborn Pope Nicholson (1808-1876) — also known as A. O. P. Nicholson — of Tennessee. Born in Tennessee, 1808. Democrat. Member of Tennessee state legislature, 1830; U.S. Senator from Tennessee, 1840-42, 1859-61; chief justice of Tennessee state supreme court, 1870-76. When the Civil War began, he left Washington but did not resign his seat in the Senate; one of ten Southern senators expelled in absentia on July 11, 1861. Died in 1876 (age about 68 years). Interment at Rose Hill Cemetery, Columbia, Tenn.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Thomas Lanier Clingman (1812-1897) — also known as Thomas L. Clingman; "The Prince of Politicians" — of Asheville, Buncombe County, N.C. Born in Huntsville, Yadkin County, N.C., July 27, 1812. Democrat. Member of North Carolina state legislature, 1840; U.S. Representative from North Carolina, 1843-45, 1847-58 (1st District 1843-45, 1847-53, 8th District 1853-58); U.S. Senator from North Carolina, 1858-61; delegate to Democratic National Convention from North Carolina, 1868, 1876 (member, Resolutions Committee). When the Civil War began, he left Washington but did not resign his seat in the Senate; one of ten Southern senators expelled in absentia on July 11, 1861. Died in Morganton, Burke County, N.C., November 3, 1897 (age 85 years, 99 days). Interment at Riverside Cemetery, Asheville, N.C.
  Clingman's Dome, a mountain on the border between Sevier County, Tennessee, and Swain County, North Carolina, is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Charles Burton Mitchel (1815-1864) — also known as Charles B. Mitchel — of Arkansas. Born in Gallatin, Sumner County, Tenn., September 19, 1815. Democrat. Member of Arkansas state legislature, 1848; candidate for U.S. Representative from Arkansas, 1860; U.S. Senator from Arkansas, 1861; Senator from Arkansas in the Confederate Congress, 1862-64; died in office 1864. When the Civil War began, he left Washington but did not resign his seat in the Senate; one of ten Southern senators expelled in absentia on July 11, 1861. Died in Little Rock, Pulaski County, Ark., September 20, 1864 (age 49 years, 1 days). Interment at Presbyterian Cemetery, Washington, Ark.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  James Murray Mason (1798-1871) — also known as James M. Mason — of Winchester, Va. Born in Georgetown, Washington, D.C., November 3, 1798. Member of Virginia state house of delegates, 1826; delegate to Virginia state constitutional convention, 1829; U.S. Representative from Virginia 12th District, 1837-39; U.S. Senator from Virginia, 1847-61; Delegate from Virginia to the Confederate Provisional Congress, 1861; Confederate States Envoy to England, 1861. Author of the Fugitive Slave Law. When the Civil War began, he left Washington but did not resign his seat in the Senate; one of ten Southern senators expelled in absentia on July 11, 1861. Died April 28, 1871 (age 72 years, 176 days). Interment at Christ Church Episcopal Cemetery, Alexandria, Va.
  Relatives: Son of John Mason (1766-1849) and Anna Maria (Murray) Mason (1776-1857); married, July 25, 1822, to Eliza Margaretta Chew (1798-1874); uncle of Fitzhugh Lee; grandson of George Mason; grandnephew of Thomson Mason; first cousin of Thomson Francis Mason and John Thomson Mason, Jr.; first cousin once removed of Stevens Thomson Mason (1760-1803) and John Thomson Mason (1765-1824); first cousin thrice removed of Charles O'Conor Goolrick; second cousin of Armistead Thomson Mason and John Thomson Mason (1787-1850); second cousin once removed of Stevens Thomson Mason (1811-1843).
  Political family: Mason family of Virginia (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  William King Sebastian (1812-1865) — also known as William K. Sebastian — of Helena (now part of Helena-West Helena), Phillips County, Ark. Born in Tennessee, 1812. Democrat. Lawyer; member of Arkansas state legislature, 1840; U.S. Senator from Arkansas, 1848-61. When the Civil War began, he left Washington but did not resign his seat in the Senate; one of ten Southern senators expelled in absentia on July 11, 1861. Did not participate in the Confederacy during the war; his expulsion from the Senate was posthumously revoked in 1877. Died in 1865 (age about 53 years). Interment in private or family graveyard.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  Jay Gibbons — of Albany County, N.Y. Member of New York state assembly from Albany County 1st District, 1861; expelled from the Assembly, April 18, 1861. Burial location unknown.
  Alexander J. Bergen — of Suffolk County, N.Y. Member of New York state assembly from Suffolk County 2nd District, 1861. Outraged by a criticism published in the newspaper, he assaulted the editor of the Suffolk County Democrat, in 1861, and was later prosecuted and fined $25. Burial location unknown.
  George Proctor Kane (1817-1878) — of Baltimore, Md. Born in Baltimore, Md., August 4, 1817. U.S. Collector of Customs, 1849-53; as Baltimore Marshal of Police in 1861, he opposed the movement of Union troops through Baltimore; on June 27, he was arrested by Federal soldiers and imprisoned in Fort Warren for fourteen months; mayor of Baltimore, Md., 1877-78; died in office 1878. Died in Baltimore, Md., June 23, 1878 (age 60 years, 323 days). Interment at New Cathedral Cemetery, Baltimore, Md.
  Relatives: Son of John M. Kane; married to Anna C. Griffith (1824-1882).
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Charles James Faulkner (1806-1884) — also known as Charles J. Faulkner — of Martinsburg, Berkeley County, Va. (now W.Va.). Born in Martinsburg, Berkeley County, Va. (now W.Va.), July 6, 1806. Democrat. Member of Virginia state house of delegates, 1829-34, 1848-49; member of Virginia state senate, 1838-42; delegate to Virginia state constitutional convention, 1850; U.S. Representative from Virginia, 1851-59 (10th District 1851-53, 8th District 1853-59); U.S. Minister to France, 1860; general in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; delegate to West Virginia state constitutional convention, 1872; U.S. Representative from West Virginia 2nd District, 1875-77. On his return from France in August 1861, was detained as a prisoner of state on charges of negotiating arms sales for the Confederacy while in Paris; released in December 1861 and negotiated his own exchange for Alfred Ely, a a Congressman from New York who had been taken prisoner by the Confederates at Bull Run. Died near Martinsburg, Berkeley County, W.Va., November 1, 1884 (age 78 years, 118 days). Interment a private or family graveyard, Berkeley County, W.Va.
  Relatives: Father of Charles James Faulkner (1847-1929).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — U.S. State Dept career summary
  George Wallace Jones (1804-1896) — also known as George W. Jones — of Dubuque, Dubuque County, Iowa. Born in Vincennes, Knox County, Ind., April 12, 1804. Democrat. Lawyer; served in the U.S. Army during the Black Hawk War; Delegate to U.S. Congress from Michigan Territory, 1835-36; Delegate to U.S. Congress from Wisconsin Territory, 1836-39; U.S. Senator from Iowa, 1848-59; U.S. Minister to New Grenada, 1859-61. Welsh ancestry. In 1861, was arrested in New York City by order of Secretary of State William H. Seward on a charge of disloyalty, based on correspondence with his friend Jefferson Davis; imprisoned for 64 days; released by order of President Abraham Lincoln. Died in Dubuque, Dubuque County, Iowa, July 22, 1896 (age 92 years, 101 days). Interment at Mt. Olivet Cemetery, Dubuque, Iowa.
  Relatives: Son of John Rice Jones (1759-1824); brother-in-law of John Scott (1782-1861) and Andrew Scott; brother of Myers F. Jones and John Rice Jones (1792-1845); uncle of John Rice Homer Scott.
  Political family: Jones family of Ste. Genevieve, Missouri.
  Jones County, Iowa is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary
  Alfred Ely (1815-1892) — of Rochester, Monroe County, N.Y. Born in Lyme, New London County, Conn., February 15, 1815. Republican. U.S. Representative from New York 29th District, 1859-63. While witnessing the Battle of Bull Run in 1861, was captured by the Confederates, and imprisoned at Richmond for several months; released in exchange for Charles J. Faulkner. Died in Rochester, Monroe County, N.Y., May 18, 1892 (age 77 years, 93 days). Entombed at Mt. Hope Cemetery, Rochester, N.Y.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  John W. Dawson (1820-1877) — of Fort Wayne, Allen County, Ind. Born in Cambridge, Dearborn County, Ind., October 21, 1820. Farmer; lawyer; newspaper editor; candidate for Indiana state house of representatives, 1854; candidate for secretary of state of Indiana, 1856; candidate for U.S. Representative from Indiana, 1858; Governor of Utah Territory, 1861. In December, 1861, after less than a month as territorial governor, fled Utah amid controversy and scandal. Just east of Salt Lake City, he was attacked by three men and badly injured. Died in Indiana, September 10, 1877 (age 56 years, 324 days). Interment at Lindenwood Cemetery, Fort Wayne, Ind.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  William T. Casto (1824-1862) — Born January 24, 1824. Lawyer; mayor of Maysville, Ky., 1850; arrested in 1861 and imprisoned for allegedly aiding the Confederacy; released in 1862. Blamed Col. Leonidas Metcalfe (son of Gov. Thomas Metcalfe) for his imprisonment; challenged him to a duel; the weapons were Colt rifles at 60 yards; Casto was shot and killed on the first fire, in Bracken County, Ky., May 8, 1862 (age 38 years, 104 days). Interment at Maysville Cemetery, Maysville, Ky.
  Relatives: Son of Abijah Casto.
  Epitaph: "A Patriot, his Country's firm unwavering friend, he was willing to die for his Principles and as a man of Honor nobly fell a Veteran of the sacred and invincible right of personal liberty."
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  John Bullock Clark (1802-1885) — also known as John B. Clark — of Fayette, Howard County, Mo. Born in Madison County, Ky., April 17, 1802. Democrat. Lawyer; Howard County Court Clerk, 1824-34; colonel in the U.S. Army during the Black Hawk War; member of Missouri state house of representatives, 1850-51; U.S. Representative from Missouri 3rd District, 1857-61; expelled 1861; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Missouri, 1860; expelled from Congress in July 1861 for having taken up arms against the union; Delegate from Missouri to the Confederate Provisional Congress, 1861-62; Senator from Missouri in the Confederate Congress, 1862-64; Representative from Missouri in the Confederate Congress, 1864-65. Died in Fayette, Howard County, Mo., October 29, 1885 (age 83 years, 195 days). Interment at Fayette City Cemetery, Fayette, Mo.
  Relatives: Father of John Bullock Clark, Jr. (1831-1903); nephew of Christopher Henderson Clark and James Clark.
  Political family: Clark family.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  Charles Christopher Sheats (1839-1904) — of Decatur, Morgan County, Ala. Born in Walker County, Ala., April 10, 1839. Republican. Delegate to Alabama secession convention, 1861; member of Alabama state house of representatives, 1861-62; delegate to Alabama state constitutional convention, 1865; delegate to Republican National Convention from Alabama, 1872, 1884; U.S. Representative from Alabama at-large, 1873-75; defeated, 1874. Opposed secession in 1860; expelled from the Alabama House of Representatives in 1862 because of his adherence to the Union; imprisoned by Confederate authorities on a charge of treason, but never tried. Died in Decatur, Morgan County, Ala., May 27, 1904 (age 65 years, 47 days). Interment at McKendree Cemetery, Near Decatur, Morgan County, Ala.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Waldo Porter Johnson (1817-1885) — also known as Waldo P. Johnson — of Missouri. Born in Bridgeport, Harrison County, Va. (now W.Va.), September 16, 1817. Democrat. Lawyer; served in the U.S. Army during the Mexican War; member of Missouri state house of representatives, 1847; state court judge in Missouri, 1851; U.S. Senator from Missouri, 1861-62; colonel in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; Senator from Missouri in the Confederate Congress, 1863-65; delegate to Missouri state constitutional convention 15th District, 1875. Expelled from the U.S. Senate on January 10, 1862 over his support for secession. Died in Osceola, St. Clair County, Mo., August 14, 1885 (age 67 years, 332 days). Interment at Forest Hill Cemetery, Kansas City, Mo.
  Relatives: Nephew of Joseph Johnson (1785-1877).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Jesse David Bright (1812-1875) — also known as Jesse D. Bright — of Madison, Jefferson County, Ind.; Jeffersonville, Clark County, Ind. Born in Norwich, Chenango County, N.Y., December 18, 1812. Democrat. State court judge in Indiana, 1834-39; member of Indiana state senate, 1841-43; Lieutenant Governor of Indiana, 1843-45; U.S. Senator from Indiana, 1845-62; member of Kentucky state house of representatives, 1867-71; Presidential Elector for Kentucky, 1868. Presbyterian. Expelled from the U.S. Senate, February 5, 1862, over alleged disloyalty to the Union, as evidenced by a letter of introduction he wrote for an arms merchant, addressed to Confederate president Jefferson Davis. Died in Baltimore, Md., May 20, 1875 (age 62 years, 153 days). Interment at Green Mount Cemetery, Baltimore, Md.
  Relatives: Brother of Michael Graham Bright (1803-1881).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  Dennis Aloysius Mahoney (1821-1879) — of Jackson County, Iowa; Dubuque, Dubuque County, Iowa. Born in Ross, County Cork, Ireland, January 20, 1821. Member of Iowa state house of representatives; elected 1848, 1858; candidate for U.S. Representative from Iowa, 1862, 1864. Catholic. Newspaper editor who criticized the Civil War; arrested in August 1862 and held until November at the Old Capitol Federal Prison in Washington, D.C. Died in Dubuque, Dubuque County, Iowa, November 5, 1879 (age 58 years, 289 days). Interment at St. Patrick Cemetery, Garryowen, Iowa.
  Edson Baldwin Olds (1802-1869) — also known as Edson B. Olds — of Circleville, Pickaway County, Ohio; Lancaster, Fairfield County, Ohio. Born in Marlboro, Windham County, Vt., June 3, 1802. Democrat. Physician; member of Ohio state house of representatives, 1842-43, 1845-46, 1862-66; member of Ohio state senate, 1846-48; U.S. Representative from Ohio, 1849-55 (9th District 1849-53, 12th District 1853-55); defeated, 1854; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Ohio, 1864. Arrested for alleged disloyalty to the Union and imprisoned in Fort Lafayette in 1862. Died in Lancaster, Fairfield County, Ohio, January 24, 1869 (age 66 years, 235 days). Interment at Forest Cemetery, Circleville, Ohio.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Lawrence Washington Hall (1819-1863) — of Bucyrus, Crawford County, Ohio. Born in Lake County, Ohio, 1819. Democrat. Lawyer; common pleas court judge in Ohio, 1852-57; U.S. Representative from Ohio 9th District, 1857-59; defeated, 1858. Imprisoned for alleged disloyalty to the Union in 1862. Died of a lung hemorrhage, Bucyrus, Crawford County, Ohio, January 18, 1863 (age about 43 years). Original interment at Oakwood Cemetery, Bucyrus, Ohio; reinterment at Forest Lawn Cemetery, Buffalo, N.Y.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Benjamin Stark (1820-1898) — of Portland, Multnomah County, Ore.; New London, New London County, Conn. Born in New Orleans, Orleans Parish, La., June 26, 1820. Democrat. Went to California for the 1849 Gold Rush; lawyer; member of Oregon territorial House of Representatives, 1852; member of Oregon state house of representatives, 1860; U.S. Senator from Oregon, 1861-62; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Connecticut, 1868; member of Connecticut state house of representatives, 1874. On June 6, 1862, a resolution to expel him from the U.S. Senate for alleged disloyalty to the Union, requiring two-thirds to pass, failed on a vote of 21 in favor to 16 opposed. Died in New London, New London County, Conn., October 10, 1898 (age 78 years, 106 days). Interment at Cedar Grove Cemetery, New London, Conn.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Eccles G. Van Riper (b. 1841) — of Evansville, Vanderburgh County, Ind. Born in New York, New York County, N.Y., October 4, 1841. Democrat. Mayor of Evansville, Ind., 1870. In 1862, while traveling on business in Arkansas, was captured by the Confederate Army and charged with being a spy; tried before a military court in Little Rock and sentenced to death; reprieved by the arrival of a new military commander, but imprisoned until the end of the war. Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son-in-law of James Garrard Jones (1814-1872).
  Trusten Polk (1811-1876) — of St. Louis, Mo. Born near Bridgeville, Sussex County, Del., May 29, 1811. Democrat. Lawyer; delegate to Missouri state constitutional convention 28th District, 1845-46; Presidential Elector for Missouri, 1848; Governor of Missouri, 1857; U.S. Senator from Missouri, 1857-62; expelled 1862; colonel in the Confederate Army during the Civil War. Expelled from the U.S. Senate on January 10, 1862 over his support for secession. Died in St. Louis, Mo., April 16, 1876 (age 64 years, 323 days). Interment at Bellefontaine Cemetery, St. Louis, Mo.
  Relatives: Son of William Nutter Polk (1786-1835) and Lavenia (Causey) Polk (1791-1825); married, December 26, 1837, to Elizabeth Skinner; father of Anna Polk (1829-1902; who married William Frederick Causey); nephew of Peter Foster Causey; third cousin once removed of Charles Polk; fourth cousin of Joseph Maull, James Knox Polk and William Hawkins Polk; fourth cousin once removed of Augustus Caesar Dodge, Marshall Tate Polk (1831-1884), Tasker Polk, Richard Tyler Polk, Albert Fawcett Polk and Edwin Fitzhugh Polk.
  Political families: Ashe-Polk family of North Carolina; Polk family (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Joshua Chilton (1818-1862) — of Shannon County, Mo. Born in Wayne County, Tenn., September 28, 1818. Democrat. Member of Missouri state house of representatives from Shannon County, 1846-55; member of Missouri state senate 24th District, 1860-61. Member, Freemasons. Arrested by Union troops as an alleged Southern sympathizer, and while a prisoner, was shot and killed, near Rolla, Phelps County, Mo., August 28, 1862 (age 43 years, 334 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Son of Thomas Boggs Chilton (1782-1865) and Susannah (Inman) Chilton (1785-1827); married to Elizabeth Chilton (1822-1899); father of Commodore Perry Chilton; uncle of Shadrach Chilton; first cousin twice removed of John Smith (1750-1836); second cousin of Thomas Chilton and William Parish Chilton; second cousin twice removed of Horace George Chilton and Arthur Bounds Chilton.
  Political family: Chilton family of Missouri.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Joseph Campbell Anderson (1830-1891) — also known as Joseph C. Anderson — of Kansas. Born in Jessamine County, Ky., 1830. Lawyer; member of Kansas territorial legislature, 1855; arrested and imprisoned during the Civil War for refusing to sign an oath of allegiance to the Union. Died in 1891 (age about 61 years). Interment at Lexington Cemetery, Lexington, Ky.
  Relatives: Son of Oliver Anderson (1794-1873) and Mary (Campbell) Anderson (1797-1842); married to Dovey Blythe (1846-1914).
  Anderson County, Kan. is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  William Henry Carroll (1810-1868) — also known as William H. Carroll — of Memphis, Shelby County, Tenn. Born in Nashville, Davidson County, Tenn., 1810. Democrat. Postmaster at Memphis, Tenn., 1853-60; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Tennessee, 1860; general in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; Gen. Braxton Bragg had him arrested for drunkenness, and he resigned from the army. Died in Montreal, Quebec, May 3, 1868 (age about 57 years). Interment at Elmwood Cemetery, Memphis, Tenn.
  Relatives: Son of William Carroll and Cecilia (Bradford) Carroll (1792-1848); brother of Mary Catherine Carroll (1816-1842; who married Caleb Cushing Norvell); father of William Henry Carroll (1842-1915).
  Political family: Conway-Norvell-Johnson family.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Clement Laird Vallandigham (1820-1871) — also known as Clement L. Vallandigham — of Ohio. Born in New Lisbon (now Lisbon), Columbiana County, Ohio, July 29, 1820. Democrat. Lawyer; member of Ohio state house of representatives, 1845-46; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Ohio, 1856, 1864, 1868; U.S. Representative from Ohio 3rd District, 1858-63; defeated, 1852, 1854, 1862; candidate for Governor of Ohio, 1863. Leader of the pro-Southern "Copperheads" during the Civil War; arrested by the Union military authorities in 1863 for treasonable utterances, and banished to the Confederate States; returned to the North by way of Canada. Accidentally shot himself, while practicing a courtroom demonstration he planned as part of a defense in a murder trial (not actually in court at the time, contrary to legend), and died of his wound the next day, in the Lebanon House hotel, Lebanon, Warren County, Ohio, June 17, 1871 (age 50 years, 323 days). Interment at Woodland Cemetery, Dayton, Ohio.
  Relatives: Uncle of John A. McMahon (1833-1923).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  William McKendree Gwin (1805-1885) — also known as W. M. Gwin — of Mississippi; San Francisco, Calif. Born near Gallatin, Sumner County, Tenn., October 9, 1805. Democrat. Physician; U.S. Representative from Mississippi at-large, 1841-43; went to California for the 1849 Gold Rush; delegate to California state constitutional convention, 1849; U.S. Senator from California, 1850-55, 1857-61. Engaged in a duel with J. W. McCorkle, June 1, 1853; there were no injuries; twice arrested for alleged disloyalty during the Civil War. Died in New York, New York County, N.Y., September 3, 1885 (age 79 years, 329 days). Entombed at Mountain View Cemetery, Oakland, Calif.
  Relatives: Son of Rev. James Gwin (1769-1841).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Gideon Searles (c.1807-1882) — of Cattaraugus County, N.Y. Born about 1807. Member of New York state assembly from Cattaraugus County, 1846; canal superintendent. Arrested in 1863, and charged with attemping to bribe Assemblyman Elias M. Bostwick by offering him $500 to vote for the Broadway Railroad bill. While walking on the Buffalo, New York & Philadelphia railroad track, was struck and killed by a train, near Franklinville, Cattaraugus County, N.Y., July 6, 1882 (age about 75 years). Burial location unknown.
  Robert Murphy Mayo (1836-1896) — also known as Robert M. Mayo — of Virginia. Born in Hague, Westmoreland County, Va., April 28, 1836. Colonel in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; court martialed in the Confederate Army, 1863, for drunkenness, and reduced in rank; lawyer; member of Virginia state house of delegates, 1881-82, 1885-88; U.S. Representative from Virginia 1st District, 1883-84. Member, American Bar Association. Died in Hague, Westmoreland County, Va., March 29, 1896 (age 59 years, 336 days). Interment at Yeocomico Cemetery, Kinsale, Va.
  Relatives: Son of Robert Mayo and Emily Ann (Campbell) Mayo; married, December 3, 1867, to Emily Claybrook; nephew of Joseph Carrington Mayo (1795-1872).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  John Harrison Surratt, Jr. (1844-1916) — also known as John H. Surratt, Jr. — of Surrattsville (now Clinton), Prince George's County, Md. Born in Washington, D.C., April 13, 1844. Postmaster at Surrattsville, Md., 1862-63; dismissed as postmaster in 1863 for alleged disloyalty to the Union; became a Confederate courier and spy; he and others attempted to kidnap President Abraham Lincoln; later, the plot to kill the President and other government officials was formulated at his mother's boarding house in Washington; he denied involvement in the assassination, but fled overseas; he was arrested in Alexandria, Egypt, and sent back to the U.S.; tried in a Maryland court in 1867 for his alleged involvement in the murder plot, but the jury couldn't reach a verdict, and a mistrial was declared; treasurer of a steamship company. Died, from pneumonia, in Baltimore, Md., April 21, 1916 (age 72 years, 8 days). Interment at New Cathedral Cemetery, Baltimore, Md.
  Relatives: Son of John Harrison Surratt (1813-1862) and Mary (Jenkins) Surratt (1823-1865; hanged for her part in the conspiracy to assassinate the President and other officials); married 1872 to Mary Victorine Hunter (1846-1926).
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
Robert G. Ingersoll Robert Green Ingersoll (1833-1899) — also known as Robert G. Ingersoll; "The Great Agnostic"; "American Infidel"; "Impious Pope Bob" — of Peoria, Peoria County, Ill.; Washington, D.C. Born in Dresden, Yates County, N.Y., August 11, 1833. Lawyer; Democratic candidate for Illinois state house of representatives 5th District, 1860; colonel in the Union Army during the Civil War; charged about 1864 with assault and battery against the Peoria County Sheriff; tried; the jury was deadlocked and could not reach a verdict; the case was dismissed before a new trial could be held; Illinois state attorney general, 1867-69; delegate to Republican National Convention from Illinois, 1876; made the nominating speech which dubbed James G. Blaine as "The Plumed Knight". Agnostic. Died in Dobbs Ferry, Westchester County, N.Y., July 21, 1899 (age 65 years, 344 days). Cremated; ashes interred at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Va.; statue erected 1911 at Glen Oak Park, Peoria, Ill.
  Relatives: Son of Rev. John Ingersoll (1792-1859) and Mary (Livingston) Ingersoll (1799-1835); brother of Ebon Clarke Ingersoll; married, February 13, 1862, to Eve Amelia Parker (1841-1923); uncle of John Carter Ingersoll (1860-1903); second cousin thrice removed of Jonathan Ingersoll and Jared Ingersoll; third cousin twice removed of Charles Jared Ingersoll, Joseph Reed Ingersoll, Ralph Isaacs Ingersoll and Charles Anthony Ingersoll; fourth cousin once removed of Laman Ingersoll, Colin Macrae Ingersoll and Charles Roberts Ingersoll.
  Political family: Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also NNDB dossier
  Books about Robert G. Ingersoll: Orvin Larson, American Infidel: Robert G. Ingersoll
  Image source: William C. Roberts, Leading Orators (1884)
  Samuel Medary (1801-1864) — also known as "The Wheel Horse of Ohio Democracy" — of Columbus, Franklin County, Ohio. Born in Montgomery Square, Montgomery County, Pa., February 25, 1801. Democrat. Newspaper editor; member of Ohio state house of representatives, 1834; member of Ohio state senate, 1836; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Ohio, 1844, 1856, 1864; postmaster at Columbus, Ohio, 1847-49, 1858; Governor of Minnesota Territory, 1857-58; Governor of Kansas Territory, 1858-59, 1859-60, 1860, 1860; candidate for Governor of Kansas, 1859. Originated the slogan "Fifty-four forty or fight," calling for aggressive action on the Oregon boundary dispute with Great Britain in the 1840s; the American claim of all the land up to 54°40' north latitude encompassed most of what is now British Columbia. Indicted by a federal grand jury in 1864 for conspiracy against the government; arrested; released on bond; never tried. Died in Columbus, Franklin County, Ohio, November 7, 1864 (age 63 years, 256 days). Interment at Green Lawn Cemetery, Columbus, Ohio.
  Relatives: Son of Jacob Medary (1770-1839) and Elizabeth (Harris) Medary; married to Elizabeth Scott (1807-1885); great-grandfather of James Gillespie Blaine III (1888-1969).
  Political families: Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York; Waterman-Huntington family of Connecticut and New York; Dewey-Blaine-Coit-Huntington family of Connecticut (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  The community of Medary, South Dakota, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Richard Taylor Jacob (1825-1903) — of Kentucky. Born in Oldham County, Ky., 1825. Lieutenant Governor of Kentucky, 1863-64. Arrested for alleged disloyalty, removed from office, and banished from Kentucky, November 11, 1864; later allowed to return to the state under direct orders from President Abraham Lincoln. Died in 1903 (age about 78 years). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Brother of Charles Donald Jacob (1838-1898).
  Political family: Clay family of Kentucky (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Alexander Long (1816-1886) — of Ohio. Born in Greenville, Mercer County, Pa., December 24, 1816. Democrat. Member of Ohio state house of representatives, 1848; U.S. Representative from Ohio 2nd District, 1863-65; defeated, 1860; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Ohio, 1864, 1880; candidate for Governor of Ohio, 1865. Censured by the House of Representatives during the Civil War, for treasonable utterances. Died in Cincinnati, Hamilton County, Ohio, November 28, 1886 (age 69 years, 339 days). Interment at Spring Grove Cemetery, Cincinnati, Ohio.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — OurCampaigns candidate detail
  Buckner Stith Morris (1800-1879) — also known as Buckner S. Morris — of Chicago, Cook County, Ill. Born in Augusta, Bracken County, Ky., August 19, 1800. Whig. Lawyer; mayor of Chicago, Ill., 1838-39; candidate for secretary of state of Illinois, 1852; circuit judge in Illinois, 1853-55; served as treasurer of the Sons of Liberty, a Northern pro-Confederate organization; in 1864, he was arrested and imprisoned for taking part in an alleged plot to break out prisoners of war held at Camp Douglas in Chicago. Catholic. Thought to be the originator of "to hell in a handbasket," though the phrase wasn't widely used before the 1940s. Died in Chicago, Cook County, Ill., December 16, 1879 (age 79 years, 119 days). Interment at Rosehill Cemetery, Chicago, Ill.
  Relatives: Married 1832 to Evelina Barker; married 1850 to Eliza Stephenson.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Nathan Bedford Forrest (1821-1877) — also known as "Wizard of the Saddle" — of Memphis, Shelby County, Tenn. Born near Chapel Hill, Bedford County (now Marshall County), Tenn., July 13, 1821. Democrat. Cotton planter; slave trader; general in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; in April 1864, after the Battle of Fort Pillow, Tennessee, Confederate troops under his command massacred African-American Union soldiers, not accepting them as prisoners, since the Confederacy refused to recognize ex-slaves as legitimate combatants; this event, seen as a war crime, sparked outrage across the North, and a congressional inquiry; in 1867, he became involved in the Ku Klux Klan and was elected Grand Wizard; the organization used violent tactics to intimidate Black voters and suppress their votes; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Tennessee, 1868; in 1869, he had a change of heart, and issued a letter ordering that the Klan be dissolved and its costumes destroyed; he went on to denounce the group and its crimes; in 1875, he gave a "friendly speech" to a meeting of an African-American organization in Memphis, calling for peace, harmony, and economic advancement of former slaves; for this speech, he was vehemently denounced in the Southern press. English ancestry. Member, Ku Klux Klan. After his death, he became a folk hero among white Southerners, particularly during the imposition of Jim Crow segregation laws in the early 20th century, and later, in reaction to the Civil Rights movement in the 1950s and 1960s. Died, from complications of diabetes, in Memphis, Shelby County, Tenn., October 29, 1877 (age 56 years, 108 days). Original interment at Elmwood Cemetery, Memphis, Tenn.; reinterment in 1904 at Health Sciences Park, Memphis, Tenn.; memorial monument at Myrtle Hill Cemetery, Rome, Ga.; memorial monument at Live Oak Cemetery, Selma, Ala.
  Relatives: Son of William B. Forrest (1801-1837) and Miriam (Beck) Forrest (1802-1867); married 1845 to Mary Ann Montgomery (1826-1893).
  Forrest County, Miss. is named for him.
  The city of Forrest City, Arkansas, is named for him.  — The World War II Liberty ship SS Nathan B. Forrest (built 1943, scrapped 1973) was named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
John H. Reagan John Henninger Reagan (1818-1905) — also known as John H. Reagan — of Palestine, Anderson County, Tex. Born in Sevierville, Sevier County, Tenn., October 8, 1818. Democrat. Member of Texas state house of representatives, 1847; district judge in Texas, 1852-57; U.S. Representative from Texas, 1857-61, 1875-87 (1st District 1857-61, 1875-83, 2nd District 1883-87); delegate to Texas secession convention, 1861; Delegate from Texas to the Confederate Provisional Congress, 1861; Confederate Postmaster General, 1861-65; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Texas, 1872, 1904; delegate to Texas state constitutional convention, 1875; U.S. Senator from Texas, 1887-91. Methodist. Arrested by Union troops in May 1865, along with Jefferson Davis, and imprisoned for several months. Died of pneumonia in Palestine, Anderson County, Tex., March 6, 1905 (age 86 years, 149 days). Interment at East Hill Cemetery, Palestine, Tex.
  John H. Reagan High School (opened 1965; renamed 2019 as Northeast High School), in Austin, Texas, was named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Image source: Library of Congress
  Thomas Hill Watts (1819-1892) — also known as Thomas H. Watts — of Alabama. Born near Greenville, Butler County, Ala., January 3, 1819. Lawyer; member of Alabama state house of representatives, 1842-45, 1880-81; member of Alabama state senate, 1847-53; candidate for U.S. Representative from Alabama 1st District, 1855; delegate to Alabama secession convention, 1861; colonel in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; Confederate Attorney General, 1862-63; Governor of Alabama, 1863-65. Baptist. Arrested by Union forces in Union Springs, Alabama, in May 1865, and imprisoned for a few weeks. Died in Montgomery, Montgomery County, Ala., September 16, 1892 (age 73 years, 257 days). Interment at Oakwood Cemetery, Montgomery, Ala.
  Judah Philip Benjamin (1811-1884) — also known as Judah P. Benjamin; Philippe Benjamin; "Poo Bah of the Confederacy" — of New Orleans, Orleans Parish, La.; London, England; Paris, France. Born in Christiansted, St. Croix, Virgin Islands, August 6, 1811. Lawyer; member of Louisiana state house of representatives, 1842-44; delegate to Louisiana state constitutional convention, 1845; Presidential Elector for Louisiana, 1848; U.S. Senator from Louisiana, 1853-61; Confederate Attorney General, 1861; Confederate Secretary of War, 1861-62; Confederate Secretary of State, 1862-65. Jewish. He fled to Europe in 1865 to avoid arrest by Union forces; he was suspected of involvement in the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln. Fell from a tram car about 1880, and suffered multiple injuries; also developed kidney and heart problems, and died in Paris, France, May 6, 1884 (age 72 years, 274 days). Interment at Père la Chaise Cemetery, Paris, France.
  Relatives: Son of Philip Benjamin and Rebecca (de Mendes) Benjamin; married 1833 to Natalie St. Martin; cousin *** of Henry Michael Hyams (1806-1875).
  Coins and currency: His portrait appeared on the Confederate States $2 note in 1861-64.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  Books about Judah P. Benjamin: Robert Douthat Meade, Judah P. Benjamin: Confederate Statesman — Eli N. Evans, Judah P. Benjamin : The Jewish Confederate
  Luke Pryor Blackburn (1816-1887) — also known as Luke P. Blackburn — of Kentucky. Born in Woodford County, Ky., June 16, 1816. Physician; member of Kentucky state house of representatives, 1843; Governor of Kentucky, 1879-83. Baptist. In 1865, he was tried and acquitted in a Toronto court for violating Canadian neutrality, in connection with a Confederate scheme to spread yellow fever in Northern cities. Died in Frankfort, Franklin County, Ky., September 14, 1887 (age 71 years, 90 days). Interment at Frankfort Cemetery, Frankfort, Ky.
  Relatives: Son of Edward Mitchell Blackburn (1787-1867) and Lavinia St. Clair (Bell) Blackburn (1794-1863); brother of Joseph Clay Stiles Blackburn; married, November 24, 1835, to Ella Boswell; married, November 17, 1857, to Julia Churchill; uncle of Corinne Blackburn (1869-1958; who married William Holt Gale); granduncle of Smith Alford Blackburn; great-granduncle of Charles Milton Blackburn; first cousin twice removed of Gabriel Slaughter; third cousin of Charles Rice Slaughter (1819-1862); third cousin once removed of Robert Pryor Henry, John Flournoy Henry and Gustavus Adolphus Henry.
  Political families: Blackburn-Slaughter-Buckner-Madison family of Kentucky; Pendleton-Lee family (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  The Blackburn Correctional Complex (opened 1972), in Lexington, Kentucky, is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about Luke Pryor Blackburn: Nancy Disher Baird, Luke Pryor Blackburn : Physician, Governor, Reformer
  George Wythe Randolph (1818-1867) — also known as George W. Randolph — of Virginia. Born near Charlottesville, Albemarle County, Va., March 10, 1818. Lawyer; delegate to Virginia secession convention, 1861; general in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; Confederate Secretary of War, 1862; after the collapse of the Confederacy, fled to Europe to avoid capture; pardoned in 1866. Episcopalian. Died of pulmonary pneumonia, near Charlottesville, Albemarle County, Va., April 3, 1867 (age 49 years, 24 days). Interment at Monticello Graveyard, Near Charlottesville, Albemarle County, Va.
  Relatives: Son of Thomas Mann Randolph, Jr. and Martha (Jefferson) Randolph; brother of Benjamin Franklin Randolph, Meriwether Lewis Randolph and Virginia Jefferson Randolph (who married Nicholas Philip Trist); uncle of Thomas Jefferson Coolidge; grandson of Thomas Jefferson; granduncle of John Gardner Coolidge; great-grandson of Archibald Cary; second great-grandson of Richard Randolph; first cousin of Francis Wayles Eppes; first cousin once removed of Dabney Carr, John Wayles Eppes and Frederick Madison Roberts; first cousin twice removed of John Randolph of Roanoke; first cousin thrice removed of Richard Bland and Peyton Randolph (1721-1775); second cousin of Dabney Smith Carr; second cousin once removed of John Marshall, James Markham Marshall and Alexander Keith Marshall; second cousin twice removed of Theodorick Bland, Edmund Jenings Randolph and Beverley Randolph; third cousin of Thomas Marshall, John Jordan Crittenden, Thomas Turpin Crittenden, Robert Crittenden, James Keith Marshall and Carter Henry Harrison; third cousin once removed of Henry Lee, Charles Lee, Edmund Jennings Lee, Peyton Randolph (1779-1828), Henry St. George Tucker, Alexander Parker Crittenden, Thomas Leonidas Crittenden, Thomas Theodore Crittenden, John Augustine Marshall and Carter Henry Harrison II; third cousin twice removed of Thomas Theodore Crittenden, Jr., William Marshall Bullitt and Alexander Scott Bullitt; fourth cousin of Benjamin William Sheridan Cabell (1793-1862), Edmund Randolph and Nathaniel Beverly Tucker; fourth cousin once removed of Thomas Jones Hardeman, Bailey Hardeman, William Lewis Cabell, Fitzhugh Lee, George Craighead Cabell and William Henry Robertson.
  Political families: Marshall-Harrison-Randolph-Cabell family of Virginia; Breckinridge-Preston-Cabell-Henry family of Virginia; Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York; Walker-Bolling family of Huntsville, Alabama (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Coins and currency: His portrait appeared on Confederate States $100 notes in 1862-64.
  Abraham Kurkindolle Allison (1810-1893) — also known as Abraham K. Allison — Born in Jones County, Ga., December 10, 1810. Member of Florida territorial legislature, 1830; served in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; Governor of Florida, 1865; arrested by Federal authorities on June 19, 1865, and incarcerated with other Confederate officials at Fort Pulaski, Georgia, for six months. Died in Quincy, Gadsden County, Fla., July 8, 1893 (age 82 years, 210 days). Burial location unknown.
  Relatives: Married to Elizabeth S. Coleman.
  George Davis (1820-1896) — of Wilmington, New Hanover County, N.C. Born in Porter's Neck, Pender County, N.C., March 1, 1820. Lawyer; Delegate from North Carolina to the Confederate Provisional Congress, 1861-62; Senator from North Carolina in the Confederate Congress, 1862-64; Confederate Attorney General, 1864-65. Episcopalian. At the end of the Civil War, with other Confederate officials, attempted to flee overseas, but turned himself in at Key West, Fla.; spent several months in prison at Fort Hamilton; pardoned in 1866. Died in Wilmington, New Hanover County, N.C., February 23, 1896 (age 75 years, 359 days). Interment at Oakdale Cemetery, Wilmington, N.C.; statue erected 1911 at Third and Market Streets, Wilmington, N.C.
  Relatives: Son of Thomas Frederick Davis (1778-1846) and Sarah Isabella (Eagles) Davis (1784-1829); half-brother and fourth cousin of Horatio Davis; married, November 17, 1842, to Mary Adelaide Polk (1817-1863; first cousin once removed of Frank Lyon Polk (1871-1943); second cousin once removed of James Knox Polk and William Hawkins Polk; third cousin of Marshall Tate Polk); married, May 9, 1866, to Monimia Fairfax (1837-1889); great-grandnephew of Samuel Ashe; cousin four different ways of John Baptista Ashe (1748-1802), John Baptista Ashe (1810-1857), Thomas Samuel Ashe and William Shepperd Ashe; cousin three different ways of Alfred Moore Waddell; second cousin twice removed of William Henry Hill.
  Political families: Ashe-Polk family of North Carolina; Polk family; Manly-Haywood-Polk family of Raleigh, North Carolina (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
Jefferson Davis Jefferson Finis Davis (1808-1889) — also known as Jefferson Davis — of Warrenton, Warren County, Miss.; Warren County, Miss. Born in a log cabin, Fairview, Christian County (now Todd County), Ky., June 3, 1808. Democrat. Served in the U.S. Army during the Black Hawk War; candidate for Mississippi state house of representatives, 1843; Presidential Elector for Mississippi, 1844; U.S. Representative from Mississippi at-large, 1845-46; served in the U.S. Army during the Mexican War; U.S. Senator from Mississippi, 1847-51, 1857-61; candidate for Governor of Mississippi, 1851; U.S. Secretary of War, 1853-57; President of the Confederacy, 1861-65. Captured by Union forces in May 1865 and imprisoned without trial for about two years. Died of bronchitis and malaria in New Orleans, Orleans Parish, La., December 6, 1889 (age 81 years, 186 days). Original interment at Metairie Cemetery, New Orleans, La.; reinterment in 1893 at Hollywood Cemetery, Richmond, Va.; memorial monument at Memorial Avenue, Richmond, Va.
  Relatives: Son of Samuel Emory Davis and Jane (Cook) Davis; married, June 17, 1835, to Sarah Knox Taylor (1814-1835; daughter of Zachary Taylor); married, February 25, 1845, to Varina Howell (1826-1906; granddaughter of Richard Howell (1754-1802)); uncle of Mary Bradford (who married Richard Brodhead); granduncle of Jefferson Davis Brodhead and Frances Eileen Hutt (who married Thomas Edmund Dewey).
  Political families: Brodhead-Taylor family of Easton, Pennsylvania; Davis-Howell-Morgan-Agnew family of New Orleans and Shreveport, Louisiana (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Cross-reference: Jesse D. Bright — John H. Reagan — Horace Greeley — Solomon Cohen — George W. Jones — Samuel A. Roberts — William T. Sutherlin — Victor Vifquain — Charles O'Conor
  Jeff Davis County, Ga., Jefferson Davis Parish, La., Jefferson Davis County, Miss. and Jeff Davis County, Tex. are named for him.
  Other politicians named for him: J. Davis BrodheadJefferson D. HostetterJefferson D. BlountJeff DavisJefferson D. HelmsJefferson Davis Parris
  Coins and currency: His portrait appeared on Confederate States 50 cent notes in 1861-64.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books by Jefferson Davis: The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government (1881)
  Books about Jefferson Davis: William J. Cooper, Jr., Jefferson Davis, American : A Biography — Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis : Ex-President of the Confederate States of America : A Memoir by His Wife — William C. Davis, An Honorable Defeat: The Last Days of the Confederate Government — James Ronald Kennedy & Walter Donald Kennedy, Was Jefferson Davis Right? — Robert Penn Warren, Jefferson Davis Gets His Citizenship Back — Herman Hattaway & Richard E. Beringer, Jefferson Davis, Confederate President — Felicity Allen, Jefferson Davis: Unconquerable Heart — Clint Johnson, Pursuit: The Chase, Capture, Persecution, and Surprising Release of Confederate President Jefferson Davis
  Image source: Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper, March 9, 1861
  Stephen Russell Mallory (c.1812-1873) — also known as Stephen R. Mallory — of Key West, Monroe County, Fla.; Pensacola, Escambia County, Fla. Born in Port-of-Spain, Trinidad, of American parents, about 1812. Democrat. County judge in Florida, 1837-45; U.S. Senator from Florida, 1851-61; Confederate Secretary of the Navy, 1861-65. Catholic. Arrested as a Confederate by Union troops in 1865 and imprisoned until March 1866. Died in Pensacola, Escambia County, Fla., November 9, 1873 (age about 61 years). Interment at St. Michael's Cemetery, Pensacola, Fla.
  Relatives: Son of Charles Mallory and Ellen Mallory; married to Angela Moreno; father of Stephen Russell Mallory, Jr.; cousin by marriage of William Francis White (1821?-?).
  Political family: Mallory-White family of California.
  Politician named for him: Stephen M. White
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  Charles Clark (1810-1877) — of Mississippi. Born February 19, 1810. Democrat. Delegate to Democratic National Convention from Mississippi, 1860; general in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; Governor of Mississippi, 1863-65. Physically removed from office by U.S. troops at the end of the Civil War, and imprisoned at Fort Pulaski, Savannah, Ga. Died in Bolivar County, Miss., December 18, 1877 (age 67 years, 302 days). Interment a private or family graveyard, Bolivar County, Miss.
  Clement Claiborne Clay, Jr. (1816-1882) — of Huntsville, Madison County, Ala. Born in Huntsville, Madison County, Ala., December 13, 1816. Democrat. Member of Alabama state house of representatives, 1842; state court judge in Alabama, 1846; U.S. Senator from Alabama, 1853-61; Senator from Alabama in the Confederate Congress, 1862-64. Suspected of conspiring with other Confederates to assassinate President Abraham Lincoln, he was imprisoned for nearly a year after the war. Died near Gurley, Madison County, Ala., January 3, 1882 (age 65 years, 21 days). Interment at Maple Hill Cemetery, Huntsville, Ala.
  Relatives: Son of Clement Comer Clay; married, February 1, 1843, to Virginia Caroline Tunstall (1825-1915; who later married David Clopton (1820-1892)); second cousin twice removed of Matthew Clay (1754-1815) and Green Clay; third cousin once removed of Henry Clay (1777-1852), Porter Clay, Matthew Clay (1795?-1827), Brutus Junius Clay (1808-1878) and Cassius Marcellus Clay; fourth cousin of Thomas Hart Clay, James Brown Clay and Brutus Junius Clay (1847-1932); fourth cousin once removed of Henry Clay (1849-1884).
  Political families: Clay family of Kentucky; Ligon-Clay-Clopton family of Montgomery and Tuskegee, Alabama (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  Coins and currency: His portrait appeared on Confederate States $1 notes in 1862-64.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  Henry Stuart Foote (1804-1880) — also known as "Hangman Foote" — Born in Fauquier County, Va., February 28, 1804. U.S. Senator from Mississippi, 1847-52; Governor of Mississippi, 1852-54; Representative from Tennessee in the Confederate Congress, 1862-65. Fought four duels; fled Alabama in 1830 to escape prosecution for dueling. Exchanged blows with Thomas Hart Benton on the floor of the U.S. Senate. Expelled from the Confederate Congress in early 1865 for going North on an unauthorized peace mission. Died in Nashville, Davidson County, Tenn., May 20, 1880 (age 76 years, 82 days). Interment at Mt. Olivet Cemetery, Nashville, Tenn.
  Relatives: Son of Richard Helm Foote (1772-1817) and Helen Gibbon (Stuart) Foote (1776-1815); married, March 22, 1827, to Elizabeth Winters (1810-1855); married, June 15, 1859, to Rachel Douglas Boyd (1831-1882).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — NNDB dossier — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Benjamin Gwinn Harris (1805-1895) — also known as Benjamin G. Harris — of Leonardtown, St. Mary's County, Md. Born near Leonardtown, St. Mary's County, Md., December 13, 1805. Democrat. Member of Maryland state house of delegates, 1832-33, 1836, 1849, 1856, 1861-62; U.S. Representative from Maryland 5th District, 1863-67; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Maryland, 1864. Tried and convicted of harboring Confederate soldiers; sentenced to three years' imprisonment; sentence remitted by President Johnson. Died near Leonardtown, St. Mary's County, Md., April 4, 1895 (age 89 years, 112 days). Interment a private or family graveyard, St. Mary's County, Md.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  David Levy Yulee (1810-1886) — also known as David Levy; "Father of Florida's Railroads" — of St. Augustine, St. Johns County, Fla.; Homosassa, Citrus County, Fla. Born in St. Thomas, Virgin Islands, June 12, 1810. Republican. Lawyer; delegate to Florida state constitutional convention from St. Johns County, 1838-39; Delegate to U.S. Congress from Florida Territory, 1841-45; U.S. Senator from Florida, 1845-51, 1855-61. Jewish. Imprisoned as a Confederate at Fort Pulaski, Fla. for a time after the Civil War. Died in New York, New York County, N.Y., October 10, 1886 (age 76 years, 120 days). Interment at Oak Hill Cemetery, Washington, D.C.
  Relatives: Son-in-law of Charles Anderson Wickliffe (1788-1869).
  Political family: Wickliffe-Holt family of Louisville, Kentucky.
  Levy County, Fla. is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  James Alexander Seddon (1815-1880) — also known as James A. Seddon — of Virginia. Born in Falmouth, Stafford County, Va., July 13, 1815. Democrat. Lawyer; U.S. Representative from Virginia 6th District, 1845-47, 1849-51; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Virginia, 1856; Delegate from Virginia to the Confederate Provisional Congress, 1861-62; Confederate Secretary of War, 1862-65. Arrested by Union forces in May 1865 and imprisoned until December. Died in Goochland County, Va., August 19, 1880 (age 65 years, 37 days). Interment at Hollywood Cemetery, Richmond, Va.
  Relatives: Son of Thomas Seddon (1776-1831) and Susan Pearson (Alexander) Seddon (c.1782-1845); married, December 23, 1845, to Sarah 'Sallie' Bruce (1822-1882); uncle of William Booth Taliaferro and William Cabell Bruce; granduncle of Howard Bruce (1879-1961), James Bruce and David Kirkpatrick Este Bruce.
  Political family: Bruce-Mellon family of Virginia.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Robert Augustus Toombs (1810-1885) — also known as Robert Toombs; Bob Toombs — of Washington, Wilkes County, Ga. Born in Wilkes County, Ga., July 2, 1810. Lawyer; member of Georgia state house of representatives, 1837-43; U.S. Representative from Georgia 8th District, 1845-53; U.S. Senator from Georgia, 1853-61; delegate to Georgia secession convention, 1861; Delegate from Georgia to the Confederate Provisional Congress, 1861-62; Confederate Secretary of State, 1861; general in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; fled to Europe in 1865 to avoid arrest by Union forces; he was suspected of involvement in the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln; later returned to Georgia; delegate to Georgia state constitutional convention, 1877. One of the greatest orators of his time. Died in Washington, Wilkes County, Ga., December 15, 1885 (age 75 years, 166 days). Interment at Rest Haven Cemetery, Washington, Ga.
  Toombs County, Ga. is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  Books about Robert Toombs: William C. Davis, The Union That Shaped the Confederacy: Robert Toombs and Alexander H. Stephens
  George Alfred Trenholm (1807-1876) — also known as George A. Trenholm — of South Carolina. Born in Charleston, Charleston County, S.C., February 25, 1807. Democrat. Banker; member of South Carolina state house of representatives, 1852-56, 1874; Confederate Secretary of the Treasury, 1864-65. Arrested by Union forces in 1865, and imprisoned at Fort Pulaski, Tennessee, until October. Died in Charleston, Charleston County, S.C., December 9, 1876 (age 69 years, 288 days). Interment at Magnolia Cemetery, Charleston, S.C.
  Relatives: Son of William Trenholm (1772-1824) and Elizabeth Irene (De Griffin) Trenholm (1781-1824); married 1828 to Anna Helen Holmes (1810-1885); father of William Lee Trenholm (1836-1901).
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Thomas Overton Moore (1804-1876) — of Louisiana. Born in Sampson County, N.C., April 10, 1804. Democrat. Planter; member of Louisiana state house of representatives, 1848; member of Louisiana state senate, 1856; Governor of Louisiana, 1860-64; delegate to Louisiana secession convention, 1861. Presbyterian. At the end of the Civil War, the military governor of Louisiana ordered his arrest as a Confederate leader; he fled to Mexico and settled in Havana, Cuba. Pardoned by President Andrew Johnson. Died near Alexandria, Rapides Parish, La., June 25, 1876 (age 72 years, 76 days). Interment at Mt. Olivet Episcopal Cemetery, Pineville, La.
  John Jones Pettus (1813-1867) — of Mississippi. Born October 9, 1813. Governor of Mississippi, 1854, 1859-63. After the Civil War, amnesty was refused to him, and he became a fugitive; the manhunt continued until his death in Pulaski County, Ark., in early 1867 (age about 53 years). Original interment in private or family graveyard; reinterment at Flat Bayou Burial Ground, Near Wabbaseka, Jefferson County, Ark.
  Relatives: Brother of Edmund Winston Pettus (1821-1907).
  Andrew Gordon Magrath (1813-1893) — of Charleston, Charleston District (now Charleston County), S.C. Born in Charleston, Charleston County, S.C., February 8, 1813. U.S. District Judge for South Carolina, 1856-60; resigned 1860; delegate to South Carolina secession convention from St. Philips' & St. Michael's, 1860-61; resigned 1861; secretary of state of South Carolina, 1860-62; Governor of South Carolina, 1864-65. Ousted as Governor by Union authorities in 1865 and imprisoned. Died in Charleston, Charleston County, S.C., April 9, 1893 (age 80 years, 60 days). Interment at Magnolia Cemetery, Charleston, S.C.
  See also federal judicial profile
  James Henry Lane (1814-1866) — also known as James H. Lane; "Liberator of Kansas"; "Fighting Jim" — of Lawrenceburg, Dearborn County, Ind.; Lawrence, Douglas County, Kan. Born in Lawrenceburg, Dearborn County, Ind., June 22, 1814. Served in the U.S. Army during the Mexican War; Lieutenant Governor of Indiana, 1849-53; U.S. Representative from Indiana 4th District, 1853-55; delegate to Kansas state constitutional convention, 1855, 1857; Kansas Democratic state chair, 1855; U.S. Senator from Kansas, 1861-66; died in office 1866; general in the Union Army during the Civil War. Member, Freemasons. Deranged, and charged with financial irregularities, he was mortally wounded by a self-inflicted gunshot on July 1, 1866, and died ten days later, near Fort Leavenworth, Leavenworth County, Kan., July 11, 1866 (age 52 years, 19 days). Interment at Oak Hill Cemetery, Lawrence, Kan.
  Relatives: Son of Amos Lane (1778-1849) and Mary (Foote) Lane; brother of George W. Lane; married 1842 to Mary E. Baldridge (granddaughter of Arthur St. Clair).
  Political family: Lane family of Lawrenceburg, Indiana.
  Lane County, Kan. is named for him.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  William Nathaniel Porter (1812-1867) — also known as Nathaniel Porter — of Tennessee. Born in Henry County, Tenn., December 15, 1812. Colonel in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; member of Tennessee state house of representatives, 1866. With others, tried to stop the ratification of the 14th Amendment in 1866 by staying away and preventing a quorum; this tactic was not successful. Expelled from the Tennessee House a few days later. Died in Henry County, Tenn., June 11, 1867 (age 54 years, 178 days). Interment at Poplar Grove Cemetery, Henry County, Tenn.
  John Winthrop Chanler (1826-1877) — also known as John W. Chanler — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in New York, New York County, N.Y., September 14, 1826. Democrat. Lawyer; member of New York state assembly from New York County 10th District, 1858-59; U.S. Representative from New York 7th District, 1863-69. On May 14, 1866, he offered a resolution defending President Andrew Johnson's veto of Reconstruction enactments, which he called "the wicked and revolutionary acts of a few malignant and mischievous men." On motion of Rep. Robert C. Schenck, he was censured for insulting the House of Representatives. Died in Barrytown, Dutchess County, N.Y., October 19, 1877 (age 51 years, 35 days). Interment at Trinity Cemetery, Manhattan, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of John White Chanler (1785-1853) and Elizabeth Sheriffe (Winthrop) Chanler (1791-1866); married, January 22, 1862, to Margaret Astor Ward (1838-1875; first cousin of William Waldorf Astor); father of William Astor Chanler and Lewis Stuyvesant Chanler (1869-1942).
  Political family: Livingston-Schuyler family of New York (subset of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Caleb Lyon (1822-1875) — of Lyonsdale, Lewis County, N.Y. Born in Lyonsdale, Lewis County, N.Y., December 7, 1822. Member of New York state assembly from Lewis County, 1851; resigned 1851; member of New York state senate 21st District, 1851; U.S. Representative from New York 23rd District, 1853-55; Governor of Idaho Territory, 1864-66. In 1866, an audit revealed that he had embezzled $46,418 in federal funds intended for the Nez Perce Indians, but he was never convicted. Died in Staten Island, Richmond County, N.Y., September 8, 1875 (age 52 years, 275 days). Interment at Green-Wood Cemetery, Brooklyn, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Caleb Lyon (1784?-?).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Lovell Harrison Rousseau (1818-1869) — also known as Lovell H. Rousseau — of Bloomfield, Greene County, Ind.; Louisville, Jefferson County, Ky. Born near Stanford, Lincoln County, Ky., August 4, 1818. Republican. Lawyer; member of Indiana state house of representatives, 1844-45; served in the U.S. Army during the Mexican War; member of Indiana state senate, 1847-49; member of Kentucky state senate, 1860-61; general in the Union Army during the Civil War; U.S. Representative from Kentucky 5th District, 1865-66, 1866-67; resigned 1866; on June 14, 1866, he assaulted Iowa Rep. Josiah B. Grinnell with the iron handle of his cane; reprimanded by the House of Representatives, and resigned, but was elected to fill his own vacancy. Died in New Orleans, Orleans Parish, La., January 7, 1869 (age 50 years, 156 days). Original interment and cenotaph at Cave Hill Cemetery, Louisville, Ky.; reinterment in 1892 at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Va.
  Relatives: Son of David Rousseau; married 1843 to Marie Antoinette Dozier.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  John Ward Hunter (1807-1900) — also known as John W. Hunter — of Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y. Born in Bedford (now part of Brooklyn), Kings County, N.Y., October 15, 1807. Democrat. U.S. Representative from New York 3rd District, 1866-67; mayor of Brooklyn, N.Y., 1874-75. Censured by the U.S. House of Representatives in 1867 for the use of unparliamentary language. Died in Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y., April 16, 1900 (age 92 years, 183 days). Interment at Green-Wood Cemetery, Brooklyn, N.Y.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Albert Rhodes (b. 1840) — of Pennsylvania; Washington, D.C. Born in Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, Pa., 1840. U.S. Consul in Jerusalem, 1863-65; Rotterdam, as of 1866; Rouen, 1877-83; Elberfeld, 1883-85; U.S. Charge d'Affaires to Netherlands, 1866; dismissed as Charge d'Affaires in February 1867, by Hugh Ewing, for suspected disloyalty. Burial location unknown.
  See also U.S. State Dept career summary
  George Washington Jones (1828-1903) — also known as George W. Jones — of Bastrop, Bastrop County, Tex. Born in Marion County, Ala., September 5, 1828. Lawyer; Bastrop County Attorney, 1858-60; colonel in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; delegate to Texas state constitutional convention, 1866; Lieutenant Governor of Texas, 1866-67; removed from office as Lieutenant Governor by Gen. Philip Sheridan, 1867, for being an "impediment to Reconstruction"; U.S. Representative from Texas 5th District, 1879-83. Died in Bastrop, Bastrop County, Tex., July 11, 1903 (age 74 years, 309 days). Interment at Fairview Cemetery, Bastrop, Tex.
  Presumably named for: George Washington
  Relatives: Son of William Dandridge Claiborne Jones and Rachel (Burleson) Jones; married, August 1, 1855, to Laura Ann Mullins.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article
  Elijah Hise (1802-1867) — of Russellville, Logan County, Ky. Born in Allegheny County, Pa., July 4, 1802. Democrat. Lawyer; member of Kentucky state house of representatives, 1829; candidate for Lieutenant Governor of Kentucky, 1836; U.S. Charge d'Affaires to Guatemala, 1848-49; U.S. Representative from Kentucky 3rd District, 1866-67; died in office 1867. German ancestry. Died by a self-inflicted pistol shot, in Russellville, Logan County, Ky., May 8, 1867 (age 64 years, 308 days). He left a note declaring that he had "lost all hope of . saving the country from the impending disasters and ruin in which despotic and unconstitutional rule has involved her." However, later news reports disclosed that he had been about to be indicted for perjury and tax evasion, based on his statements as a candidate. Interment at Maple Grove Cemetery, Russellville, Ky.; cenotaph at Congressional Cemetery, Washington, D.C.
  Relatives: Son of Frederick Hise and Nancy (Eckstein) Hise.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — U.S. State Dept career summary
  Fernando Wood (1812-1881) — of New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa., June 14, 1812. Democrat. U.S. Representative from New York, 1841-43, 1863-65, 1867-81 (3rd District 1841-43, 5th District 1863-65, 9th District 1867-73, 10th District 1873-75, 9th District 1875-81); died in office 1881; mayor of New York City, N.Y., 1855-58, 1860-62; censured by the House of Representatives in 1868 for using unparliamentary language. Died in Hot Springs, Garland County, Ark., February 14, 1881 (age 68 years, 245 days). Interment at Trinity Cemetery, Manhattan, N.Y.
  Relatives: Brother of Benjamin Wood (1820-1900).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  Books about Fernando Wood: Jerome Mushkat, Fernando Wood : A Political Biography
Andrew Johnson Andrew Johnson (1808-1875) — of Carthage, Moore County, N.C.; Greeneville, Greene County, Tenn. Born in Raleigh, Wake County, N.C., December 29, 1808. Mayor of Greeneville, Tenn., 1830; member of Tennessee state house of representatives, 1835; member of Tennessee state senate, 1841; U.S. Representative from Tennessee 1st District, 1843-53; Governor of Tennessee, 1853-57, 1862-65; U.S. Senator from Tennessee, 1857-62, 1875; died in office 1875; Vice President of the United States, 1865; President of the United States, 1865-69; candidate for Democratic nomination for President, 1868. Member, Freemasons; Knights Templar. In 1868, was impeached by the House of Representatives; tried and acquitted by the Senate, which voted 35 to 19 (short of the required two-thirds) on three of the eleven articles of impeachment. Died, after a series of strokes, at his daughter's home in Carter County, Tenn., July 31, 1875 (age 66 years, 214 days). Interment at Andrew Johnson National Cemetery, Greeneville, Tenn.
  Relatives: Married, May 17, 1827, to Eliza McCardle; father of Martha Johnson (who married David Trotter Patterson (1818-1891)).
  Cross-reference: Edmund G. Ross — George T. Brown — Christopher G. Memminger — Thomas Overton Moore — John W. Chanler
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — NNDB dossier
  Books about Andrew Johnson: Hans L. Trefousse, Andrew Johnson: A Biography — Howard Means, The Avenger Takes His Place: Andrew Johnson and the 45 Days That Changed the Nation — Paul H. Bergeron, Andrew Johnson's Civil War and Reconstruction — Mary Malone, Andrew Johnson (for young readers)
  Critical books about Andrew Johnson: Nathan Miller, Star-Spangled Men : America's Ten Worst Presidents
  Image source: James G. Blaine, Twenty Years of Congress, vol. 2 (1886)
  Tunis George Campbell (1812-1891) — also known as Tunis G. Campbell — of McIntosh County, Ga. Born in Middlebrook (unknown county), N.J., April 1, 1812. Minister; abolitionist; delegate to Georgia state constitutional convention, 1867; member of Georgia state senate, 1868, 1869-72; expelled 1868; defeated, 1872; expelled from the Georgia State Senate in 1868 based on the claim that only whites could serve; charged with falsely imprisoning white men as Justice of of the Peace, and served a year of hard labor in Georgia's brutal leased labor system. Methodist. African ancestry. Died in Boston, Suffolk County, Mass., December 4, 1891 (age 79 years, 247 days). Burial location unknown.
  W. M. Saunders — Delegate to Florida state constitutional convention from Gadsden and Liberty counties, 1868; expelled from convention. Burial location unknown.
  D. Richards — Delegate to Florida state constitutional convention from Gadsden and Liberty counties, 1868; expelled from convention. Burial location unknown.
  Benjamin Grubb Humphreys (1808-1882) — also known as Benjamin G. Humphreys — of Mississippi. Born in Claiborne County, Miss., August 26, 1808. Member of Mississippi state legislature, 1837; member of Mississippi state senate, 1839; general in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; Governor of Mississippi, 1865-68. During Reconstruction, he was physically ejected from the governor's office by an armed force under the orders of the U.S. military commander of Mississippi. Died in Leflore County, Miss., December 20, 1882 (age 74 years, 116 days). Interment at Wintergreen Cemetery, Port Gibson, Miss.
  Relatives: Married to Mildred Hickman Maury (1823-1899); father of Benjamin Grubb Humphreys (1865-1923).
  Political family: Humphreys family of Greenville, Mississippi.
  Humphreys County, Miss. is named for him.
  See also Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
  William Dudley Chipley (1840-1897) — also known as W. D. Chipley — of Pensacola, Escambia County, Fla. Born in Columbus, Muscogee County, Ga., June 6, 1840. Democrat. Colonel in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; fought against Reconstruction along with other members of the Ku Klux Klan; he was among those implicated in the murder of George W. Ashburn in in 1868; tried in a military court, but Georgia's re-admission to the Union ended military jurisdiction, so he and his co-defendants were released; general manager of the Pensacola Railroad; successfully promoted the construction of the Pensacola and Atlanta Railroad in 1881-83; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Florida, 1884, 1892; mayor of Pensacola, Fla., 1887-88; member of Florida state senate, 1895-97. Died in a hospital at Washington, D.C., December 1, 1897 (age 57 years, 178 days). Interment at Linwood Cemetery, Columbus, Ga.
  Relatives: Son of Dr. William Stout Chipley (1810-1880) and Elizabeth (Fannin) Chipley (1819-1873); brother of Stephen Fannin Chipley (1838-1898); married to Ann Elizabeth Billups (1848-1910).
  The city of Chipley, Florida, is named for him.
  See also Find-A-Grave memorial
  Russell Sage (1816-1906) — also known as "The Sage of Troy"; "The Money King"; "Father of Puts and Calls"; "Old Straddle" — of Troy, Rensselaer County, N.Y.; New York, New York County, N.Y. Born in Verona, Oneida County, N.Y., August 4, 1816. Whig. Merchant; banker; Rensselaer County Treasurer; delegate to Whig National Convention from New York, 1848; U.S. Representative from New York 13th District, 1853-57; railroad builder; arrested in 1869 and charged with violation of New York usury laws by charging high interest rates on loans; fined and sentenced to five days in prison, which was later suspended. On December 4, 1891, Henry Norcross, a stockbroker, brought a bomb to Sage's office in New York City as part of an extortion scheme; when his demands were refused, he detonated the bomb, but Sage suffered only minor injuries. Died in Lawrence, Nassau County, Long Island, N.Y., July 22, 1906 (age 89 years, 352 days). Interment at Oakwood Cemetery, Troy, N.Y.
  Relatives: Son of Prudence (Risley) Sage (1778-1865) and Elisha Sage, Jr. (1779-1854); married, January 23, 1840, to Maria-Henrie Winne (died 1867); married, November 24, 1869, to Margarett Olivia Slocum (died 1918); fourth great-grandnephew of Robert Treat; second cousin once removed of Edgar Jared Doolittle; second cousin twice removed of Jonathan Brace; third cousin once removed of Thomas Kimberly Brace, Alvah Nash and Dwight May Sabin; third cousin twice removed of Josiah Cowles; fourth cousin once removed of Daniel Chapin, Orsamus Cook Merrill, Timothy Merrill (1781-1836), Daniel Upson, Greene Carrier Bronson, Daniel Kellogg, John Russell Kellogg, John Adams Taintor, John Calhoun Lewis, Millard Fillmore, Daniel Fiske Kellogg, Henry G. Taintor, Henry Gould Lewis and Daniel Frederick Webster.
  Political families: Kellogg-Seymour-Chapin-Adams family of Connecticut and New York; Woodruff-Hornblower-Seymour-Wadsworth family of Connecticut; Hoar-Sherman family of Massachusetts; Murphy-Merrill family of Harbor Beach, Michigan (subsets of the Three Thousand Related Politicians).
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page
  Charles W. Bryant (born c.1830) — of Harris County, Tex. Born about 1830. Delegate to Texas state constitutional convention, 1868-69. African ancestry. Expelled from the Texas Constitutional Convention after being accused of raping an 11-year-old girl; jailed briefly, but then the charges were dropped. Burial location unknown.
  Edward Dexter Holbrook (1836-1870) — also known as Edward D. Holbrook — of Idaho City, Boise County, Idaho. Born in Elyria, Lorain County, Ohio, May 6, 1836. Lawyer; Delegate to U.S. Congress from Idaho Territory, 1865-69. Censured by the House of Representatives in 1869 for use of unparliamentary language. Shot and mortally wounded by Charles H. Douglas, and died the next day, in Idaho City, Boise County, Idaho, June 18, 1870 (age 34 years, 43 days). Interment at Masonic Burial Ground, Idaho City, Idaho.
  See also congressional biography — Govtrack.us page — Wikipedia article — Find-A-Grave memorial
"Enjoy the hospitable entertainment of a political graveyard."
Henry L. Clinton, Apollo Hall, New York City, February 3, 1872
The Political Graveyard

The Political Graveyard is a web site about U.S. political history and cemeteries. Founded in 1996, it is the Internet's most comprehensive free source for American political biography, listing 312,576 politicians, living and dead.
  The listings are incomplete; development of the database is a continually ongoing project.  
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Copyright notices: (1) Facts are not subject to copyright; see Feist v. Rural Telephone. (2) Politician portraits displayed on this site are 70-pixel-wide monochrome thumbnail images, which I believe to constitute fair use under applicable copyright law. Where possible, each image is linked to its online source. However, requests from owners of copyrighted images to delete them from this site are honored. (3) Original material, programming, selection and arrangement are © 1996-2019 Lawrence Kestenbaum. (4) This work is also licensed for free non-commercial re-use, with attribution, under a Creative Commons License.
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